Our Date With Destiny has Arrived

Submitted by William Skinner

Since the abolition of slavery, the Caribbean region has been heading toward a date with destiny. Many of us have hailed events as defining moments. In most cases those moments lingered a while and then faded into historical reference. The abolition of slavery was a significant moment for our physical being but the scars of mental slavery still shackle us to a belief that we have reached the apex of our civilization.

The rise of the working class in the 1930s and onward to individual state independence, would have further cemented that we had arrived at a stage of development that was almost miraculous. It is a remarkable feat, that we went from slavery to independence in a historically short time. We should therefore be forgiven if we thought: The Strife Is O’er, The Battle Won.”

We were skilful with our limited resources and those countries within the region with more bountiful resources than others, were generous in their assistance toward their often-struggling brothers and sisters. We even forged ahead with regional unity and gave birth to the regional movement known as CARICOM. Outside of the occasional family squabble, the Caribbean has enjoyed longer periods of regional unity than we thought possible. Daily we try our best to develop our collective communities but the realities of individual countries, often forced to act on their own rather than a unified force, remain a monumental challenge.

The date with destiny finally arrived via a vicious carrier or messenger, we now know as COVID-19. The abolition of slavery; rise of the working class; independence, hurricanes and of course the glorious days of dominating the world of cricket, now seem to be fading occurrences as we grapple with the new norm. The COVID-19 has revealed that we have been meticulously unprepared for the date with destiny. AS the new norm descends upon us, there is wide spread panic and we are now bombarded by often weak and visionless speeches by leaders, who in many instances have abandoned common sense. We built our future on sun seekers and international treaties. We are treated like school children being forced to pass tests and grades that often have little or nothing to do with our cultural, social, or economic realities.

In a rather perverse way, we actually attached ourselves to the saying: “Why buy a cow when you can get milk free.” We now face the brutal reality that there is no free milk and we really have no unlimited access to cows we don’t own. Its time to buy our own cows and produce our own milk. It’s time to own the Caribbean farm and take it off the auction block.

As my friend’s grandmother asked him, when he was going through a rough period in his new environment of the USA and was contemplating a return to the island: “Did you come for the improvement or the exchange?”

Our date with destiny has arrived and no iron bird our floating hotel will save us from this brutal reality.

88 comments

  • Br careful Sir William!

    You almost sound dispensationalist.

    But right. The devine judgement of Pachamama has come.

    The “minmic men” of Caribbean elites had no answers in relative prosperity and could be expected to be further adrift as Pachamama enters the scene.

    Like

  • Excellent assessment William, now the facts are written what do you expect the rely, if any, will be ?

    Like our Blogmaster says, SAME OLD SAME OLD, Wily thinks will prevail. Wily hopes just once he’s wrong and BARBADOS may see a glimmer of hope.

    Like

  • True words. The issue now is how the people of the region can take matters into our own hands. Relying on the visionless leaders and the local and foreign elites they serve will land us back exactly where we are.

    Liked by 1 person

  • William Skinner

    @ Pacha, Wily Coyote, Tee White
    Reading the submissions of a youth born after independence, who is considered a rising star on the political scene, I have realized that those yet to come, will be carbon copies, of those that are in control at present.
    It’s absolutely frightening.

    Liked by 1 person

  • PoorPeacefulandPolite

    Raise your blood pressure – see if that approach clears the blockage !!

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ William Skinner

    The future always seem frightening to those who are afraid of what the future holds. Our history attests to our ability to overcome and cope with whatever fate throws at us. Post COVID-19 era will be no different. The past ,you are always quick to point out,were no Halcyon days,nor is the present. We will simply have to cope and we will. We are Barbadians. We are doing quite well despite the forebodings. We got this.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Tee White

    The leaders come from among us, they do not arrive from Mars.

    Liked by 3 people

  • YOU HAVE BEEN DUPED! SOLD DOWN THE RIVER ON A BIG BROWN LOG!!

    The President of Tanzania didn’t trust the World Health Organization, so he had fake test samples sent to labs.
    He took samples from papaya fruits, sheep, goats, and other things. They all came back positive for corona virus.

    Like

  • William Skinner

    @ Vincent Codrington
    First you note that I address the region. I am not pessimistic but the response so far to how we propose to act post COVID -19 is not encouraging. We seem hell bent on making the same mistake. Any batsman who fails to correct his or her mistakes,would get out the “same way” each time.
    The term frightening should not be taken in its literal sense. Perhaps I should have said disappointing.
    Of course we will all survive. Look around you; those working for $250 per week or less are breathing; those exposed in the press living below squalor are breathing.

    Liked by 2 people

  • Those working for $250 a week must be protected. Those exposed in the press living below the poverty line must be lifted up. All the rest of us must rightsize our expectations, including share holders, cabinet ministers, prime ministers and governors general.

    I don’t expect to escape unscathed. I am already learning to grow some of my own food.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    No batsman knows before hand how the ball is going to come off the pitch. He gives it his best stroke when it does.
    Correcting mistakes? The future is seldom a carbon copy of the past. We have always to do the best we can in each situation. There are geniuses; but only in retrospect . There is ,however, a heavy dose of luck.

    Like

  • If what was said is True on this Video, then the Deep State is Much Larger and More Pervasive than we All Know. They are Willing to Use Any Bad Actors, Any Means means necessary, including Sinking the World’s Economy so that they can Accomplish their Goal of Total Control and All of their Nefarious Plan! I Never Imagined that the Deep State was was so All Encompassing. Even in the Old Days Slaves Rebelled and we must Educate Ourselves so we can Rise up so that we are NOT Made Serfs! We all have seen different Parts of the Great Conspiracy but here ii is they have REVEALED themselves, they usually do. They have even through Fauci said in early 2017 that the Present Administration would face a Pandemic and All of the Co-conspirators said we would Never Get Back To Normal, getting us to Accept Willingly, Restrictions that they want to Impose, such as Endless Lock-downs (house Arrest) whenever they Feel Like it! Is What they are Preaching as the NEW NORMAL.

    In America there is a Case where a man was Shot Twice in his Chest and his Death was recorded as Covid because his Lungs were Punctured…So Do Not Believe the Numbers you hear, they are being Inflated because the Government pays more when you Treat a Covid Patient.

    Seven People Died in Barbados from Covid How many do you think died from other Causes? In Two Months we’ve had more Heart Failure Deaths than Covid, but we still lock up and Still scared that the Bogeyman coming, in Old Time Barbados they would say “D Heart Man! And Now ya wearing Mask that are Not Mandatory but Mandatory, while looking at ya neighbour like he is a Zombie coming for you.

    All of these Controls, Plans and Methods have been well thought out and Using International Agencies to Implement their Objective, while you are being Beguiled that they are Trying to save you.

    And the “Philanthropist” at the Center of it All has Stated Multiple Times Publicly that the World has too many People and it should be reduced from Seven Billion to Seven Million people. He the same Man that Says he is going to Save the world by Implementing Mandatory Vaccine, that in Recent Years, have All been Contaminated with Mercury and other Foreign Substances.

