Another Heather Cole Column – Something Happening

Stedson Wiltshire (Red Plastic Bag) gave a vivid description of what is seen on Kadooment Day in a calypso song entitled Something Happening. The joyful song presents a stark contrast to the sobering reality unfolding in Barbados. With a backdrop of Covid-19, the cause of labour unrest is deeply disturbing as it is related to changes in the Severance Pay Act and the refusal of some hotels to pay their potion of the workers’ severance pay. As the reality of this crisis sets in, anguish, lack of information, confusion and frustration confront a large section of the population and now a once docile people seem to be erupting. Protests have become a fixture on the landscape with 40% unemployed predominately in the tourism sector; no one knows how this will end but something is definitely happening.

There is no comparison in recent history to what is now unfolding. Complexity and growth of the economy makes it distinct from the 1930’s but it is noteworthy that there was no labour union to prevent the downward spiral that culminated in the 1937 riots in Barbados. Trade unionism came into existence after the riots to protect the rights of labour in 1941. What is mindboggling is that it was out of the struggle of the black working class that both the Barbados Workers Union (BWU) and the Barbados Labour Party (BLP) were conceived and born. Now the relationship is akin to 2 children abandoning their mother. This should never have become a matter of political expediency as the BWU depends on the black working class for financial support and the Barbados Labour party depends on the black working class (the largest voting group) for votes. The action of both has shown that they have joined forces and abandoned this class.

In contrast with the song, one can see questionable union actions. One can query the BWU’s agreement to the BEST Program as it offers less than favourable relief to the workers than to the hotels. The program provides financial assistance to hotels and a wage subsidy to workers but no severance. It was stated that only $30 Million of the $300 Million dollars has been taken by the hotels. Part of the remaining $ 270 Million dollars can be used as severance for the workers. Essentially the BEST program is fundamentally flawed as it does not contain a severance payment option.

One can also query why the recently held press conference only resulted in a solution for the workers of Club Barbados and did not take into consideration the thousands of other unemployed workers. What was required is an across the board solution for the hotel industry and any other affected industries. There were so many twists and turns regarding the story of the workers of Club Barbados that it is difficult to decipher but yet it does not justify treatment as a special case as it leaves out others whose plight is the same.

Both the Prime Minister and Ms. Moore chastised the Media but one cannot imagine how the secret of 40% unemployed in Barbados could be kept, not discussed or their protests not covered if they take to the streets. A fair Press is not the enemy of the people. Highlighting these stories humanized the suffering of the workers. They became real people with real problems and in need of real solutions. We all felt their pain. Change is never a factor that comes into play with silence or secrecy; with them ignorance pervades. What the media can do in addition to highlighting the protest is to utilize the top corner of the new paper to daily post unemployment numbers, NIS payouts as a show of solidarity with the workers and carry stories of how this crisis has affected individual persons and neighbourhoods.

One can see government as having created an environment for the lack of trust. The role of government in any democratic society is to provide an enabling environment for all to flourish. This is exhibited in the provision of social services and laws. When the Severance Payment Act was amended in August 2020, the reason for its changes and the why now could not be justified as it was the midst of the current pandemic. The changes now extend the layoff period from 13 to 22 weeks before they can file for severance and that employees must give 4 weeks notice to the employer prior to the end of the 22 weeks period. It also states that the employer can contest severance. It is a punitive amendment to the law and has led to much confusion and ultimately the amended act is disadvantageous as the underlying principle is to disqualify workers from obtaining severance payments. The level of confidence in the government with regards to the treatment to workers is now at an all-time low.

One can also see that this is not only an economic issue. It is also a matter of social justice. Less than favourable treatment has been meted out to one specific class of the population; the black working class. The same people who for almost 400 years have been feeling the brunt of what occurs in the Barbadian society. This class has the highest rate of unemployment, highest incidence of crime, the highest rate of minimum wages, have a high cost of living, poor housing, reduced access to potable water, are in need of proper roads and combined they pay the highest taxes. The only positive thing that they as a group possess is votes at election time. It is these same people who are in need and are being denied the money that should be theirs. One of the women, a former Club Barbados worker lamented that she feels like George Floyd with the weight of someone’s foot on her neck and that she could not breathe. Do their lives and livelihood matter?

One hopes that now we are in the post Nelson era, that governance comes with an aspect of social justice; that no decisions are made on the behalf of the people without consideration of how the disadvantaged black working class will be affected and that there will be a living wage, programs put in place not for pit toilets but for creating wealth to remove vicious the cycle of poverty. If the opportunity to create wealth can be provided to the already privileged it should also be provided to the black working class. The government saw it fit to compulsorily acquire property on Bay Street to give to a developer. It must also do the same for the black working class through co-operatives for agriculture, business development and housing. It is hoped that laws which still seem to be derived from the slave codes will be removed from the laws of Barbados. This is in reference to laws being written from the punitive point of view of ‘let us deny them that colonial mentality’; as though some things are still just too good for the black working class of Barbados.

The irony of these developments is that both the BWU and BLP have bitten the hand that feeds them.

345 comments

  • “They became real people with real problems and in need of real solutions. We all felt their pain.”

    Frauds and sellouts can never feel Black people’s pain, but they can pick up the people’s money to end the tiefing minorities pretend financial pain..

    Mia and the gang ought to be kicked out of parliament for once again disenfranchising ONLY BLACK PEOPLE….taking their money and give it away to thieves, like if it’s hers….and reducing the Black populaton to searing poverty. Those treacherous actions should have equal reactions…

    Liked by 1 person

  • A well thought out article of a black govt putting both knees in the necks of its people
    The imaginary of this article becoming a made for TV movie in modern day history would be almost on the same level of Roots
    Expect the slave masters being of their own kind bounding their victims feet and hands in economic chains
    What a dam shame that a govt who promised much to the people have become modern day slave masters to their own people driven by a desire to keep the white rich upper class rich and the black people poor and beggars
    My God

    Like

  • The biggest joke posted to the blog by a person who supported every policy the last government implemented including sending home over 3000 government employees and passing on tuition university cost.

