Minimum Wage (Yes) Timing (No?)

Whether studying the issue in the classroom or conversing in a rum shop the amount and timing of the implementation of a national minimum wage generates robust discussion in any country. Pros and cons are easy to find on both sides of the contentious issue.

The Barbados government some suggest are moving like the proverbial bull in a china shop to implement a minimum wage of $8.50, up from $6.25 with security guards to get $9.25 to take effect on All Fools Day 2021. The trade unions are saying it is too low and it should be implemented without delay. Some in the private sector suggest it is too high and the date of introduction is too aggressive.

This government’s decision to increase the minimum wage is commendable and long overdue. The evidence support in the last 5 years there has been significant upward movement in the rate of inflation and the Retail Price Index supports Barbados being an expensive place to live.

The concern by parties of the dispassionate kind entering the debate is not the amount of the minimum wage being introduced but its timing. Moving from $6.25 to $8.50 is significant. Its introduction must be weighed against how the market is likely to respond. Unfortunately this is an unknown. After more than 10 years of a struggling economy many businesses are operating with depleted cashflows. Bear in mind COVID 19 would have exacerbated stress to the profit and loss of many businesses. It is easy for some to sit in the armchair and make the uninformed assumption that all businesses make money. Many operate at the margins.

On the biscuit and cheese side of the discussion, the data supports those earning at a subsistence level must be experiencing an enormous challenge. The obvious position is that a caring society must find ways to support the most vulnerable. The blogmaster will not join the politically motivated and uninformed crews by shouting the minimum wage should be hiked to $10.00 and to hell with considering the consequences. Many debating the issue are unaware this is a debate raging in many countries including the most developed.

It may be useful for the calculus used by the technicians to be made public. The majority of Barbadians will not understand it but it make help to deflate the emotional arguments that a national minimum wage amount is not determined by pulling from a hat.

It seems the majority of opinion from the private sector is that the timing is bad given the vagaries of market of the last 13 years and the consequential negative impact. From the view of trade unions and under-represented workers, now is the best time because of the current state of things.

In is against this background the government has had to make a tough decision.

The blogmaster is always amused when decisions – as in this case moving forward with the implementation of a minimum wage is made – several interest groups will make themselves heard post facto. What is the purpose of the tripartite arrangement (Social Partnership) we beat our chest again? The discord the many dissenting views must cause the public does not help to inflate confidence into the Barbados space. In a situation like this why the social partnership could not have agreed to a communique registering the different concerns after discussing government’s decision to move ahead? It seems all issues in the country have to be resolved after a predictable adversarial process. Historically this has not been the Barbados way.

Whether the government folds to the request of private sector to suspend the hike in minimum wage or not, there is a problem to solve.

How do we (society) protect the vulnerable and marginalized worker in the society at a difficult time.

How does government implement a minimum wage policy to equatable redistribute income in the society.

So far the statement on the matter from Andrew Bynoe of A1 supermarkets is one of the more sensible ones registering with the blogmaster.

I would even advocate moving to $10 an hour to somebody who works for 40 hours, so they would have a gross take-home pay of $400. However, having said that, the cost of living has to be addressed, because for businesses to be able to support the minimum wage up to $10, we have to look at the other areas of costs that affect the running of businesses…Employees would have to honour efficiency and higher productivity within the workplace…

Andrew Bynoe

353 comments

  • @CH
    Great movie. Even with my short attention span, I watched the complete movie.
    Great response. You anticipated where I was coming from.

    @Lawson,
    You may have invented a new profession – funeral comedian.
    You come out and do your routine and not a man laugh. Not a dry eye in the house. People in tears and PRAYING you would leave.

    Like

  • @555dubstreet: “every time I go to America they single me out to go through the full-body scanners which can damage your gonads

    Hey… The last time I left the “Great US of A” they did everything short of a body-cavity search. I didn’t actually have a gun pulled on me, but an agent did unclip her gun while I was searched…

    Admittedly, I had proven that the CLEC Kit provider had left the Root passwords as default during the training session. A profoundly stupid mistake by the provider.

    Like

  • Injustice and either government would have done it, teachers should know that they need psychological help.

    https://www.nationnews.com/2021/03/28/teachers-docked-pay-restored/

    Like

  • John2March 29, 2021 9:22 AM

    Só after crying down all the borrowing you are suggesting it is good that we have the money in the bag to prop up / stimulate the economy

    At least one can truly say that is money well
    When the economy shows signs of life
    After all the money borrowed is money which the people would have to repay
    Therfore putting the money to use which will stimulate the economy would at least build the confidence in the minds of people

    Like

  • Mari.

    Poor you

    Like

  • John2March 29, 2021 4:54 PM

    Mari.

    Poor you

    Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    No poor Barbados

    Like

  • Found it interesting.
    Especially the ending
    Not worth reading.
    Did I confuse you?
    https://www.barbadosadvocate.com/business/barbados%E2%80%99-economic-freedom-score-declines
    “The index has been used as a barometer in some circles to suggest sound economic and social progress and to indicate good economic policies being pursued by states with high ranking.

    However, this has not received global acceptance. Leading international economist, Jeffrey Sachs, has challenged the index, stating that there is no correlation between a country’s rating and its economic progress.

    China is not among the countries ranked, but it continues to record high and sustained growth compared to those in the high positions of the index.”

    Even more confused than when I started the article.

    Like

  • Chris..The Asian world know their thing, they never stop inventing, i used some of their more advanced products in North America, unparalled.

    Like

  • @WWoU: “The Asian world know their thing, they never stop inventing, i used some of their more advanced products in North America, unparalled.

    The Asian world does indeed “know their thing”.

    They are considered masters of what is called “the long game” in game theory discussions.

    Like

  • BD should have a universal basic income of say $3-400 per month per single person or family as it has a small population of 300K it is doable. The same monies would be put straight back into economy as money goes round and round what comes in goes out again and so on and so forth.

    Like

  • @Chris Halsall March 29, 2021 3:38 PM “Personally, I take people seriously when they can smell correctly…”

    Some people cannot see, That is a legitimate disability.

    Some people cannot hear. That is a legitimate disability.

    Some people cannot smell. That is a legitimate disability.

    Like

  • @555dubstreet… I think we’re actually on the same side…

    Your videos didn’t work for me (I run Linux), but I hope you et al will enjoy this.

    Like

  • @CH
    Distraction.
    My I-I program needs more data
    Advantages/disadvantages of Linux.
    Cost of Linux compared to regular computer?
    Can it be used to browse like a Lenovo/Dell computer?
    I will google also.

    Like

  • How could having two jobs BAKING BREAD be a conflict of interest, these wannabe slave master bakeries are known for LOCKING WORKERS IN SO THEY CAN’T LEAVE during their schedule, some of them are lucking a fire didn’t break out at those rat infested holes to kill workers who don’t even get decent wages……..slave society Barbados where they don’t want to pay you for one job, but prevent you from having a second to keep you in poverty..

