Dots, Dots, Dots and More Dots

Sitting in a vehicle trapped in traffic on the highways and byways of Barbados any hour of the day has become a permanent inconvenience. The inability of authorities past and present, public and private, to effectively implement and enforce measures to address this and other woes. The problem of chronic gridlock on our roads is symptomatic of a crisis of governance.

Does the National Productivity Council still exist? How many hours are flushed daily because of idle time spent sitting in traffic by citizens who are gainfully employed?

Is the oil import bill still north of 700 million dollars? How many millions of dollars can be saved were an efficient transportation system to be implemented?

How many of the fossil powered vehicles are registered and what percentage represent electric or hybrid vehicles? How does this translate to Barbados becoming a 100 percent green and carbon neutral island by 2030?

There is the challenge to repair one of the most dense network of roads in the world made more challenging by more than 100,000 registered vehicles. This is not sustainable given limited foreign exchange resources.

The Barbados Court System was described as in danger of collapsing under its weight by Attorney General Dale Marshall. Is it fair to suggest to whom it should concern that the chaos on the roads is accentuating the problem?

The pandemic has forced providers to change how products and services are being delivered to the public. Eighteen months later the Barbados Licensing Authority and Barbados Revenue Authority are good examples of two government agencies responsible for administering road traffic being overwhelmed by the volume.

Insurance companies have reported to be paying out over 25 million dollars annually in claims. The number does not include unreported damage below the deductible or from non insured vehicle owners. Car parts are imported.

The decision by successive governments to pass on increases of the price of petrol to consumers has been a contentious issue given the inflationary impact on the economy. Recently an attempt – originating in the social media space – to buy petrol one litre at a time failed but it highlighted the thirst for fossil fuel is real.

If the analogy is borrowed to define how affairs of state is managed to compare with a system which is defined as – an interrelated set of components working together for a purpose – then the consequences of connecting the dots as it pertains to our dysfunctional transportation system is clear. It is a useful exercise to connect the dots for yourself.

What did you conclude?

214 comments

  • Look who what I say offends wunna have my condolences.

    David’s post is true the Jews and the Cubans work as a united group as do the Indians. Any that have knowledge of how the Jews of New York became such a strong lobby would understand. They worked together and even imported goods together by all putting in the little they had, as none of them in the early days could of afforded to buy a minimum shipment on their own. The Cubans in the USA did not go their looking for Jobs. Study the landscape there and you will see many of them are self employed in small business now. Many of the earlier ones have in fact gone on to build substantial businesses as well. Truth is some will work 60 hours a week to reach their goal and others want to work 40 and wonder why they have nothing today. Stop and ask yourself if some of us had to pool our resources to get ahead how many of us would risk it! Continue crying oh is me and holding out you hand for charity while others continue to consolidate their wealth by joint ventures among themselves.

    Tired hearing the same old sad story and excuses for why we are where we are today. We are here because we don’t trust our own and will not invest as a group, but instead prefer to pull against each other while looking for handout. Who frighten to say it I just did! Long and short we do not support our own!

    Like

  • @John A

    To add, they did it as a minority ethnic group. Pick sense from the comment.

    Like

  • William Skinner

    Oh how we have moved forward after six decades!
    Same old argument bogus as it is . We hear this crap all the time:
    Blacks don’t support blacks. Well who were we trusting from and buying groceries from all those years ?
    Who were giving our poor black children free private lessons?
    What color was the teachers going in their pockets and buying supplies for our black children?
    What color was the neighbor who gave us a meal as youngsters when our parents could not ?
    What color shops at Ricks and Jordan’s.?
    What color supporting the mechanics and body repair men?
    What color supporting the vendors
    What color supporting the activities in Oistons?
    What color built Baxter’s Road : the Pinkstar, Enids, Colins etc ?
    Please stop this foolishness. We have always supported each other.
    We can only support with what we have!
    Do you realise that people in this country still working for less than $300 per week.
    All this nonsense about Jews and others “ sticking together “ You all don’t even know that the money came out of Israel
    and the financial Centres catered to them?
    Why the ass wunnuh blaming your own Black people (the victims) for their plight. Please tell me where this level playing field is that we are playing on.
    @ John A I personally find your views pathetic yo say the very least.
    You are a black Barbadian and you have to know that pure racism has systematically destroyed many of the striving black businesses going back to the early 60s and right up to now. And we are over90% of the population.
    Like @ Donna says a lot of us seems to have adopted the white man’s narrative.
    Stop living in some make believe world. You and others seem to forget that less than three generations ago we were poor as ass barely surviving. We had almost zero generational wealth.
    Like I said recently we like we just wake up with a car , house and job and now talk absolute nonsense.
    Damn it sometimes I actually feel all ah we like we white or some shit.
    Peace.

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  • David
    Yes they did
    But Mari and Donna are still correct . They were also assisted for politically reasons ( the Cubans ).

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  • @John A

    Agree it was timing of the geopolitical flow. It is no different to Barrow leading at the time he did when England was dumping colonies. Timing is everything.