    Like

  • The role of a union must change in a modern society with the rise of the knowledge workers. These workers are and will continue to be contract workers and see little value to becoming members of a union. The workers have to become more active in shaping a modern and relevant agenda by voting out those in control with their old ideas and puppet strings tied to the establishment.

    Liked by 1 person

  • David it must be raining down heavy buckets of truth
    I noticed that you took to holding umbrellas over Mia head
    This article pelts some heavy drops over her head
    Be careful don’t be an idiot for Mia standing in that thunderstorm holding umbrella over her head and get pneumonia
    This govt in 2 years when compared to Stuart 10 year period has already repeated all of the same faults Mia criticized Stuart one great exception is that of having a cabinet the size of Mount Rushmore and paid consultants for doing nothing of value or worth to for people and economy
    The suffering of the people is real and something worth while addressing
    Meanwhile u jump off the painted red fence to talk jobby
    Maybe it has something to do with that early Mint Tea u drinking
    Just maybe the Tea is spiked with a heavy dose of ignorance

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  • Hope you noticed it was published unedited to BU as well. This is most important and would have gone over your partisan head.

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  • Understood that these workers are not union members
    However it wouldnt be far fetched to say that the private sector does not encourage unionism
    Hence the workers stay clear of that path to protect their job which in itself is another story which needs to be told

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  • You are missing the point which McDowall touched on in the Nation. Union membership is on the decline globally. In some countries the back of the union has been broken and workers have to rely on relevant laws that are efficiently enforced. We need to upgrade old positions. This is 2020.

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  • Stop Children what’s that sound
    For what it’s worth
    Somethings Happening*

    (*) Happenings was the name given to the 60’s black protests in USA for civil rights and white hippy youth protest movements anti-vietnam war and national draft for military service to fight communism

    Like

  • Dear Miss Cole
    A fine article . The reason that the workers of that particular business were so quickly assisted has to do with where the rich and famous hang out from time to time. People help their friends.
    The media deserves to be thrashed. They have collectively stopped publishing crime statistics and the best efforts are made to protect the PM from serious questions on the economy. For example, whenever there is a response from the government , on economic matters, it usually comes from a consultant named Professor Persuad. I now understand that he won the seat in constituency 31. Nobody knows where it is, not even the Electoral and Boundaries Commission.
    Now, if we want to hear about crime ,we have to go on social media and get informed about the daily car hi jacking and other dangerous crimes. The police will not get public support because the people know who getting protection.
    We are known for two things: very short memories and the denial syndrome. Failure to nip negative trends in the bud forty years ago has brought us to this point. But we are known for liking pretty pictures. We love putting new paint over old boards. Who the hell cares about the termites.
    This is who we are.

    Peace

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  • “Union backs have been broken ”
    Only recently we noticed such going on with a bi election by which Mia took an advantage of making sure the breaking of backs unions continue to provide refuge for the status quo
    Hence Toni Moore hand picked to become a mouth piece for govt policies
    Boy uh tell uh
    Barbados is heading down a darkened lopsided stairway

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  • Again your deduction is based on a flimsy position. The executive of the BWU can be changed overnight by union membership if they are dissatisfied. We have to see the need to see pass our noses.

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  • David
    You should join one of these organizations to see how all the structures prevent the type of sudden change suggested.

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  • @Pacha

    They pretty much operate as old boys clubs where strings are yanked by the elites.

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  • More broadly, these socioeconomic problems were long foreseen.

    We are still in a recession-depression and the best that can be hoped for is a W-recovery. Not the V-recovery the establishment promised. We warned you 8 months ago.

    We have known that tourism is unlikely to rebound for 2 to 3 years at best. Tourism is the backbone of economy unfortunately.

    The failure of tourism has caused broad deprivation and this has fired crime no doubt.

    David, what is the level of foreign reserves last known.

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  • @Pacha

    The trendline is still pointing north and we know why. The graphs are accessible on the CBB website homepage.

    http://www.centralbank.org.bb/

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  • @David
    Apparently in our country,the backs of the trade union movement were not broken pre the 2018 election. As you know I don’t know what was happening “ globally “ then . They were quite active with marches approaching 20,000. They were quite active demanding salary increases of 23% after they had “crunched” the numbers. They were quite active when they settled for 5% shortly after the 2018 elections. They were very active marching with the employers .
    Just keeping it fair boss.
    The trade unions have betrayed the working class and as others have stated the Social Partnership is a sham. Both the BLP and the DLP have systematically weakened the labour movement and this massacre, has been aided and in some cases orchestrated by the intellectual elites. Once more the question that automatically arises is: What are we giving people free education for , underwritten by the abused working class if the recipients have no social conscience to defend the working class whenever and where never necessary?
    Peace

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  • @William

    The unprecedented alliance we witnessed pre 2018 was a convergence of popular opinion directed towards an unpopular government by all sectors of society. It had little to do with the unions per se, they went along for the ride based in the opinion of this blogmaster OPPORTUNISM.

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  • William Skinner is quite right. The unions have not only betrayed the workers in barbados and almost everywhere else they have also betrayed the blp earlier on and the dlp at least twice in the last 30 years.

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  • @Pacha

    Do you recall the Royal Shop and Sandy Lane confrontation? What about that company on the Harbour Road that blatantly ignored BWU demands. Leroy Trotman with foghorn it did not matter. The power of the union as we know it is no more.

    Here is a story Simple Simon style: there was a time trade unionists were loath to accept a glass of water from corporate, this is no more. Enough said.

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  • Pacha…and none of the black sellouts, racists and thieves can see the NEW BLACK WORLD ORDER…none of them are invited anyway…….and are subject to arrest anywhere they believe they can land and continue their crimes against Black/African populations….

