Welcome Stamp: good idea but not Elixir

Submitted by Richard Petko

These pages have been inundated with comments concerning the Welcome Stamp (WS). I don’t wish to disparage the concept (with all respect to PLT), but the notion that Barbados can earn new amounts of foreign exchange from it or transition to a long-stay tourism/work model as opposed to regular tourism model are completely unrealistic.

The first point I wish to stress is the Welcome Stamp is no more than a 1 year tourist visa. A visa that costs $2000 USD for singles and $3000 USD for families. I mention these amounts because they have become a sore point for most of the people I have met.

As a foreigner living in Barbados I have had contact with over 20 WS families and a handful of WS singles. Why did they come here? The families arrived from Canada/USA/UK because they wanted their children to experience face to face schooling. In September private schools in Barbados offered this. As well there was a sense of adventure the families were looking for; but the over-riding reason was education. The singles I have met came for a year of fun and adventure. They did not know what the future would hold in their countries, so they decided to take the plunge.

We are now 9 months into the welcome stamp experience and I can share my observations of why the program serves a purpose but will never lead to an economic transformation.

Regarding the families, every single one is planning to go home as in-school learning is a reality in Canada, UK and the USA. In fact, I already know of 2 families that have left Barbados for Miami since January 6th when this government decided to shut down face to face schools. They now have their children attending classes in Florida. I know of only one family that is contemplating staying here another year, the other 19 are on their way out. Most of them have enjoyed their time here, but the reality is Covid pushed their decision and without Covid life shall return to normal for them.

When it comes to the singles, adventure brought them here, but after 1 year the adventure streak has passed. I feel this cohort may be one that the Welcome Stamp attracts in the future, but again for only one-year timelines.
Both cohorts tend to have the same negative experiences in regards to the program and living in Barbados.

The cost of the WS Program

It didn’t take long for these people to realize you can come to Barbados and stay for 6 months on a tourist stamp for free; then can extend your tourist visa for 6 months at a cost of $100 – http://www.immigration.gov.bb/pages/Extension.aspx. Needless to say all of them felt ripped-off by the cost of the program. I do not think the program can continue at its present cost because the word is out. Not to mention other jurisdictions also now have similar programs at lower price points. Now that a welcome stamp person knows they can extend a visa for $100 there is no reason to pay for the welcome stamp.

  • Other laments that I have heard, which are familiar to us all.
  • Cost of food
  • Cost of clothing
  • Hassles with customs department – One individual broke their iPhone, shipped it back to USA for warranty repair and had to argue for 3 weeks with customs when the phone was returned to not have to pay import duties on it.
  • For the singles, 4-5 nightspots. When accustomed to Las Vegas/Miami nightlife most places including Barbados come up short
  • Bad roads and lighting. I know of numerous women and men who simply refuse to drive the roads especially at night. This is an issue they don’t face in their home countries.

These may seem trivial but they are not. Not every welcome stamp family is one of millionaires. They are middle class families renting small houses on the south coast and a shopping trip to Price Smart is not a frivolous event for them. For the singles, breaking an iPhone or a iMac and then trying to find a replacement or have it fixed is quite crucial to their personal and business life.

The main selling point of Barbados is no doubt the weather, but warm weather and nice beaches cannot over-come major living issues. We have to remember Barbados is not in competition with just the Caribbean, it is in competition with Texas or Florida or California. People from the northern climates next year post-Covid will look at Tampa Bay or San Diego as a place to live for a year. In those locales they will have world class roads, shopping, food choice and entertainment options aplenty. For someone from Boston they will also not have to worry about visa applications or fees.

The Welcome Stamp is an idea that needs to be reviewed and optimized. If tweaked correctly It can offer a marginal stream of people and revenues to Barbados, but it is no magical potion to bring Barbados hundreds of millions of dollars.

112 comments

  • I didn’t think you need a visa to get in barbados

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  • “I know of only one family that is contemplating staying here another year, the other 19 are on their way out. Most of them have enjoyed their time here, but the reality is Covid pushed their decision and without Covid life shall return to normal for them.”

    We should go into a little detail here. The programme is a flash in the pan because our local masses think only of sex and alcohol. How else can it be explained that our civil servant sex workers and the despicable participants of the bus crawl have sabotaged the whole winter season?

    Mia Motlley is really a very good Supreme Leader. But she is surrounded by many idiots in the population. It is time to exchange at least 80000 locals for immigrants.

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  • If we really want a lot of money in the country, we need to attract expats to build their grand mansions here and employ our masses as gardeners and maids. We already have enough useless academics.

    To realise this plan, however, we need two things: first, tax exemption for foreign mansion and villa owners (i.e. no land tax and no import duties) and second, political participation (I have in mind 50 percent of the seats in the Senate). After all, we cannot allow only the impoverished, naïve masses to determine the fate of our island.

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  • peterlawrencethompson

    Thanks for your analysis Richard. Every initiative needs thoughtful and constructive criticism, and yours is very welcome.

    The damage done to the Welcome Stamp programme by the short sighted greed of encouraging short stay tourism over the Xmas season does not compare to the damage done to Bajan lives and livelihoods by the Governments refusal to implement and enforce a sensible quarantine period of at least 7 and preferably 14 days for all arrivals. Those on the Welcome Stamp visa are just as angry at this incompetence as most Bajans are.

    I argued vociferously in favour of a US$237 fee for the individual visa, with the family visa fee to be US$347, but my arguments did not carry the day.

    The BTMI established a dedicated Welcome Stamp desk in October, and engaged a professional consulting firm to give them management support; this is a positive step forward. However, they still have not accepted the fact that the ENTIRE BTMI organization should be devoted to the Welcome Stamp programme, because everyone else is flogging a dead horse and wasting their time and public money on a dead short stay tourism industry.

    The Department of Immigration is problematic, because although their official website says that visitors to Barbados from Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the UK, and the USA can stay for 6 months as you say, in person they are telling people that the limit is only 3 months before applying for a 3 month extension at a fee of $100.

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  • @ peterlawrencethompson February 17, 2021 9:12 PM

    We didn’t catch the plague due to the shortness of the quarantine, but due to drug boats with infected crews, prostitution in the quarantine hotels and tourists with fake Corona results.

    Or do you really think that so many people get a negative test result three days before the trip and then are suddenly positive on our island? Not me.

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  • @ peterlawrencethompson

    The Welcome Stamp is a good concept but you have the challenge of using your influence to make it work.

    The front end fees of $2000 USD for singles and $3000 USD for families should be reduced to 2 to 3 hundred dollars.

    Its your concept PLT. Make it succeed.