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  • The Cubans were welcomed with open arms

    The Haitians were intercepted and returned

    Make sense from that

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  • John AJuly 19, 2021 2:28 PM

    You are aware that most of the Cubans in Miami arrived there with only a suitcase if lucky. This too was the case with most of the Jews who arrived in New York in the late 40s. Yet both have become strong forces both economically and politically over the last 4 decades. So what is stopping others from doing the same

    Xxxxx Internal as well as external politics gave them plenty leverage to reach great heights
    Xxxxxxxx
    Many West Indies arrived in the USA with little or nothing had good educational backgrounds much of what would be found in the Cuban immigrant and some still struggling to become achievers on the same level of many Cubans who arrived at the same period
    Case and point Hurricane Andrew destroyed and area where Cubans occupied
    Next door or in close proximity A dominated black area was devastated
    But guess whose homes were rebuilt to a level that it was hardly noticeable of the devastation in quick time
    The blacks had to wait years for their homes to be repaired
    Don’t be fooled thinking that all it takes is one to work hard
    The politics involved is a major driving force ascto who will achieve what or when
    The Cubans came with a suitcase that is just a story with a begginning but missing is the middle and the end

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  • @ David

    Exactly. But look at what happens here. We have perfectly qualified locals but what do we allow? We allow companies to import foreigners. We have companies here capable of doing excellent work but what do we do? We give contracts to the Chinese who as part of the contract must supply everything from China, labour to shovels all must be Chinese.

    I have seen some Chinese windows used here that can’t hold a candle to our locally made ones. We go to the Chinese cause the money easy to get, but what do our people get from it? Not even the sale for a window or a door that’s what.

    You want to talk about who standing in wunna way, well start at the top and come down. What colour them is again too?

    Tired of the same old crap position when nothing is being done about it in any structured way of enfranchismemt. Look at agriculture same story. People importing chicken and so on that we can supply locally. When those with an axe to grind come talking crap tell them stop and look deeper at why we here. Instead of wunna belly aching here on the blog do like the Cubans in Miami and lobby hard for change.

    Good I dun wid dat!

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  • We are the majority group in the country but we have lost our identity. A people without an identity is like a blind man in a dark room.

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  • @ william

    You could find my comments what you want it is water off my back. What you doing to promote change? What you doing to see our chicken farmers get the opportunity to fill the orders being placed for imported chicken? What you doing to lobby that a percentage of contracts given must have the furniture etc supplied by local manufacturers? Answer is not one RH.

    You think the Cubans in Miami got such a strong lobby because the sit home and type on blogs? No they have worked among themselves and grown their economic base and how you may ask? Very simple if you own a Cuban restaurant then the lawn in front cut by a Cuban lawn maintenance company. If the restaurant do well and expand it is a Cuban contractor that will get the job. Nobody here can’t tell me bout the Cubans in Miami. I have done business with many of them. Plus guess what even when their businesses grow where you think you find most of the owners? Not up stairs in no fancy office but downstairs on the same sales floor where the wealth came from to begin with. I shop at Cartlon I ain’t shame to say so neither. When I go in there I still see the Bynoes sometimes on the shop floor. They have succeeded because they have never lost touch with their customer base and even today know that is where their future lies.

    We problem is we like to look out and find fault cause we don’t like what we see when we look in!

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  • JohnA

    We problem is we like to look out and find fault cause we don’t like what we see when we look in!

    Xxxxxxxxcxx

    What u call finding fault is what others called a task of sieving through the political realities

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  • We can only get there if we lobby for true change. The leaders must ask the below question before they borrow or spend a cent of our funds or implement a policy.

    Will doing it this way benefit the local population and economy the most? If not how can I approach this project or issue that it does?

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  • The Jews were a cohesive group, held together by a common identity
    Xxxxxx
    But don’t forget that the jews did not walk away empty handed from what was done to them during the Holocaust what they determined was a terrible and horrible event in the lives
    Up to present some of the older Jews are collecting financial reparations from Germany
    The Jews did not fight that fight alone but had Britain the UsA to help them fight for monetary justice
    Yes the unified factor help them to achieve a correction of a wrong
    However the politics at play help them to win

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  • Let us agree that a person can be brilliant in some areas and deficient in others. On the economy, I can listen to John A all day. On other matters the attention span is shorter.

    —-x—
    Even the great AC has moment of brilliance followed by long moments of less than brilliance

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  • Even the great AC has moment of brilliance followed by long moments of less than brillianc

    Xxxxxxx
    Most of what I determine in commentary is mostly by observation
    Hence those who are test book intellectuals would find my comments to be malicious or weird
    The difference between them and myself is what my mind captures through observation is not written in text books
    But are recorded in my mind as a truth hence when I barrell down a road with intent it is hard for anyone to change my mind because what I capture in my mind the ability for others to see is not in their text book way of thinking
    Now I bet some one going to say “WhAT”

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  • @ Theo

    Thanks for your kind words. What I am saying is not that different to others. My point is that although we are a small state in relation to many, we can implement policies that will uplift our economy and by extension our people. Remember all the buy Bajan campaigns etc of the past? They depended on the consumer’s patronage to succeed. I am saying we need to go further by ensuring it is policy that our local furniture manufacturers and farmers for example, are guaranteed an agreed percentage of the pie. Do what you can to help yourself first then talk about what others can do for you.

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  • DavidJuly 19, 2021 2:40 PM

    @John A

    Their success was as a group.

    DonnaJuly 19, 2021 2:50 PM

    Correct, David. The Jews were a cohesive group, held together by a common identity.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Family units.

    There is plenty of division in the Jewish community, Orthodox and un orthodox, Ashkenazi and Shephardim

    But one thing all sections of Cubans and Jews have in common, strong family units.

    Here is an example of a Cuban family unit that did exceptionally well.

    Estefan’s paternal grandparents were José Manuel Fajardo González (who ran one of the first Cuban restaurants in Miami, Florida) and Amelia Montano (who was a poet).[14][15][16] Estefan also had uncles who were singer-songwriters.[16] Her father José was a Cuban soldier and a motor escort for the wife of Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batista. As a result of the Cuban Revolution, the Fajardo family fled to Miami in 1959 and settled there. In 1961 José participated in the failed Bay of Pigs Invasion. He was captured by his cousin, who was a member of Fidel Castro’s army, and imprisoned in Cuba for nearly two years.[5] On his return he joined the United States military and fought in the Vietnam War.