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  • @ William

    It is true that globally old industrial trade unions have been losing members over the last couple decades. However, the number of members of professional associations have been growing exponentially.
    Like most things, we have discussed this matter before. In most developed countries, the HR departments are now providing many of the benefits that trade unions have historically campaigned for collectively.
    These range from basic things such as paid holidays, sick leave, etc, to medical and dental insurance, pensions, expenses, in-house training, childcare etc.
    Pay rises have now become part of the annual appraisals, not collective bargaining.

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  • @ David
    Are you denying that the NUPW, publicly stated that after they “ crunched” the numbers, that the then government , could have given its members a 23% salary increase?
    Are you denying that within a very short time after the current administration came into office that the same NUPW readily accepted a 5 % increase?
    I am not on your lost decade nonsense and trying to pin every misstep and mistake of this administration on the one that brilliantly failed 2008 -2018. The people dealt with them and that’s the ultimate judgment.
    Peace

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  • LOT OF NICE BEAUTIFUL PABLUM IN WUNNAH LONG TALK………..BUT CAN ANYONE A WUNNAH TALKERS DO BOUT UM?
    JUST ASKIN FUH A FRIEND.
    WE PONTIFICATING ELSEWHERE BOUT WHO FAIL, BUT WHAT WUNNAH GWINE DO BOUT WE OWN DEBACLE THAT IS ALREADY IN TEARS?
    WUNNAH GOT ANYBODY TO CREATE JOBS AND LOWER THE UNEMPLOYMENT RATE IN BEAUTIFUL, BEAUTIFUL BARBADOS?

    Like

  • David

    Are you in any doubt that more selling out by the unions will come sooner or later and depending on perceived interests.

    We have wagered that the GS of the bwu is aiming to be the next pm after 10 years of mugabe. If this is true and within her grasp then loyalty to mugabe is almost guaranteed. There is only one way such a loyalty oath can be delivered.

    The country must reconsider whether unions are workers” organizations or political operators.

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  • @William

    Your point is a moot based on what has been posited. The elites control the unions in Barbados. You only had to be embedded in the contentious march next to union leaders to listen to their mouthings.

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  • @Pacha

    The positional authority of the GS is at the discretion of who?

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  • David

    The GS is a creature of the bwu. And as such has in turn made the bwu apparati subject to her and her alone. A dictatorship. How else could she so easily be in church and chapel at the same time. No less so for Walcott to Trotman. Only that people can now more clearly see the the perfidious operation of both party and union.

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  • @Pacha

    The person sitting in the GS position can be removed if determined by the membership.

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  • David
    That in true theoretically. But there is a gulf between theory and praxis.

    Like

  • @Pacha

    We can agree and therein the problem can be found deeply rooted.

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  • Let’s see what the follow pattern frauds in the parliament do, with their determination to continue criminalizing Black people ONLY for the marijuana plant, but are equally intent to have marijuana slave plantations complete with slave masters, guards and dogs….FRAUDS…

    this was yesterday..

    “The UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs voted on Wednesday to remove cannabis and cannabis resin from a category of the world’s most dangerous drugs, which could impact the global medical marijuana industry.

    The Vienna-based UN agency said in a statement that its 53 member states had voted 27-25, with one abstention, to follow the World Health Organization’s recommendation to remove cannabis and cannabis resin from Schedule IV of the 1961 Convention on Narcotic Drugs.”

    Like

  • Waru
    What you expect. We will be led by the nose to pave the way for moneyed interests. Like we always are.

    The same people who benefited from the criminalization will now mek money from legalization.

    Like

  • Theory and praxis??????

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  • David does these concerns mean anything to u
    Serious concerns and the abuse of law which govt / Mia leadership has heaped upon the people in two years

    song entitled Something Happening. The joyful song presents a stark contrast to the sobering reality unfolding in Barbados. With a backdrop of Covid-19, the cause of labour unrest is deeply disturbing as it is related to changes in the Severance Pay Act and the refusal of some hotels to pay their potion of the workers’ severance pay. As the reality of this crisis sets in, anguish, lack of information, confusion and frustration confront a large section of the population and now a once docile people seem to be erupting. Protests have become a fixture on the landscape with 40% unemployed predominately in the tourism sector; no one knows how this will end but something is definitely happening

    Like

  • AC-DC should tell us what the brain trust of her dlp are proposing.

    Or is yours limited to badgering the incumbents.

    Like

  • Pacha…That was always the Mia plan, the lowlife minorities get wealthy off the plant and the black majority continue to go to prison for the same plant….it takes a special type of vicious niga to even stand to be near her…..but they’re hand to mouth and money licorish, no surprise….that they will support the criminalization, exploitation and disenfranchisment of people who look just like them..

    Like

  • @ PachamamaDecember 3, 2020 9:37 AM
    “The same people who benefited from the criminalization will now mek money from legalization.”
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Just like it was with Alcohol; e.g. the Kennedy bootlegging family.

    It’s really amazing to live to see the day when the plant called Mary Jane the daughter of Satan has become a money-making Cinderella and now being worshipped like a goddess called Medical Marijuana as if the plant has to strands of DNA one called Go(o)d for medicine and (D)evil for other purposes.

    Medical marijuana is nothing but a load of hypocrisy not even worth the amount of imported manure needed to grow the crap.

    How can the medicinal marijuana be legally allowed but the same cannabis cannot be used for culinary purposes or homeopathic uses?

    Isn’t the maxim an ounce of prevention (good eating and healthy exercising) worth a pound of cure (over-processed and costly medicinal marijuana benefiting only a few) which only a few can afford especially in these foreseeable hard economic times?

    The same way the authorities- acting on behalf of certain vested interest groups (with the capital) can ‘legalize’ the growing and importation of the sacred herb why can’t they also allow the growing of the same plant for personal consumption in the same way the same policy-makers are exhorting the poor to grow their own food in their back yards?