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  • The Supreme leader needs a brain transplant
    Her is a leader who could not see evidence of a crisis looming ahead but kept allowing tourist from hot spots to enter the island
    Worst yet she nows blames the population for allowing the virus to become community spread
    I never envinsoned spoiled and pampered people living in USA and UK to give up the easy and comforts of international life to live in barbados
    Yeap COVID sent them packing here but as reality sets in many would head back to their easy life of air conditioners washing machine and dryers low fuel and food cost
    Recently i watched a u tube video of a welcome stamper and family living here in which they said they love the island
    However energy cost forced them to hand wash and line dry their clothings
    Dont imagine too many nomads entertaining that thought furtherless engaging in hand washing clothes daily or even weekly

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  • A very interesting post from Richard Petko. Some of the points that he has raised have been discussed on BU since time and memorial. For example the condition of the roads, bad lighting, the cost of food, etc. As a nation we appear unwilling to address these points. Tragically, when such views are expressed by overseas Bajans it’s taken personally and seen as an attack on the country. This is why Barbados continues to regress.

    I have travelled to Boston once and have limited experience of America. However, I have read a lot of material on the country. I spent a lot of time near Charleston and spent sometime in and around Harvard. Harvard is an exceptionally well to do town with an elevated infrastructure.; whilst Charlestown is a functional working class town. What I found remarkable about this part of the States was how run down and depressed the place was. This was evident in my travel time between the two towns; and is a common feature throughout America.

    America pales in comparison to Europe and other parts of the world in so many aspects. The lack of availability of decent quality food in the richest country in the world remains a mystery; however it explains why large numbers of her people are morbidly obese.

    We should appreciate and take on board what Mr Petko has written. Reading between the lines he is saying that the disadvantages far outweigh the advantages of living in Barbados. Factor in the bureaucracy, where time means money in America where as in Barbados it has little value attached to it. A great place to spend a short time, especially during winter.

    Unfortunately the views from Tron expresses, clearly, why Barbados remains underdeveloped in so many areas.

    The USA is a country noted for its high levels of racism. It surprises me why a number of their citizens have chosen to spend a year of their life in a predominantly black country.

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  • @ TLSN February 17, 2021 10:13 PM

    I would like to differentiate here times somewhat seriously and leave now once the “court jester” aside.

    Who got us into this situation? A VERY SMALL criminal minority among the locals and tourists, no more. The overwhelming majority of our population and tourists followed and follow the Corona protocol very carefully. It is unfortunate that a dozen idiots are enough to infect 1000 people.

    We should not hide from the Americans in Barbados either. The fact is that prices in Barbados are very high. OK. We are just a small island in the Atlantic and not a continent. Besides, the high prices prevent immigration of poverty. Very nice. Barbados is a dream island. For many unaffordable. We are just not a cheap discounter, but at the top. Unlike many other islands in the Caribbean you can buy everything you desire. Mercedes, BMW, Miele, Hans Grohe and all other luxury goods.

    And one last note: The Corona virus has impressively proven that there is only ONE humanity. All people under heaven are related to each other. Not skin colour, not religion, but our will determines our destiny. People are good and bad because of their personal choices, not because of their skin colour or religion. There is no such thing as a “Barbadian condition”. The old European-American narrativ “black equals backwardness and white equals progress” is OVER. No white dominance ANYMORE. Look at Korea, look at China, look at Japan or look at Barbados, a small island soon having more vaccine units per capita than Europe. We should be very proud that we have such intelligent and ambitious citizens as Mia Mottley and PLT.

    Be proud of our most beautiful island! Black live matters!

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  • @angela cox February 17, 2021 10:00 PM “Recently i watched a u tube video of a welcome stamper and family living here in which they said they love the island. However energy cost forced them to hand wash and line dry their clothings. Dont imagine too many nomads entertaining that thought furtherless engaging in hand washing clothes daily or even weekly.”

    I had to check this because I know that you tell nuff, nuff lies. I live in Barbados too, and I have not hand washed anything in more that 30 years. My electricity bill over the last six months averages out a $67.38 BDS per month, which is about $33.69 USD per month. hardly enough to drive anybody from a a place which they love. If something is driving up the electricity bill it is certainly not the cost of running a washing machine.

    I user solar for heating water.
    Gas for cooking.
    And I line dry, not because I can’t afford to run an electric dryer but because I believe it is a little something I can do to live a greener life. From talking to relatives who do use electric dryers, doing so myself might double my bill to $134.76 BDS per month or $67.38 USD
    I’ve never used air conditioning at home. I use open windows, and fans as necessary. At this time of year it is ever cool enough especially at nights that I even have to use a quilt.

    That said I have heard of Americans lining in Barbados whose electricity bills top $1,000 BDS per month,

    But it does not have to be so.

    Unless such people are deeply, deeply in love with the utility company.

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  • With the minimum salaries for those visitors they should be more than able to do machine washing and drying

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  • 555dubstreetFebruary 17, 2021 7:32 PM

    Dubs, was going to post this a few days ago, was remiss. Yours is a unique and positive outlook.

    Good stuff, keep posting.

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  • Good Article by RP. All makes sense. On the costs, Cost of food, Cost of clothing, Hassles with customs department, as a Barbadian I agree with all of this.

    The costs are insane. The bureaucracy and systems on individuals imports / repairs are poor.

    Maybe with more food grown locally, that first one will be reduced. There is room. Years ago, I remember when vegetables used to be so expensive at the supermarket. A certain local farmers market started up and we started buying there. Much cheaper.

    A short while after, the prices in the supermarket had been reduced substantially, by dollars not cents. That showed me how much price gouging occurred and from then most of our vegetables came from the small markets and vendors.

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  • TSLN,

    You know you are lying, right. That is not why we take offence.

    I realise you guys are tone deaf or not half as smart as you think you are.

    Maybe its a comprehension problem.

    Must be some OVERSEAS BAJAN CONDITION.

    But no more time for your nonsense! Back to enjoying my island life in Barbados! Living in an imperfect reality, working to make it better. Shutting out the assholes who pretend all is well in their own adopted shithole countries!

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  • TSLN,

    You know you are lying, right. That is not why we take offence.

    I realise you guys are tone deaf or not half as smart as you think you are.

    Maybe its a comprehension problem.

    Must be some OVERSEAS BAJAN CONDITION.

    But no more time for your nonsense! Back to enjoying my island life in Barbados! Living in an imperfect reality, working to make it better. Shutting out the assholes who pretend all is well in their own adopted shithole countries!

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    I HAVEN’T READ THE DRIVEL POSTED BY SOME OF YOU FOR A WHILE ON BU.

    HOWEVER TRUE TO FORM YOU CONTINUE TO SHOW YOUR DUMB AND PETTY ASS.

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  • @ Baje

    Welcome back.