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  • An example of a very strong Jewish family unit that did very well is the Rothschild family.

    I suspect it even had business links through trade and finance to Barbados through the Motefiore family.

    Fortunes were made in trade and finance.

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  • William Skinner

    @ John A
    Your thesis is flawed. You are blaming the Black victims. You are also inaccurate when you join others in saying Blacks don’t support Blacks. How the hell do you think we have survived past and present hardships ?What you and others need to ask yourselves is why after nearly sixty years of independence, we are still having this debate. It is virtually impossible to have a enlightened discussion with those who want to sweep historical facts under the carpet. Here we are talking about Cubans in Miami and Jews in the USA, who have all cashed in the rampant racism against Afro Americans. First we need to ask ourselves who financed the anti-Castro/Revolution Cubans in Miami.
    Then we must aske ourselves who financed the Jews in New York and elsewhere.
    Why not talk about why Black Wall Street was burnt to the ground ? Who burnt it flat ?
    Then when you switch to our country ask yourself some very simple questions such as: Where would Black aspiring business people get substantial collateral to finance businesses ? Where is the abundance of generational wealth. Call Rawle Brancker and he might find a few minutes to educate and inform you on these matters.
    Asking me what I do and have done is irrelevant at this point. Note, I never asked you any such thing.

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  • If you want to understand the make up of the Cuban business people I suggest you read the story of Cuban Billionaire Mike Fernadez a Cuban that came to the USA with nothing. When you have nothing to fall back on all that you can do is go forward and do what ever it takes to survive.

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  • Why should I call Rawle Brancker when I can call Mr Bynoe at Carlton or Mr Hoyte at Terrific Tiles, or Mr Lynch at Home Improvement Hardwares who also owns Southern Plaza in Oistins and hear of his success?

    For every black failure you list I can list a black success story. Some live in the past while others look towards a better future.

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  • John AJuly 19, 2021 6:56 PM

    If you want to understand the make up of the Cuban business people I suggest you read the story of Cuban Billionaire Mike Fernadez a Cuban that came to the USA with nothing. When you have nothing to fall back on all that you can do is go forward and do what ever it takes to

    Xxxxx
    There are many such like stories
    But there are many even with hard work and knowledge did not make it pass the first stop
    Not because they were stupid but stumbling blocks played a pivotal role in their way
    The Cubans were handed a platter of goods the day they landed in Miami
    Several doors which were closed to other ethic groups were opened to them
    Some never even bother to learn English but got jobs in hospitals some were govt jobs
    They were included from day one and accepted by the govt as people who were in dire need of help
    Hence govt welfare took care of their every need for years and up to present
    Cheques food stamps free housing with immediacy while blacks names were on waiting list for months on ends waiting approval
    Meanwhile govt loans for low income workers were approved for them with immediacy to start businesses and buy homes
    On the other hand the blacks we’re given all types of excuses
    The plan was for the Cubans to forged ahead build business which would mostly employ their own
    The road for success started at that point and has never stopped
    Blacks were caught off guard thinking that language would stop the Cubans from achieving but it was not to be so Govt had their backs gave them what they wanted in helping them to build several stories of success
    Along the way came their own banks and the rest is history
    Cubans got it all in thirty years while blacks await a promise of forty acres and a mule

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  • @John A

    In a Black majority country despite the so-called establishment we should be doing a better job at enfranchisement. As you pointed there are enough successful businesses in the country to show piece/shop around as models for success. We need to start more doing.

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  • JohnA

    So who support those black business that you just mentioned?
    The 3% or the chinese?

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  • DavidJuly 19, 2021 7:45 PM

    @John A

    In a Black majority country despite the so-called establishment we should be doing a better job at enfranchisement. As you pointed there are enough successful businesses in the country to show piece/shop around as models for success. We need to start more doing.

    Xxxxxx
    What would one call success in Barbados as an enough successful black businesses
    One or two or even twenty is not enough in a country managed by all black government
    My observing eye points me to the south …East and west coast were I several lots of white established businesses
    Hardly find one black in the midst unless one looks long and hard

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  • @angela cox: “Hardly find one black in the midst unless one looks long and hard

    Everyone I report to happens to be Black. I didn’t actually notice that until asked.

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  • We have many black owned businesses in Barbados. Some of us are confusing the issue of black owned businesses with who owns big business and control the wealth (includes power).

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  • William Skinner

    @ John A
    “Why should I call Rawle Brancker when I can call Mr Bynoe at Carlton or Mr Hoyte at Terrific Tiles, or Mr Lynch at Home Improvement Hardwares who also owns Southern Plaza in Oistins and hear of his success?”

    Now please answer this: Which race supported the above businesses ?
    That’s the damn point I keep making here on BU. The crap you and others talking about “ blacks not supporting blacks” is inaccurate and essentially baseless.
    We have always supported each other. Ask Bynoe, Hoyte or Lynch who makes up the biggest slice of their customers?
    Sometimes we just get carried away with unsubstantiated nonsense. We eagerly drink the divide and rule cool aid , used so violently during slavery.
    We all want to move forward but we can’t do so by pretending that the playing field is level.
    Right now as we speak there are hundreds of young , bright black business people who can’t get a leg up. And that should be our focus rather than come here trying to sell a pig in the bag.

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  • Barbados is a majority Black country, obviously all successful businesses here must have majority black customers. When the talk is about why Blacks don’t support black business we mean what again?

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  • @WS: “Right now as we speak there are hundreds of young , bright black business people who can’t get a leg up. And that should be our focus rather than come here trying to sell a pig in the bag.

    Hear! Hear.

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  • @BU_David: “When the talk is about why Blacks don’t support black business we mean what again?