    “Yesterday morning a number of workers at Purity Bakeries Ltd staged a work stoppage following the termination of one of their colleagues.

    Head of the Unity Workers’ Union Caswell Franklyn told the Caribbean Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) that a worker was fired last Friday on the grounds of a conflict of interest.

    Franklyn said: “This morning the workers at Purity came out in solidarity with one of their colleagues that got fired on Friday. He was fired on the pretext that he had a conflict of interest because he worked at another bakery. They are using the pretext that he worked elsewhere; he is not working elsewhere right now so even if he had a conflict of interest, it no longer exists.”

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @WW&C
    these Bajan stories are frequently interesting
    From BT
    “Workers at Purity Bakeries are back on the job after a work stoppage this morning.
    In a brief statement, the Barbados Workers Union (BWU) explained the workers had taken the action in support of a colleague who was previously a member of the union.
    The statement said: “In December, an issue involving an employee of Purity Bakeries Limited was being investigated and subsequently became a disciplinary matter.
    As occurs from time to time, the employee in question, who is still a member of the Barbados Workers’ Union (BWU), decided to exercise his right to alternate representation and for over a month the BWU has not been treating to the matter.
    This morning, after being informed that the matter was no longer being handled by the BWU, the colleagues who turned out in a show of solidarity returned to their workstations just before 9 a.m.”[Quote BT]

    Methinks we have a battle between the Unions? Several conflicts between your quote and this one.

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  • Northern…it’s well known the unions on the island do more harm than good, they collude with government and these small time enslavement oriented businesses and NOTHING CHANGES…..things certainly don’t get any better.. Caswell tries but the corruption and selloutism is way too strong…all these businesses need closing..the population need a fresh start….away from parliament negros..an ever increasing BLIGHT ON THE LAND..

    Like

  • Tuesday Morning Blues from the Heavens Above

    Like

  • Is it not refreshing g to revert to the topic at hand?

    No delay
    New minimum wage April 1 despite objections
    by CARLOS ATWELL carlosatwell@nationnews.com
    THERE WILL be no reconsideration of implementing the national minimum wage of $8.50 an hour from April 1.
    Minister of Labour Colin Jordan said yesterday the matter had been ventilated thoroughly and Government had come to the fairest position at this time.
    “There will never be a good time to increase costs to any business, but we are at the point where there are people in this country who are working and, while putting in 40 hours a week, still are not able to meet the basic needs for themselves and their families. That is a matter which cannot go unattended,” he told the DAILY NATION.
    “I will say this: If your business model does not allow you to succeed unless people are paid less than would allow them to survive properly, then your model is not sustainable. A proper business model must ensure your workers can survive on what you are paying them.”
    He said Government had articulated its position from last December. A tripartite Minimum Wage Board made up of employers, unionists and independents – which included two university professors and a retired banker – made a report to Government on implementing the minimum wage which was further enhanced by a Blue-Ribbon Advisory Committee, chaired by retired Chief Justice Sir David Simmons.
    “The Minimum Wage Board heard from all sides, but we decided to go a step further and set up a Blue-Ribbon Advisory Committee, again made up of independents, former trade unionists and employers which also made recommendations. They met with a wide cross section of people and organisations – from economists, the Barbados Private Sector Association (BPSA), the Barbados Chamber of Commerce and Industry, the Small Business Association and others.
    “There was nothing coming out from any of the reports suggesting we should delay. The final reports came to me and I made the recommendations to Cabinet and Cabinet agreed to go ahead. We are on course for implementation from April 1,” he said.
    Jordan said they had heard it all – the minimum wage was too low, it was too high, it was coming too soon, it was too long in coming, there should be a living wage instead, and the wage should be tied to productively – and the decision made was the most balanced for now.
    “How can you expect a worker to produce when they cannot provide for themselves and their families? When these workers are paid more, it will go straight back into the economy. These workers have a high marginal propensity to consume, that is, they will spend their money in shops, supermarkets, in retail, at the hairdresser and on food, transport and clothing; in fact, in many businesses with other minimum wage workers.
    “It is not a case where every worker in Barbados will get a raise. The national minimum wage is only for those who are earning less than the wage, so while it will cost some businesses, it will not be significant. By settling on $8.50, we are saying to both workers and employers we recognise these are tough times. We did not go to where some were asking, like to $10 or $12 an hour, plus the start date also reflects we recognise the times,” he said.
    50 days ago
    The minister said the Minimum Wage Order was drafted 50 days ago and the public had 40 of those days to respond, but objections only started coming last week. He said detractors were going to the public to gain momentum and to make it look like the majority of people were against the implementation of the minimum wage, but this was not the case.
    As for security guards, he reiterated they would operate on a separate sectoral minimum wage of $9.25 an hour as they tended to work different, often longer, hours and would not be tied to 40 hours a week. He said once all this was in place, the shop assistant and domestic worker minimum wages would officially be repealed.
    Last week, BPSA chairman Edward Clarke expressed concern about the timing of the wage and called for it to be put back to January next year. He said he regretted the measure would be pushed through even after the BPSA had submitted its concerns and suggestions.
    Clarke added such a move would not benefit the present economic climate or stagnant business sector, as many businesses would have to make “serious adjustments” to their operations to comply with the minimum wage law.
    Last month the Human Resources Association of Barbados expressed similar concerns, saying the wage was long in coming but even so, the business climate was not ready and it would take lobbying and advocacy to ensure it was implemented at a better time.

    Source: Nation

    Like

  • Interesting read posted to IADB blog.

    Why have Caribbean countries been so indebted, and what can they do to improve outcomes?

    March 10, 2021 by Henry Mooney – Joan Oriol Prats – David Rosenblatt – Jason Christie Leave a Comment

    Caribbean countries have long been among the most indebted on earth, and related vulnerabilities have slowed growth and poverty reduction across the region. Our chapter in Economic Institutions for a Resilient Caribbean—entitled: Debt Management and Institutions in the Caribbean: Best Practices and Priorities for Reform—focuses on debt-related vulnerabilities affecting Caribbean countries that are members of the IDB’s Caribbean Country Department—The Bahamas, Barbados, Guyana, Jamaica, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago. In it, we undertake a detailed review of factors that have driven debt accumulation, identify common factors that have driven debt and related economic crises, and also review the evolving consensus with respect to sound international practices for debt management. In this context, we discuss priority reforms with the potential to help address existing deficits, and insulate Caribbean economies from future shocks, in order to support faster and more inclusive growth.