    We Should Not be like the Frog in a Pot with the Fire Simmering under us and Not Jumping out, until too late when we are Cooked Educate yourself, Save yourself, Only then Can You Save Others.

    The Mirror Project – Documentary Film – Coronavirus

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @David, ur 9:25 could be considered a variation of the Willy jab of ‘same ole, same ole’… although of course it’s so true that it hurts us deeply when we see it repeated! 🙂

    Barbados and all other nations are simply the results of what the PEOPLE want … when we blame the politicians we are merely shifting the blame from ourself… very few people have the fortitude and integrity to EVER blame themselves for the failures of which they are complicit.

    But a news item this morn broadens this concern quite dramatically but will get little play or notice, I suspect.

    The most powerful man in the world is threatening to legalize lying and the spread of disinformation by executive order… In a sentence that is bluntly the thrust of a proposed directive  that will curb the ability of social media sites to ‘tag’ remarks considered “potentially misleading.”…

    Of course this man disseminates on a daily basis the type of false and misleading data which at any other stage of our lives would have been bluntly called ‘lies’ and discarded from the public discourse… but now he actually has the power (or thinks he does) to muzzle the cry of ‘liar, liar”.

    So yes, @Skinner, when you talk of “Our date with destiny has arrived” you are astute and correct way beyond the confines of dear lil Bim!

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Vincent

    “We got this.”

    That’s exactly what everyone is concerned about, PAST history using WE GOT THIS has not turned out well, The ostrich philosphy has proven not to work. You can only stitch your head in the sand so long, eventually it’ll get stuck and your in deep SHIT.

    Like

  • @David

    “The leaders come from among us, they do not arrive from Mars.”

    Now there’s an idea, let’s give some Martians a go, cannot be any worse than what we got.

    Like

  • The world will be changed permanently:

    A global, novel virus that keeps us contained in our homes—maybe for months—is already reorienting our relationship to government, to the outside world, even to each other. Some changes we expect to see in the coming months or years might feel unfamiliar or unsettling: Will nations stay closed? Will touch become taboo? What will become of Hotels, restaurants/cook shops. Rum shops will survive? Yes it’s an escape.

    But crisis moments also present opportunity: more sophisticated and flexible use of technology, less polarization, a revived appreciation for the outdoors and life’s other simple pleasures. No one knows exactly what will come, but here is my best stab at a guide to the unknown ways that society—government, healthcare, the economy, our lifestyles and more—will change.

    The comfort of being in the presence of others might be replaced by a greater comfort with absence, especially with those we don’t know intimately. Instead of asking, “Is there a reason to do this online?” we’ll be asking, “Is there any good reason to do this in person?”—and might need to be reminded and convinced that there is. Unfortunately, if unintendedly, those without easy access to broadband will be further disadvantaged. The paradox of online communication will be ratcheted up: It creates more distance, yes, but also more connection, as we communicate via WhatsApp more often with people who are physically farther and farther away—and who feel safer to us because of that distance.

    Liked by 1 person

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    “No batsman knows before hand how the ball is going to come off the pitch. He gives it his best stroke when it does….Correcting mistakes? The future is seldom a carbon copy of the past. We have always to do the best we can in each situation. There are geniuses; but only in retrospect . There is ,however, a heavy dose of luck.”

    @Vincent, that’s an interesting take on life… amazingly so…. Of course the future is not an (exact) carbon copy of the past but the fact is that there are often enough similarities that it does seem like ‘deja vu, all over again’… Starting with the sun raising and setting every day… different times according to the seasons surely, but a sameness that looks quite carbon copied.

    And on the outer extremes of that… over in Afghanistan or Syria where war still rages.. is there a big distinction in practical terms between an incoming barrage of mortar rounds on Monday morning compared to the fusillade of heavy machine gun-fire on late Saturday!

    You HAVE to plan and correct any mistakes you made in protecting your city in those different scenarios…if not you DIE by bullet or mortar shrapnel; similarly you have to correct life mistakes and learn to read the ball off the pitch and adapt to the changing circumstance of life better like when the ball comes ‘out of the rough’ … otherwise you die, also!

    And cricket… Well … That’s an even more amazingly interesting analogy….. Are u suggesting that the genius of a Sir Garry who modified his stroke play based on “how the ball is going to come off the pitch” was a genius “only in retrospect” … Or a Lara or Tendulkar or a Gayle!

    Just other perspective of your analysis!

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  • @ Mr. William Skinner

    You said and I quote

    “,,,As the new norm descends upon us, there is wide spread panic and we are now bombarded by often weak and visionless speeches by leaders, who in many instances have abandoned common sense…”

    It would be extremely easy to go down the avenue of enumerating each of these 30 visionless leaders for you BUT DE OLE MAN GOING LEAVE THAT TO THE MANY BLOGGERS WHO WILL FOLLOW ME HERE

    I smiled when you spoke of the grandmother of your friend and was reminded of the words of my own grandmother who said “you cannot make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear!”

    When massa GAVE THE REGION INDEPENDENCE few know that it was given to the perfect docile population and faithful British Citizen.

    It is important for you to understand this inveterate mendicancy that is embedded in the psyche of 98% of the population.

    You kind sir are like Covid-19, an aberration!

    Once you contemplate the gravity of that statement you start to contextualize what your “weak and visionless” means when such characteristics form the very baseline of our collective experience and which is critical for the country to live.

    Let me brek it down in de ole man uncouth vernacular. (I will not go too wide with my language because de ole man has a respect for you but here is a borderline anecdote)

    Remember when you was a young man and you buy 3 condoms and put dem in you pocket and show one to the fellers? Remember how de fellers used to look at you like a boss? But you remember going to a fete and dere was a few women dere, but all of dem was wid men? What you do wid de condoms?

    In the same vein that you are speaking of that vision-less structure for our country, de ole man likens the paucity of women at that party!

    And it begs the question, by which process will one be able to pre-qualify candidates for the required “vision”?

    Liked by 1 person

  • William Skinner

    @ Vincent Codrington
    I don’t think Everton Weekes would agree with you. Great batsman know how the pitch is playing and what will be bowled to them. Great anticipation.
    By your reasoning, we would not have known that the bottom could have fallen out of the tourism bucket so we waited on the catastrophe of COVID-19.
    Those who play the game well , first spend a lot of time watching and analyzing it. Ask Sir Garry. Lol.
    @ DPD
    You are on point !

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    Not buying that. To follow your logic to a linear conclusion great batsmen would never be bowled out. The evidence is that they do.

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  • I will not allow you guys to leave out Alvin kallicharran, the most under-rated batsman in the world according to Tony Cozier and ME.

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  • Vincent Codrington

    @ dpD

    I think you are responding, as usual, to statements I did not make. But if your wont is to nick pick on your reconstructions of my statements please do. But please note that they are your reconstructions not my original statements.