    I hope, and expect, that you appreciate what I’m saying is said honestly.

    Most of us actually work together. Supporting each other.

    Doing otherwise would be sub-optimal.

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  • When I spoke earlier about the success of others I spoke to the pooling of resources to purchase as is done by others. I never spoke about black clients patronizing black retail businesses. There is a big difference!

    What I speak of is a group of small black business people pooling their resources to buy say a 40 ft container of a commodity, as opposed to each buying a few cases of the same item from Massy at higher prices. How many of you for instance know that practically all of the Indians who sell in the country from their vans and cars are supplied by basically 3 larger Indian merchants. Here is how they work.

    The Indian merchants give the self employed salesman who own their vans the products on consignment. They then go into the country and sell with the understanding that a percentage must be returned to the merchant to cover the cost of the goods taken. Next week the same thing happens and the traveling salesman has his van refilled. That type of arrangement calls for trust and respect among the parties involved. Once that is done all those involved prosper.

    That fellow bloggers is what I mean when I speak about people working together and pooling resources for the benefit of all involved. Few also know how diversified the Indian business holdings here now are as well. They have branched out in many non traditional sectors from health care to insurance just to mention a few.

    To attempt to explain this further would be pointless so I rest my case on this issue. If they are those that still don’t understand the point I am trying to get across I can help with no further explanation.

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  • William Skinner

    @ David
    “Barbados is a majority Black country, obviously all successful businesses here must have majority black customers. When the talk is about why Blacks don’t support black business we mean what again?”

    You are one of the main ones on BU pushing a whole heap of nonsense about this blacks supporting not blacks foolishness.
    Barbados was built and remains on a colonialist built retail plantation economy. When we spend our often meager earnings with black businesses, we are really spending all we have.
    We are just two generations removed from poverty. A lot of the wealth built up has been done by black professionals because by the late 70s most of the black businesses had succumb to a consumer base it could no longer satisfy.’
    This made a clear path for the next generation of whites to dominate the expanding post independence economy.
    You and others need to recognize that the public service was always the major employer of the same black middle class we talk about. As late as the 70s many public servants were earning below $300 per month.
    The problem is that for the last forty years salaries have not kept up with inflation and it’s difficult to control consumer spending in open economies.
    In the meantime all the distribution trades, shipping, tourism, car dealerships remained in the hands of the mainly white corporate barons.
    In other words were it not for the growth of the credit Union movement many of us could not buy homes or purchase cars etc.
    Banks are not charitable organizations. We disposed of the only national bank and then came correspondent banking and a host of international agreements, that essentially made it increasingly difficult for our indigenous black manufacturing class to survive.
    There are very few young black business people who can source $250000 or more from old money or generational wealth.
    I know lawyers who graduated and could not buy a chair far less open a practice. Same with doctors, accounts etc.
    We need to discuss such subjects in a broader context. Do you really think there are thousands of blacks out there who have million to invest? Don’t you know that the average person cannot buy the black belly lamb in the supermarkets because it is nearly three times as expensive as the imported lamb?
    Let’s get real and start to discuss how we can radically reform the country to give each citizen a fair break. We need to stop this nauseating pie-in-the-sky mumbo jumbo and start to deal with the deep socio economic disparities we have .
    Sometimes I feel as if we Blacks are a frigging minority begging for social and economic rights.
    As Adonijah says: There are two Barbados.

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  • @William

    You have no idea. Your head is burrowed very deep in it as far as what is unfolding in Barbados. You remind the blogmaster of the matador facing the bull with a red rag. All you see is red, oops black!

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  • @John A

    There is something else the minorities do, they target key persons in positions of authority to do you know what.

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  • William Skinner,

    You are obviously correct. No black customers, no business.

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  • Well… John A just said it so, by God, it must be so!

    Murdaaaah!

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  • NorthernObserver

    @JohnA
    “That type of arrangement calls for trust and respect” and also enforcement. Never forget that part. Or soon 3 of the top sellers will figure out they can get together, and order in bulk?
    The ‘key’ to the Massy game is being large enough to control your suppliers. To stop them selling to your largest customers. If they do, you must cut them a new asshole immediately.
    The second issue is credit. It is a double headed monster, in the import game. International suppliers rarely extend credit. But to sell locally one must.

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  • Having said that, I do believe more of us could overcome in Barbados by pooling our resources but that is DESPITE THE DELIBERATE ROAD BLOCKS not because they do not exist.

    Still, nobody burning down our businesses like in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

    P.S. Lobbying is not just mout talk. Money talks even louder. Large campaign contributions buy favourable legislation and policy AND LARGE GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS.

    Some people playing dem doan know!

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  • And as for the other John re the strong family units – I hear there were strong family units where our ancestors came from.

    But… slavery tore families apart. Their could be no strong family units under the slave system. The men were used as studs and the woman routinely raped by the slavers. Children were sold away from their mothers.

    After three hundred years, the slaves knew nothing about family structure.

    Still the white man’s fault.

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  • Is the crime rate in Barbados steadily increasing daily
    Or is it my imagination ?
    It seems that our social environment is heading similar in the same direction as Jamaica
    The IMF has been managing the economic affairs of Jamaica
    The IMF is managing the economic affairs of Barbados

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  • William Skinner

    @ Donna
    You are more than correct!
    Amazingly we have people here comparing slaves with political refugees!
    They need to tell us what were the similarities of the Cuban experience in Miami and the slaves who were brought to the Caribbean. They also need to tell us about the similarities of the Jews and the slaves brought here from Africa. They also need to tell us about the similarities of the indentured Indians brought to this region and the slaves.
    These people are behaving as if the slaves freely swam from Africa here because of a dictatorship. As you have correctly stated the black family was literally destroyed by white slave masters.
    We are here taking a people, our own people, who were treated worst than cattle and comparing them with people who were not captured but escaped a political system they did not favor.
    Its only due to our incredible resilience that we established new families and then extended families after we we were brutalized and driven into the ground.
    That’s not “ living in the past”or only “ seeing black”. That’s our history.
    And those who feel we are going to go forward without realizing that are the ones who have us stuck where we are today.
    I don’t have the tenacity or resilience of WURA but this current discussion clearly shows why we need @ WURA on this blog.