    Caribbean Countries: Among the World’s Most Indebted

    The history of public debt in Caribbean countries is striking. Several countries in the region have been among the most indebted in the world (measured in terms of the public-debt-to-GDP ratio) since gaining independence beginning in the 1960s (Figure 1). While economic and debt crises have been common throughout Latin America and the Caribbean over the past century—particularly when compared to other regions—the frequency, depth, and duration of such episodes for Caribbean countries makes it an outlier.

    https://blogs.iadb.org/caribbean-dev-trends/en/why-have-caribbean-countries-been-so-indebted-and-what-can-they-do-to-improve-outcomes/

    Like

  • All the points Colin Jordan laid out are correct
    However the timing is wrong on several factors
    Many of which govt is toned deaf to received or downright ignorant of the economy performance and the economy need to be healed before a viable and sustainable increase is probable
    Putting cart before the horse is a recipe for disaster

    Like

  • Wouldn’t have needed to say any of this if yall didn’t go OVERTHIEFING for over 30 YEARS….racism, discrimination and disenfranchising of the tax generating majority creates A MASSIVE COST AND LOSS to any country. So that when natural internal and external shocks occur…the whole country is at a distinct DISADVANTAGE.

    Like

  • Ya OWN CRIMINALITY against Black people is what is taking yall DOWN…

    “Cost Of Racism: U.S. Economy Lost $16 Trillion Because Of Discrimination, Bank Says
    September 23, 2020 2:42 PM ET
    ADEDAYO AKALA

    Citigroup estimates the U.S. economy lost $16 trillion over the past 20 years as a result of discrimination against African Americans. Above, the American flag hangs in front of the New York Stock Exchange on Sept. 21.
    Spencer Platt/Getty Images
    Nationwide protests have cast a spotlight on racism and inequality in the United States. Now a major bank has put a price tag on how much the economy has lost as a result of discrimination against African Americans: $16 trillion.

    Since 2000, U.S. gross domestic product lost that much as a result of discriminatory practices in a range of areas, including in education and access to business loans, according to a new study by Citigroup. It’s not an insignificant number: By comparison, U.S. GDP totaled $19.5 trillion last year.

    And not acting to reverse discriminatory practices will continue to exact a cost. Citigroup estimates the economy would see a $5 trillion boost over the next five years if the U.S. were to tackle key areas of discrimination against African Americans.

    “We believe we have a responsibility to address current events and to frame them with an economic lens in order to highlight the real costs of longstanding discrimination against minority groups, especially against Black people and particularly in the U.S.,” wrote Raymond J. McGuire, a vice chairman at the bank and the chairman of its banking, capital markets and advisory team.

    Wall Street itself has also faced accusations for years of discriminatory practices against African Americans, such as limiting approval for mortgages or not providing enough banking options in minority neighborhoods, which are among the damaging actions identified by Citigroup researchers.

    Like

  • Told yall for YEARS to get these racist, thieving minorities and the fraudulent social parnership of PARASITEs…OUT OF BLACK LIVES…but because yall so SELLOUT, WICKED and benefitted ya DIDN’T ….now look…brought down by ya own HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATING PRACTICES against the Black population…what a thing…

    “Race-based discrimination and inequality has cost the US about $16 trillion in lost gross domestic product over the last two decades, according to a new study published by Citi, first reported by Bloomberg.

    The lost GDP is a result of Black Americans earning less than white Americans, having less access to home and small business loans, and limited access to higher education.

    If the US could immediately end “the most severe forms of economic discrimination against African Americans,” US GDP would see a $5 trillion boost by 2025, Bloomberg reported.

    In 2019, McKinsey estimated that the racial wealth gap will cost the US economy up to $1.5 trillion between 2019 and 2028.
    “We have a responsibility and an opportunity to confront this longstanding societal ill,” Citigroup vice chairman Raymond McGuire said in the report.

    Citi recently announced a $1 billion commitment toward closing the racial wealth gap in the US.

    Citi is not the only company making this kind of commitment. Mastercard also recently pledged to invest $500 million toward closing the racial wealth gap and promoting financial inclusion among Black people.
    Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.”

    Like

  • KARMA and RETRIBUTION are TRULY WONDERFUL…

    brought down by their own GREED, self-hate and CORRUPTION..

    Like

  • Below is my response to the news article posted by David on 30 March 2021 at 4.53 am.

    On 16 March 2021, the Government stated that the National Minimum Wage (NMW) should be $8.50 per hour from 1 April 2021. Source: https://www.nationnews.com/2021/03/17/its-not-enough/

    But the statement was made BEFORE the 17 March 2021 deadline for objecting to the Minimum Wage Order 2021. Source: https://labour.gov.bb/notice-of-intention-to-make-a-minimum-wage-order/

    Therefore, objecting to a Minimum Wage Order may be seen as a sham – if the Government “makes up its mind” about the NMW – BEFORE the deadline for objecting to the Minimum Wage Order. Or BEFORE the Government has considered the Minimum Wage Board’s review of the objections as per section 7(4) – (5) of the Minimum Wage Act 2017.

    The Minimum Wage Act 2017 is available at: https://www.barbadosparliament.com/uploads/bill_resolution/28601e67ca4cd024137c48f875457e27.pdf

    Like

  • Wuh if i had that information since last year….UN GOT IT TOO….lol

    Right along with the reports on crypto-racism and the neocolonialism that the sellouts in the parliament allow minority trash to practice on the Black majority for 54 YEARS….a report that has been around for over 20 years….so trying to promote racists and thieves aka social partnership of parasites to UN to suck more money out of Black lives wasn’t too bright.

    Like

  • Mari

    Two days ago the raise should have been made to corespond to the rise in inflation
    Inflation is probably up 100% the last 13 yrs and there was no increase in minimum wages
    The economy was in the hospital for the last 13 yrs and there was no increase in minimum wages

    Today ur story is to wait until the economy heal . What if the economy still in the hospital for another (dlp) decade?

    What happened to the rising with inflation argument?

    You holler hard about all the tax breaks etc that the business got earlier. Now u don’t think that the ease that them te they can’t ease the ones dead bottom of the economic ladder?

    You reall should shut to hell up on this topic

    Like

  • @ WURA-War-on-U March 30, 2021 8:15 AM

    You should check out the piece of legislation which the Antiguan government is about to put on the statute books.

    It is a game-changing piece of legislation to regulate the cultivation and distribution of marijuana and which is so many light years ahead as to make Barbados the land of so much hypocrisy look like a nun wearing a habit in a strip club.

    The objective of this bold move is to make Antigua the No.1 destination in the Caribbean for “medicinal” tourism with the offshoot being a boom to the country’s marijuana cottage industry.

    Which young Brits of any ethnic background would want to choose Barbados over Antigua if they fear the consequences of enjoying a few spliffs instead of hot rum while vacationing in Victorian Barbadoes?

    No wonder the ‘wandering’ prude called little England is now seen as the laughing stock of the region.

    Like

  • Mia had the opportunity and she blew it while working overtime to elevate everyone except the people who elected her, opportunity lost and gone, most people have moved on, it’s a big wide world out there and no one needa to listen to or follow a backward colonial government who don’t value the LIVES OF BLACK PEOPLE and see them only as voters…..and the poor to be confined to POVERTY GENERATIONALLY..she screwed up, i tried to warn her….but i ain’t got pedigree dog food…..am allergic to animals.

    “No wonder the ‘wandering’ prude called little England is now seen as the laughing stock of the region.”

    fraud of a “prude”

    Like

  • John2 March 30, 2021 8:17 AM #: “What happened to the rising with inflation argument?”

