The Phartford Files: BCC Fast Becoming a Basket Case

Submitted by Ironside

One scholarship! That is all the Barbados Community College (BCC) was able to garner in 2019!

Not surprising, given the recent revelations regarding the ongoing scandalous performance of BCC nursing students in the regional nursing examinations.

Well, the Mia Mottely administration has solved the nursing problem: Barbados will be importing nurses and nursing is to be removed from the curriculum of the BCC and (possibly) given to Ross University.

But this is just the tip of the iceberg. The problems at the Eyrie institution get more interesting by the semester:

1. Pass mark to 45%; a two stage drop from 60% through 50% over the last ten years or so. In the same time UWI raised its from 45%.

2. Recent implementation of supplemental exams for every student for every major subject across the board – no questions asked; no restrictions – in stark contrast to what obtains at comparable colleges across the world.

3. An arrogant Student Affairs Department – which falls under the ambit of the Registrar – that stuffs upwards of 45 students in rooms designed to comfortably seat 30 students despite specifications from teaching department heads. Every day, some students in some divisions report having to “borrow” furniture from adjacent rooms with the attendant problems of delays in the start of classes and possible injury to fellow students along the narrow corridors.

4. Increasing breakdown in discipline. Tutors complain of the blatant cursing in the closely confined spaces of the college premises and rudeness to tutors with no response from the administration. Some of those confined spaces are just opposite to the offices of the Registrar who has not lifted a finger to check the uncouth behaviour. No surprise there, since it appears that, according to some staff members, the Registrar – Mr. Roger Worrell – can’t decide whether he is “student friendly” or “student centered”. Whichever it is, it does not come with strong discipline! It is simply his sick idea of “loving students”.

5. The treatment of students found guilty of cheating is an eye opener. Under the current directives, if a student is caught cheating in an exam he or she is to have the examination booklet removed and given another one, right there in the examination room, ostensibly pending a later investigation. Such investigations invariably never happen and guilty students continue on the campus with impunity.

6. Failure to get national accreditation even after having begun the process for it more than three years ago and after the appointment of a so-called consultant to manage the process.

7. Increasingly blatant corruption in the institution from successive Boards of Management downwards. The recent appointment of a new principal to the BCC is a case in point and worthy of separate discussion.

The appointee, Mrs. Annette Alleyne, is hitherto an unknown to most BCC staff. Translated, that the means that nobody seems to have ever heard her express an opinion- controversial or otherwise- on anything of educational importance in the institution! In other words, nobody knows if she gives a good Bajan phart about the BCC!

So how does she become principal? Better still, why would she even apply for the job given her lack of management experience and apparent disinterest in the job? And why was she given the job by the Professor Velma Newton led Board of Management when it appears that there were at least three other candidates – with doctoral degrees, demonstrated interest and/or experience and/or expertise – who apparently applied for the job?

How does the Project Director of the IMPACT Justice Project justify brushing aside three other highly qualified candidates who have demonstrated commitment to the BCC for so many years in favour of an obviously shallow candidate, if one can judge by the interviews Mrs. Allyene has given so far?

If one had any suspicions about the new Principal’s appointment, those were confirmed by her no-show on the relatively recent Peter Thorne moderated People’s Business discussion on nursing in Barbados. Mr. Thorne was at pains to point out that they had sent repeated requests to the BCC administration for participation in discussion on the matter.

But perhaps we are being unfair. Maybe the new Principal was under gag order by the Board? That would not be surprising because tight control of communication seems to be the working philosophy of the Mia Mottley administration.

In her “historic” and histrionic meeting with BCC staff a year ago, Professor Velma Newton, short of issuing a threat, left no doubt about how she feels about staff, at any level communicating, with the public without her “blessing”.

That should be very alarming to lovers of freedom and justice, since no such strictures are placed on members of staff of the UWI where the BCC chairperson is still an employee and as noted above, Director of the IMPACT Justice Project. For example, Jeff Cumberbatch, a UWI law lecturer, is a regular contributor to this blog.

What shall we say to these things: “All educators are equal but some are more equal than others?”

There is a lot more than meets the eye here and Phartford Files will have more to say on this later. For the time being, these are a few of takeaways from this BCC case worth noting:

1. The BCC is fast becoming a basket case (“a person or thing regarded as useless or unable to cope”). The cause is deeply rooted in the failure of successive political administrations to appoint competent, professional managers rather than yard fowls and people they can easily control. Both of the so-called main parties are guilty of this practice. This BLP administration has taken it to a new level.

2. Corruption is now spreading like a cancer even across our top educational institutions (it is an open secret that the former SJPP is a DLP political pork barrel).

3. Integrity legislation is a smoke screen and a soother for the masses; it is will not stop this kind of corruption.

4. The current politico-governance system in this country is morally bankrupt at the core and needs to be permanently dismantled.

In the meantime, while we wait patiently for the next election, the powers that be are reminded that the Barbados Community College is funded by our taxes and is therefore, a public institution. The time for a response regarding the BCC is past due!

118 comments

  • “The treatment of students found guilty of cheating is an eye opener.”

    Just be glad that the students are being prepared for their future lives here. Once they become DLP candidates, at least they know that systematic lies will always get them away with.

    “the former SJPP is a DLP political pork barrel”

    Thank you for confirming that Barrow and his henchmen have always plundered Barbados since independence.