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  • “How can the medicinal marijuana be legally allowed but the same cannabis cannot be used for culinary purposes or homeopathic uses?”

    total hypocrisy, even worse, is legislating for medical marijuana but REFUSING to allow the sick and disabled or the population at large, at least 4 plants a year to grow personally to beat back chronic pain and other diseases which will take pressure off the healthcare system…….but got a bunch of white frauds like themselves waiting to kickstart marijuana slave plantations…

    .waiting for the feds to declassify marijuana as well and see how dumb the black face idiots will look…

    Like

  • The overarching issue is that our history appears to hinder our ability to manage and lead effectively. The need to feel superior to others impacts on the ability of the top echelon to listen to constructive criticism; to opt out of cliches,; to coach and counsel others; and to recognize and implement successful strategic change. Economic benefits accrue to a smaller sect as puppeteers manipulate economic activity, politicians toot incremental political gains and their sycophants shout support in an effort to drown out opposing views.

    The major consequence of the manipulations has been the increasing tears in the economic fabric pre COVID-19. They are now gaping post Covid-19, at a time when there are limited options for a real fix and a dire absence of sound strategies.

    Years ago in Jamaica, the discussion centered on why Barbados economy remained relatively buoyant and it a low crime island. The Jamaican pointed out that Barbados’s relatively large middle class provided economic support and acted as a buffer (between the rich and poor) which suppressed crime. He warned if that class ever contracts significantly Barbados will begin to exhibit traits common to Jamaica. Sadly, this is becoming more evident post Covid-19.

    The machinations being mentioned are only serving to further create an economic crisis that will adversely affect this island in the short and long term.

    Like

  • REALITY POEMS
    Culture is Free

    LKJ Linton Kwesi Johnson
    Bass Culture
    Cultural Dub

    Muzik of blood
    Black reared
    Pain rooted
    Heart geared
    All tensed up
    In di bubble an di bounce
    An di leap an di weight-drop
    It is di beat of di heart
    This pulsing of blood
    That is a bubblin bass
    A bad bad beat
    Pushin gainst di wall
    Whey bar black blood
    An is a whole heappa
    Passion a gather
    Like a frightful form
    Like a righteous harm
    Giving off wild like is madness
    BAD OUT DEY
    Hotta dan di hites of fire
    Livin heat doun volcano core
    Is di cultural wave a dread people deal
    Spirits riled
    An rise an rail thunda-wise
    Latent powa
    In a form resemblin madness
    Like violence is di show
    Burstin outta slave shackle
    Look ya! boun fi harm di wicked
    Man feel
    Him hurt confirm
    Man site
    Destruction all aroun
    Man turn
    Love still confirm
    Him destiny a shine lite-wise
    Soh life tek the form whey shiff from calm
    An hold di way of a deadly storm
    Culture pulsin
    High temperature blood
    Swingin anger
    Shattering di tightened hold
    The false hold
    Round flesh whey wail freedom
    Bitta cause a blues
    Cause a maggot suffering
    Cause a blood klaat pressure
    Yer still breedin love
    Far more mellow
    Than di soun of shapes
    Chanting loudly
    SCATTA-MATTA-SHATTA-SHACK!
    What a beat!
    For di time is night
    When passion gather high
    When di beat jus lash
    When di wall mus smash
    An di beat will shiff
    As di culture alltah
    When oppression scatta

    Like

  • Got plenty of ideas but nobody is going to listen. Soooo… I will do my own little thing and encourage and help others in my little sphere. That’s all! It’s been working so far!

    Like

  • RE Years ago in Jamaica, the discussion centered on why Barbados economy remained relatively buoyant and it a low crime island. The Jamaican pointed out that Barbados’s relatively large middle class provided economic support and acted as a buffer (between the rich and poor) which suppressed crime. He warned if that class ever contracts significantly Barbados will begin to exhibit traits common to Jamaica. Sadly, this is becoming more evident post Covid-19.

    The machinations being mentioned are only serving to further create an economic crisis that will adversely affect this island in the short and long term.

    YOU ARE 100% CORRECT!
    THE FACTS ARE THAT THE CONTRACTION IN REAL LIVESTYLE AND LIVING STANDARDS OF “MIDDLE CLASS” BAJANS HAS BEEN APPARENT TO ME SINCE THE NINETIES. I WAS AMAZED AT THE CONDITIONS IN WHICH TEACHERS AND OTHER CIVIL SERVANTS LIVED WHEN I VISITED HOMES DURING MY DUTIES WITH THE POLICE TO VERIFY DEATHS

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  • Good comment, groslyn! The need to feel superior is our biggest hurdle. It means we have to keep our peers down so we can rise a little above them. We have already been programmed to believe that we cannot win against the other races and so we only see other blacks as our competition.

    As I have been saying for a while now, our problems begin in our minds. That is why I have been saying that we need to focus on ourselves.

    Like

  • But…those civil servants and teachers probably took holidays overseas every year and sometimes in every time there was a long weekend. There was a time when if any one of them heard you were taking vacation they would ask where you were going and there was an embarrassed silence if you said you would be spending it in Barbados.

    I believe that Barbadians have more air miles under their belts than most of the people in the world.

    Like

  • As the conversation around the country centers on policing, criminal and racial justice, and social equity, the topic of the War on Drugs must play a central part. For decades, the War on Drugs has been a tool to target Black and Brown Americans and change life trajectories in those communities for millions of people. The protests and policy debates across this country seek to change both the outcomes processes, practices, and institutions that produce those outcomes. One significant institution contributing to racial inequity is American drug policy.

    The second edition of my book Marijuana: A Short History will be released on June 30th, and it explores the explicitly racist roots of cannabis policy in the United States as well as the broader War on Drugs. It highlights how politicians across the political divide spent much of the 20th century using marijuana as a means of dividing America. By painting the drug as a scourge from south of the border to a “jazz drug” to the corruptive intoxicant of choice for beatniks and hippies, marijuana as a drug and the laws that sought to control it played on some of America’s worst tendencies around race, ethnicity, civil disobedience, and otherness.

    My book discusses how U.S. government officials first painted cannabis as an insidious substance flowing across the border like immigrants from Mexico. Next, the government described cannabis as a drug for the inner city and for Blacks, while also lying about it, leading to murder, rape, and insanity. Next, political opponents of Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan designed and enforced laws to target a variety of groups across America.