    I hope you’ve noticed Coxy has been using the terms ‘inflation’ and ‘cost of living’ interchangeably, thereby indicating she does not know the difference between the two, as well as making conflicting comments and has so far been unable to answer any questions posed to her.
    She is essentially putting together ‘bits and pieces’ of information and mixing them with assumptions, vague, generalized statements and metaphors as the basis to construct her contributions.

    Coxy asked about the inflation rate and when given the information, changed the topic. She was adamant the proposed minimum wage of $340 per week would be subject to income tax. When ‘told’ the tax threshold is $25,000 per annum, which meant earnings up to $480.76 per week are not taxable, she called me a “yardfowl” and came with a BOGUS CLAIM that ‘someone in the know’ told her otherwise. A predictive response from someone who is incapable of sustaining a reasonable discussion.
    Note how she has apparently gone off those topics and is now ‘talking’ about an “overheating economy,” whatever that is.

    Clearly indicative of someone who is ‘bluffing’ her way through the ‘conversation.’

    Additionally, Coxy’s ‘attack dog and self-appointed lawyer,’ who, in an attempt to save her, usually rushes in believing hurling his personal abuse would intimidate contributors from demanding explanations of her comments…… is missing in action.

    As such, she is ‘out to sea.’

    Like

  • This is all she had to do, make sure each household HAS MEDICINE to take care of the varioius illnesses that kills bajans annually…many of which can be controlled with homegrown medical marijuana…..make life easier for the population…take the weight off the healthcare system….but when ya anti-black you only want to criminalize and imprison Black people…..but no, came up with some wishy washy shit about 14 grams and still fining people for it, making it illegal all over again….laughing stock…

    “One month after decriminalizing cannabis, the tiny Caribbean nation of Antigua and Barbuda is drafting legislation to legalize recreational and medical marijuana sales.

    The Misuse of Drugs (Amendment) Act, 2018, published in the Official Gazette on March 5, amends the Misuse of Drugs Act to state that “a person who is in possession of a maximum of 15 grams of the drug Cannabis or Cannabis resin is not guilty of an offence.”

    It also makes it “lawful” to cultivate up to four cannabis plants per household and expunges marijuana convictions involving a quantity of 15 grams or less.”

    Like

  • @Miller

    All countries have an approach they adopt to determine the type of society we want. One does not have to follow another country.

    Like

  • @ David March 30, 2021 1:25 PM

    Even if that moral “approach” is based on double-standards and hypocrisy which that same Christian” society preaches against?

    Barbados still has on its statute books the law of capital punishment.
    There are some prisoners who have received such a sentence and have exhausted their rights to appeal. Why isn’t this expectation of the society not being fulfilled?

    Why then does Barbados commit itself to the various charters and conventions on human rights?

    Well explain to us how you can pass a law which does not criminalize a person for being in possession of 14 or less grammes of marijuana but still criminalizes the supply of that same amount of marijuana?

    Isn’t this a clear case of aiding and abetting in the supply of the =<14 of ganga which is still a contraband substance?

    Why not do like Antigua et al and allow for the domestic production up to a level not considered for commercial purposes so that the users of that 14 grammes do not have to resort to illegal sources for their supply?

    Like

  • @Miller

    You are offering a circular argument. The government deems it a wedge issue that should go to a referendum. This is the kernel of the matter. Let the discussion start from this point.

    Like

  • @Tony

    Seems to be a good catch.

    Like

  • @David: “One does not have to follow another country.

    That’s not exactly true in all cases. And this is often where the complexity comes into the equations…

    A simple example (only one of many dimensions)… The $BDS is tied to the $USD.

    IMO, the UK was very smart by not tying their “Pound” to the “Euro” during their experiment.

    Like

  • @ David March 30, 2021 2:12 PM

    “Circular argument” or your get-out-clause?

    Why a referendum? Was there one for medicinal marijuana or ‘going republic’ which will affect every citizen and resident on the island and even those Bajans living overseas?

    Wasn’t the Abortion legislation a “wedge issue” too? Didn’t the churches and moral crusaders condemn that ‘Act’ of legalized murder to no avail?

    How about the ‘termination’ of the death penalty to the referendum test?
    Hasn’t Barbados made certain commitments to international rights and justice agencies to that effect?

    Like

  • @Miller

    The blogmaster is not responsible for the referendum stake in the mid.

    @Chris

    So many issues are not binary to solve. There is always room for hindsight.

    Like

  • Miller…i won’t worry my head with the argument…we are not the ones who will be KICKED OUT OF PARLIAMENT…..we don’t have a thing to lose or worry about and we have OPTIONS…that they were HIDING FROM THE POPULATION….can’t hide it anymore though….it’s all out in the open….and people have connected…

    Like

  • @David: “There is always room for hindsight.

    Those that fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it.

    This is true even as we approach the “singularity” of AGI.

    Like

  • @Chris

    The world maybe approaching the singularity of AGI as you suggest but Barbados has not even seen a blipon the radar.

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @Artax
    ac August 17, 2016 8:11 AM
    All in all the Bees were stung by an unexpected budget of a barbados of great hope and high expectations for the future very little in this budget says that barbados is drowning in a sea of doom and gloom

    ac August 17, 2016 10:58 AM
    Lol Artax the “warm up stale soup” where u try to connect Sinckler proposals as same old is not the same as Mia repitions and circular recitations of doom and gloom
    Here is why .previously Sinckler had inact a proposal wherby those who could not or refused to pay their taxes would be given a time period to do so or face harsh punishment. Now one year later he decides rather than punished give leniency to them ..which in my mind is symbolic of a govt beliving in the philosophy of a barbados being a society more than an economy

    ac January 2, 2017 11:48 AM
    Artax
    Oh well .we shall see what the electorate says

    The challenge is we all need to focus on Barbados the society, NOT Barbados the economy. Doom and gloom is NOT the way to go. It isn’t the right time to give the small man a raise. This must be good for society. The DLP doyenne has spoken. Timing is everything. Remember, symbolism.

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  • @Northen Observer

    You aspire to usurp Artax’s superior research skills?

    Like

  • @David: “The world maybe approaching the singularity of AGI as you suggest but Barbados has not even seen a blipon the radar.

    Are you sure about that?

    How many of our young spend more time in front of their multiple screens playing games and/or checking up on each other than they spend using their hands (and their minds) to create stuff?

    I’m not meaning to be negative here. But it’s frustrating watching so much opportunity being squandered.

    Like

  • So I heard on the VOB 12:30 pm news words to the effect that the Small Business Association is good to go with the $8.50 per hour minimum wage; but that the Chamber of Commerce is not.

    I am not good with the numbers so can somebody explain how the small gals and guys are good to go; while the big boys and girls are not?