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  • Many Bajans who move to foreign assume they have superior intelligence to Barbados locals and like to run them down. This is the underlying message of GP and Hal that oozes out of their pores whenever they speak. Back to the matter in hand.. Barbados is a small tropical holiday island of paradise to come to but after 6 months to one year the novelty wears off and people start missing the hustle and bustle of the shitty city of iniquity like London and other places. Travelling is about experiencing different cultures, lifestyles, people and having fun etc.

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  • Cuh dear not unlike u to take a subject matter and speak on singular terms
    Are u familiar with the word family
    That which includes children
    Well think of how much an energy bill would cost within a scope of having a family of more than two people and having to do laundry by way of washer and dryer daily or weekly.

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  • Correction – “it’s”

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  • “The USA is a country noted for its high levels of racism. It surprises me why a number of their citizens have chosen to spend a year of their life in a predominantly black country.”

    the ones so inclined are given the green light to practce racism against the citizens in a black majority country without consequences, it’s no secret, they brag about it on return to white countries…that’s every racists dream…livng out evil fantasies enabled and condoned by dumb black leaders…..when have you ever heard about any of them including local racists being arrested for practicing racism against black people. It has never happened….and they refuse to criminalize it or enforce current laws that would put an end to the viciousness….check out the arrogance of the sandy lane manager in the Tiny Tempeh affair…he looked at the African man as though he was less than human, that dirty lowclass behavior is normal for black majority Barbados.

    good news for them, they’re now FAMOUS WORLDWIDE for it and it will bring more controversy and exposure hand in hand with their racist tourists’ displays.

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  • Short stay tourism as mightily supported by the government for 70 years has not been transformational either.

    Meaning that this problem of underdevelopment has causal reasons whether we have WS tourism or not. We fail to recall anybody suggesting that it would be a panacea.

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  • The bottomline is that sound risk mitigation is built on the principle of spreading the risk. We have to reduce our dependence on tourism. This will not happen overnight. It will not happen for a long time if we assess the medium and long term strategies successive governments have tabled including the incumbent.

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  • “Meaning that this problem of underdevelopment has causal reasons whether we have WS tourism or not. ”

    “underdevelopment” in more than one instance relates to the minds of the miseducated and stupidly corrupt policians.

    were their intellect and minds fully developed, outcomes would be far different…but check even their speech patterns, everything is clouded with brainwash and colonialism residing in a 17th century realm..

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  • So next time nuisance racist tourists crawl into the island acting up and displaying their fraudulence by looking down on Black people and calling islands 3rd world, remind them that ya know all about them, many of whom live in food lines these days so they don’t starve.

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  • Richard Petko may be misguided in making direct comparisons between Barbados and America. However the man is no dummy. He has been on the island long enough to know of the country’s shortcomings and it’s many advantages.

    How many Richard Petkos do we need for us to take on board their messages. Let’s demolish this long standing foolish wall which cannot accept constructive criticism.

    The IMF boys are in town. When they say jump: you jump!.When they say thirty percent of the island’s beaches have to be privatised: you will have to comply. When they say you must triple the cost of public transport fares or propose that you privatise the entire public sector. You will have to carry out their instructions word by word.

    Enough of this foolishness.

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  • Richard Petko may be misguided in making direct comparisons between Barbados and America. However the man is no dummy. He has been on the island long enough to know of the country’s shortcomings and it’s many advantages.

    How many Richard Petkos do we need for us to take on board their messages. Let’s demolish this long standing foolish wall which cannot accept constructive criticism.

    The IMF boys are in town. When they say jump: you jump!.When they say thirty percent of the island’s beaches have to be privatised: you will have to comply. When they say you must triple the cost of public transport fares: again you will have to carry out their instructions. When they inform you to privatise the entire public sector. You will have to obey them.

    Too bad that our leaders are not the most prudent.

    Enough of this foolishness.

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  • @David

    “strategies successive governments have tabled including the incumbent.”

    Does Wily detect that You’ve ditched your RED underware and now going bareback, ha, ha.

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  • @Wily

    The blogmaster wears same colour as yours.

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  • Although Wily and PLT rarely on the same page he did come up with an initiative which could have been minimally effective. It was overly promoted though as a SAVIOUR and be all which quickly religated it to the KNEE JERK pile.

    Barbados, if it’s to survive as a nation, needs more of these initiatives, however it needs a major rethink of its socialism system. Government mis-management since INDEPENDENCE has been a continual implementation of KNEE JERK solutions which sounded Good however were inevitably destined to FAILURE. Four plus trips to the IMF in 65 years for bail outs.

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  • This is truly horrifying during a brutal winter.

    i read somewhere where a mother and daughter died from CM poisoning while in their car tryiing to say warm..it’s bad out there and getting worse..

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  • @Richard Petko “Hassles with customs department – One individual broke their iPhone, shipped it back to USA for warranty repair and had to argue for 3 weeks with customs when the phone was returned to not have to pay import duties on it.”

    I am not an Apple user but one of my children is a complete Apple Believer. I was told that there is a certified Apple repairer in Sheraton Center, Christ Church.

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  • Also if you ship an item outside country for repair there is a process to follow so that it is exempted from duties.

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  • @TLSN February 17, 2021 10:13 PM “For example the condition of the roads, bad lighting, the cost of food, etc. As a nation we appear unwilling to address these points. Tragically, when such views are expressed by overseas Bajans it’s taken personally and seen as an attack on the country. This is why Barbados continues to regress.”

    Alas!!! Alas!!! One can only fix roads and improve lighting with TAX MONEY. In my last year at paid full time work I paid in excess of $19,000 BDS in income tax + land tax + 17.5% VAT on most things, and I am just a poor ZR using old lady [that is I cannot afford a car] That is the REALITY. HOW MUCH MORE DO YOU THINK I SHOULD HAVE PAID so that we can improve roads and lighting and reduce the cost of food? Or are you like so many overseas Bajans only full of talk? Truthfully how much of YOUR OWN MONEY are you willing to put into the Barbados tax pot?

    Now to improve at least my own food security I am a part time “peica” farmer. I give away quite a bit of what I grow, those recipients are surely not complaining about the cost of the food which I produce. At this point I am largely, BUT NOT ENTIRELY SELF SUFFICIENT in fresh/frozen produce.

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  • Regarding the customs Apple thing, they did follow the “procedure” and still faced the hassle. With the certified Apple repair that is much different than sending your phone for full warranty repair or replacement.
    Once i asked upon my arrival if the laptop I had was new, the customs person at airport was implying I was bringing a new computer to Barbados and should pay VAT on it. It was not, I can say in none of my worldly travels has such a question ever been posed.
    The WS can at best be a complement to the existing system. It needs to add more value if they continue to plan on charging $2000 USD for one person. Maybe include the one year drivers permit, have a program with a bank or even better a credit union where the individual can immediately have a bank account. Get a partnership with Flow or Digicel that includes a month or two of free mobile phone fees. Even a comprehensive coupon book would be a thought. Otherwise the charge is excessive and with Google and all the WS type programs around the world, the interested recipients will see that Barbados WS doesn’t add value.
    Making a lifestyle transition to Barbados has to be as seamless as possible if there is any hope for this WS to have successful longevity.