    Like

  • William skinner

    @ Piece
    Fair comment. My views are on the entire region. Amazingly most of the current leaders are UWI graduates. I am appalled by the lack of intellectual creativity. No fresh ideas. It’s really depressing to say the very least.

    Like

  • I await Chaper 1.

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  • @William

    well said

    Just observing

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  • Two comments struck me. One was from Pachamama who stated that “……The “minmic men” of Caribbean elites had no answers in relative prosperity and the other was from William Skinner who stated that the majority of Caribbean leaders were taught at the UWI.

    We continue to pick from the same fruit tree which produces the foulest of fruits and expect the results to be different. Pluralism is found wanting within our region. For example we completely ignore the potential of the Rasta movement. Their voice should be heard. We could equally say the same for the majority population. Perhaps the voice from traditional “poor whites” may have something to add of value.

    With regard to our date with destiny none of us can be certain. The only certainly is that our government has zero control of Barbados destiny and remains in a strait- jacket. Mia hints at connecting to Africa. We all know that this is a last resort measure. The continent of Africa has many internal problems however it is a hungry continent with many creative and innovative individuals who are out performing their brothers and sisters in the Caribbean region.

    Be prepared for our government to open negotiations with countries with bigger purse strings than ours. Who remembers Minister Estwick and his approach to the UAE (an Arab MUSLIM country) to clear the country’s debt problems?

    As a black nationalist I look forward to changes been made on the ground by Barbados majority population. Mia has no more cards to deal. She is merely sniffing around trying to grab any assets that she believes are in reach of her claws. I wonder how safe people’s savings are when a country hits rock bottom. Mia needs to be transparent with the people and change course or step down. The elite have to be heavily reduced in numbers. Mia should set in train legislation which will ultimately asset strip from this cossetted group. Return the land to the people of the country and curtail the building of further hotels on the island. This would be just a start.

    We know which group of people will suffer most during this Covid-19 pandemic. Mia must be aware that social unrest cannot be too far behind if she does not change course.

    Liked by 1 person

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @Vincent, good sir, if u are capable of making statement here in BU then I suspect it’s fair game for another to discuss ur comments.

    As I say here often, ones uses a blogger’s remarks to enter a discourse because their point has an angle that is of interest … It is NOT nitpicking guy… Can get real, PLEASE.

    If u are unwilling to debate ur posts then so be it… And if I misinterpret your post then that’s bad on me.

    … BUT considering two of us took a similiar perspective on your post I can only be amused that you proclaim that ME, I, Only DpD has some tendency to respond to a ‘statement you didn’t make’. Ah well.

    So at the odd chance of doing it again I would once more disavow you of the perspective that “To follow your logic to a linear conclusion great batsmen would never be bowled out. The evidence is that they do.”

    That’s startling … ANY batsman can KNOW EXACTLY what is going to be bowled (a bouncer, a googly, whatever) and STILL get out from poor execution of the intended stroke…. Same in life: we know a hurricane

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  • de pedantic Dribbler

    … is imminent and yet get in trouble because we executed our protection plans badly!

    @Donna, that’s a LOL. In the short list noted how can Alvin Kallicahran be considered left out!

    He was a top class batsman, no doubt of that, and he can stand next to Sobers, Lara, Gayle, Tendulkar or Weekes proudly on his achievements.

    So in a quick list of that type there is no shame or slight in omitting Kallicharan.

    Just clarifying.

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  • As usual, long talk and fantasies.

    Liked by 1 person

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    And a further LOL blast of yesteryear…. I was then a Rowe man and still am… That was of course the eternal cricket argument of the era.

    Alvin was good…yes … but Lawrence was just so silky, smooth good tho. 😂

    And there endeth my glance back into time, way, way back into time.

    Like

  • The date with destiny finally arrived via a vicious carrier or messenger, we now know as COVID-19.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Seven deaths, but back in 1854, following the abolition of slavery there was cholera.

    20,000 Bajans died in three months.

    What is the big deal with COVID-19?

    Like

  • @ Piece
    Fair comment. My views are on the entire region. Amazingly most of the current leaders are UWI graduates. I am appalled by the lack of intellectual creativity. No fresh ideas. It’s really depressing to say the very least.

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    HAVING TAUGHT AT UWI CAVEHILL, A FEW MONTHS AGO BOTH DR LUCAS AND MYSELF SPOKE ABOUT MOST OF THE DEGREE PROGRAMS BEING THEORETICAL AND MOST TUTORS/LECTURERS ARE DINOSAURS TEACHING FROM NOTES OF MANY YEARS.

    WAS CUSSED BY DR GP.

    THINGS WILL NOT CHANGE AS UWI IS A DEGREE MILL IN MOST AREAS.

    WHAT YOU ARE SEEING IS A ACCURATE REFLECTION OF THIS INSTITUTION.

    Like

  • William Skinner;

    I do’nt think our date with destiny has arrived yet. I think destiny has only sent us a calling card.

    I’ll expand on this later, but I think the first wave of Covid-19 has only given us a glimpse of what is in store for us over the next 6 months or so as the effects begin to be felt in full force throughout the World. America is now starting its battle with destiny in the guise of the Minneapolis racial bombshell that is somewhat different from the modern indignities and death visited on Blacks just as Covid is different to the Spanish Flu and other viral diseases / pandemics of the last century or so.

    A perfect storm iappears to be developing in the US as Trump and his AG gird up to get into the mix there as they shortsightedly fail to recognize that pre-Covid strategies in a post-Covid world will not work. Will they recognize that it will be most dangerous to follow their usual racist playbook at a time when Covid 19 has put over a quarter of the workforce out of work? If the 2nd Covid wave arrives later this year I won’t be surprised if it is even bigger than the current one because of the mismanagement of the first one.

    I’ll continue tomorrow as I think the destiny of the whole Earth is tied up in matters that transcends Trump and Covid 19

    Like

  • “He was a top class batsman, no doubt of that, and he can stand next to Sobers, Lara, Gayle, Tendulkar or Weekes proudly on his achievements.”

    @ dpD

    I was going to ‘ask’ if you actually ‘called’ Gayle ‘in the same breath’ to ‘call’ SIR Garry, Lara, Weekes and Tendulkar. However, the word “achievements” ‘said’ it all.

    Liked by 1 person

  • fortyacresandamule

    In order for black nations on this earth to develop economically at their own pace, on their own terms and accord they would have to abondon western values, institutions and way of thinking. Only an extreme and radical move like this would suffice. Even if it means going backwards and starting from scratch, I think the price would worth it. However, the majority of the populace would rebel.The modern lifestyle and comfort they have come to enjoy under this system is just too intoxicating to give up. In other words, they don’t mind being the wretched of the earth or the whiteman’s burden.

    Like

  • William Skinner

    @ Artax
    In other cultures DPD would have been beheaded for such a travesty. Let’s forgive him, he had a lapse. Lol

    Like

  • William Skinner

    @ fortyacresandamule
    Even the most progressive amongst us cannot deny your position.
    @ Iyallsmall
    I hasten to think you might just be right!
    @ Baje
    The intellectual output of UWI in no way matches the investment. That now is clearly obvious.