    Like

  • @Tron

    Must you try so hard to distil a serious issue to nothingness?

    Liked by 1 person

  • It seems as if one item grabbed our attention.

    The treatment of students found guilty of cheating is an eye opener. Under the current directives, if a student is caught cheating in an exam he or she is to have the examination booklet removed and given another one, right there in the examination room, ostensibly pending a later investigation. ”

    Were they then given added time?
    Were they allowed to copy answers from the old booklet?

    Some issues should be treated seriously, but blatant ignorance should be ridiculed (distilled to nothingness)?

    Like

  • Members of the Board are:

    Professor Velma Newton - Chairman
    Dr. Idamay Denny - Deputy Chairman
    Mr. Randy Eastmond
    Ms. Reva Graham
    Ms. Gillean Alleyne
    Mrs. Evadne Wiltshire-Brewster
    Mr. Chris Cooke-Johnson
    Dr. Pamela Dottin
    Mr. Dayle Haynes
    The Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Education, Technological and Vocational Training
    

    Like

  • This comes up from a search for the principal:

    Page Not Found

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    Make sure that you’ve typed it in the address bar of your browser correctly. If the problem persists, please don’t hesitate to notify our Webmaster.

    Return to the homepage?

    Like

  • This post is one of bitterness, venom and the awful savagery of the Bajan Condition. Its author is obvious one of those who lost out, or a close friend and supporter. This is a good example of why Barbados is a failed state. Character assassins operating cowardly behind nom de plumes. Same on you, @Ironside. Go back to the cesspit.
    Is this what BU has become?

    Like

  • Where is the character assassination? Why are the questions not valid about the criteria used to appoint the principal?

    Did you bother to make contact with the issues raised?

    We on the rock are embarrassingly aware if the shortcomings at BCC.

    The blogmaster is aware two weeks after the start of this term the school is struggling to enroll new entrants for several reasons you probably will not accept because the source is anonymous.

    Like

  • i happen to know the present principal and she is as light weight as they come. she was not even in the reckoning previously and was told to apply for the job (by BLP operatives) when it came up. her rival was the acting principal who was respected and did a good job but lost out to Annette Maynard.

    this story has a lot of merit to it.

    Like

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @Ironside “4. The current politico-governance system in this country is morally bankrupt at the core and needs to be permanently dismantled.”

    It is not clear to me whether Ironside means the BLP politico-governance system, or the DLP politico-governance system.

    If he means the BLP it must mean that we the people are corrupt too because we voted for the current politico-governance system.

    I don’t take kindly to being called corrupt, and if Ironside is a D, and is calling me corrupt, I might get in a snit and NOT vote for the D’s next time around.

    Like

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    So is the new principal Annette Alleyne or Annette Maynard?

    I am confused.

    Like

  • Wow
    Q u ite a mouthful here.
    Couldn’t believe my eyes.
    How are educators for a tert i ary institution managed?

    Like

  • From time to time I teach at BCC; I will restrict my comments to the area I am familiar with. There seems to be over indulgence in making sure that every one passes,even when it is blatantly obvious that candidates have not attended classes and haven’t a clue about course content. I will give an actual example. I was teaching Organic Chemistry and students were given assignments every two weeks as part of their course work. In addition, praticals were conducted once weekly which had to be written up . All practicals were graded and the results added to those obtained from the course work. There was one particular student who wouldn’t attend the practcals or hand in course work.. It was not surprising that he failed the end of semester written example. He also failed the supplemental examination (he got 10 marks on the exams). I was pressured to pass the candidate. The authorities wanted to know if the course would not help the candidate to pass the course. I explained that there was no course work, since the candidate hadn’t submitted any. and as far as I was concerned I didn’t want to see him in any class I was teaching again. What was going on was that government was paying for the course, the candidate had leave from work to attend college full time on full pay and could fail year after year and government would still foot the bill. The candidate was allowed to enter the program the following year when I was not at the college( I had written an article to the press and was fired for doing so at the time)..
    Apart from the above, when it comes to chemistry in the section I was teaching, there is a need to improve the equipment . for example, a distilled water still is needed if one wants to be serious about chemistry.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Correction :written example” should read WRITTEN EXAM”

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Greene
    @ Robert

    Greene, I am afraid you are missing the point. The person appointed may not be the best person for the job, but civility demands that once the appointment has been made people buckle down and cooperate fully, rather than start a guerrilla war. We can all whinge about our line managers. My last line manager was not the brightest person I have ever worked with, but we had a good working relationship. Decent people just get on with the job and cooperate fully.
    @Robert , your issues are different and go right to the heart of the institution, its governance and ethics. Hopefully the new principal will sort out all these issues.
    But we must reject character assassination masquerading as a concern about the leadership of the organisation. The college functions in the interest of the students, not of people with poor-quality PhDs and other letters after their names. Because someone has acted in a position does not mean s/he is best suited for the job.
    Part of the failure of our nation is the move to Barbadianise every job, no matter the quality and experience of the Barbadian candidate. That is why every new government has an enormous power of patronage. We want a society based on merit, not party membership.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Nonsense!

    If the appointment was not transparent taxpayers have the right to voice displeasure. It happens every day of the week in democratic systems of government.