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  • @TLSN
    Regarding the IMF boys. The president of Belarus rejected a 1 billion dollar bailout back in June of 2020 because they insisted on Belarus imposing the draconian covid lockdowns that we now see in Barbados and took place in Western Europe. Well he didn’t take the bucks and didn’t impose lockdowns ever and guess what, the country has not had Covid disaster and is one of the few free nations like Sweden and Florida in the world.
    Kind of interesting Barbados is imposing harsh lockdown with imf overlords in town. Wouldn’t be surprised they are pressuring for this and present government doesn’t have will to push back.

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  • @angela cox February 18, 2021 6:21 AM “Cuh dear not unlike u to take a subject matter and speak on singular terms. Are u familiar with the word family. That which includes children
    Well think of how much an energy bill would cost within a scope of having a family of more than two people and having to do laundry by way of washer and dryer daily or weekly.”

    Poppit. I was raised in a family of 9 children and two parents. I have SUCCESSFULLY raised multiple children myself. I still now assist with the care of grandchildren. I am not one of those grandmas who send the grandchildren home with dirty clothes. When I was growing up occasionally my parents’ grandchildren would show up for days, weeks, months or years while the parents migrated or re-migrated or dealt with the trauma of racism or divorce in the great white north. So yes indeedy I do know what family means. I know the good. I know the bad. I also know that it costs the same to run a washing machine with one pair of socks as it does to run a machine with a full load. Only when my children were pissy infants did I run my washing machine more than one day a week. At all other times I ran my washer on Saturday mornings, did the laundry for the whole family on that day. During the week then we were/are always sparkling clean.

    I’ve also with my sisters did Saturday morning laundry for a family of 11 people with a wooden washtub and jukking board. And we were always sparkling clean then too. The public health nurses and inspectors were amazed when they visited.

    We are all over 60 now so we don’t work like that anymore. 6 to 9 hours of field labor per week is enough for me now.

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  • Here are a few comments from experience. I have been coming to Barbados for 30 years and we have family homes in the USA and Canada. Each country has some of its own unique advatages but if I had to chose to be only at one place, it would be Barbados. The USA for Canadians allows entry for 6 months. For most europeans, 3 months. Right now the USA is considering a “snowbird visa” that would allow 55 year olds and older Canadians to stay in the USA for 8 months (240 days). Many of the provinces in Canada allow their residents to be absent for 7 months. Barbados should implement a “snowbird visa”. It is cold in Canada for 7 months or more in a year.. If you are in the USA for 180 days or longer you should file a form 8840 or if you dont, you might be subject to USA income tax.

    As far as costs go health care in the USA is out of site. A 2 hour trip to emergency for food poisning cost me $24,500.00USA. That is not a typo. Some things in Barbados are more expensive but many things are not, especially compared to Canada. You can buy a decent home in Barbados for $325,000 USA. Taxes and utilities are a fraction of what they are in the USA and Canada. Once you get past the cost of buying a house and a car a couple can live a nice life in Barbados on their Canada Pension and Old age security.. And of course you dont have to heat your pool which in the USA might cost $300.00 a month at this time of year or heat your house. And the internet for $40US a month unlimted is beyond world class. It is superb. Firestiks get you all the TV you could ever need especially if you know how to download some live tv apps. You can have a Canadian and USA voip phone that rings in Barbados for $3.00 a month.

    The over 55 year olds, many who are selling houses in Canada and the USA should be a prime target for Barbaods as long term stay tourists. And when the North East trade winds are around, Barbados is glorious.

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  • @TLSN February 18, 2021 9:58 AM “The IMF boys are in town. When they say jump: you jump.”

    Just letting it be know that we Bajan parents raised, bathed, dressed, fed, clothed, housed, schooled and IMMUNISED our IMF main man [AND ALL ‘O WUNNA OVERSEAS BAJANS TOO] Even if Hal thinks that we taught our IMF man to learn by rote. Although somehow this “learning by rote” did not infect Hal nor you nor a single overseas Bajan.

    How come?

    P.S. If we Bajans are so incompetent how did we manage to raise such notables as Hal, TLSN, Baje etc.?

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  • @Richard Petko ” Maybe include the one year drivers permit, have a program with a bank or even better a credit union where the individual can immediately have a bank account. Get a partnership with Flow or Digicel that includes a month or two of free mobile phone fees. Even a comprehensive coupon book would be a thought.”

    I like these suggestions, and if they can be implemented in a cost effective way, why not?

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  • @RICHARD PETKO February 18, 2021 11:10 AM “Regarding the IMF boys. The president of Belarus rejected a 1 billion dollar bailout back in June of 2020 because they insisted on Belarus imposing the draconian covid lockdowns that we now see in Barbados and took place in Western Europe. Well he didn’t take the bucks and didn’t impose lockdowns ever and guess what, the country has not had Covid disaster.”

    Balarus has had 200 deaths per million population; and 28,967 infections per million

    Barbados has had 97 deaths per millon; and 28,967 infections per million.

    I love Richard Petko, but I nominate him to be Covid19 death number 29 hopefully before the end of today.

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  • Yeap cuh dear it is all about u
    The world must live according to your standards
    Yuh must have been raised in a shoe box oblivious as to how world changes impact peoples lives in different ways

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  • @Traveler February 18, 2021 11:27 AM. “Barbados should implement a “snowbird visa”. It is cold in Canada for 7 months or more in a year.”

    I am with ya on this as long as your government permits you to bring your health care money with you. Because elder care is not easy, nor is it cheap. I know. Been there, Done that.

    And as long the Barbados government can get some tax money out of you for roads, lights, etc. to keep the place nice, nice and even to improve things.

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  • CORRECTION: Barbados has had 97 deaths per millon; and 8,543 infections per million.

    Therefore Belarus has had twice as many deaths and 3.3 times as many infections as Barbados.

    What if instead of having 731 people in isolation we had 3.3 times as many?

    What if we had 2,412 people in isolation right now?

    What is the breaking point for our health care PEOPLE?

    What is the breaking point for our FAMILIES?

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  • Chamber predicts layoff chain – Chamber predicts layoff chain: https://barbadostoday.bb/2021/02/18/chamber-predicts-layoff-chain/

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  • https://www.nationnews.com/2021/02/18/bajans-medicinal-marijuana/

    If all things are in place for production and manufacturing, Barbadians should be able to access locally produced medical cannabis in just over two years.