    Like

  • Covid 19, Pandemic or PLANDEMIC?

    US experts and specialists in critical care arrive at a Covid-19 critical care treatment protocol used on over 100 patients so far, only two of whom died, both of those in their 80s and with “advanced, chronic medical conditions”. Doctors responsible for developing the protocol claim the USA’s medical establishment (AKA the Rockefeller birthed Medical-Industrial-Complex), the CDC, the WHO and the Trump White House seems to studiously ignore their successful treatment protocol and are reluctant, for some strange reason, to publicize this life saving treatment option.

    Front-Line Critical Care Working Group

    As noted by the Alliance for Natural Health, despite the fact that “the obstacle course posed by the peer review process to scientific publication has been removed,” and despite many critical care specialists using treatment protocols that differ from standard of care, information about natural therapeutics in particular are still being suppressed by the media and is not received by those who need it most — critical care physicians.

    “We all need to be asking why. After all, people are dying. How would it make relatives feel if it was found that their loved one had died needlessly just because the doctors who were having greatest success were not being listened to and their innovative protocols had been systematically ignored?” Alliance for Natural Health states.3

    According to the article, efforts by Dr. Pierre Kory — medical director at the Trauma & Life Support Center and a faculty member in the Division of Allergy, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine in the Department of Medicine at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health — to share the Front Line COVID-19 Critical Care Working Group’s4 (FLCCC) successes with other health care professionals have so far come to naught.

    Kory was one of five doctors participating in a May 6, 2020, roundtable discussion5 on COVID-19 with ranking senate committee member Gary Peters, D-Mich. In his testimony, Kory states, in part:6

    “I want to start by saying that I am part of a group of physicians which include several of the most highly published and well-known critical care experts in the country and world (Drs. Paul Marik, Umberto Meduri, Joseph Varon and José Iglesias). In response to the COVID crisis we formed the Front-Line Critical Care Working group

    Members of our group have now treated in excess of 100 hospitalized patients with our treatment protocol. Nearly all survived. The two that died were in their 80s and had advanced chronic medical conditions.

    SNIP

    According to Kory, the FLCCCs MATH+ protocol has been delivered to the White House on four occasions, yet no interest has been shown. Worse, he says they continue to be stonewalled by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and the National Institute for Health. Why?

    Isn’t saving lives, right now, and by any means possible, more important than pushing for a vaccine? If the MATH+ protocol works with near-100% effectiveness, a vaccine may not even be necessary (my emphasis /GM). The MATH+ protocol gets its name from:

    Intravenous Methylprednisolone

    High-dose intravenous Ascorbic acid

    Plus optional treatments Thiamine, zinc and vitamin D

    Full dose low molecular weight Heparin

    https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2020/05/29/dr-paul-marik-critical-care.aspx?cid_source=dnl&cid_medium=email&cid_content=art1HL&cid=20200529Z1&et_cid=DM547465&et_rid=882298134

    Like

  • John; re. your post last night in which you said

    “Seven deaths, but back in 1854, following the abolition of slavery there was cholera. 20,000 Bajans died in three months.
    What is the big deal with COVID-19?”

    Wow! You don’t seem to appreciate that they are significant differences between the Barbados and World of 1854 and that of 2020 which implicitly speak to the chasm between the local Cholera epidemic and the Covid-19 pandemic. Your comparison is as Chalk is to Cheese!

    Cholera is caused by a living pathogen and had a vector while Covid-19 is caused by a new invisible non-living virus which at present is not known to have a vector. Communications were antediluvian in 1854 as compared with internet based communications now Barbados was essentially a frontier outpost in 1854 and Human life, especially black life, was considered inherently less valuable than such life is considered in the Barbados of 2020. etc. etc.

    Pshaw!

    Like

  • “My views are on the entire region. Amazingly most of the current leaders are UWI graduates. I am appalled by the lack of intellectual creativity. No fresh ideas. It’s really depressing to say the very least.”

    “The intellectual output of UWI in no way matches the investment. That now is clearly obvious.”

    @ Mr. Skinner

    If you’re referring to regional political leaders, do you really believe your above comments are fair?

    You and a few others seem to be suggesting UWI is a ‘degree mill’ that produces graduates who are unable to think rationally or objectively and according to you, they “lack of intellectual creativity,” or your mate who ‘calls’ people “appallingly ignorant because they learnt by rote.” However, UWI’s BA or BSc degrees are accepted as qualifying prerequisites by some of the best UK, Canadian and US universities, for example, …….. from which these same ‘rote learners’ graduate with MSc and PhD degrees.

    Let’s look at Grenada’s PM, Dr. Keith Mitchell, for example. Michell graduated from UWI in 1971, with a BSc in mathematics and chemistry. I believe that degree would have assisted him in gaining acceptance at Howard University, where he graduated in 1975 with a MSc. In 1979, Mitchell subsequently gained his doctorate in mathematics and statistics from the American University.

    How about St. Kitts & Nevis PM, Dr. Timothy Harris? He was the only student, so far, to have graduated from UWI with BSc, first class honours, in accounting. Harris also gained his MSc with a distinction in accounting from UWI St. Augustine and Doctor of Philosophy degree in Administration majoring in Accounting, from McGill University (in association with Concordia University, University of Quebec at Montreal and University of Montreal).

    I believe anyone having successfully completed post-graduate studies would have developed a higher or different level of thinking from what he/she would have learnt as an undergraduate. As such, I’m a bit puzzled as to why we’re judging or assessing our leaders specifically on their UWI undergraduate training, rather than on their post-graduate academic achievements from INTERNATIONAL universities?

    In other words, why BLAME Mitchell’s “lack of intellectual creativity” on his UWI undergraduate BSc and not his PhD from the American University?

    However, St. Lucia’s PM, Allen Chastenet provides another interesting perspective, in that he is not a UWI graduate. He attended high school in Canada and graduated from Bishop’s University in Quebec, with a BA and a MSc from the American University.

    I believe, as it relates to this issue, you’re unnecessarily bashing UWI. Surely an individual compiling and successfully defending his/her doctoral thesis is indicative of some level of creativity.

    Chastenet’s example clearly indicates it’s a type of ‘organizational culture’ that exists among the politicians. This is ‘more or less’ fueled by the ‘die hards and yard-fowls,’ to whom politicians pander by telling them what they want to hear and giving the ‘gifts.’ They’re elected for 5 years, during which, being accountable is not a priority. They will spend the first 2 or 3 years blaming the previous administration, giving lackeys jobs……. and ‘you know the rest.’

    And, the cycle begins again during the next election campaign, when they will give excuses for their failures or inaction, talk some shiite, make some more promises and gullible electorate would either vote for or reject them. If the opposition party forms the next ‘government,’ the roles remain the same and they too will play the ‘blame game.’

    So, why should they be creative or change the status quo, when the ‘existing political system’ is similar to a fraternity or ‘lodge’ that works in their favour?