    All along, one consistent target for the nation’s cannabis laws were communities of color. Despite cannabis usage rates between whites and non-whites being similar, Black Americans are arrested for cannabis offenses at a rate of nearly 4:1, compared to whites. And in a nation with nearly 700,000 cannabis-related arrests each year (a number that was over 800,000 a few years ago), these policies affect an enormous number of Americans.

    Over the past several years, states and localities have passed legalization and decriminalization reforms in an effort to rein in such arrest numbers. In states that have legalized, arrests have fallen dramatically; although in many such places, racial disparities in arrests have changed little. Legalization or decriminalization are steps in the right direction, but as Marijuana: A Short History points out, such policies only help fix the present and future. Most of those reforms do little to fix the past.

    In an effort to fix the harms of the drug war, some states, via their legalization laws and others through subsequent legislative changes, have used record expungement for low-level cannabis offenses in an effort to right those wrongs. However, the impact of the broader War on Drugs is more lasting and institutionalized than record expungement can overcome. (Although the book discusses Illinois’ newest cannabis legalization law and the more comprehensive and systematic efforts it includes.)

    The future of cannabis policy in the United States, however, must include expungement (preferably, automatic expungement), but also more comprehensive efforts to help the communities that have been ravaged by the War on Drugs. Legalizing cannabis doesn’t undo past arrests, and record expungement doesn’t make up for the years and decades of fewer educational, employment, and other related opportunities as a result of that drug arrest. Nor does record expungement assist the people who have been negatively affected by a family member’s drug arrest and/or incarceration.

    As states legalize cannabis or seek to adjust their existing cannabis legalization policies, there are a few areas in which policy can help those most profoundly impacted by the War on Drugs. First, there must be an effort to retrain police, post-legalization in ways that help address existing and ongoing racial disparities. Police departments can use changes to cannabis laws as an ideal opportunity to address some of the behaviors, choices, and biases that contribute to inexcusable disparities that exist between non-whites and white’s arrest rates.

    In addition, more effective policies must be implemented in legalizing states to create new and lasting ownership opportunities for people of color and those with previous, low-level cannabis convictions. Several states have tried to craft policies to accomplish such goals, but they have largely fallen short of expectations. Access to business licenses is a critical part of that process, but so, too, is free business consulting for new entrepreneurs and greater access to reliable capital. That access to capital cannot simply be funding for opening a business, but the cannabis industry thus far shows us that even businesses that get off the ground have trouble thriving, leading to the sale, merger, and closure of businesses. Helping business owners remain competitive is key.

    Next, as states tax cannabis heavily—especially relative to other consumer products—governments must decide the most effective means of spending that money. States have directed funds toward transportation, education, mental health services, and policing, among other areas. However, community reinvestment to those communities, something my colleague Makada Henry-Nickie and I call the “Cannabis Opportunity Agenda,” is critical. This can be achieved by returning cannabis revenue back to Black and Brown communities, through not opening up more cannabis companies, but by supporting the type of community and economic activity that improves individuals’ well-being and achievement while lowering crime rates.

    For decades, the criminal justice system in the United States extracted from Black and Brown America money, human beings, and opportunity. The legal cannabis industry can help return what was taken. The history of cannabis policy demonstrates that racism was institutionalized and enforced in specific communities, and it is now legalization that must institutionalize the means for their recovery.
    (Quote)

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  • I believe that Barbadians have more air miles under their belts than most of the people in the world.

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    WELL WELL WELL

    SPOKEN BY SOMEONE WHO LIVES ON THE 2 x 3 ISLAND WHO KNOWS ABOUT EVERYONE LIVING AROUND THE WORLD.

    KEEP TALKING TO YOUR PLANTS THEY ARE THE ONLY ONES MOST TIMES YOU MAKE SENSE TO.

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  • One can also see that this is not only an economic issue. It is also a matter of social justice. Less than favourable treatment has been meted out to one specific class of the population; the black working class. The same people who for almost 400 years have been feeling the brunt of what occurs in the Barbadian society. This class has the highest rate of unemployment, highest incidence of crime, the highest rate of minimum wages, have a high cost of living, poor housing, reduced access to potable water, are in need of proper roads and combined they pay the highest taxes. The only positive thing that they as a group possess is votes at election time. It is these same people who are in need and are being denied the money that should be theirs. One of the women, a former Club Barbados worker lamented that she feels like George Floyd with the weight of someone’s foot on her neck and that she could not breathe. Do their lives and livelihood matter?

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    100/100 (A+)

    Like

  • Great post that! Somebody needs to tell that story very LOUDLY. We need to deal with the damage here also. Now! Making poor black boys into criminals for a spliff has to stop! The legislation proposed has not gone enough.

    I like the idea that the taxes collected from the medical marijuana industry should be earmarked for communities that have also been ravaged by the war in drugs.

    Like

  • Something happening.

    “Minister of Labour Colin Jordan will chair a meeting between the Barbados Workers’ Union (BWU) and management of G4S Secure Solutions Barbados today.”

    Like

  • Correction – has not gone far enough

    Like

  • Oh @Baje

    Like

  • Have you ever heard of hypebole, you ass of a jackass? The point being made was that the middle class had misplaced priorities.

    Piss off!

    Like

  • That should be “hyperbole”.

    One comment and it had to include the 2×3 reference. It seems that once your base is Barbados you can know nothing.

    And that is how you propose to lift Barbadians up – by first beating them into the ground!

    Asshole!

    Like

  • @ Baje

    It comes back to the nonsense spoken by some Professor of Management at the UWI recently. Crime is not a public health issue; it is a social construct, it is political.
    So, in defining crime, we must be precise as the portmanteau term has no meaning to those who have worked in the criminal justice system, or even those who have seriously studied the subject.
    Crime is an exercise in power relations, in the distribution of political power. So to talk about boys (and we usually mean boys) on the block who shoot each other, there is a better explanation of such simplicities.
    Moral outrage, such as the silly statement by that preacher a few years ago, belongs in the dust bin of history. Further, an LLB in any English-speaking country, does not equip a young lawyer with any criminological knowledge of any kind. LLBs are about applied law.