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  • Pooling? Sou sou , credit unions., purchiing and reselling will soon come

    Housing and cars came mostly through the credit unions, We don’t have to do it the Indians way

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  • @John2

    The minorities pool cash/equity. Some of you guys dont get it. Try to judge from where we are today.

    #nocredit!

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  • When all said and done the majority population would have nothing to pool or share
    Pockets empty because of govt stronghold policies of fees and taxes along with high energy cost and food prices

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  • David

    All will agree the minorities pool

    I was respond to John A comment that WE don’t pool to purchase and resell

    I the beginning we had nothing to pool so we used to share what we grow
    U give me ur yams I give u my potatoes

    After we started getting a shilling we sou sou

    Then when we got a dollar we credit union

    Through the credit union we get better houses and cars. We still got a long way to go but it false to say we do not pool for our own up liftment

    To purchase and resell may be correct though. We will not get there using the Indian model but through the credit unions

    Barbados

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  • @John2

    There is 9 billion in savings belonging to mostly Black bajans.

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  • The IMF sits some where in Washington far away from the internal economic issues of the day that burdens barbadians household
    Govt seems to agree with ever decision the IMF makes decisions running against the best interest of barbadian households
    However decisions made by the ImF which benefits international lending agencies which in return grants govt a favour status of accessing more loans to strap on the shoulders of barbadians
    This is serious business

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  • Didn’t u guy have this conversation
    It seem like I am repeating Someone (that I probably agreed with)

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  • NorthernObserver

    @David
    Is that because the minorities have their savings in offshore accounts?

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  • @NO

    Those occupying the pinnacle.

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  • Most of what I determine in commentary is mostly by observation
    Hence those who are test book intellectuals would find my comments to be malicious or weird
    The difference between them and myself is what my mind captures through observation is not written in text books
    But are recorded in my mind as a truth hence when I barrell down a road with intent it is hard for anyone to change my mind because what I capture in my mind the ability for others to see is not in their text book way of thinking.

    Not, “WHAT”…….. but…….. WTF??!!??

    Like

  • DonnaJuly 19, 2021 11:51 PM

    And as for the other John re the strong family units – I hear there were strong family units where our ancestors came from.

    But… slavery tore families apart.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++

    I’ve always heard that polygamy was the norm in much of Africa.

    Slavery did not tear families apart. Quite the opposite.

    Hear Thomas Sowell on the Black family.

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  • Oh, the white man eyes see no other culture as being valid.

    Polygamy and family structure are not mutually exclusive.

    In fact, poor fool, POLYGAMY IS A FAMILY STRUCTURE.

    And such families can be very strong if one has been so socialised.

    And so Africans may have been polygamous AND have strong families. And so they often did.

    Polygamy often ensured the survival of the tribe. See if your naŕrow brain can stretch enough to figure out how!

    Sigh…

    🤦🏽‍♂️

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  • Boy oh boy! Getting my theres and theirs mixed up!

    Person, woman, man, camera, tv.

    Oh, thank God! I am still a genius!

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  • Murdaah! I must hear a shite man, sorry, a white man on the black family! He will surely clear up any facts and fallacies about black people. After all, that’s what they do!

    Artax, post one uh dem rolling and laughing yellow men fuh muh!

    Murdaaah!

    Lookah de Johnnie gon kill muh wid laugh!

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  • Here’s how the white man destroyed our black families.

    It was too painful to form bonds that would be broken as a matter of routine. Easier to harden your heart not to care too much than to have your heart and manly pride smashed to pieces, watching your woman raped by an ugly white beast as you stood, rendered helpless. Better to remain aloof from your offspring than to endure the torture of the flesh of your flesh, your precious jewels, ripped away one by one and sold off, never to be seen again!

    To cut one’s self off from feeling too much is a coping mechanism. It is about survival . It is not easy to switch back on when the danger is past.

    My grandmother told me that years ago many many men used to see their daughters as fair game. They used to say that they were not fattening pig for somebody else’s poke.

    I know it still happens but I would bet not nearly as often.

    Like

  • @David

    Not only 9 billion on the bank but most of it earning less than 1% interest with inflation running over 3%!

    Like

  • @John A

    This is the systemic issue, the difference between Blacks and other ethnic groups. They know and exploit the difference between saving and investing.

    Like

  • @ Donna

    Thomas Sowell is a noted African American scholar and senior fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution.

    He is a Trump supporter, so, it isn’t surprising John would regard his word on anything as the gospel.

    Like

  • The point is that slavery in America did not break up black families, the welfare state of the 60’s did.

    Sowell started life as a Marxist and then figured it all out for himself, by himself!!

    He is in his 90’s now and was around long before Trump came on the scene.

    Like

  • DonnaJuly 20, 2021 11:32 AM

    Oh, the white man eyes see no other culture as being valid.

    Polygamy and family structure are not mutually exclusive.

    In fact, poor fool, POLYGAMY IS A FAMILY STRUCTURE.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Mormons practiced polygamy at one time too!!!

    Never said Polygamy was not a family structure, just stated a fact with which you seem to agree.

    Like

  • Sowell started life as a Marxist!!

    He was cured of the affliction by the Federal Government!!