    Liked by 3 people

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @Artax n @Skinner… Amidst the serious, major issues of the moment let’s gander a bit on sports…

    Re “In other cultures DPD would have been beheaded for such a travesty. Let’s forgive him, he had a lapse. Lol”

    Gents I casually remind you that the basher Chris Gayle may not have as outstanding a stats line as those other giants but for sheer will, destructive dynamism and skill the man stands up well next to them.

    He was no great ‘technician’ but what he lacked there he super compensated with his bat speed and hand-eye coordination…. as all great batsmen do.

    But the long and short of it is simply that here was a guy who in tests could score a triple century to show his steadfastness against the slow Sri Lankans, and then withing the same series vrs the quick Aussies make a rapid fire 125% strike rate 100 one day and then a very sedate over 7 hour 150+ on another to show his full range and scope.

    Not a word needs be said on his T20 and ODI excellence.

    He is not a Sobers or Tendulkar surely but he is still absolutely brilliant and has to be given his due as one the all-time top WI players!

    I do want to keep my head intact…🙃

    Liked by 1 person

  • William Skinner

    @ DPD
    You have already been forgiven by the Cricketing Gods. You have successfully “ walked back” your previous entry caused by a lack of sleep.
    In the future, kindly only mention Sir Garry Sobers in the same breath you call any god that you worship .
    The mere fact that Sir Garry walks amongst us is a miracle to all mankind.
    Bethlehem is located at: Walcotts Ave, Bayville, St. Michael, Barbados , West Indies/ Caribbean.
    Now we urge you to go and enjoy the weekend because you still have your neck. 😊

    Liked by 2 people

  • re ArtaxerxesMay 29, 2020 8:24 AM
    well reasoned Artax
    your reasoning here can not be refuted

    Like

  • Key facts
    Cholera is an acute diarrhoeal disease that can kill within hours if left untreated.
    Researchers have estimated that each year there are 1.3 million to 4.0 million cases of cholera, and 21 000 to 143 000 deaths worldwide due to cholera (1).
    Up to 80% of cases can be successfully treated with oral rehydration solution (ORS).
    Severe cases will need rapid treatment with intravenous fluids and antibiotics.
    Provision of safe water and sanitation is critical to control the transmission of cholera and other waterborne diseases.
    Safe oral cholera vaccines should be used in conjunction with improvements in water and sanitation to control cholera outbreaks and for prevention in areas known to be high risk for cholera.
    A global strategy on cholera control with a target to reduce cholera deaths by 90% was launched in 2017.

    https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/cholera

    History
    During the 19th century, cholera spread across the world from its original reservoir in the Ganges delta in India. Six subsequent pandemics killed millions of people across all continents. The current (seventh) pandemic started in South Asia in 1961, and reached Africa in 1971 and the Americas in 1991. Cholera is now endemic in many countries.

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Cholera can kill in hours unlike COVID-19 which may take weeks.

    I repeat, what’s the big deal with COVID-19?

    The statement “The date with destiny finally arrived via a vicious carrier or messenger, we now know as COVID-19.” demonstrates how complete and utter the brainwashing of supposedly intelligent creatures the media has achieved.

    Like

  • Uwi Cave Hill is no longer fit for purpose in its current form and should be shut down or converted to a different kind of educational institution of more immediately use to the populace.
    From all reports the uwi of the 1960s/70s even early 80s was a fantastic institution. But that UWI served a different purpose from the one today. The old heads on this blog remember a different Barbados, a different world, a different type of UWI student. The current UWI is a net cost to the country not a benefit. It should either be reinvented or closed.

    Like

  • Wow! You don’t seem to appreciate that they are significant differences between the Barbados and World of 1854 and that of 2020

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Not really, while access to potable water has improved for many but the quantity remains about the same and the population grows!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • Piece the Prophet

    @ John

    You said and I quote

    “…Seven deaths, but back in 1854, following the abolition of slavery there was cholera.

    20,000 Bajans died in three months.

    What is the big deal with COVID-19?…”

    It is a great thing you have spoken

    Your comment epitomizes the type of thinking that characterizes the state of play in these matters, local and regional.

    You present the insular thought hierarchy that Mr William Skinner has commented on eloquently here.

    Yours is the small 2 x 4 island mentality that occupies rather suffuses the halls of power and is that to which citizens totally cede their lives daily.

    “…we are the world…”

    This 166 sq. mile failing economy, proudly acclaims that COVID MEANS NOTHING while the entire world is in ICU!

    Incredible!

    Liked by 1 person

  • The entire world is not in ICU … that’s a joke.

    Look at Africa, the largest continent.

    Few deaths, no demand for ICU beds.

    But look at Africa and its problems with potable water and you realise immediately COVID-19 is no big deal.

    It is only a big deal because of the effect brainwashing by the press has had on supposedly intelligent creatures.

    Like

  • PTL, yours is a euro centric view of the world!!!

    You are swayed by the incompetent leadership of in New York, Italy, Spain and the UK.

    If you look at the numbers you will realise that the pareto principle is at work, a sure sign the various governors and mayors screwed up.

    Like

  • @ GP

    Thanks.

    @ dpD

    I couldn’t resist responding to your comments.

    You mentioned Gayle’s “destructive DYNAMISM and SKILL,” in ‘one breath,’ and in another breath you ‘said’ “He was NO GREAT TECHNICIAN but what he lacked there he super compensated with his bat speed and hand-eye coordination…. as all great batsmen do.” Perhaps you were inhaling (something) between ‘breaths.’

    I know many of will be quick to say Gayle is one of WI’s ‘all time great test batsmen,’ mainly because he has 15 100s and is one of 4 batsmen to score two triple centuries ……. having scored 317 against South Africa in 2005 at the ARG and 333 against Sri Lanka at Galle International Stadium in 2010.

    Incidentally, BOTH matches were drawn. Gayle played 3 of the 4 test match series against SA, scored 317 in the 3rd test and finished the series with 329 runs. Similarly, in the 2010-2011 3 match test series against Sri Lanka, Gayle scored 333 in the 1st test and finished the series with 366 runs.

    This ‘destructive, dynamic and skilled batsman’ FAILED to SCORE OVER 400 runs in TWO test series in which he scored TRIPLE centuries.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Gayle could not cope with the inswinger.

    Guys like Starc etc. would eat him for breakfast.

    Haydn had that fault too but Haydn was also part of a top team.

    Iain Bishop repeatedly cleaned him up in his early days with the ball pitching and moving in.

    Bat/pad gap.

    Haydn addressed the fault better than did Gayle.

    Like

  • @ Donna,

    Over the years you’ve have always raged about your love of Kallicharan. You are probably basing your memories on Kalli’ when he destroyed Denis Lillle in the first world cup in England and sent him packing to recover in the outfields.

    There is a man whom I would always rank above him and he would be in my top 11. A man of Guyanese extraction, aesthetically pleasing on the eye, sartorial, poetic in his nature, concise and elegant in his batting style and a murderer of fast bowlers. Step forward Roy Fredericks.