    Like

  • @Hal

    take it from me, mate, the appointment and how it came about should attract an investigation. she is not a line manager. she is head of an institution that she had no experience to run. she is in over her head (pardon the pun)

    @Simple
    Annette Alleyne nee Maynard

    Like

  • @ Greene,

    I assume there was open competition to fill the vacancy. The position was advertised, people shortlisted and an interviewing panel interviewed those people from which a decision was made.
    The new appointee will be on probation, if s/he proves incapable, then s/he will be dismissed. That is how all well-organised institutions recruit. Only, at a certain level, recruitment agencies are employed to assist. If she fails, she fails. We have a right to fail. But trying to crucify the woman before she even takes up her job is terrible, brutal even. Very Barbadian. ALL staff have an obligation to cooperate fully with her or leave..

    Like

  • I also was told by a tutor that she was pressured to pass a student who had lifted his thesis straight from the internet. This was at UWI though.

    Liked by 1 person

  • You are obviously clueless how these people are recruited/appointed and importantly why incompetent principals are shuffled about the system without being disciplined.  You should reread Senator Caswell’s  comments about teachers/principals who abuse children and survive in the system. You should hush if you are unaware of these things. The problem, you are always.

    Like

  • @ Hal

    yuh know that you usually say that “Barbados is a failed state” or “this will end in tears” when referring to some iffy policy or questionable practice? well this is one of them.

    what is ironic is that you are appearing to give the benefit of doubt to the hiring and i am agreeing with your hitherto mantra that in this particular hiring we have failed and it will end in tears.

    Like

  • In a relayted story in today’s press Ross University has teamed with the QEH for a ‘series’ of simulations.

    Like

  • DavidSeptember 15, 2019 9:28 AM

    You are obviously clueless how these people are recruited/appointed and importantly why incompetent principals are shuffled about the system without being disciplined. You should reread Senator Caswell’s comments about teachers/principals who abuse children and survive in the system. You should hush if you are unaware of these things.
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Recently saw that the same thing happens in the Canadian school system. Check out the Team USA gymnastics scandal. Not to make light of these things but we must stop seeing ourselves as the exception to the rule. And then there’s the Jeffrey Epstein scandal . Brett Kavanaugh’s case is just now coming under scrutiny again. Trump has shown America how its much touted Constitution is just a bit of scrawled up paper . Boris Johnson has highlighted the British mess. And don’t get me started on the international scandal that is the Roman Catholic church. How about those Boy Scouts leaders? THE WORLD AND NOT JUST BARBADOS IS IN A FAILED STATE.

    How do we work DAILY to minimize these daily problems? They are and always will be like recurring decimals. Ad infinitum. No sense throwing up our hands. Let’s roll up our sleeves instead! .

    We can make it better though NEVER perfect.

    Like

  • ” She holds a Masters in Education from Miami University; a Diploma in Education (Dist.) from the University of the West Indies (UWI), Cave Hill; and a BSc. in Chemistry and Biology (Hons), from UWI, Cave Hill.

    For the past 19 years, she has been part of the faculty of the BCC, where she served as a Chemistry Tutor; Chemistry Coordinator, Tutor 1; and more recently, Senior Tutor in the Division of Science.”

    https://www.nationnews.com/nationnews/news/239831/alleyne-principal-bcc

    Like

  • @Hal Austin

    I would simply like to add the following to the stinging responses made to you by David and Greene.

    My summary critique is that you are a master of the filibuster ( a.k.a red herring) and a VERY confused person.

    ++The Red Herrings++

    Who says that BCC staff should or would not cooperate with the new principal? Does the staff have a choice?

    Foolishness!

    Character assassination? Have you not heard? People don’t even know the woman! So what character is there to assassinate? I said she was shallow and I stand by that. It is the same comment I might make after reviewing a student’s presentation. Just a critical assessment. In Bloom’s educational taxonomy it is called “evaluation”. It is a higher order intellectual skill!

    ++The Confusion++

    ++Part of the failure of our nation is the move to Barbadianise every job, no matter the quality and experience of the Barbadian candidate. That is why every new government has an enormous power of patronage. We want a society based on merit, not party membership. [Excerpted from September 15, 2019 7:15 AM]++

    And how are we to get “a society based on merit, not party membership” and still give government “an enormous power of patronage”?

    Do you even understand what you are saying?? Where did you learn to reason? Have you ever heard about internal consistency in argument?

    Get serious man…and stop “pharting” on this blog!

    P.S. There you go …I just assassinated your character!!!

    Like

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @HantsSeptember 15, 2019 11:14 AM

    From what Hants has pointed out, it seems to be that the lady has the formal education and the experience necessary to run things

    I am beginning to wonder now if “Ironside” isn’t an old time misogynist, (perhaps an old time DLP misogynist, one of the impotent old men who feel entitled to run things in perpetuity.

    It would be helpful if ironside would come back here and list the education and experience of the other candidates for the WORK as principal of the Barbados Community College.

    @Ironside “hitherto an unknown to most BCC staff. Translated, that the means that nobody seems to have ever heard her express an opinion.”

    Can Ironside explain how the lady could have been teaching at BCC for 19 years and still be an unknown? Perhaps she is not an opinionated blowhard, but is that a bad thing?
    After all BCC is not Indian’s national Open University which has 4 million students. it is not even the California Community College System which has over 2 million students. At BCC a school with just over 3,000 students the faculty should all know each other, especially after 20 years of working together.