    Like

  • Cuhdear BajanFebruary 18, 2021 12:25 PM
    I do pay taxes in Barbados…everytime I spend money I am paying a tax. I do not get any exemptions. If I were not here the tax reveune collected would be less than it otheriwise would be. So far as health care costs go, the cost of health care in the USA is sky high, not so bad in Canada but not free as many beleive. All of the people I know who travel to Barbados purchase emergency travel insurance. So there is another opportunity. The Govt should get into the emergency medical insurance business. Here is some of the compeition https://medical.travelinsurance.com/travel-medical-insurance/
    All of the companies in the medical travel insurance business are making money.

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  • At least they know it’s not a rush job and that “over 2 years” could stretch to 5 years because they still don’t know that they don’t know…

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  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Richard Petko
    I am surprised that nobody has yet figured out my real agenda behind inviting Welcome Stampers to Barbados.

    Sure, the FX that they spend here is a very welcome indeed it is the only bright spot in our tourism industry, not to mention in the Barbados economy in general. However it is simply an evolution of tourism and we need to grow beyond tourism. As you point out, it is not going to rescue the Barbados economy by itself.

    In order for Barbados to prosper in the 21st century we need to master the technologies that power the global economy and we need to be selling services directly into a global marketplace. Why the emphasis on services?? because we are thousands of miles away from the people with money who constitute our primary market, and shipping any material object over these thousands of miles incurs transportation costs which often make the item uncompetitive. We ourselves need to imitate the Welcome Stampers by working remotely selling services directly to the global marketplace.

    The whole point in recruiting people to Barbados who can work remotely is because they are on the cutting edge of the biggest revolution in economic organization since the rise of the limited liability company as a vehicle for organizing people into productive groups. They are also all knowledge workers, many of them in the fields that are going to be the most important of the 21st century. This is the knowledge that Bajan society needs to assimilate, and Welcome Stampers are one of our strategies for doing so.

    The point is not so much for a few Americans to live here each earning a minimum $50k USD salary for a year… the point is for many Bajans to be living here and working remotely for the same companies that the American does and also earning a minimum $50k USD/year salary.

    The many Welcome Stampers that I’ve spoken to are fully on board with this strategy… they think it would be cool to have Bajan colleagues… a few have already started posting job opportunities in local WhatsApp groups to work at the companies that employ them.

    So recruiting 10,000 Welcome Stampers to Barbados over the next 5 years is good… but simultaneously employing 10,000 Bajans working for those same $50k USD salaries over the same time frame is much better.

    Like

  • @RP
    A fair summation.
    Unofficial stampers have been in Barbados for years. Of those I met, they were usually young couples with small children, where one or both had an occupation they could perform online. And Barbados was usually ‘one stop’ of a wider plan. In hindsight, the unforeseen benefit was the massive publicity it attracted on the international stage. You cannot buy that.
    Sadly, once bureaucrats anywhere get their fingers into the pie, one can expect an array of counterproductive decisions. For those who think they are merely going somewhere with a fabulous climate ceteris paribus, they are wrong. For those willing to entertain new foods, new activities, new friends; it will be a mecca. For those whose expect all to be the same as living in their 600sf condo in a frozen/chilly Urbania, they will struggle. Either way, it is not a panacea, but a nice addition which has growth potential, to be meaningful but not major/dominant.

    Like

  • @PLT

    Are you serious?

    Like

  • @SS
    “I love Richard Petko, but I nominate him to be Covid19 death number 29 hopefully before the end of today.”
    Really?

    Like

  • Wasted nearly 13 years after the previous 41 wasted DBLP years of keeping young people stagnated and now have to play catch up.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Hal Austin February 18, 2021 2:35 PM
    “Are you serious?”
    ++++++++++++++++
    Just watch me…

    Like

  • @Traveler February 18, 2021 1:41 PM

    All good.

    Like

  • lawd…just saw Donville in a video throwing down a wicked Red Plastic Bag ragga ragga soca dance, while cooking a meal, he looks good too, glad for him.

    Like

  • @peterlawrencethompson February 18, 2021 2:28 PM

    All good.

    Like

  • @PLT

    OK.

    @ Northern Observer

    @SS
    “I love Richard Petko, but I nominate him to be Covid19 death number 29 hopefully before the end of today.”
    Really?…(Quote)

    This is what we have to deal with on BU and the chairman remains as quiet as a dormouse. This has gone beyond a cheap laugh. It speaks to the mind of a mature woman. She needs help.

    Like

  • @NorthernObserver February 18, 2021 2:33 PM

    Good.

    I spent a good part of my working like teaching both Bajans and foreigners that “over and away” is NEVER EVER the same as “home” but if you are flexible, if you are adaptable, if you are open minded, then over and away has some advantages [but some difficulties too] and is worth a try, whether that over and away is Barbados, next door in St. Vincent or in the countries of the great white north.

    Northern, please stop this afternoon’s snow storm, Little Johnnie needs to get home from work safely.

    Lol!

    Like

  • PLT 2:28

    Maybe we are to reconsider our earlier comment.

    Where has a national level of high technology transfer so occurred.

    Certainly not when Intel, Corcom and others were here.

    To us this services idea at such scale and total dependence seems unworkable.

    Like

  • @Hal Austin February 18, 2021 3:06 PM “She needs help.”

    Why don’t you show up and help me?

    Are you even capable of helping even yourself?

    Stupseee!

    Was I not reprimanding Richard Petko for suggesting the Belarus solution to us? Did I not point out that Belarus has had twice the death rate of Barbados? If we go the Belarus way, then Barbados will need to have, in fact WILL HAVE 56 deaths instead of 28. And if 28 more people will die then why not Richard? Is his life any more precious than any of the 28 people who have died? Is his life more valuable than that of the nurse? Than that of the 9 year old? Than that of my multiple relatives who are working on the front line?

    If any life is valuable, then all lives are valuable.

    If other people’s lives are of little or no value, then no life is of value.

    Here endeth the lesson.

    Like

  • @WURA-War-on-U February 18, 2021 3:03 PM “lawd…just saw Donville in a video throwing down a wicked Red Plastic Bag ragga ragga soca dance, while cooking a meal, he looks good too, glad for him.”

    Saw that too.

    But it looks like a much younger Donville, maybe 10 or 15 years younger.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Pachamama February 18, 2021 3:22 PM
    I think that tech skill transfers take place between individuals, and in the case of Intel and others most of those individuals who benefitted from that tech transfer subsequently left Barbados and sought their fortunes elsewhere. My elder brother worked at Intel for a single summer while in sixth form. He had intended to study architecture at university, but then he went into computer science and has had a very productive career, currently as a very senior operating systems engineer at a Silicon Valley industry leader with $9 billion in annual revenue. So he benefited, but Barbados not so much.

    My schemes may indeed be unworkable, but the difference between then and now is that now the core skillset is remote work delivery, a suite of technologies that dis not exist when my brother was at Intel in the summer of 1971. In any case I’m going to try.