    Like

  • Here is Ron DeSantis exposing the difference between the incompetence in New York and his leadership in Florida.

    Like

  • Here is the genius, Cuomo of New York fame.

    Like

  • Just to show how many airheads exist here is an example.

    All the monkeys aren’t in a zoo, on a day we meet quite a few!!

    The problem is the monkeys are promoted by the press who are mostly monkeys themselves.

    That’s why there are so many monkeys around these days!!

    Brainwashed by other monkeys.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Roy Fredericks was pure magic.

    His 169 at Perth was out of this world, also against Lille and Thompson in their pomp.

    I listened to that innings all night back in 1975.

    Like

  • William Skinner

    @ Artaxerxes
    Your response strengthens my position. You are speaking of certification and academic achievement. Kindly show how this certification and academic brilliance is transforming the region. My article seeks a regional narrative and is not about any individual island.A serious look at the regional leaders would show that in many cases their vision is less progressive when compared to those who went before them. The purpose of a university is to produce thinkers and those who want to create rather than mimic Eurocentric out dated norms.
    You must also question whether the education received is in sync with National socio economic goals.
    The UWI has failed the region and those who achieve national leadership have not performed exceptionally well. That’s why we run cap in hand to international loan sharks and embarrass ourselves by rushing up to events such as United Nations only to address empty halls.
    I rest my case.

    Like

  • @William

    The blogmaster agrees with your last comment.

    The investment in UWI should have created the knowledge capital to fuel transformational thinking and action plans to affect our region. Instead we see compromise our beliefs as a people by being mirror images of the unproductive elements of other cultures.

    Like

  • @WS
    The purpose of a university is to produce thinkers and those who want to create rather than mimic …You must also question whether the education received is in sync with National socio economic goals.The UWI has failed the region

    UWI should be shut down!

    Like

  • Here is an example of a country with a population of 97 million with no COVID-19 deaths.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/vietnam-how-this-country-of-95-million-kept-its-coronavirus-death-toll-at-zero/ar-BB14MxiR?ocid=spartandhp

    It is obvious there was incompetence in handling the outbreak …. Cuomo just has to open his mouth and you can hear it.

    The foolish brother Chris Cuomo has earned the nickname “Fredo” after the idiot brother in the Godfather.

    Rush Limbaugh made up the nickname for him.

    Like

  • UWI WAS SET UP TO TRAIN DOCTORS IN 1948 FOR THE BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS ………THATS A FACT THAT CAN NOT BE DENIED OR REFUTED

    UWI HAS TRAINED A NUMBER OF WELL TRAINED DOCTORS ……..THATS A FACT THAT CAN NOT BE DENIED OR REFUTED

    RE The purpose of a university is to produce thinkers and those who want to create rather than mimic
    UWI MEDICAL SCHOOL HAS DONE THIS WELL ALSO

    QUESTION: WHAT ARE THOSE WHO ARE BULLSHITTING ABOVE DONE OR CREATED ANYWHERE TO DEVELOP BARBADOS OR THE REGION?.

    RE The investment in UWI should have created the knowledge capital to fuel transformational thinking and action plans to affect our region. Instead we see compromise our beliefs as a people by being mirror images of the unproductive elements of other cultures.

    HAS ANY OF THE THOSE WHO ARE BULLSHITTING ABOVE WHO STUDIED OUT SIDE UWI OBTAINED the knowledge capital to fuel transformational thinking and action plans to affect our region?

    PLEASE KINDLY GIVE A LIST OF EXAMPLES OF THESE ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND EXPAND THEREON .

    Liked by 2 people

  • Vincent Codrington

    There is no doubt in my mind that UWI has and is carrying out its mandate. There is enough objective evidence to support such an assertion. The fact that not all graduates are foolish enough to contribute to the self deprecating,self undermining narratives will disappoint many commentators and so it should.
    I will repeat: show me the evidence that UWI has not delivered on its mandate.

    Like

  • @Vincent

    The region is wallowing in high debt, addicted to conspicuous consumption, unable to feed itself, has been unable to register patents/copyrights to separate itself etc.

    Like

  • THE FACT THAT “The region is wallowing in high debt, addicted to conspicuous consumption, unable to feed itself, has been unable to register patents/copyrights to separate itself etc” HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH UWI BUT WITH THE LEADERSHIP OF THE REGION, AND THE BEHAVIORAL PATTERNS OF THE PEOPLE uh lie?

    I HAVE NEVER WALLOWED IN DEBT: EVERY LOAN I HAVE EVER TAKEN WAS PREPAID
    I HAVE NEVER ENGAGED IN CONSPICUOUS CONSUMPTION, AND WAS ALWAYS ABLE TO FEED MYSELF BECAUSE WE FARMED

    Liked by 1 person

  • DR LUCAS IS A UWI GRADUATE WHOSE IDEAS AND INNOVATION WAS THWARTED BY BOTH GOVERNMENT AND THE PRIVATE SECTOR
    NO DOUBT THERE ARE OTHERS

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David BU at 8;25 AM

    Our debt situation has nothing to do with either “conspicuous consumption ,nor”inability to feed ourselves”..Nor is the need to register patents a sine qua non of the good life.

    Of course the non registering of patents is an untruth. We have two Bajans working in laboratories in North America with patents registered by them or their places of employment. Just because we do not know of them does not make your assertions true. I know of these two scientists because they are members of my Alma Mater. I am sure there are dozens more.

    The so called debt burden is another non issue/ red herring like the graduation principle for getting concessionary loans and grants from international finance institutions. What is the debt burdens of Japan, UK. USA ?. Wfo are the major creditors of the GoB? Did the creditors complain?
    We have a tendency in this country to believe our own lies. The trouble is, I am not so sure whether it is malicious or not.

    Like

  • @Vincent

    Do not trivialize the comment. We are talking about material contributions to sustaining the well being of our society. Regarding debt, who made the decisions to create the debt? A debt to chase our taste for imports?

    Like

  • RE Regarding debt, who made the decisions to create the debt? A debt to chase our taste for imports?

    IT SURE WAS NOT THE UWI OR ITS OFFICERS

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David BU

    The debts were not created by the ordinary John and Jane Citizen of Barbados. They were created by the GoB and ,advised by those who have responsibility to restrain them. They were bad policy and strategic decisions in most cases. The debts were not used to pay for imported consumer goods and services. Please do the research on each foreign loan and the stated purposes of those loans . Ask your self whether they were actually spent on the stated purposes., or on citizens imported consumption goods.

    David we need to deal with the facts. A lie repeated long enough puts on the raiment of truth.

    Like

  • “UWI should be shut down”.

    Sometimes I do not know how to laugh or if to cry.
    Pray sir, could you tell me what would be next step after shutting down UWI?
    Could you tell me what would replace UWI?
    How shutting down UWI will improve the Caribbean?

    Notice that I have not provided an opinion on UWI (shutting it down or keeping it open) and only wish for you to give us more of your thoughts.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    Correction

    I should have typed “foreign and local loans.”