    Like

  • @Chris

    Agree with the last part of your statement. Who to blame though, the children or…

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @David
    I could never come close to Artax’s skills. They are accepted as superior.
    @SS
    and you haven’t even mentioned the BPSA, which on paper, represents both? All posturing. Yet when @ac, shouts “timing is wrong” it makes you wonder. Opposition for the sake of opposition? Or has she joined forces with the Chamber? In the end, the future is a large P/T workforce. A few $/hr is nothing compared to the cost of benefits and commitment. Why you can toss a Grantley for short, no commitment encounters. (da was for your BU BF)

    Like

  • And with unemployment so high
    Who would be the real beneficaries from the wage increase ?
    Go figure

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Cuhdear Bajan: “I am not good with the numbers so can somebody explain how the small gals and guys are good to go; while the big boys and girls are not?

    I have not actually been following this particular problem space in detail. But, basically, it all boils down to the same maths every time the question comes up.

    Humans cost money. Thus, it costs Companies to retain said Humans.

    Publicly Traded Companies traditionally have the mandate to maximize the Shareholder Value. One way this “fiduciary duty” can be achieved is to minimize the cost of the Human Employees.

    It has been identified in some spaces that the Companies and the Humans are actually in a symbiotic relationship. This is why, for example, in Asia, some employees are unionized but tied to a specific Company.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @David

    “Seems to be a good catch” – I guess it depends on whether you are batting or fielding.

    Like

  • @ NorthernObserver March 30, 2021 3:11 PM

    Brilliant!

    “ac August 17, 2016 10:58 AM #: Here is why previously Sinckler had inact a proposal wherby those who could not or refused to pay their taxes would be given a time period to do so or face harsh punishment. Now one year later he decides rather than punished give leniency to them ..which in my mind is symbolic of a govt beliving in the philosophy of a barbados being a society more than an economy.”

    You won’t believe for the past 2 years & 10 months, Coxy has been severely critical of the Mottley administration’s decision to ‘write off’ uncollectible taxes, which she NOW describes as ‘tax waivers for the rich and famous.’

    And, her daily mantra? “Barbados is drowning in a sea of doom and gloom.”

    Yuh know, Coxy’s actions do not surprise me. She is a ‘political pimp,’ a ‘yard-fowl.’ Her ‘morning and evening words’ never agree. But, she isn’t the only ‘BU regular’ who is guilty of engaging in such activities.

    Like

  • @NorthernObserver March 30, 2021 4:27 PM ” few $/hr is nothing compared to the cost of benefits and commitment. Why you can toss a Grantley for short, no commitment encounters. (da was for your BU BF)”

    Shaking my head. Paying attention to the science, and it seems that viruses are not yet done with us humans, therefore cheap, short no-commitment encounters, whether encounters of the personal kind, or the work kind, are not the best way going forward. Reading how in Canada the high mortality in nursing homes was caused by among other things the practice of hiring low paid part timers who then had to hold multiple jobs in order to pay the rent, food and utilities, and that these “cheap” workers transported the virus from work place to work place. Wasn’t Barbados post-Christmas Covid19 spread caused when workers in the security sector moonlighted as security in the tourism sector. And how has this short sighted dependence on “cheap” part-timers worked out for Barbados or Ontario [both of which places I lovingly regard as home]

    A Grantley for a short no commitment encounter may seem the most economical way, but there is some value in having an effective, loyal, hard working, well trained, committed workforce. Just as there is value in having a committed, loving, loyal spouse rather than doing business with a “lady” or “gentleman” one found on the internet yesterday Even if such spouse is only human and is sometimes “miserable.”

    Like

  • @ CH:
    “Humans cost money. Thus, it costs Companies to retain said Humans.”
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    But without humans there will be no ‘great’ demand for the products and services produced by the same ‘dehumanized’ companies.

    As you correctly pointed out in the most philosophical of manner, there is a symbiotic relationship between man and the ‘machinated’ company.

    Since life appears to be one ‘big’ cycle of a ‘bigger’ circle maybe we humans are either evolving to be like the Star Trek Borg ‘Seven of Nine’ or returning to a Hobbesian state where ‘human life is nasty, brutish and [definitely[ short’.

    Like

  • @Miller: “As you correctly pointed out in the most philosophical of manner, there is a symbiotic relationship between man and the ‘machinated’ company.

    I sincerely don’t mean to be philosophical.

    I’m just speaking my own truth. Based on what is obvious to me.

    Like

  • @Chris Halsall March 30, 2021 4:31 PM “Humans cost money. Thus, it costs Companies to retain said Humans.”

    True.

    But it is only humans who buy goods and services produced by companies. Companies cannot sell unless humans buy can they?

    Well not quite true. My cats do business with Purina etc., but the cats do get their money from their human/me.

    Looking forward to that utopian day when corporations can dispense with all human workers and every man, woman and child shall sit under his vine and under his fig tree, or lime of his own block because we shall never have to work anymore.

    Like

  • angela cox March 30, 2021 4:27 PM #

    RE: “And with unemployment so high.”

    Yes, unemployment rate has increased, which could be reasonably attributed to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    But, you’re giving the impression unemployment is at 100%. Do you know what percentage of those persons who were working for less than the proposed $8.50 per hour are currently unemployed?

    RE: “Who would be the real beneficaries from the wage increase? Go figure.”

    Are you correlating the proposed minimum wage with unemployment? If yes, then it is ludicrous to so. It clearly demonstrates you’re unable to think rationally.

    Several businesses such as supermarkets, village shops, mini-marts, bars, restaurants, food and beverage canteens, gas stations, stores, etc, have reopened. This means people employed as shop assistants, cashiers, merchandisers, janitorial cleaners, gas attendants, security guards, just to name a few…….. and others employed in various categories who may be earning below the proposed $340 per week, have also RETURNED to work.

    So, won’t these people “be the real beneficiaries from the wage increase?”

    I would be the first to agree, if you had mentioned ‘government’ has kept us in the dark as it relates to its post COVID socio-economic policies.
    Don’t you believe that would be a much more important topic for discussion, rather than using unemployment as the basis for your silly criticisms of the proposed $8.50?

    Like

  • @ Chris Halsall March 30, 2021 4:56 PM

    But one’s “Truth” can only be distilled through a scientific lens or a philosophical view of life.

    And your lens- though not 20:20 perfect- is good enough to see the Truth as observed through your many years of ‘live’ experiments and experiences.

    Seven of Nine (7 of 9) would make the perfect partner for our ‘very’ lo(o)ne(l)y friend Data; don’t you think? No need to exchange money for food, sex or sleep.

    At least our Canadian friend Lawson would appreciate the ‘dark’ side of that joke.

    LOL!!

    Like

  • @Cuhdear Bajan: “But it is only humans who buy goods and services produced by companies. Companies cannot sell unless humans buy can they?

    An incorrect assumption.

    Many Companies buy “stuff” from other Companies.

    Sometimes this is as low-level as Electrons in a copper wire. Sometimes in a superconducting wire.

    Sometimes as high-level as very heavy rare-earth elements. Helium and Argon gas are currently in high demand, in certain markets.