    Like

  • DavidJuly 20, 2021 12:27 PM

    @John A

    This is the systemic issue, the difference between Blacks and other ethnic groups. They know and exploit the difference between saving and investing.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    So what you are saying is that Blacks are too dumb to figure this out for themselves!!

    Rubbish.

    Like

  • Now let’s see
    How the IMF the managers of Barbados decisions can help lower crime
    Decreased unemployment
    Serves a purpose where our social network does not further decline
    Help to preserve a,Barbados that is is more than an economy but a community
    All across the length and breath of Barbados people are going through the most gruelling economic times
    However those that are put in place to govern seems more than satisfied that having a larger than large pay out for consultants should be enough a signal to say Barbados economy is under control
    But then again when everything goes Haywire the people would take the blame

    Like

  • People of all kinds and natures have choices to make.

    Asian Americans make one choice which sets them apart from others.

    It is ridiculous and self defeating to make a choice which leads down one road and envy someone who made a different choice and is on another road.

    Walk your walk and stop bitching.

    If you are not happy with the route you are going, choose to change it.

    Like

  • Investing takes risk that not many people are willing to undertake
    Barbadians live by an old adage
    Bird in the hand is worth a thousand in the bush
    Recently I heard conservation where many were complaining that they feel rip off by home owners insurance. Companies now in their time of needing financial help to fix their homes
    This too is an issue that media should dig their heels into asking questions
    Issues like these leaves a bad taste of mistrust in the mouths of anyone wishing to invest

    Like

  • David

    I don’t have much time

    If you want to follow the others models then it the rich blacks that should dip into the $9billions and give the Pope blacks a leg up .

    Whe the Indians come with only a suitcase there is already a job waiting for them- provided by the ones who came before .

    Like

  • There are somethings a white man born into privilege and grew up on a plantation will never understand.

    Liked by 1 person

  • connecting the dots
    where is BRAVEN

    6OisbLRD3Vk

    Like

  • Look uh Buccanal

    Where isbraven

    Like

  • thats the way govt has been treating the black people
    Hilton HOTEL workers begging for their severance meanwhile govt takes over 80 million debt of needhams point holding ltd
    Now the vendors cant make a living because of govt actions

    Like

  • David,

    You are being generous. John DOES NOT WANT to understand.

    Look how he had the gall to offer me up a white Trump supporting vile creature as an authority to teach me, a black woman, about the black family!

    Of course, I did not watch his stupid ass video. I never do.

    I stopped listening to the white man’s narratives when I heard them say how one Columbus discovered some “New World” in 1492. I was about 11 years old. So I was ready to present the queen with my backside in 1976.

    They cannot be trusted to tell the truth.

    Like

  • With all the negative problems the people had to bear in the past year
    High unemployment struggling to make ends meet
    Covid and on and on
    Yuh think it is fear that govt officials would shut down the poor business man from making a living
    Meanwhile govt opens its borders so that the white establishment in the hotel industry can make a living
    Never mind that open borders are conduits for bringing in the virus
    Wunna think it is fair how govt treat the blacks and keep the best servings for the high and mighty business person
    Wait black vendors ain’t people too deserving of the same respect directed to the white business establishment

    Like

  • Angela Cox,

    That’s MR. BRAVEN to you!

    You go, girl!

    They have to do better than this. The people are trying to make an honest living. We must try to facilitate it somehow.

    Like

  • Them.in charge really tek bajans fuh
    Cause they would never try that sh.it in a country like Jamaica
    Closing down people business from.making an honest living
    Yuh think that with all the crime and rise in poverty levels govt would be happy to see people making a honest living
    But No govt send officials to ring fence black.people business
    Another example of Braven being lap dogs
    Not a word utter in support of the vendors

    Like

  • @AC
    I stepped away and my place is already taken? 😢😥

    Like

  • John is toxic and is a troll.
    He gets his kicks from pushing buttons.
    I read his post for the big lie.

    Like

  • Two words for govt officials
    Shameful and disgusting
    Remove that RH fence stop treating wunna own like second class citizens
    Those vendors are examples of harding working people despite what others might say about blacks not liking to work hard
    Vending not easy it is struggle and now govt officials making those people lives a harder struggle

    Like

  • AC
    I see the poetry. I will try to tease it out.

    Two words for government officials
    ——–x-__—–++
    It’s downright sad and disgusting
    How Mia abuses those who are trusting
    Sellers expecting government to come to their defense
    Instead they are met with a strong iron fence
    A fate even worse than an eviction
    Closing of gates and barring of admission
    People working hard to make ends meet
    Now facing arrest if they sell on the street
    ‘Mr Braven’ silent as if he is a mute
    Silent so as to hide the damn ‘trute’
    Vending already hard and full of tears
    Made worse and it appears nobody cares
    A government that claim ‘we got it’
    Only delivering piss and pure shat.

    I see you still have it.
    You go girl….

    Like

  • I think you should be posting in the “poets’ corner’

    Like

  • When Angela Cox sticks to the facts, she will have my support.

    I am consistent in this.

    As I have stated before, there is plenty to criticise without making stuff up. There is nothing more potent than the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth.

    Like

  • Now,,,, these people are not rich people and they are trying to make am honest living. They will try to set up in a manner which they believe will bring them the most money. If there is a problem with the way they are doing business, the authorities should seek a solution that still allows them to feed their families. There are children in these homes looking to be fed.

    This heavy-handed enforcement helps nobody.

    This attitude has to change. What in God’s name is wrong with us?

    Like

  • Dots dots dots and more dots

    The Mighty Gabby Speaks

    Gabby is accusing the ruling United Workers’ Party (UWP) of Chastanet of using his copyrighted music for political advertisements without his authorisation during the ongoing general election campaign there. But the St. Lucian political entity says he has the wrong party.