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ TheOGazerts at 9 :18 AM

    I empathize with you. I do not like Pitty Parties so I would not say welcome to the Club. But the effusions that come from some commenters keyboards are painful enough to make one shed tears. UWI graduates citizens with job skill sets and improved decision making skills, the purpose for which it was established. Some commenters want it to produce creative citizens and material wealth for $%@& to spend on imported conspicuous consumption goods and services. Unbelievable!!

    Like

  • TLSNMay 29, 2020 2:30 PM

    @ Donna,

    Over the years you’ve have always raged about your love of Kallicharan. You are probably basing your memories on Kalli’ when he destroyed Denis Lillle in the first world cup in England and sent him packing to recover in the outfields.

    There is a man whom I would always rank above him and he would be in my top 11. A man of Guyanese extraction, aesthetically pleasing on the eye, sartorial, poetic in his nature, concise and elegant in his batting style and a murderer of fast bowlers. Step forward Roy Fredericks.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    No! I am basing my claim on the fact that he batted on terrible pitches in India while all the rest crumbled around him. You need to check your facts. It was about his tight technique.

    He was quite good at pace but he was better at spin.

    But don’t argue with me, argue with Tony Cozier who saw what you never did because he was always THERE!

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Mr. Skinner

    It’s either you’re contradicting yourself or I’m completely lost and don’t understand your point.

    You previously ‘said’ your “views are on the entire region and amazingly most of the current leaders are UWI graduates that lack intellectual creativity.” In all fairness, you cannot ‘pin-point’ the lack of creativity specifically to UWI graduates, especially if they completed their post graduate studies at other universities.

    Now you’re ‘saying’ I’m “speaking of certification and academic achievement.” Isn’t graduating from UWI or any other university about “certification and academic achievement,” since someone can only graduate if they successfully completed a degree program?

    Then, you went on to ‘say’ your “article seeks a regional narrative and is not about any individual island,” which does not make sense. It would make more sense if the region was UNITED under ONE leader. It is not, therefore, we must deal with INDIVIDUAL ISLANDS and their LEADERS.

    RE: “The UWI has failed the region and those who achieve national leadership have not performed exceptionally well. That’s why we run cap in hand to international loan sharks and embarrass ourselves by rushing up to events such as United Nations only to address empty halls.”

    Are you suggesting UWI is responsible for what you outlined in your above comment? My examples of the PMs of GND and SKB served to indicate those guys went on from UWI to complete their doctoral degrees at ‘foreign’ universities. And, I also included the PM of SLU who received his high school and tertiary level education in Canada and USA.

    But, it seems as though you’re purposely ignoring this fact to push a particular narrative that UWI has failed the region……. which I believe is nonsense.

    I realize many of you guys like to ‘jump on a band-wagon’ and use frivolous excuses to unnecessarily bash UWI.

    Liked by 1 person

  • William Skinner

    @ Artax
    I don’t think that because the region is not united there is need to promote insularity. The UWI is a West Indies/ Caribbean institution. All of the regional bodies and associations are managed by a majority of UWI students. I have been at pains not to cherry pick. My perspective is always that of a regionalist because when our socio economic challenges are analyzed there would always be similarities.
    If you are happy with the current group of leaders and you don’t believe it’s a reflection of the region’s university that’s your opinion. Note that I have not deemed your position to be nonsense and I certainly don’t see you via your well balanced posts as a bandwagoner or one who goes around “ bashing” anything.
    What really is the purpose of a regional university? If you don’t see it as an institution to provide progressive and creative leadership we the people should not be burdened with its financial needs.
    You must identify any exceptional leaders who are graduates of UWI.
    Quite frankly the entire educational system from primary to university level has fallen very short in creating enlightening regional leadership.
    Our being in a persistent economic malaise is not by accident. It has a lot to do with the collective leadership of the region and if many of those leaders are from within the walls of UWI my position stands.
    You need to respond to my original thesis and abandon trying to get me in some insularity debate.
    If your position is that the university’s sole function is to be a diploma mill, that’s probably the most popular view. I just believe we have not reaped the real benefits of underwriting UWI. Quite frankly this whole idea of free university education for all and sundry should be revisited and emotional mumbo jumbo should be removed from
    the debate.

    Like

  • @ Mr. Skinner

    I’m even more confused. How am I “trying to get (you) in some insularity debate.”

    Where in any of my contributions I mentioned anything about being “happy with the current group of leaders?”

    Let me explain once again. You mentioned “REGIONAL LEADERS.” I gave examples of three ‘regional leaders,’ two of whom graduated from UWI and one who did not receive his education in the Caribbean. I did this to illustrate that, whether or not they received their education at Cave Hill or St. Augustine…….. or a university in Canada, their leadership skills are similar.

    RE: “All of the regional bodies and associations are managed by a majority of UWI students.”

    Yes, that’s true. But, I’m sure you’ll agree those jobs usually require post graduate or professional qualifications. Gone are the days when, for example, all a guy needed to be considered an accountant was BSc Accounting. Now-a-days, to be considered an accountant, one must have ACCA or CPA professional qualifications.

    So, are you suggesting we should blame any mistakes that guy makes is as a result of his UWI education, while ignoring his professional qualifications?

    RE: “Our being in a persistent economic malaise is not by accident. It has a lot to do with the collective leadership of the region and if many of those leaders are from within the walls of UWI my position stands.”

    So, in your opinion, what’s the purpose of post graduate education? Okay, if a guy is an undergraduate from UWI and he did his MSc and PhD at Oxford and Harvard respectively. Are you suggesting his short comings or failures as a leader, are as a result of his UWI education ONLY, and no consideration should be given to the quality education he received at the post graduate level?

    Quite frankly, you’re essentially presenting ‘straw man arguments’ and not making sense. But, then again, you should forgive me. Being “an appallingly ignorant bookkeeper that learnt by rote,” I’m not the ‘brightest bulb’ in this forum.

    Let’s agree to disagree.

    Liked by 1 person

  • The UWI, by any measure, has field the region. It has become a degree mill, taking undergraduates in in large number and pumping them out. To add to this the influence of a post-graduate institution suggest to me the speaker has had very little experience of post-graduate education. The reality is that early institutions have more influence on an individual than later ones.
    I have spoken on numerous occasions about the influence of St Giles on my development (or failure), where as I cannot remember tutors in some institutions I have attended. You go in, attend lectures, write essays, and go home.
    UWI is functionally a teaching university, what little research it does is in so-called political science and the humanities – the low hanging fruit of higher education.
    I asked sometime ago what has Prof Alleyne contributed to development economics, a subject he has been involved in since the late 1960s, and some BU regular construed that as insulting. But no evidence was produced in a subject that has been over-contributed and in which a Caribbean man won a Nobel Prize.
    To conclude, UWI has failed Barbados and the Caribbean.