    We live in unbelievably cool times. It was only recently we could talk about working with material only a few hundreds of a degree above absolute zero.

    YMMV…

    Like

  • @Miller: “Seven of Nine (7 of 9) would make the perfect partner for our ‘very’ lo(o)ne(l)y friend Data; don’t you think?

    OK. For the record, you’re now introducing the Star Trek Universe into this debate.

    I copy what you are saying. When I was young I actually mapped 7 of 9 to six of nine. Few found the joke funny…

    Like

  • Mia scored political points
    But was the increased a net gain for the economy
    No’
    Not even the most supportive of govt can logically say that in this COVID environment that the wage increase will give the economy traction
    Why because the timing is wrong
    Holler all yuh want applaud all u want
    The economy legs are still broken
    The question what is govt going to do about that

    Like

  • @angela cox: “The economy legs are still broken

    Please present your argument with supporting evidence.

    Are you familiar with the concept of speaking into a vacuum? Listening in a vacuum tends to be even harder…

    Like

  • @ Chris Halsall March 30, 2021 5:27 PM

    So how come you didn’t find Lawson’s very “smelly” joke so funny?

    He was taking a ‘mickey’ white bottom six out of a ‘top’ black of nine.

    That’s the last of the dark ‘corny’ jokes of the spring wine from the miller’s ‘funny’ mill.

    Now back to the drawing board of the ‘circular’ minimum wage argument as if the money is not going to end ‘back’ in the companies’ coffers as the ‘mechanical’ workers will be faced with higher prices for the very goods and services they need to exist.

    Like

  • @Miller: “So how come you didn’t find Lawson’s very “smelly” joke so funny?

    I did find it funny. That was the point. Flex around the language. Push, pull, tug. Roll it all around.

    Please do try to keep up. Seriously.

    Like

  • Mari

    Go look for something else to cuss Mia bout but never pull against the least fortunate getting an extra dollar in their pockets. NEVER. If you were in their position you would be thankful for the little extra coppers even if it only help to pay bus fare for one day.

    Mia scored political points is the only thing you said that is right

    The dlp again put their foot in their mouth and will pay price when the time comes

    Like

  • @ Chris Halsall March 30, 2021 6:07 PM

    Must have missed out on your end of the repartee while I was visiting R.I.P van Winkle in ‘Noddy’s’ land.

    Would try to pay attention next time I visit lawson’s funny farm of lullabies.

    Like

  • @John2: “The dlp again put their foot in their mouth and will pay price when the time comes

    An outside observer might interpret that as being a threat.

    WTF?

    Like

  • Chris Halsall
    I already presented enough evidence
    Sorry but u came to the party late

    Like

  • @angela cox: “Sorry but u came to the party late

    I’m not yet convinced I have nothing to contribute.

    Happy to be proven I’m useless… 😎

    Like

  • “An outside observer might interpret that as being a threat.”

    You will find that the spiritually blunted and politically befuddled don’t know if they are coming or going, so expect anything no matter how outlandish.

    Like

  • Chris

    To bad for the outsiders

    Any idiot that follows bajan politics know what I meant

    Like

  • angela cox March 30, 2021 5:48 PM #: “But was the increased a net gain for the economy? No. Not even the most supportive of govt can logically say that in this COVID environment that the wage increase will give the economy traction.”

    Please explain the above comment in plain, simple English.

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @ac
    the increase in minimum wage “is symbolic of a govt beliving in the philosophy of a barbados being a society more than an economy”. It has nothing to do with giving the economy traction. It is recognition of the societal benefits that workers at the lowest end of the wage earning spectrum, receive a raise. It is long overdue.

    @ss
    the LT care story came back to bite them in their ass. Yet it is all about the cost of benefits, and having persons as full time, permanent employees vs the P/T and temps. Everybody who isn’t entrepreneurial wants a government job; their remuneration is outstanding.

    Like

  • NorthernObserverMarch 31, 2021 4:10 AM

    @ac
    the increase in minimum wage “is symbolic of a govt beliving in the philosophy of a barbados being a society more than an economy”. It has nothing to do with giving the economy traction. It is recognition of the societal benefits that workers at the lowest end of the wage earning spectrum, receive a raise. It is long overdue.
    Xxxxxxxxxx

    I am not against an increase
    However I am for an increase that is fair one that is doable and one which the economy can support
    What is being rolled out as an increase cannot be described as fair doable and economical feasible at this time
    This increase signifies a political power play by govt one that would build support coming from low end wagers
    Many who are shouting about the paltry increase would soon see the negative ramifications when low end workers are sent home empty handed
    Businesses are not in business to support govt policies when these policies attack and cripple their bottom line
    No need for me or repeat or engage with this issue any further the economy speaks and will continue to speak on this issue now and going forward

    Like

  • ArtaxMarch 31, 2021 2:37 AM

    angela cox March 30, 2021 5:48 PM #: “But was the increased a net gain for the economy? No. Not even the most supportive of govt can logically say that in this COVID environment that the wage increase will give the economy traction.”

    Please explain the above comment in plain, simple English.
    Xxxxxccccccccccccc
    Understandable u would not get it

    But let me ask this of u what is the purpose of govt putting money in the people hand if it has no multiple effect
    One on the economy and the other on the household ?

    Like

  • So despite the TENS OF MILLIONS OF DOLLARS of Black people’s money paid to consultants by BLP in nearly 3 YEARS, not one of them thought it prudent to tell Mia about the below am sure someone read it somewhere, it’s been out since SEPTEMBER 2020 …6 WHOLE MONTHS, they all watched her address the UN and make a complete ass of herself by promoting the same racists and thieves aka social parasites, who rob the economy….time to get rid of useless consultants, who only COUNT MONEY, sucking on Black blood with nothing for the population to show as a gain….BLP set itself up.

    “Cost Of Racism: U.S. Economy Lost $16 Trillion Because Of Discrimination, Bank Says
    September 23, 2020 2:42 PM ET
    ADEDAYO AKALA

    Citigroup estimates the U.S. economy lost $16 trillion over the past 20 years as a result of discrimination against African Americans. Above, the American flag hangs in front of the New York Stock Exchange on Sept. 21.
    Spencer Platt/Getty Images
    Nationwide protests have cast a spotlight on racism and inequality in the United States. Now a major bank has put a price tag on how much the economy has lost as a result of discrimination against African Americans: $16 trillion.”