    @”three other candidates – with doctoral degrees, demonstrated interest and/or experience and/or expertise – who apparently applied for the job?”

    If Ironside is a real-real man [and it got to be a he] he would come back here and since he is so much of an insider to know that 3 people with doctoral degrees applied, let Ironside tell us who those three people are, and tell us what they studied, what degree and what quality of grades they earned, how long they have taught, and what management experience they have.

    Otherwise Ironside is just is a jealous old man, blowing hot air.

    In short…

    An impotent old phart.

    Like

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @Ironside “why would she even apply for the job given her lack of management experience and apparent disinterest in the job?”

    I would think that the lady applied for the job BECAUSE SHE WAS INTERESTED IN THE JOB. I don’t know what would lead Ironside to think otherwise. People apply for a job, because they are interested in the job.

    Like

  • The same reasons Jeff Broomes caused a whole commission of enquiry. Stop with the simplistic arguments.

    Like

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    Jeff Broomes, NOT Professor Jeff Cumberbatch.

    Like

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    And Jeff didn’t cause anything. The Ministry of Education and the DLP officialdom of the time were impotent to make a rational decision, so a foolish, unnecessary, and expensive Commission was called.

    And lest we forget the Chairman was a known DLP partisan.

    And the blasted Commission sucked up we taxpayers money. Our money went from our pockets to the bank account of a DLP partisan.

    Stupssseee!!!

    I still vex ’bout dat.

    One of the reasons I did not vote for the DLP in 2018.

    Still hoping and praying (today being Sunday) that the DLP pulls their act together. A special prayer for Brother Donville as well.

    Like

  • @ Ironside
    Coming on a blog to undermine the new principal is a sackable offence. It is gross misconduct. That aside, it is unethical, and vile. It says more about the blogger than it says about the principal. Nothing about that is filibustering. You are heartless.
    You typify the Bajan Condition. Shut up and go away, you despicable man. If you are a member of staff you should give the woman your full support. Where is your morality? Is it because you do not like a woman boss?
    The reason why Barbados is in the state it is in is because of people like you.

    @Greene

    Innocent until proven guilty. If you have evidence that the appointment was improper then that is different. But because someone did not get a job does not mean the person who got it was corrupt. Until then you give them your full support.
    Have you noticed that every public sector position is disputed: DPP, commissioner of police, Chief Justice, every head teacher’s position, CEO of the Transport Board, we can go on. It is the Bajan Condition. Too many people scrambling for too few positions. Crabs in a barrel.
    Do you notice they all come on anonymously?

    Like

  • Are you the one who brays Barbados is a failed state?

    Are you the one who decries the traditional media?

    Yet you would chide Citizens the right to question the leadership responsible for the failed state you criticize daily.

    Like

  • Go figure!

    It is certainly right to question the motives of everyone who posts anonymously on a blog but who knows if there is something in it or not.

    I would ask Ironside to explain further and give details.

    Like

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @Hal AustinSeptember 15, 2019 1:18 PM @ Ironside Coming on a blog to undermine the new principal is a sackable offence. ”

    I would bet anything that Ironside is not a member of staff of the BCC, and so cannot be sacked. I don’t believe that he even applied for the job. But I expect that he is forwarding complaints from some person (s) who applied and that person (s) is likely a DLP partisan who was assured that the job was his…but the people sacked the DLP last year. The DLP is very likely to remain in opposition for 10 years, maybe 15, and the person(s) who was promised the job by the DLP now knows that he will NEVER be principal of the BCC.

    This story presented at the head of this blog, is pure political partisanship. It has nothing to do with academic excellence or with anything serious.

    There are too many people in the world who hope to move forward because they know somebody, went to the right school, belong to the right party, are a member of the right club or the right lodge etc., etc.

    And sadly it is not just a “Bajan Condition.” It is a universal human failure.

    See what has been happening in the united States: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2019_college_admissions_bribery_scandal

    Like

  • @Simple Simon

    You agree the last comment by you is speculation?

    Like

  • This submission reminded the blogmaster we had received notice a few weeks ago BCC is being sued.

    ttps://barbadosunderground.files.wordpress.com/2019/09/bcc-law-suit.png

    Like

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @Hal AustinSeptember 15, 2019 1:18 PM “It is the Bajan Condition. Too many people scrambling for too few positions. Crabs in a barrel.”

    No point blaming Bajans and calling them “crabs in a barrell”

    Barbados’ population density is 1704 per square mile/660 people per square kilometer.

    The United Kingdom’s population density is 671 per square mile/259 per square kilometer.

    We must never forget that Barbados was deliberately over populated in order to provide free, and then cheap labour for the British owned sugar industry.

    My question to all those who throw the “crabs in a barrell” insult at Bajans, and in this case my question specifically to Hal is “if the United Kingdom was 2 1/2 times as densely populated as it is now would the British people also behave like “crabs in a barrell?”

    Like

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    The United States has a population of 92.1 people per square mile, and we see that the United States is moving to build walls to keep out foreigners. I wonder how Americans would behave if there were 1706 people per square mile in that country. Would Americans behave like “crabs in a barrell?”

    China has a population density of 375 people per square mile I wonder how Chinese would behave if there were 1706 people per square mile in that country. I wonder what would happen if China was 4 1/2 times as densely populated as it is now. Would Chinese behave like “crabs in a barrell?”