    In a statement issued Tuesday, the acclaimed calypsonian, folk singer, noted lyricist and composer, said it had been brought to his attention that the UWP was or is using his intellectual property in the form of his music “without the expressed permission of the composer or publisher.”

    “I wish to disassociate myself from Allen Chastanet and the United Workers’ Party, who in no form or fashion align with the philosophical values that I represent,” the renowned artiste declared.

    “Therefore, I am compelled to instruct Allen Chastanet and the United Workers’ Party to cease and desist from the use of any of [my] intellectual property and copyrighted music in any form for political advertising, motorcade or public meeting during the election campaign, including on the SKY FM 93.1 radio station frequency,” insisted the holder of an Honourary Doctorate from the University of the West Indies (UWI), Cave Hill Campus.

    “I am therefore seeking compensation of EC$40,000 for the usage of my music during this election campaign,” Gabby added.

    Like

  • Chastanet Responds

    insisted that his ruling United Workers Party (UWP) is not the one using copyrighted material of Barbados calypsonian, Anthony Gabby Carter, in the campaign leading up to Saint Lucia general elections on July 26.

    In an interview with Barbados Today, Chastanet said he believes Gabby, whom he described as a gentleman he respects, was misinformed.

    “I think he has got the wrong party,” the Saint Lucia prime minister told the Barbados publication.

    Chastanet said while he has not been in contact with the Barbadian music maestro, others have been trying to reach him.
    However, Chastanet told Barbados Today that he has nothing to do with the radio station.

    “And as you would appreciate, any radio station that is operating is licensed and if they were using anybody’s music they would be covered under the copyright…the licensing,” he said.

    Gabby was quoted as saying that he would give adequate time for the Saint Lucia prime minister to respond to his demands.

    Like

  • William Skinner

    @ all
    We have treated vendors like second class citizens for decades. We have had fifty plus years to bring vending into mainstream business but we thought that chasing them from pillar to post and allowing them to set up all types of shacks were the answer.
    We need to have at least a dozen to fifteen well strategically established public markets set up throughout the country. With the amount of cars on the road there is no need to establish venting facilities only in Bridgetown.
    Once more the BLPDLP have exercised a lack of vision.
    Going around in circles has been the economic policy since independence.
    Peace

    Like

  • William SkinnerJuly 21, 2021 2:15 PM

    @ all
    We have treated vendors like second class citizens for decades. We have had fifty plus years to bring vending into mainstream business but we thought that chasing them from pillar to post and allowing them to set up all types of shacks were the answer.

    Xxxxxxx

    Dam shame
    Xxxxx

    Now in less than a month vendors are complaining about mistreatment
    One set being told to ply their trade in an area that stinks of effulent
    Now to fence them in an area where plying there trade becomes hard
    Is downright criminal

    Like

  • One side of a complex story told solely through the eyes of America.

    Swallowed hook, line and sinker by these two.

    Like

  • Oops! Wrong blog!

    Like

  • Have anyone noticed how silent the blp operatives become when fingers are pointed at this govt concerning mistreatment of it’s black citizens
    Yes many which gave present govt a comfortable election victory
    Yes many who bought into govt sweet sounding words of Hope
    Now pray tell where is the Hope by which vendors plying their trade were at first thrown outward to the streets
    Then after outburst of being treated like homeless dogs were told to go behind the fence and take what wunna can get
    Heartless and nothing short of being a downright dirty plan by govt officials to keep small business people scraping the bottom of the barrell

    Like

  • This video speaks of officials operating like boot licking commanders
    Telling vendors not to come on the property
    The property which the vendors pay govt through licensing agreement that they can enter premises unless agreement is broken by illegal or illicit transactions unconnected to what gives them permission to buy sell or trade their goods and services
    Yet govt send officials to disrespect the vendors in the most despicable and offensive manner
    Really a fence !

    Like

  • But BRAVEN
    Phew stiking lot not one mumbling word
    But then again BRAVEN agreed to a govt plan of setting up temporary space in a stinking foul smelling area for vendors to sell their goods
    Phew some association that to be associated with
    Hope vendors don’t have to pay an annual fee to BRAVEN for representation cause by any other sounding word it can be said it is wasted