    Like

  • Now I can again make my point which was a point many persons have made here on numerous occasions.

    Middle-classed Barbadians of my generation were not as smart as their parents and grandparents. We became obsessed with showing off our new found “wealth” and developed champagne tastes on mauby pockets. We spent our money on things that quickly depreciated in value or never even had real value in monetary terms. This is otherwise known as conspicuous consumption. We maxed out on personal loans and credit cards. With these we purchased annual or biannual overseas holidays for our entire families, unnecessarily big automobiles and various other status symbols. Therefore we paid an astronomical amount of interest rather than earning a return on an investment.

    I can speak of this because I live on the 2×3 and I am speaking about the inhabitants of the 2×3.

    My plants obviously are if greater intelligence than you are. Or maybe they don’t have the overwhelming urge to belittle at least one Bajan a day. Still, that would be greater intelligence. Emotional intelligence.

    😊

    Like

  • PachamamaDecember 3, 2020 10:15 AM

    AC-DC should tell us what the brain trust of her dlp are proposing.

    Or is yours limited to badgering the incumbents.

    I think they have decided to use a page out of Mia play book
    A page which was hot with criticisms
    Notice how well it played of tge Bees

    Like

  • A big challenge for Barbados, other countries also, is the haste we distil issues through a political eye. We are learning from the developed countries or so it seems.

    Like

  • Oh dear me! I have agreed with a Hal Austin post. Actually called it a great post. And I have also agreed with Baje. Surely I now make sense to more than my plants?

    P.S. I am still the former primary school teacher whom you defended fiercely when Lorenzo called her a pea brain. Of course, that was when he also called you a jackass.

    The hypocrisy is astounding!

    Like

  • @ Baje

    It comes back to the nonsense spoken by some Professor of Management at the UWI recently. Crime is not a public health issue; it is a social construct, it is political.

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    @ Hal

    LET ME ADMIT THIS HE WAS ONE OF MY FORMER STUDENTS.

    A GOOD HARD WORKING INDIVIDUAL AND VERY RESPECTFUL.

    HE MEANS WELL IN HIS ANALYSIS ON WHAT IS HAPPENING ON THE 2 x 3 ISLAND.

    LIVING PRIMARILY ON THE 2 x 3 ISLAND ONE CAN DEVELOP A VERY NARROW WAY OF THINKING..

    Like

  • AC-DC

    Unlike Mia and her party you are in the unique position where a critical intervention within the affairs of Bajans could pay rich dividends.

    Like

  • @ Baje

    I am not disputing his intentions, but his conclusion, in a subject in which he does not appear to have any specialist knowledge, is nonsense. It is an idea he has picked up and does not appear to fully understand.
    I will like to see an essay by him elaborating on his thinking, rather than just a quote for a newspaper.

    Like

  • @ Baje

    I am not disputing his intentions, but his conclusion, in a subject in which he does not appear to have any specialist knowledge, is nonsense. It is an idea he has picked up and does not appear to fully understand.
    I will like to see an essay by him elaborating on his thinking, rather than just a quote for a newspaper.

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    YOU ARE AWARE THAT WHAT MIGHT HAVE BEEN PUBLISHED COULD ALSO HAVE BEEN THE LIMITATION OF THE NEWSPAPER REPORTER.

    Like

  • I have been waiting to hear from the union bosses in light of Covid, if they plan to expand their strike fund to cover issues of layoffs due to situations like covid going forward. In other words do the unions intend to put anything in place to ensure that after the benefits expire from the NIS, their memebers have something to fall back on?

    Remember year It is covid but next year God forbid, it could be a hurricane or another virus. This incident should have taught the unions that going forward they must plan differently. It can no longer be a case of collecting union dues and puffing up wunna chest when a worker gets laid off. We need to all understand that covid has sent us an important message, it is left to us to either ignore it or change our direction.

    Like

  • RE covid has sent us an important message, it is left to us to either ignore it or change our direction.
    THE OLIVET DISCOURSE PROMISES US MORE PANDEMICS WHOSE UNIVERSAL EFFECTS WE CAN ALSO IGNORE

    Like

  • @ Baje

    You may be right. But I can only go on the information in the public space. Crime is an issue that should be well debated in public, but we are not that developed. We prefer to whisper in the corridors and heckle those who venture to put forward an opinion.
    By the way, although it pains me, journalism in Barbados is really underdeveloped. They badly need training and I have offered to assist fore free, but of course the Barbados Condition kicked in.

    Like

  • Miller

    The FDA has just given initial approvals for a number of projects studying a range of psychedelics which are showing vastly better promise than drugs like psilocybin.

    They have said that mushrooms, ayahuasca have the potential for rewiring the brain, reversing memory loss, curing addiction etc. Backed up by John Hopkins studies about traumatic injuries to athletes.

    These are not knew. The Ancient Egyptians, we believe, and the Greeks used psychedelics as treatment modalities. It was only Nixon’s dirty war on drugs which purged the academic literature of their efficacy and criminalize them.

    Now they are back in a big way with real money to be made with big pharma lining up.

    For Barbados if we every want real development there is no other way but being disobedient to massa.

    Permit the resident Witch Doctor to enter!

    Like

  • @WS
    “Are you denying that the NUPW, publicly stated that after they “ crunched” the numbers”
    I am forced to inquire “what numbers”? Exactly what information did the NUPW have access to, which permitted an accurate analysis of anything. The answer my friend, is blowing in the wind………….
    And with this article, amongst other recent postings, suggest the direction of the wind is changing.

    Like

  • @JohnA
    what ‘strike fund’? Are unions mandated to have a ‘strike fund’? Or have they been managed like the NI funds? Ask Senator CF, he knows a lot about such matters.