    We must not mistake a human condition for a Bajan condition.

    Like

  • @Ironside

    The new principal has a recourse in defamation. She should sue BU and WordPress and file a writ of discovery to identify @Ironside. Then sue him (if it is a he) for every penny he has. She should find a pro bono lawyer or a no-win, no-lose attorney to take up the case.
    The point is reputational damage: as a new principal the students would not respect her if they have been told she got the job through some corrupt process. That is serious. She must push back. Some bloggers think they can come on here and use nom de plumes to spread their hate. Nonsense.
    If her stated qualifications and experience are correct (she holds a Masters in Education from Miami University; a Diploma in Education (Dist.) from the University of the West Indies (UWI), Cave Hill; and a BSc. in Chemistry and Biology (Hons), from UWI, Cave Hill) then she is more than qualified to be principal of a community college, or what we call a further education college.
    Legal action is the only way of reversing that dark, cultural underbelly which seems to find a home on BU..

    Like

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @Hal AustinSeptember 15, 2019 2:26 PM “as a new principal the students would not respect her if they have been told she got the job through some corrupt process.”

    Perhaps the new students, and the former students whom the lady has taught over the last 19 years are much, much smarter than we give them credit for. Maybe they are discerning. Maybe they don’t believe every nonsense that they hear.

    Maybe they don’t listen to the foolish gossip of angry impotent old men.

    Like

  • You need help.

    Do you know the nonsense that plays out at BCC?

    When ordinary citizens in the know attempt to challenge the nonsense you come with your stiff upper lip shite?

    Let bajans in the know prosecute this matter.

    Like

  • no-win, no-fee

    Like

  • @Hal

    trust me on this one, mate. the woman has no management experience to run that institution. she is v light weight. the job should have gone to go the lady who had been acting and doing a stellar job. the incoming BLP perceiving her to be a DLP advised the present principal to apply. the interview panel was stacked and she got the job without any prior managerial experience, and with coached responses.

    i am surprised it took so long to surface. it was one of the v first political appointments made and it was drawn to the attention of certain people.

    David obviously knows more than what he is saying as do i.

    trust me on this one, Hal, Ironside is spot on

    Like

  • It is no different to how senior teachers are appointed by the ministry of education. There is a panel by the Chief Education Officer decides. What process what!

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  • @ Greene

    As you are someone familiar with the UK, you know it is usual to skip a generation when making appointments; deputies/acting officers do not often, and should not automatically, succeed in the substantive position.
    As to management experience, the good lady can be sent on a management course. If you go to any business school in the UK nearly all the executive courses are recent promotions.
    I do not know the lady’s experience, but the interviewing panel must have seen something in her. What @Ironside’s mates and friends should do is ask for feedback on their interviews, especially the former acting principal. All decent companies provide feedback, telling people where they could improve and why they were not appointed.
    You take a chance on talent. How old is the new principal? How old is the former acting principal? How old are the other candidates? Decisions are not only made on qualifications. We may assume that all shortlisted candidates met the benchmark.
    Management is not about dead men’s shoes. It is also about the future of the organisation.

    Like

  • @Hal

    i dont think you understand what i am trying to say.

    to put it bluntly it was a political appointment- no more no less

    it was so egregious that it was drawn to certain people’s attention whilst it was being hatched but 30-0 has weight, doesnt it?

    the present principal was not even going to apply but such was the intent to appoint no one seemingly with a colour of the other party that she was told to apply and assured she would get the job. she pointed out her shortcomings and she was told it doesnt matter

    let David or ironside tell you what happened to the lady who had been acting principal

    Like

  • @ Greene

    I fully understand what you have been trying to say. But I am pushing back against that. I have sad that the new principal will be on probation; if she fails then she will be sacked. If she or any other political appointee remans in a job even if they are obviously incompetent, then it confirms that Barbados is a failed state.
    In the meantime, it is the professional duty of ALL staff to cooperate fully with the new principal. The big task now to improve the quality of the education, which is what all good Barbadians should be doing. Stop the whinging and sniping.

    Like

  • How do you know what are her terms and conditions of employment?

    Liked by 1 person

  • And around and around they go and where they stop nobody knows. The more things change the more they remain the same. Exactly how important is it that a principal of a community college should be a party member marching in step with a party in power? I can understand the sabotage that can occur in certain positions but how does it play out in such an institution?

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  • I fully understand what you have been trying to say. But I am pushing back against that.

    @Hal
    With all due respect, you need to put on a cup of tea, take a step back, have a seat and close your mouth.

    Listen to @Greene and @David.

    You are prosecuting a case with zero knowledge of the facts. You are shadowboxing.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Donna

    You have put your finger on the precise issue!

    Therefore, your question “Exactly how important is it that a principal of a community college should be a party member marching in step with a party in power? …is very relevant.

    The BCC Act gives the Board absolute power over the BCC, a fact that current chairperson made very clear in her first face-to-face encounter with BCC staff. So regardless to what political persuasion you might have you would not survive as principal very long of you rubbed the Board wrong or failed to carry out its mandate.

    When an institution is floundering, you don’t hire someone who has little to no grasp of the issues and now has to go on a management course! Hal Austin is talking pure piffle!