    Like

  • Connecting the dots

    Poor performance
    DLP PRESIDENTIAL HOPEFUL BLASTS BARBADOS’ ECONOMIC MANAGEMENT
    By Kareem Smith
    The COVID-19 pandemic is absolutely no excuse for the current state of the Barbadian economy, according to the man aspiring to be the next president of the Democratic Labour Party (DLP).
    In a scathing attack on the country’s social and economic direction under the current administration, Reverend Guy Hewitt, the former High Commissioner to the United Kingdom pointed to other Caribbean countries, which he claims are all performing better than Barbados.
    Hewitt also charged that recent first quarter statistics from the Barbados Statistical Service (BSS) may not tell the full story of the country’s unemployment situation.
    The cleric was addressing an ethnically diverse audience of about 50 at the Barbados Yacht Club on the topic A path to peace, prosperity and progress where he declared that many of the difficulties facing the country could be overcome with a dose of strong leadership.
    “The world bank has indicated that Barbados’ economy fell by 17.6 per cent last year. That is not the issue. The issue is that we are one of the worst performing economies globally,” Hewitt declared to nods from many in the audience.
    “This is not about COVID, this is about who we got bout here running our affairs into the ground. Jamaica contracted by 10.2 per cent, Trinidad and Tobago 7.8, even Dominica outperformed us and they are using some of the same advisors, but I guess they are getting better value for money down there.
    “According to the IMF, our debt to GDP ratio is at 147 per cent. It ranks us now as the seventh most indebted country in the world and with unemployment through the roof, nobody, except probably the people who say it, feels that unemployment is at 17.2 per cent, because we know that is counting those looking for work and the majority of people in the hotel sector know there is no work out there. So they are not counted,” he added.
    While blasting Prime Minister Mia Mottley’s eight-member team of economic advisors, Hewitt lamented the fact that the country continues to be one of the most expensive places in the world where many struggle to make ends meet.
    He added that even with the Government looking to expand the financial services sector, the country ranked at 128th on the World Bank’s Doing Business rankings, behind Jamaica (71st), St Lucia (93rd) and Dominica (111th).
    He stated: “This is not about party allegiance.
    We have to be aligned to this land we love, so we need to face facts and get the right people and develop the right strategy and put the right policies in place to chart our way to a stronger, more resilient and diversified and sustainable economy.
    “In our tourism sector, we like to feel that we are world beaters. Our tourism product is not even top-ranked in the Caribbean. If you look and see where the top properties are in the Caribbean, they are elsewhere.
    “We are now playing around with not being at the leading edge in tourism; our financial services sector is in peril; we have our biggest trading partner in Canada and nobody can find a High Commissioner. Last I heard, he was running behind Hurricane Elsa up in St George North.
    This is not good enough,” Hewitt contended.
    In addition to the economy, the religious leader expressed concern about the social fabric of the society, which, in his opinion, is characterized in many instances by poverty, drug abuse, family dysfunction, non-communicable diseases and mental health issues.
    He renewed calls for an overhaul of the country’s social services that bring all welfare agencies and government departments under one central institution.
    “We cannot keep throwing money haphazardly at our problems. We need to be able to be systematic about it,” he charged.
    Hewitt’s statements came even as he prepares to face off with current DLP President Verla DePeiza for leadership of the party.
    When asked about the nature of his Yacht Club presentation, Hewitt said he considered the invitation as an opportunity to interface with an increasingly diverse and inclusive group of Barbadians, some of whom represent the business community.
    “As somebody who aspires to lead in Barbados, I have to lead for every Barbadian.
    So whether it is the business community, the trade union movement, the society, community groups, I have to provide inclusive leadership that brings them all onboard. So I am pleased that the members of the Yacht Club were able to find what I had to say consistent with what their aspirations might be as business leaders or as leaders in their own communities,” said Hewitt.
    (kareemsmith@barbadostoday.bb)

    Like

  • I remember when Mottley stated that Haiti economy was in a better state than Barbados
    I also remember when Mottley had the audacity to step on Dominica economic toes which helped to increase Dominica economic woes in her earnest to boldly invite one of Dominica economic drivers Ross University to Barbados
    Now I am reading that Dominica economic performance is on better standing than that of Barbados
    As the old people say what goes around comes around

    Like

  • Some of you people have to be illiterate. The discussion has to be about creating growth in a recessionary environment caused by the pandemic. In other words using a crisis to ensure best outcomes.

    Like

  • DavidJuly 22, 2021 6:16 AM

    Some of you people have to be illiterate. The discussion has to be about creating growth in a recessionary environment caused by the pandemic. In other words using a crisis to ensure best outcomes
    Xxxccc
    Her he comes throwing nasty dirty shade
    Cut it out

    Xxxxxxxx
    Simply put anything having to do with the economy of Barbados is pertinent and revelant to any discussion that highlights negligence towards the creation of growth for the Barbados economy
    The vendors plight fits into such discussion along with what Hewitt stated is our financial disrepair

    Like

  • Dot and more Dots
    Ditto

    Our borders are open govt has to to another realization that our welcomed visitors are in possession of fake documents
    Govt stated that an alert has been sent to GAIA officials to be diligent
    Meanwhile our other ports of entry such as Port St. Charles grants access to visitors
    What about that port of entry where private access by boats and yatchs are permitted

    Like

  • Is Senator Caswell throwing shade

    In a one of his comments to House of Parliament he stated the recent unemployment numbers were not entirely true
    Going on to say that his belief indicates numbers more of 30 percent
    He gauged his numbers on the Hotel industry being the biggest drivers of the Barbados economy and where a vast percentage of workers were laid off

    Like

  • @ angela coxJuly 22, 2021 7:44 AM
    (Quote):
    Simply put anything having to do with the economy of Barbados is pertinent and revelant to any discussion that highlights negligence towards the creation of growth for the Barbados economy
    The vendors plight fits into such discussion along with what Hewitt stated is our financial disrepair…(Unquote).
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    A very good point you have raised there, dear angela cox aka “ac”!

    But your ‘Guy’, the preacher man, is clearly not (yet) the sharpest opposing knife in the political blue and yellow box containing the keys to the gates of economic heaven.

    He needs to up his game and focus on more bread and butter issues required to deliver daily food on the tables of those currently out of work.

    Since he was trying to influence a cross-section of the Bajan community from a podium right in the heart of the pending hotel corridor (and looking over the Carlisle Bay) why didn’t he raise the matter of the status of the Hyatt Hotel?

    Hasn’t the Hyatt hotel been promoted by the current political administration since 2019 as the economic game-changer for the country and saviour of a fast-dying Bridgetown the Capital of the coming republic of Barbadoes?

    Don’t you think work on the construction of that ‘brand-name’ Hyatt erection will clearly make a difference to the economic recovery of the country, the plight of Bridgetown and demonstrate a measure of confidence in the brand called Barbados?

    After all, injecting US$ 200 million in a “recessionary environment” can have the same impact on the Bajan economy as developing a vaccine against Covid-21 to mitigate its ‘dangerous’ effects on the travel and tourism industry in the Caribbean.

    What sayest thou, David?

    Like

  • Miller
    Why not send your concerns to him

    Like

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