    Like

  • Bracing for impact of wage hike
    by COLVILLE MOUNSEY colvillemounsey@nationnews.com
    THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY is expressing disappointment that Government is moving full steam ahead to implement a national minimum wage of $8.50 come tomorrow, despite objections from the employers regarding the timing.
    With 24 hours to go before the legislation is proclaimed, both the Barbados Chamber of Commerce and Industry (BCCI) and the Barbados Employers’ Confederation (BEC) say they are still in the dark as it relates to key areas of the new law, having not yet seen the final order paper.
    Meanwhile, prominent businessman Eddie Abed, a past BCCI president, has revealed that based on the calculations for his group of companies, he is now bracing for a 20 per cent increase across the board, which will result in increased prices, shortened work weeks for some employees and even possible layoffs.
    Speaking to the MIDWEEK NATION yesterday, executive director of the BEC, Sheena Mayers-Granville, said she was concerned that the entire process seemed rushed, noting that since the first Order Paper was drafted in February, enough time had not been allowed for a full ventilation of the potential ramifications for both labour and capital.
    ‘Not enough time’
    “I want to suggest that there has not been enough time for extensive consultation on all of the terms and conditions as well as the impact that would come with moving from a shop wages order to a national minimum wage. On February 4, the order was first published, noting that the deadline for objection was March 17. So, between March 17 and April 1, there was simply not enough time to fully ventilate all of the issues that could arise,” she said.
    “Note that as of today (Tuesday), no one has a copy of the final minimum wage order which is to take effect on Thursday. There has been much debate about the actual rate. Our concern, having read the proposed order, related a lot to the impact across the island and different industries and sectors that never had to deal with a minimum wage. There are also many unanswered questions at this point related to compliance as well as terms and conditions. Those questions will remain unanswered until we have a final sight of the order,” said Mayers-Granville.
    The BEC head explained that the business community’s warnings of a rise in cost of living at the height of dealing with the economic challenges brought on by COVID-19, would be felt in some sectors more quickly than others.
    She pointed out that about 90 per cent of the private sector workforce earned above the shop assistant minimum threshold of $6.25, and therefore she expected that mainly small retail enterprises were going to be immediately impacted. She added there was likely to be a sharp increase in some services such as security, which would be absorbed by some but passed on to customers by others.
    “The majority of the Barbadian worker does not earn at the $6.25 that was previously in place. In fact, I would say that above 90 per cent of the workforce earn above that. There are some industries that will be severely impacted, security being one of them. We also know that smaller retail operations have persons working at $6.25 and they are likely to feel the brunt of 36 per cent increase right off the bat.”
    In yesterday’s DAILY NATION, Minister of Labour Colin Jordan closed the door on calls from the business community to delay the move until next year.
    “There will never be a good time to increase costs to any business, but we are at the point where there are people in this country who are working and, while putting in 40 hours a week, still are not able to meet the basic needs for themselves and their families. That is a matter which cannot go unattended,” he said then.
    BCCI president Trisha Tannis said that with discussions closed, it was now up to each individual business to make the adjustments to ensure their survival.
    Disappointment
    “Understandably there is disappointment and there is not much more that could be said at this time. The minister’s reported comments pretty much put a full stop on those discussions. It is natural for there to be disappointment when one’s concerns are not taken into consideration, but there isn’t much more we can do at this point,” she said.
    “Every company essentially will have to do their assessment. We do know that some sectors are going to be more impacted than others. There are multiplier impacts as there are those companies that will have to brace for increase in wages and an increase in security fees as well.”
    Abed told the MIDWEEK NATION that the calculated 20 per cent increase in wages across the board needed to be offset by a 20 per cent increase in sales, something which current market indicators did not support.
    Will increase
    “We have done the calculations where we have not only had to increase those salaries close to minimum wage, but obviously those that were earning above the minimum wage would still have to have comfortable separation between the new minimum wage and what they are currently taking home. It means that across the board our weekly wages will increase to just over 20 per cent.
    “For us to do this, we must equally increase our sales by a percentage that offsets that. The dilemma currently is that there is just no appetite right now for increased sales,” he said.
    “We don’t anticipate increased sales for the next 60 days because we sell non-essential goods. We have a few tools in place to try to deal with this. Some of our staff may have to go on four-day work weeks. We will also go into a promotion sale mode for the next few months. The other thing which no one wants to talk about is that prices will go up once we start to replace goods.”

    Source: Nation

    Like

  • Now some spiritually stunted yardfowl can jump out and tell me that US, UK and Canada did it too…lol

    Like

  • Those employers crying now are the SAME FRAUDS who boast about how many MILLIONS THEY MAKE IN PROFITS ANNUALLY…..most of which is OFFSHORED….liars and thieves..

    the workforce need to MOVE AWAY FROM THESE FRAUDS eventually and make sure they CANNOT HIRE anyone from the other islands to treat them as slaves, refuse to pay decent wages, or benefits or severance…shut them down.

    Like

  • Miller…this is proof positive that both toxic anti-black governments never copy the positives that UK, US etc have to offer to improve Black lives they only copy the negative and barbaric…..they can’t even say it’s a lie….evidence will beat them down.

    https://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/new-york-elections-government/ny-new-york-senate-approves-adult-use-marijuana-20210330-q7m4otyzqrcbjeifj5gdvqj7fu-story.html#nt=pf-double%20chain~top-version1~flex%20feature~curated~nypot-754p~Q7M4OTYZQRCBJEIFJ5GDVQJ7FU~1~1~3~7~art%20yes

    “ALBANY — New York state lawmakers approved legislation legalizing adult use marijuana Tuesday after debating in blunt terms the benefits and pitfalls of pot.

    The bill, passed by both the Democratic-led Senate and Assembly, removes cannabis from the list of controlled substances and will eventually legalize, tax and regulate recreational pot for adults over 21.

    It also expunges past pot convictions and a large percentage of tax revenue will be set aside for community reinvestment grants and social equity for minorities who have faced harsh penalties for marijuana possession.”

    Like

  • William Skinner

    @ David
    “Our leaders in government, business and labour have too often spoken with romanticised fascination about national sacrifice. And too often they have looked the other way while the poorest, weakest and least able have borne the brunt of that sacrifice.”

    Barbados Today Editorial, Wednesday March 31st., 2021

    Facts matter !

    Like

  • although i don’t promote smoking…am yet to hear the Rasta Community complain that they got infected with Covid.

    “Rebecca Theodore
    altSph2onsorehd ·
    Also listed as the safest vaccine against Covid 19. Psychologist now say marijuana is better than zinc or vitamin D.
    Hey! Pass de Dutchie pan de left hand side.
    Burn it!”

    Like

  • Facts as well as factors matter as well
    So when govt gives increases in a weak and sluggish economy
    It makes for wonder why
    Underlying factors are crucial and important in making decisions

    Like

  • Mari

    Businesses are not in business to support govt policies when these policies attack and cripple their bottom line
    Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    You weren’t singing that tune when the hotel were holding back on paying the former workers their severance

    And again what bottom lines you talking about. Didn’t they get write off and tax cut? Smdh

    Like

  • John2

    You weren’t singing that tune when the hotel were holding back on paying the former workers their severance
    Xxxxxxxxxxccc

    Yuh talking chalk and cheese
    Wheel and come again

    Like

  • angela cox March 31, 2021 5:11 AM #: “I am not against an increase. However I am for an increase that is fair one that is doable and one which the economy can support. What is being rolled out as an increase cannot be described as fair doable and economical feasible at this time.”

    ‘Government’ is proposing an increase in the national hourly minimum wage rate, which would increase the wages for people employed in the private sector.