    You hire someone with relevant professional knowledge and orientation to run a educational organization that aspires to global recognition and impact.

    A professional orientation means that the manager focuses on finding rational solutions to the problems at hand. If a professional manager has political views, he or she being a professional, will keep them under wraps and get on with job. He or she understands that it is the job of the Board to infuse any advice given by the professional with their political agenda.

    If the manager’s decision-making is found to be “under political influence” they ought to be fired. BCC needs professional management at this time; political inbreeding is still inbreeding!

    Possession of a doctoral degree is not about the designatory letters behind the degree. It is the level of intellectual training and higher order thinking skills that are engaged with passage through such a degree that are important. Even so, not everyone with such a degree – I must admit- understands that that is what it is about.

    Whether or not the current incumbent has a doctoral degree is an issue because it sends a message to the wider international academic community (and aspiring students) that the head of the institution bothered to obtain a qualification that signifies for them (i.e. the international community) the state of having reached the pinnacle of academic achievement.

    Some colleges and universities require even their registrars and recruiters to have a doctoral degree. That the board failed to treat this as a very important issue given the BCC’s aspirations,says a lot about the Board.

    Therefore, the issue is also about image. If image is not important why does the UWI seek to hire international faculty, no doubt at a premium? Because there are no locals available? Nonsense!

    It must be stressed that this issue is not about the person’s character…that is a big fat red herring. We are talking about professional preparation for the specific job under discussion. If the principal or for that matter the chairperson wishes to take Hal Austin’s advice, let it be so. That might very well be the opportunity to shed light in some dark corners.

    I do not understand why a government minister can challenge CEOs and Heads of ministries in this country (including that of the BCC) about the performance of their departments and ordinary citizens, whose taxes are paying both of them, should have no say. Rubbish!

    The purpose of education is not to foster mindless conformance but induce critical thinking in its citizens; regardless to which party is in power.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Sunshine Sunny Shine

    Hal Austin

    You bettas re-read what you wrote. Your defence in this matter, particularly the one about sending the person to do a management course is the stuff made for laff-it-off. This is a top position. We assume the person hired for the position already got all the expertise, experience and know-how to bring to bear. If you have to send them at that level for training then you are automatically saying that there is an issue of competence and a lack of prerequisite skills needed to do a meaningful job. Perhaps they are versed in commonsense.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Ironside,

    That’s the beauty of typing as opposed to speaking. One has more time to think and some of us chose to use that time to do so.

    Liked by 1 person

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @DonnaSeptember 15, 2019 4:20 PM “Exactly how important is it that a principal of a community college should be a party member.”

    It should not be important at all.

    But maybe I am living in la-la land.

    No wonder i applied for a civil service “pick” since 1968 and Service Commission hasn’t got back to me as yet.

    I never wore a party shirt, so no cushy civil service job and nice pension for me.

    Like

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @IronsideSeptember 15, 2019 6:48 PM “That might very well be the opportunity to shed light in some dark corners.”

    Talking about shedding light in dark corners can you tell BU what became of the previous principal Dr. Gladstone Best? Smart guy. Experienced etc.

    It seems to me that he suddenly disappeared from the scene just before the 2018 election. Still I see him out and about and he seems perfectly healthy to me.

    A simple question from a Simple Simon

    Neither “B” nor “D”

    Like

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @Ironside “Therefore, the issue is also about image. If image is not important why does the UWI seek to hire international faculty, no doubt at a premium? Because there are no locals available? Nonsense!”

    I trust that you are mistaken.

    UWI ought not to be using our tax money to hire international faculty at a premium too? when equally qualified local talent is available, especially if as you say is is about image? A university should not be about image. A university’s mission should be about firstly excellent teaching, and secondly excellent research.

    In any event what is “international faculty” anyhow?

    A foreigner who has studied at foreign universities?

    A Bajan who has studied at foreign universities?

    A foreigner who has studied at UWI?

    Do explain.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife: September 15, 2019 11:16 PM

    You are out of touch with reality…and not understanding the image thing at all in this context..perhaps you should ask Professor Beckles?

    As for Dr. Best: please ask him next time you see him!

    Cheers!

    Like

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    The last time a very bright fellow (HC, top foreign universities and all that) told me “you don’t understand” I lived to see him on the front pages in handcuffs.

    Because you see I did understand then.

    And I do understand now.

    i said before, and I will repeat UWI ought not to be using our tax money to hire foreign academics if the purpose of those hirings is “image”

    However I have no problem with foreign hirings if the foreigners bring something significantly more that their foreignness. If they bring some academic rigour that will work to the benefit of UWI’s students (and to the benefit of the taxpayers whose money PAY for the whole thing.)

    Liked by 1 person

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    I notice that you have shunned the question re Dr. Best, and have attacked me calling me “out of touch with reality”

    Since you are a well informed insider why don’t you just answer the question?

    I might well ask Hilary about the image thingy, since I have known him since he was in short pants.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Greene September 15, 2019 3:54 PM

    Thanks for confirming what I had sort of read between the lines.

    I have been accused of character assassinating the woman but the funny thing is that if the sequence of events you relate is true that individual has done more to damage her own integrity than anything we can say, if you get my drift.

    I have no doubt the new principal will soon be heard to be doing her doctorate all expenses paid by the Board.