    Like

  • Looks like he just had a haircut, that’s all.

    Like

  • “He had intended to study architecture at university, but then he went into computer science and has had a very productive career, ”

    a win win…no losing…

    DBLP wasted 54 years of Black lives, that in itself is a crime.

    Like

  • @SS
    you mean that little bit of snow in the city? Here, it is piled 5ft on either side of the driveway. Spent the morning sorting through my maple tapping equipment, will get them in place by next week. I am sure the few inches the City will get, will not cause havoc. Then again, the folks around here call the members of Urbania, citidiots, and when you see some of what they do on snowmobiles, in ice huts, and in the summer on lakes, it is difficult to find fault with their terminology.

    Like

  • @SS
    a reprimand is one thing. You went well beyond a reprimand.

    Like

  • Jamaica Nice
    with good music
    and better collie

    Like

  • @PLT 2:28
    Agree with your vision, but we must also develop a workforce with the necessary skills if we want to use local talent. That is a missing piece of the plan.
    ‘The point is not so much for a few Americans to live here each earning a minimum $50k USD salary for a year”

    I also want to add that a US person earning US $50K/ annum is not a good candidate for such a visa. $100K minimum.

    Like

  • @NorthernObserver February 18, 2021 3:50 PM “Spent the morning sorting through my maple tapping equipment, will get them in place by next week.”

    Happy tapping.

    A friend sent me some homemade. I am treasuring it.

    Like

  • @ Traveler February 18, 2021 11:27 AM

    Thank you very much for your fair and balanced assessment of our island.

    @ peterlawrencethompson February 18, 2021 2:28 PM

    PLT is intellectually three light years ahead of everyone else on the island. No wonder our Supreme Leader has quietly buried the COVID19 Council. After all, with PLT she has the best advisor who delivers ideas for free.

    Like

  • PLT

    Very well! But at which point in this cycle, as outlined by you, would we be able to drive technological development as owners, throwing off the mantle of perennial service station mentality which comes with that, in circumstances where services are so susceptible to a downward spiral in value added terms.

    Like

  • No worries about the covid remark. If I catch it I have a 99.99999% chance of full recovery.

    PLT I see your point and it is grand. But to get those 10,000 nomads to come here is 2000 a year for 5 years. Don’t think it is happening with the current system in place.
    The main issue is where are the 10,000 people they would hire. As much as the government lauds the education system here it is not as robust as they say. The entire 11 plus concept is archaic and leads to children being siloed into their respective middle/high school which has its limitations both real and perceived. This concept of Harrison college and Queens being the top high schools just doesn’t exist in canada and usa. All schools are good and all work to develop kids of all abilities and they don’t pigeonhole them into a classroom based on the spelling and math skills from the age of 11.
    These WS people are not going to come here for 1 year to mentor or train an assistant. If they need an employee they want them readily available.
    Not to mention if they actually like the quality of employees and then say “lets open a branch office here with 5 people” well then the WS person has to legally get a work permit and then try to open a business here and from first hand knowledge this is yet another one of Barbados government major letdowns. Incorporating a company here, dealing with Caipo and opening a corporate bank account will quickly dampen the enthusiasm this WS worker/entrepreneur may have.
    It could be a chicken and egg issue. I think get this influx of WS talent you need good roads, street lights, easy government services, easy banking and then you can think about having WS people rave back to head office how they should setup a branch here in lovely Barbados.

    Like

  • @cuhdear why dont you look at all the amazing countries that imposed useless senseless lockdowns to try and stop a cold virus. UK usa canada italy spain Argentina Peru the list goes on. All have 5-7 times the death rate of people “with” covid..
    So yes I shall stick to using Belarus and even Sweden as examples because they kept their economy open and schools open and society open and let this flu pass through naturally as it should and each country is well down the list of per capita with covid deaths.
    Cheers

    Like

  • @PLT

    You are correct on the service focus and opportunities it can offer Bajans.

    I live it daily and have mentioned before that I use Pakistani and Algerian freelancers from Fiverr, Upwork (could easily have been a Bajan service provider) and took courses on Udemy. These are multi million dollar new age services companies that prove the model works and don’t need any blessings from doubting Thomases.. My service just got accepted in South Africa and this overseas Bajan, me, is sitting 5000 miles away and never set foot there. Never. All online / via Zoom and $$ USD flowing

    I have been lamenting my fellow bajans about our unexplainable inertia, lack of imagination and massa kiss ass attitude for years. Now we are in an era where the playing field is more level and a bright Bajan kid (I give up on the old heads) with a computer and internet access can be just as savvy as a kid in Japan or the USA but we still doubt ourselves. What’s up with that eh?? And the thing is not much investment capital is needed.

    THERE IS NO EXCUSE

    LETS GO BARBADOS!!

    Like

  • @ Pachamama February 18, 2021 5:11 PM

    Belarus also has a large IT industry. At least before the recent unrest. If this is possible in a dictatorship, then even more so in a one-party democracy with a Supreme Leader.

    Like

  • And this is another reason i can never like politicians, tens of millions are at risk of dying.

    “It’s a tale as old as America, practically: a wealthy politician who builds a career trashing elites gets caught doing something decadent and ill-advised in the middle of a catastrophe affecting their constituents.

    This time, that politician is Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX), a staunch conservative and Trump loyalist, who was photographed on a plane headed to Cancun, Mexico while millions in his state have experienced freezing weather without power and heat for days, during a severe winter storm. Residents and hospitals are also reportedly facing water shortages, and millions of Texans are under a boil water advisory. At least 24 people have died across the South as a result of the extreme weather, according to multiple outlets.

    A photo of Cruz at the Houston airport went viral late Wednesday, and multiple outlets including Fox News, MSNBC, CNN, the Associated Press, and The Dallas Morning News have since confirmed that it was, in fact, the senator traveling on a flight to Mexico. Fox reported that a Republican source said, “The photos speak for themselves.”

    Like

  • @Richard Petko

    When you start talking about Covid19 as a cold, as a flu I cease having any conversations about Covid19 with you. When you raise Sweden as an example which Barbados should follow I done.

    Sweden has had 1,242 Covid19 deaths per million people; and 61,841infections per million.
    Barbados has had 101 Covid19 deaths per million people; and 9,204 infections per million.

    You and others who do not live in Barbados may be comfortable with a Barbados death rate which is 12 times higher than it is. Wunna may be comfortable with 1,242 Bajans dead from Covid19. I am not.

    And yet you and those people are uncomfortable with me wishing a hasty Covid19 death on you.

    May you be Covid19 death number 30.

    Like

  • O Jesus Christ!

    Even under covid Bajans at home still promoting tensions between one class in Barbados and their step children abroad, economic refugees in the main.

    But the situation is worse than that. There are Bajans all over the world who have for centuries been ignored by every institution in Barbados. Panama is one example.