    Like

  • Pacha…Mia had an early opportunity to capitalize real big on the marijuana, but screwed up with HER NO BLACKS ALLOWED racist policy….so now, no intelligent black person trusts her, only the stank smelling yardfowls…

    Selling passports will soon be even bigger than tourism.

    “REUTERS/STANFORD CONWAY (
    A coveted St. Kitts and Nevis passport
    In contrast, the country’s wealthy citizens who are acquiring second passports have a much greater advantage when it comes to doing business, vacation, or simply acquiring a second home abroad. A Kenyan citizen, for example, who also gains Dominica citizenship would be able to travel visa-free to 140 countries including many jurisdictions in the Americas, Europe, and Asia than their countrymen with just a Kenyan passport. CS Global describes the second passport as a “Plan B”.

    There has been such high demand from wealthy South Africans and Nigerians for CBI programs that Henley opened an office in Lagos this year. It also has offices in Cape Town and Johannesburg.

    A review of the several options on offer in different countries shows prospective applicants must be ready to part with $150,000 to more than $3 million. The figure can be higher depending on the wishes of the applicant, their dependents, and the requirements of the host country.

    Meanwhile, the number of Kenyans with the financial muscle to consider the option is projected to grow. Kenya’s super-wealthy with a net worth of more than $30 million is forecast to grow by 14%, while those with at least a $1 million is projected to grow by 13% from 2,900 to 3,369 in the next four years.

    Countries in the Caribbean, for example, are offering prospective beneficiaries options such as in real estate where an applicant buys a state approved property and holds it for a specified period of time or nonrefundable cash contributions to the respective funds of the countries offering.”

    Like

  • No one is trusting house negros who have a racist apartheird policy against Black people in Barbados and are more than likely easing in boer pig South African racists, rapist animals as we type……never trust a sellout…

    Like

  • @ Northern

    I hear the big bosses at the union say they had a strike fund. They never said where it was or how much was in it though. Lol

    These unions need to change with the times and understand that these ain’t the days of Frank Walcott no more. They need to look to secure their workers
    More on and above the NIS benefits. I mean what exactly you does get fuh these dues you paying?

    I hope the strike fund was not invest in Sinkyuh paper too as dat would be a hell of a ting!

    I hereby by the power vested in me by the association of shop keepers and white rum retailers, deem the fund be called by all unions THE STRIKE AND CATASTROPHY FUND as of today the 3rd day of December in the year of our lord 2020! I further deem that as a sign of solidarity all Mercedes Benz and BMWs owned by the unions will be replaced with Kias or Hyundais and that further to this these said above mentioned vehicles must be driven with the AC off and Windows down as a sign of being at one with their membership.

    Cuss me all wunna want I don’t wuk for wunna.

    Like

  • @ NorthernObserver December 3, 2020 3:26 PM

    I was going to ask John A a similar question, but decided not to. However, from my understanding, a union’s ‘strike fund’ is used to assist its members in the event of prolonged strike action, if such action has been sanctioned or recognised by the union. If this is true, then, I don’t understand how the fund becomes relevant in a situation where former employees were protesting the non-payment of their severance on the date their former employers promised it would be paid.

    Rather than discuss the issue rationally and reasonably, some of us prefer to politicize it, to suggest impropriety on the BWU’s part, simply because Toni Moore is that union’s general secretary and the BLP’s member of parliament for St. George North.

    But, as you quite rightly mentioned, perhaps Caswell Franklyn could give a ‘second opinion.’

    Like

  • Waru
    Blacks will get a republic and titles. The Whites, Asians and lackey investor classes have first lien on all resources. Lol.

    Like

  • @Artax
    my understanding aligns with yours.
    However, what was your interpretation of the NI Catastrophe Fund?
    I mean before a few months back

    Click to access e0215f0c7b25f89026cab9e9b51ea271.pdf


    Could the strike fund not be similarly altered for ‘interpretive reasons’?
    Doesn’t protetsting and not working = strike?

    Like

  • @JohnA
    cuss ya?
    You gine get arrested and publicly whipped.

    Like

  • @ Artax
    @ Northern

    All shite talk aside now. If the union is representative of the members and the members in fact are shareholders in the union, then what is to stop the members voting at an AGM for the strike fund to be incorporated into a strike and Catastrophy Fund by way of a resolution and a vote there on?

    My experience with body corporates shows that many changes have come out of AGMs where the resolutions have gotten the votes needed to pass them. Why then should a union be any different? After all the union is there to serve its members not the other way around.

    Like

  • @Northern

    I only providing mental fodder for thought that’s all! lol

    Like

  • @ John A

    You are right. The AGM is the supreme body.

    Like

  • “The Whites, Asians and lackey investor classes have first lien on all resources. Lol.”

    as assigned by the black face racists, who will be around to beg the Black population for votes in 2023 , begging, begging, begging to return them to the parliament, but only slaveminded yardfowls and those with short memory syndrome will forget the big NO BLACKS ALLOWED sign the haunted house racists hung out so they can import slave masters and sell out the marijuana…..

    and amending labor laws to deny black hotel workers their severance,

    and trying to bully the media to cover it up

    and violate Caswell’s right and the constitution to keep the black population unknowledgeable about their rights under the constitution…..there’s a lot to remember…..

    Like

  • Oh dear me! I have agreed with a Hal Austin post. Actually called it a great post. And I have also agreed with Baje. Surely I now make sense to more than my plants?

    P.S. I am still the former primary school teacher whom you defended fiercely when Lorenzo called her a pea brain. Of course, that was when he also called you a jackass.

    The hypocrisy is astounding!

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    ALL THIS IS SHOWING IS YOUR PETTYGREE

    Like

  • @William Skinner December 3, 2020 8:20 AM @ David Are you denying that the NUPW, publicly stated that after they “ crunched” the numbers, that the then government , could have given its members a 23% salary increase? “Are you denying that within a very short time after the current administration came into office that the same NUPW readily accepted a 5 % increase?”

    But William NOBODY believed that a 23% salary increase would be forthcoming.