    I have no doubt the previous acting principal was pissed. However, she has returned to her substantive post of Deputy Principal and like the rest of the professional staff has no choice but to cooperate. But don’t expect anything to move at a speed other than the usual “slow” and “stopped”. Then the powers that be will claim “sabotage!”.

    P.S. It amazes me how a staff of some 200 persons or thereabout can let his happen and do nothing about it. One woman raised hell over this country about the reduction in disability benefits and got the attention of the government and is still alive!

    Fear does have torment!

    Like

  • @SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLifeSeptember 15, 2019 11:42 PM

    How come you didn’t know Dr. Best since he was in diapers! You are not a very good fisherman!

    Like

  • A simple strategy of walking the corridor is useful for the principal. The students want to see you and not the only the janitors.

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  • This Bajan obsession with doctorates aand other superfluous paper qualifications is laughable. All we do is circulate mediocrity – people with PhDs in cultural studies or MScs in political sociology from the LSE that in the real world mean nothing.
    If the new principal’s qualifications are as stated above, then she is more than qualified to be principal of any UK college of further education.
    There are two principles here: the first is the dumbing down of senior executive positions by the recruitment of Barbadians, whatever their competence, the Barbadianisation of all positions (we often get it with diplomatic positions).. And the second, and very important, ALL positions at a certain level in Barbados should be opened to all CARICOM citizens and failing that, to the world. We want the BEST, not just the best Barbadians..
    We must stop looking inward and filling dead men’s shoes. We have permanent secretaries who should not be clerical officers. There is also the myth that the person acting in a position or one who has been in a job for a long time should be appointed manager. Nonsense. How then do you head hunt staff? There is a reason why a person remains in a job for years without moving. Qute often they are lazy and incompetent.
    How do we capture bright, young people and stop them from running off to Europe or North America?
    Then there is the matter of decency. Coming on a website anonymously and smearing your new boss is vulgar and savage and any such person should be sacked.
    Such a person should be dismissed immediately and not even given an opportunity to clear their desk. Such behaviour is vile. It does not matter if the person got the job because of political or family connections. There is a civilised way to behave and a savage, primitive way to behave.

    @SSS

    Hal Austin
    You bettas re-read what you wrote. Your defence in this matter, particularly the one about sending the person to do a management course is the stuff made for laff-it-off. This is a top position. We assume the person hired for the position already got all the expertise(Quote)

    I do not know how management operates where you are, but in the UK, even FTSE100 company CEOs regularly go on management courses. It is about improvement. Senior (and not so senior) executives also have mentors. Our CEO at the FT often went on management courses.
    Further training is a crucial part of your annual appraisal – both training you think you need, and what your firm thinks you need. It is about preparing one for the next step up.
    In interviewing new recruits, I always asked where they hoped to be in a year, two years, three years. And in any good organisation/profession, continuing professional development is key.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Hal Austin

    I hereby award you the M.A in irrelevance and incoherence…with honours!

    Like

  • @ Hal Austin September 16, 2019 8:45 AM

    Congratulations, dear Hal!

    I couldn’t have written it better. The problem in Barbados is quite simple: we have far too many leadership positions in relation to the total population, because our nemesis Barrow had the insane idea to copy the British Empire instead of looking at Singapore, Switzerland or other successful small nations. It is therefore no wonder that many management positions are filled by staff who are not even suitable as gardeners or housemaids.

    Barbados is a typical case of cultural transplantation, where the received institutions do not fit the habits of the natives. This is why our bureaucracy is so dysfunctional.

    Like

  • @Ireonsde

    I did not go to school. I already have a PhD in mediocrity from Trump university. It taught me to be scared of open competition and think I should automatically get a job whatever my competence. Grow up,
    By the way, explain your bogus statement. Or is this Bajan scatter gun shooting? Support the new principal or get another job, Dodo.

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  • Is the issue here about paper qualifications? Your head is hard, like ac.

    Spot on!

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  • If the facts of this woman’s hiring as outlined by Greene are accurate then we do have a problem, If this woman allowed herself to be embroiled in this then she should be prepared for some push back. We were promised business unusual, not business as usual. This red and yellow mentality needs to be stamped out.

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  • Just for the sake of accuracy Ironside, the benefits (invalidity) from the NIS were not reduced. It was the pensions coming from the Treasury that were abated since the invalidity benefits were ERRONEOUSLY classified as pension.

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  • @Hal

    with regard to your post about qualifications and management courses, i will say this-

    yes we should be cautious about paper qualifications. lots of companies especially techs in the US no longer require degrees for some of their jobs. however there ought to be some minimum qualification for certain positions and if one is required to manage an entity at a certain level there ought to be requisite experience or experience close enough to qualify. I also agree with some high level job being advertised across the region but only if other Caricom countries do the same

    i have been on numerous management courses and what i can tell you is that after the 2nd the rest are BS in furtherance of management consultants selling the latest management repackaged systems and buzz words. yet man management to me basically surround- treating your staff fairly and honestly when assigning tasks, conducting appraisals, in promotions and giving bonuses and lead them in a manner that is fulfilling to company goals and the laws of the land whilst paying attention to staff welfare.

    however i would acknowledge that management in certain fields may require other considerations

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Greene

    lots of companies especially techs in the US no longer require degrees for some of their jobs.
    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    You’re coming on here spreading bullshit information.