    Except when these same entities want something.

    All these agencies and people promoting tensions between two classes of Bajans, as they see reality, generally have no sustained critique for the White elites with the jackboot on our necks. But kicking Black ass seems always in vogue.

    Like

  • Interesting.

    Looks like the folks with children will be heading to Florida.

    Like

  • Pingback: BARBADOS: Welcome Stamp: A Good Idea … But Not A Long Term Tourism Solution | Guyanese Online

  • JohnFebruary 18, 2021 10:07 PM

    Will you stop bringing US politics into every discussion? Yes, we know you still love Trump. We get that. We know. You love Trump! Okay?!!

    Enough now.

    Like

  • Lawson…just saw a video of the guy who drank the bottle of alcohol straight up, he looks right as rain, probably didn’t feel a thing.

    Like

  • TOURISM NOSEDIVE
    Officials still ‘very confident’ despite 93% fall-off
    Long-stay visitor arrivals to Barbados plummeted by 93 per cent in January, but tourism officials are still optimistic the industry, which has taken a beating from the COVID-19 pandemic, will rebound.
    Chief executive officer of the Barbados Hotel & Tourism Association (BHTA), Senator Rudy Grant, painted the gloomy picture of the situation during a media conference yesterday, revealing that hotel occupancy had fallen as low as six per cent in January.
    However, he shared BHTA’s chairman Geoffrey Roach’s hopeful outlook for a revival of the industry.
    Grant attributed the dramatic drop in visitor numbers to developments in Barbados’ major source markets because of the pandemic, but based on reports from tour operators and other travel industry representatives in Barbados’ main source markets, he indicated the desire for travel to Barbados was still high.
    He also suggested the availability of a vaccine should help to restore confidence in travel. Given these factors, the BHTA executive said: “We are very confident that we will see a resurgence of the tourism sector.”
    Record arrivals
    In 2019, Barbados recorded more than 700 000 visitor arrivals by air and 850 000 by sea, making it a record year for tourism performance. Until the COVID-19 pandemic struck and brought the tourism industry worldwide to its knees, local tourism officials were predicting another bumper year for 2020.
    Grant said Government’s Barbados Employment and Sustainable Transformation Plan (BEST) had given businesses in the tourism sector a lifeline that enabled the retention of hotel workers.
    Noting that the programme focused on the re-engagement of workers and there was also a business transformation component, the BHTA’s CEO said: “We believe that the utilisation of the BEST programme will enable those businesses which need some financial support to be able to make it through at this critical time.”
    Prime Minister Mia Amor Mottley conceded Monday the BEST plan needed to be “refined”, and yesterday Grant said: “We think that it is a lifeline that can be properly utilised with some adjustments.”
    He pointed out not all of the hotels were participants in the programme and said the current hiatus in tourism business should provide an opportunity for hoteliers to pay attention to their plant to ensure that the hotels were “fit for purpose” when the tourism industry resurges.
    Roach said it was important for Barbados to look to the future, adding that while the island had enjoyed good brand equity through the years, “We have to ensure that we step up our game up as much as possible to keep Barbados as one of the key destinations that people would want to travel to”.
    He said this must be done considering the competition expected from other destinations when tourism travel resumes worldwide.
    (GC)

    Source: Nation

    Like

  • “People from the northern climates next year post-Covid will look at Tampa Bay or San Diego as a place to live for a year. In those locales they will have world class roads, shopping, food choice and entertainment options aplenty. For someone from Boston they will also not have to worry about visa applications or fees.”

    In Florida they will likely be able to prove they are Covid-19 free with a “spit test” rather than an intrusive and unpleasant PCR test from a throat swab.

    Fred Turner, CEO of Curative, a US testing company, says reliance on high CT count PCR tests which produce too many false positives (according to Dr. Fauci any CT at 35 or over is useless because of the high false positives) will result in “everlasting lockdowns”. He is looking for approval from the FDA for more widespread use of his company’s spit test to diagnose Covid-19 cases. Currently, the FDA only approves Curative’s spit test for cases which are symptomatic or which have been symptomatic within the two weeks prior to the test. However, the state of Florida allows the spit test to be used on both symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects with no limitations.

    The Insanity of the PCR Testing Saga
    Analysis by Dr. Joseph Mercola

    SNIP

    Testing for Dead Viruses Will Ensure Everlasting Lockdowns
    To circle back to the Curative PCR test, the company argues that the test is accurate when it comes to detecting active infection, and as CEO Fred Turner told Buzzfeed:19

    “If you’re screening for a return to work and you’re picking up everyone who had COVID two months ago, no one’s going to return to work. If you want to detect active COVID, what the ‘early’ study shows is that Curative is highly effective at doing that.”

    Again, this has to do with the fact that the Curative spit test has a sensitivity resembling that of a nasopharyngeal PCR set at a CT of 30. The lower CT count narrows the pool of positive results to include primarily those with higher viral loads and those who are more likely to actually carry live virus. This is a good thing. What the FDA wants Curative to do is to widen that net so that more noninfectious individuals can be labeled as a “case.”

    In an email to Buzzfeed, Dr. Michael Mina, an epidemiologist at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, stated that using a CT of 45 is “absolutely insane,” because at that magnification, you may be looking at a single RNA molecule, whereas “when people are sick and are contagious, they literally can have 1,000,000,000,000x that number.”20

    Mina added that such a sensitive PCR test “would potentially detect someone 35 days post-infection who is fully recovered and cause that person to have to enter isolation. That’s crazy and it’s not science-based, it’s not medicine-based and it’s not public health-oriented.”21

    While the FDA has issued a warning not to use the Curative spit test on asymptomatic people, Florida has dismissed the warning and will continue to use the test on symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals alike. Only Miami-Dade County is reconsidering how it is using the test, although a definitive decision has yet to be announced.22

    The Lower the CT, the Greater the Accuracy

    While the FDA claims high sensitivity (meaning higher CT) is required to ensure we don’t end up with asymptomatic spreaders in our communities, as reviewed above, this risk is exceedingly small. We really need to stop panicking about the possibility of healthy people killing others. It’s not a sane trend, as detailed in “The World Is Suffering from Mass Delusional Psychosis.”

    According to an April 2020 study23 in the European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases, to get 100% confirmed real positives, the PCR test must be run at just 17 cycles. Above 17 cycles, accuracy drops dramatically.

    By the time you get to 33 cycles, the accuracy rate is a mere 20%, meaning 80% are false positives. Beyond 34 cycles, your chance of a positive PCR test being a true positive shrinks to zero.