    If, according to you, $8.50 is a “paltry increase and cannot be described as fair,”………..

    ……………. then, please ‘tell’ the forum what HOURLY RATE, in your opinion, would be fair, reasonable and “economically feasible at this time?”

    Like

  • Ifyou don’t take the sellouts down they will take you down…ah hope they tief all the yardfowls’ houses ah want to see these fools on the streets.

    They are many of us in Barbados who do not want the Vaccine and we want to retain our Personal Rights and our Property Rights and our Sovereignty! Recently a Very Harsh Law was Passed under the Guise of Covid saying that under the covid laws the government can seize, requisition or forfeit any land, property or goods. With a Piece of paper they can take over your property and your refusing to talk to them, they no longer have to Serve you anymore they can just throw the piece of paper on your property and they can come in and take possession and even use the Army/BDF to come and take it over. This is Not Right, we must Stand Up For Our Rights.

    Official Gazette, March 26, 2021 – PART A – No.37
    Go to the Arrangements and Click on the Writing of the 8th item… To see how your Rights are being Infringed on. Do What they Say or Else…Residents are reminded that: Any person who contravenes this Directive or fails to comply with any condition specified by the anybody they appoint, is guilty of an offence and is liable on summary conviction to a fine of $50 000 or to imprisonment for a term of one year or to both…

    Why After a year of Covid is this Law Being Enacted? Why Why?

    https://gisbarbados.gov.bb/download/official-gazette-march-26-2021-part-a-no-37/

    Like

  • The masses are naive as usual. Of course Baloney, Jerkham and the Williams brothers are behind the initiative of such a high statutory minimum wage. After all, the minimum wage is far too high for local agriculture. This will kill our local farms so we will have new slaves on the hotel plantations.

    This ensures the economic domination of the Big Four for another 50 years. Thank you very much, dear government and unions, for caring so much about our white minority!

    Like

  • What Black Bajans have to learn is they have to REESTABLISH THEIR INDIGENOUS AFRICAN IDENTITY….i posted the info about the Sixth Region….so get cracking…

    you are NOT soverign….THEY LIED…

    Like

  • When this govt is placed under a microscope of transparency all which is revealed attaches it self to political posturing
    How in two years when the economy is on its worst performance can govt initiate an hourly wage increase and one that can nearly if at all put a dent in households and energize the economy
    The govt making mock sport and only the foolish would go along for the ride
    Politricks is the name of the game fully embedded in this issue
    Those who have eyes to see would see

    Like

  • On this increase govt has laid out a path wherby the people would be punished cause being rise in prices
    More unemployment
    Less spending power in the economy as people try to hold on or save what little they have
    There is no trickled down effect but an effect of continuing of poor economic

    Like

  • Critical Analyzer

    Minimum Wage is such an outmoded concept and should be scrapped across the board.

    Replace it with a Survival Stipend of $50 paid on a weekly basis to every Barbadian citizen on attaining the age of 18 and fund it by a tax.

    This will keep down inflation caused by increasing the minimum wage and force employers to stop paying starvation wages as people will not accept those jobs because they will now be guaranteed some type money in their pocket each week to at least allow them to eat and survive without begging.

    Like

  • David March 31, 2021 11:00 AM

    Minimum wage ‘could spell farming peril

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2021/03/31/minimum-wage-could-spell-farming-peril/

    David are u surprised

    But without a viable wage to offset the difference
    The overall outlook for people remains dismal and the economy continues to struggle and govt revenue remains flat because of lack of spending

    Like

  • angela cox March 31, 2021 11:16 AM #: “But without a viable wage to offset the difference.”

    Could you please ‘tell’ BU what, in your opinion, would be “a viable wage to offset the difference?”

    I believe this is a fair question.

    Like

  • Critical Analyzer March 31, 2021 10:58 AM #

    As you may have realized, I’m not one of the ‘brightest bulbs’ on BU. So please bear with me, while I ask you a few questions, in the interest of clarity.

    RE: “Minimum Wage is such an outmoded concept and should be scrapped across the board. Replace it with a Survival Stipend of $50 paid on a weekly basis to every Barbadian citizen on attaining the age of 18 and fund it by a tax.”

    Are you suggesting government should subsidize a stipend at the expense of taxpayers, thereby absolving the private sector of their responsibility to pay adequate wages?

    If so, then, could you please provide the forum with further details about the tax which you propose would fund the stipend?

    RE: “This will keep down inflation caused by increasing the minimum wage and force employers to stop paying starvation wages as people will not accept those jobs because they will now be guaranteed some type money in their pocket each week to at least allow them to eat and survive without begging.”

    Are you suggesting one of the underlying objectives of a taxpayer financed stipend is forcing employers to INCREASE wages? But, according to you, wouldn’t an increase wages result in a corresponding increase in inflation?

    So, rather than seek employment, people will be happy to survive on a weekly $50 stipend?

    If they currently cannot survive on what you call “starvation wages,” I’m wondering how they will survive on $50 per week……. without begging?

    Like

  • Artax why should I explain any thing to u
    You prostrate yuh self as a walking encyclopedia
    What u don’t know u Google BTW u have a canny way of picking and choosing comments to fit your purpose
    In this instance u can check Websters

    Like

  • David March 31, 2021 12:40 PM

    ‘Timing’ debate rages, but Bajans back minimum wage – https://barbadostoday.bb/2021/03/31/timing-debate-rages-but-bajans-back-minimum-wage/

    The timers like myself not arguing against a wage increase
    Timers Arguments are grounded in fairness and logical conclusion
    Govt has presented a case on political posturing

    Like

  • angela cox March 31, 2021 12:43 PM

    RE: “Artax why should I explain any thing to u?”

    I’m asking you to explain to the forum, NOT me.

    RE: “You prostrate yuh self as a walking encyclopedia”

    I’ve never said or attempted to convince anyone I was. That is a total fabrication……you’re making up things “to get cheap laughs.”

    RE: “What u don’t know u Google BTW u have a canny way of picking and choosing comments to fit your purpose.”

    Could you please provide me with the name(s) of your website(s), so I could Google it/them and find out what hourly rate, in YOUR opinion, would be fair, reasonable and “economically feasible at this time” and “a viable wage to offset the difference?”

    “Picking and choosing?” you made several comments, which I asked you to clarify. If your unable to answer, just say so, rather than spewing personal abuse and making yourself appear to be silly in the process.

    RE: “In this instance u can check Websters.”

    Are you suggesting I “can check Websters” to find YOUR answers to questions?

    Like

  • angela cox March 31, 2021 1:07 PM #:”The timers like myself not arguing against a wage increase. Timers Arguments are grounded in fairness and logical conclusion. Govt has presented a case on political posturing.”

    Please explain to BU, on what basis “are your arguments grounded in fairness and logical conclusion?”

    Please explain what you mean by “logical conclusion?”

    Please explain why proposing a minimum wage rate could be interpreted as “political posturing/”

    Like

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