    Like

  • William Skinner

    @ Artax
    i think you are stressing qualifications as against leadership. My main thesis is not about first degrees second degrees. Mine was a simple position : the regional leaders most or many of whom are graduates of the UWI have not demonstrated stellar leadership. I am stating emphatically that I am disappointed that with the mammoth underwriting of the UWI by the masses of the region, these leaders have not demonstrated any spectacular creativity in regional problem solving at the socio economic level. What are they being taught in the class rooms that so far has not redound significantly or not at all to the benefit of the region.

    You stated thus: ” Quite frankly, you’re essentially presenting ‘straw man arguments’ and not making sense. But, then again, you should forgive me. Being “an appallingly ignorant bookkeeper that learnt by rote,” I’m not the ‘brightest bulb’ in this forum.”

    Let’s agree to disagree.

    Now I am terrribly disappointed that you have chosen to inject the above into what I consider a civil discourse. I have never attributed such to you. The reason I am disappointed is that you and I have always maintained an extremely high level of discourse. As you said we can agree to disagree but please don’t sink to the level of attributing thaings to William Skinner that are not of his currency.

    Like

  • @ Donna,

    If you look at the stats there is scarcely a fag paper between Kallicharan and Fredericks. In terms of tests played and their respective batting average there is very little to choose. The link below states that Kallicharan made an immediate impact in test cricket and was without doubt one of our premier batsman. He was eventually entrusted with the number three slot.

    Let us accept that they were both legendary figures in West Indies cricket and that the two of us were fortunate enough to have watch both men ply their trade in England. One for Warwickshire and the other for Glamorgan. Is it any coincidence that once the English refused to recruit West Indian cricketers that the cricketing prowess of the West Indies went into freefall.

    https://www.cricketcountry.com/articles/alvin-kallicharran-a-great-promise-only-partly-fulfilled-24295

    Like

  • William Skinner

    Kallicharan greatest contribution to West Infues cricket, was holding the fort when Kerry Packer bought out the test side. I don’t think he was really accepted in the players’ dressing room after that. He was an accomplished exciting batsman with an excellent temperament but there have been very few West Indies batsmen as exciting to watch as Fredericks.

    Like

  • @TG
    Pray sir, could you tell me what would be next step after shutting down UWI?

    Consider the counterfactual. Let’s continue to support the current failed UWI model and waste more scarce resources in the process. How has that been working out? How will that work out going forward?

    See previous comment I made: shut down reinvent UWI if it can not be reinvented to help the country solve some of its pressing problems.

    Uwi Cave Hill is no longer fit for purpose in its current form and should be shut down or converted to a different kind of educational institution of more immediately use to the populace. From all reports the uwi of the 1960s/70s even early 80s was a fantastic institution. But that UWI served a different purpose from the one today. The old heads on this blog remember a different Barbados, a different world, a different type of UWI student. The current UWI is a net cost to the country not a benefit. It should either be reinvented or closed.

    What is UWI’s mandate? It’s purpose? Has it helped Barbados with its most fundamental challenges? Is it in a position to even help with those challenges? What is the opportunity cost of the $Billions spent on UWI?

    Most of the support for UWI is just sentimentality from alumni. That is how they are supposed to respond. Fair enough.

    If UWI in its current guise were to disappear tomorrow how would Barbados’ current trajectory be any worse? Probably not.

    I repeat. UWI is a MASSIVE failure and is in dire need of reinvention or closure.

    Like

  • William Skinner

    @ Dullard
    You need to realise that we want everything to change but we also want everything to remain the same. That is the real Bajan conditioning. We have been conditioned to believe we alone have the best beaches; we believe that an airport without the landing deck is an asset because tourist want to “feel the sun” when they get off de plane. Don’t worry about the rain or inconvenience to the physical challenged or the time wasted.
    So, UWI can continue as it has been for forty years while every other institution of learning adopts and adapts to new realities. Recently UWI Cave Hill has been rolling out PHDs like ripe mangoes falling in a hurricane wind. Do some research and discover what area of study the PhD in.
    We believe that a 2020 model can be produced on an 1820 platform.
    Note I said it’s the Bajan conditioning. Not “condition”.

    Like

  • COVID-19 seems to be a thing of the past with all the Anti-fa riots in America.

    So much for the date with destiny.

    Like

  • John
    I think you’ve got it wrong. The Anti-fa riot in America was actually the Donald Trump / Steve Bannon inspired, Alt-right riot in Charleston about 3 years ago. Could you tell us a bit more about Anti-fa today instead of carrying Trump’s fire-rage.

    Like

  • Report: Need for another IMF ease

    Private sector and trade union representatives fear that Government’s economic targets are in jeopardy, despite efforts to soften the blows from the COVID-19 pandemic.

    The Social Partnership-appointed Barbados Economic Recovery and Transformation (BERT) Monitoring Committee thinks the authorities may, therefore, need to negotiate a further ease in terms with the International Monetary Fund (IMF).

    The committee, which is co-chaired by Barbados Workers’ Union general secretary Senator Toni Moore and Barbados Private Sector Association chairman Edward Clarke, raised its concerns in the latest public report for the period ended March 31.

    The body noted that Government “made excellent progress under the programme in achieving all of its performance targets, and in particular the primary balance surplus of six per cent of GDP and the growth in net international reserves

    to levels well above the programme target”.

    However, it had concerns about the impact the pandemic would have on the economic targets.

    “With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, [Government] has held discussions with the IMF regarding supplemental funding, and amendments to the future programme targets, in order to have the fiscal space required to cope with the challenges that the pandemic is posing to the Barbados economy,” said the committee.

    “On April 30 the [Government] reached a staff level agreement with the IMF that includes an augmentation of the Extended Fund Facility of about US$90 million, as well as lowering its primary fiscal surplus target to one per cent of GDP for financial year 2020/21 from the initial six per cent.”

    It called the severity of the COVID-19 impact “the principal risk to

    the programme”.

    “The Committee is concerned that even with the lowering of the fiscal surplus target, and the supplemental funding expected, it will be a significant challenge to meet the targets established for the coming fiscal year and close monitoring and further collaboration and negotiation with the IMF may be necessary as the full impact of the pandemic on the economy emerges in the months ahead,” said the report, which was released before the IMF disbursed US$139 million to Barbados this week.

    The other members of the BERT Monitoring Committee are Edwin O’Neal (Congress of Trade Unions and Staff Associations of Barbados), Robert de Silva (The Creditors’ Group), Greg McConnie (private sector), Donna Wellington (private sector), and Akanni McDowall (National Union of Public Workers).

    (SC)

    Source: Nation newspaper

    Like

  • lyallsmall
    June 2, 2020 6:41 AM

    John

    Could you tell us a bit more about Anti-fa today

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Check comments in George Floyd Blog.

    COVID-19 had become so boring I am only now noticing your request.

    Believe all you want to know about the fascist organization, Anti-Fa, I covered yesterday in that blog before I noticed your request.

    Apologies for the belated response.

    Like

  • The various chapters in the Anti-fa organization are clearly pretty well organized as you will observe from the riots around the world yesterday.

    You will also notice that Moscow and Beijing escaped unscathed and that Africa does not seem to be affected.

    Like

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