    More:
    https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2021/02/19/covid-pcr-test-fraud.aspx?ui=bb4dacf56d364c8aecefb22217091c77d2154762c68fd258d557a18be6f6af77&sd=20100827&cid_source=dnl&cid_medium=email&cid_content=art1HL&cid=20210219_HL2&mid=DM809083&rid=1087929775

    Like

  • I am sure the peasants were hopeful and waiting on sunshine while Noah and family watched from the Ark…Did it work out for those peasants??

    Frog in a warming pot syndrome is a thing., but hey that’s why we are at a point of reckoning, no longer protected by easy loans, that separates leaders who can see around the corner and have the balls to pivot and lead versus those who just pontificate, postulate, politic, project and ponder all the while showing no REAL progress. At the end of the day the results WILL show.

    How could anyone possibly think Tourism will bounce back to a pre-Covid model?.

    #PromotingBrainDrain

    Like

  • The mortgages of these talking heads have their salaries paid from the sector. What do you expect them to say?

    Like

  • David that is true

    But this is exactly what needs to change

    Did our journalists challenge this obviously ridiculous statement in light of the obvious reality? Have they stepped up lead and demand more from our leaders and industry captains?

    Has Mia and her cabinet really articulated what our pivot looks like so the talking heads don’t have to make these obviously ridiculous and impractical statements given the leadership vacuum on the question of where do we go from here?

    Look we can either make excuses as usual or get the required job done. Covid and the resulting nationalism in G20 countries with vaccine hoarding and closed borders shows there is no room for 2nd place, also rans and perennial beggars. It’s black and white you either have excuses or results.

    We still don’t get it??? The ONLY way it changes now is with strong leadership. No two ways about that. SOMEONE HAS TO LEAD BARBADOS OUT IF THIS. We will make mistakes but SOMEONE HAS TO LEAD.

    In the meanwhile I URGE my fellow Bajans to learn how to develop and monetize content to earn some extra USD. It possible

    Like

  • @Bajanabroad

    To be fair in this forum and even in the traditional, there has been and continues to be voluminous commentary re our over dependence on tourism.

    Like

  • They’ll maybe – maybe not get it that saving their sorry dependent lives is more important than go nowhere tourism..no one really cares if they do, they’ve wasted decades.

    Like

  • For those of you – especially Tron – who still do not get it. Here is an article which appears to be gaining traction even in places whose local economies have benefited from tourism.

    https://www.aljazeera.com/opinions/2021/2/18/it-is-time-to-end-extractive-tourism

    Like

  • I have said from the jump that these liars and frauds who push the dependency, racist, slaver tourism, should all BE IN PRISON…they are evil, no good trash…the whole of them especially the shitheads in the parliament…told yall Barbados is advertised as a racist country, it truly is, where the scum of the earth can parade as tourists and pretend to the detriment both social and economic of the Black population…the same way they use any and every excuse to criminalize, demorialize and destroy Black lives, using the marijuana

    “Capitalist forces have convinced the increasingly overworked middle-class labour force in the West and elsewhere that to “relax”, it needs a vacation abroad with all comforts provided. As a result, it is willing to pay significant sums of money to be mass transported south and east to enjoy a week of leisure at the expense of local communities who suffer from the abuse of their land and resources by tourism corporations and their local partners.

    Quite literally, whole relationships between people, and between people and nature are shaped by the need to allow the paying tourist customer to do and be whatever they desire. It is a vicious circle where capitalist labour exploitation, consumerism and wealth extraction work to produce an incredibly destructive kind of mass tourism.

    If there was ever a time to reconsider the tourism industry, it would be now. The COVID-19 pandemic offers us the unique opportunity to reflect on the ugly reality behind our exotic vacations and break the cycle of exploitation. This would take not only reforming the tourist industry but also overhauling our labour systems.

    The many harms of extractive tourism

    The tourism industry, and the governments that welcome foreign revenue, thrive on the argument that local livelihoods depend on tourism and insinuate that millions of people will be reduced to abject poverty without it. But a closer examination of how large-scale tourism clusters function reveals who the true winners and losers of mass tourism are.”

    Like

  • I know it still has to be broken down for some, although they’ve heard me rant about this for 8 STRAIGHT YEARS..

    when they came up with that shite about “just beyond your imagination”……..yeah, i saw it in NYC….where a lot of those fraud tourists like to pretend, they can’t get through 24 hours without pretending dumb shit….well, if ya want to be racist, hating black people, belittling them, being violent to them because ya still see them as slaves and telling them how much they need tourism to survive or they will starve, come to Barbados, just beyond ya imagination….

    but…KARMA has it now that the same fckers are starving themselves….

    and that has literally DESTROYED THE ISLAND…socially and economically.

    Like

  • Great post by TLSN.
    Must print and read.

    Like

  • Anything devised by criminals, racists, enslavers, thieves, murderers rapists and allround lowlifes in the 1700s….as tourism was in Barbados…CAN’T BE GOOD FOR BLACK POPULATIONS….ya would have to be a slave from the 1700s to think it could ever end well for Black people….now yall know why i call them…yardfowls, wickum etc Slaves.

    Like

  • Many Welcome Stampers staying
    MANY PEOPLE on the Barbados’ Welcome Stamp have chosen to remain on the island despite recent developments related to the COVID-19 pandemic.
    This is according to chief executive officer of the Barbados Hotel & Tourism Association (BHTA), Senator Rudy Grant, who suggested that even with Barbados’ current COVID-19 challenges and developments in major Barbados tourism source markets, many of them who chose to remain here might have done so based on the fact that the country has been doing “reasonably well with the management of COVID-19”.
    The Barbados Welcome Stamp Programme, introduced last July, targeted potential long-stay visitors and families interested in working from Barbados for up to 12 months. Hundreds responded to the novel idea, with close to 2 000 applications having been received and nearly 500 approved by last November. Interest surrounded the fact that Barbados had at the time recorded a comparatively low number of COVID-19 cases and under ten deaths.
    Since that time, however,
    countries such as Canada and Britain, key source markets from which many of those on the Welcome Stamp came, introduced travel restrictions that saw some people ending their stay here prematurely.
    ‘Not as big’
    Barbados’ more stringent COVID-19 protocols and measures imposed as cases began to spike and deaths increased, were also factors that were expected to impact the programme.
    However, on Thursday, Grant said all reports to the BHTA from its members indicated the fall-out was not as big as expected.
    In contrast, the BHTA executive conceded that the national pause instituted by Prime Minister Mia Amor Mottley on February 3 and recently extended to February 28, had dealt a hard blow to hotels offering staycations. Grant said because of Barbadians’ response to staycation offers, some hotels had been enjoying occupancies as high as 70 per cent.
    Speaking during a media briefing that day, Grant explained: “What is happening
    now is that component is not there because of the new measures that have been put in place.” But he said “the expectation is that once we get through this period and we are able once again to reopen, we will see a continued focus on the staycation component.”
    (GC)

    Source: Nation

    Like

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