    Stupssseee!!!

    i have worked 40+ years in 3 different countries and have NEVER received a 23% pay increase, although once I received an 80% increase, but that was based on more education and sensibly switching to a bigger, better employer. I’ll be honest I have never been loyal to any employer. I was there strictly to do an honest day’s work for an honest day’s pay and if I saw a better opportunity it was bye, bye. Loved my work, loved my pay, but was never so foolish as to love any employer.

    Like

  • So if the workers who pay the union leadership are not happy with the leadership they would be extremely foolish to keep the leader(s).

    However I have no reason to believe that the workers are foolish.

    Like

  • @John A December 3, 2020 4:13 PM “I hereby by the power vested in me by the association of shop keepers and white rum retailers, deem the fund be called by all unions THE STRIKE AND CATASTROPHY FUND as of today the 3rd day of December in the year of our lord 2020! I further deem that as a sign of solidarity all Mercedes Benz and BMWs owned by the unions will be replaced with Kias or Hyundais.”

    You have something against Suzukis?

    Like

  • @John A

    The Unions struggle to collect membership dues. What monies are available in a strike fund? The blogmaster suspects little.

    Like

  • @ John A

    Do you know if the union’s constitution allows for members to be shareholders?

    I know members of co-operative credit unions are also shareholders and can propose and vote for resolutions at annual general meetings.

    Unless we can refer to the BWU’s constitution or its by-laws, then, we’re merely assuming what we ‘feel should or should not happen.’

    Like

  • This is what happens when lambs lie down with lions now wunna getting mailed

    Like

  • Makes for wonder how many of them back in 2016 took Toni Moores foolish advice and stood in solidarity to march with big business against the Stuart administration
    But wunna were warned about how the march would impact wunna lives
    Now the businesses belly full and wunna bellies empty

    Like

  • @ Artax

    From memory i remember there is a provision for the members to use the AGM to put resolutions to the floor. Now mind you having not read the bylaws so I am not sure what percentage of the members it takes to pass a resolution, or of it can be done with a mix of members present and proxies.

    These are the questions the members should be seeking out answers for as it will place the power back in the hands of the members. Of course don’t expect the board to give you those answers you all need to research it yourselves.

    Like

  • @ NorthernObserver

    The 2006-2007 Catastrophe Fund was previously established to provide financial assistance to low income workers who own or occupy chattel houses worth not more than $125,000, that were destroyed as a result of the ‘forces of nature.’

    Amendments to the Act increased the value of chattel houses to be not more that $150,000 and the occupant’s earning less than $25,000 annually. And, also permitted the fund to extend financial assistance to qualifying businesses.

    0.1% of an employee’s NIS contributions goes to the Catastrophe Fund.

    RE: “Doesn’t protesting and not working = strike?”

    It depends on how you look at it. Under circumstances where employees decide to strike as a result of a work related grievance, then protesting and not working = strike.

    On the other hand, supposed employees were made REDUNDANT and their employer promised to pay them severance on or by a specific date. If on that date the employer reneged on his/her promise and the FORMER employees decide to protest as a result, then, I don’t believe this type of protest action could be reasonably described as a strike.

    Like

  • @ac
    Shame on u for letting the dead cat out the bag……and twice!!!

    Like

  • Mia said het govt was the repair govt
    Lol

    Like

  • @Artax
    it was extended to include….Disruption of business by a pandemic and related containment measures…earlier this year??

    On the def’n of strike….you are correct…….and, you need to appreciate when I’m AGM (all good mate) or TTM (taking the mickey). If you can alter physical damage from weather to include economic damage by pandemic, why then, cannot one extend “strike” to include disturbances caused by the effects of redundancy? All BS to suit whatever purpose one desires?

    BTW…where is @greene? Did he get a pick?

    Like

  • @ NorthernObserver

    How these workers’ disputes are being discussed, is indicative of the hypocrisy practiced on BU. Recall in 2014, when Transport Board retrenched some of its employees and promised to pay them all monies due by a particular date. On the day in question when the former employees turned up at TB’s headquarters they were not paid.

    Similarly to the former Club Barbados employees, they expressed their frustration outside TB’s compound and were subsequently interviewed by the media. Lisa Marshall was one of the former employees who was vocal about not being paid her severance.

    A few days after, an individual writing under the name ‘Douglas,’ posted an article to BU, entitled “Lisa Marshall- Retrenched Worker From Transport Board,” in which documents from her personal file were divulged to insinuate she stole money from TB.

    Some of the same contributors who are NOW being discourteous to the Unions and pretending to be in solidarity with Club Barbados employees………..

    ………….. were at the time on BU, cussing the media for highlighting the TB debacle and, rather than show solidarity with the retrenched workers, they admonished them for going to the press, while saying they were unpatriotic and being unfair to the DLP. One DLP supporter in particular, called Lisa Marshall a thief.

    Like

  • @Artax
    say it ain’t so.
    anyway, I know you know nuff bout de TB, and have a good long memory.
    You haven’t seen the side entrance to the BU rumshop has new signage? Above that entrance reads “Hypocrisy Lounge”. I doan care, I still gine fire a few.

    Like

  • So are u saying that the response to these workers should be hushed silence
    Listen up.bro
    There is more than one wheel that is driving this broken down workers wagon along with the employers who are not only thiefing from workers but govt
    Employers who have been giving a helping hand by govt
    There are so many problems with this issue that a blind man on a trotting horse can see and decided which side of the issue is cause for concern
    As usual the defense steps up and places blame on the many voices in solidarity with the workers
    However what the defense needs to know that the many voices crying out for justice are those from both political side of the fence

    Like

  • @ David BU

    Thanks for posting the BWU regulations.

    @ NorthernObserver

    Changes to government’s Catastrophe Fund can be made through amendments to the Act by the ruling administration at the time. In other words, politicians make the decision is made on our behalf…….. without consulting the electorate.

    I believe any changes a union’s strike fund is perhaps a decision to be made by members and the executive.

    Like

  • ******** politicians make the decision on our behalf……

    Like

  • @Artax
    The distinction is noted and I concur.

    Like

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