    The companies that you are referring to must not be well known or credible.

    For someone not living in the USA and operating in this arena you seem to know a lot based on ignorance.

    Like

  • @ David September 16, 2019 9:55 AM

    Don’t you think this is a ‘golden’ opportunity to arouse the sleeping debate about the long-promised University College of Barbados?

    Why should a two-bit country like Barbados have so many different institutions of tertiary education and training?

    Why should there be such duplication of training courses on offer?

    Why are the taxpayers being forced to underwrite this wastage of very scarce resources by having some many different institutions operating as separate ivory towers of individual fiefdoms?

    Isn’t this the ‘ideal’ time to make BERT a force for good other than one of hurting only poor people under the banner of austerity?

    How can the current administration talk about BERT when thousands of fancy gas-guzzling 4 WDs have taken over the cart rods of bumpy Barbados some of which can be seen on the way to the various campuses strewn all over St. Michael?

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  • What does the BLP social contract support.

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  • “Just for the sake of accuracy Ironside, the benefits (invalidity) from the NIS were not reduced. It was the pensions coming from the Treasury that were abated since the invalidity benefits were ERRONEOUSLY classified as pension.”

    Donna

    Are you sure you’re being accurate?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Greene,

    Of course any such recruitment policy must be CARICOM wide. Also, I myself have been on many management courses and they are as you described.

    Like

  • @ Miller

    Good question. The first question is why was the Polytechnic that was conceived to develop those who were not academically inclined hijacked and why was the original purpose for the Community College altered.
    There is no way the BCC would have fallen into disrepute if it had been allowed to function as it was intended.
    We would not now have a shortage of artisans if the Polytechnic had been allowed to fulfill its original mandate.

    Like

  • The blogmaster discussed this matter with a senior person at BIDC years ago, he confirmed there was no accommodation made in planning because change of premises was never done.

    Like

  • @ Greene

    Excerpt taken from one of your links:

    After further analysis of the data, LinkedIn identified specific positions more likely to be filled by noncollege graduates, including electronic technicians, mechanical designers, and marketing representatives.

    That being said, college degrees seem to pay off. Workers that hold at least a bachelor’s degree earned more than the $932 median weekly earnings for all workers in 2018, according to a recent report from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics.
    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    The three positions highlighted can easily be learned on the job and are blue-collar workers in the USA.

    However bonafide technical positions that are viewed as professional will have a degree as a prerequisite.

    Like

  • @Baje

    and taken from the second link i posted

    [quote] Among the high-paying jobs at top companies that don’t require a college degree: A brand director position at Apple (the listing simply says “bachelor’s degree preferred”) and an editor for Apple News (it says bachelor’s or master’s degree preferred or equivalent work experience), both in the Bay Area. Other jobs include a corporate account manager at Oracle (applicants need either a BA/BS degree in business/related field or equivalent work experience) in Boston and an account manager for Google Cloud in Chicago (the listing simply says bachelor’s degree or equivalent practical experience).

    Brand directors in San Francisco can make roughly $200,000, and editors and account managers about $60,000, according to salary data reported by Glassdoor.

    LinkedIn revealed that the top jobs that don’t require a four-year degree (all based on profiles of people working at top companies who don’t have a four-year degree) include mechanical designer, electrical technician, manufacturing technician and telecommunications technician. Mechanical designers at top companies are eight times less likely than average to be required to have a four-year degree, and electrical technicians seven times less likely. Mechanical designers make about $71,000, electrical technicians $69,000.[quote]

    https://www.marketwatch.com/story/you-dont-need-a-4-year-college-degree-for-these-high-paying-jobs-at-google-apple-netflix-2019-04-08

    again i apologise

    Like

  • @ Greene

    I know from first hand experience of not one case where it says a degree or equivalent work experience for any of those high paying jobs over US$100K where the candidate selected doesn’t have at least a first degree in USA.

    Secondly, I am very sceptical because both of the 2 links quotes LinkedIn whose primary means of income is generating revenue in the employment job sector hence I view with scepticism as part of their marketing ploy.

    I work in the high paying technical professions and travel extensively so would be attuned to industry,

    Like

  • ArtaxSeptember 16, 2019 12:02 PM

    “Just for the sake of accuracy Ironside, the benefits (invalidity) from the NIS were not reduced. It was the pensions coming from the Treasury that were abated since the invalidity benefits were ERRONEOUSLY classified as pension.”

    Donna

    Are you sure you’re being accurate?

    Just for the sake of accuracy Ironside, the benefits (invalidity) from the NIS were not reduced. It was the pensions coming from the Treasury that were abated since the invalidity benefits were ERRONEOUSLY classified as pension.”

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Which part are you questioning? I saw a newspaper report where the NIS said that there was no change from their end and that it was the Treasury that abated the pensions and paid only the difference between the NIS benefit and the pension.

    If you are questioning whether or not the invalidity benefit was erroneously deemed to be a pension, as far as I am concerned Caswell put that issue to bed for ALL LOGICAL AND UNBIASED PEOPLE WHEN HE SAID THAT IT IS ACTUALLY AN EXTENDED SICKNESS BENEFIT THAT CAN BE STOPPED IF A PERSON RECOVERS ENOUGH TO RETURN TO WORK. This is how it has always been understood by all And that is why the pensions were not abated at the same time that the pensions of those above retirement age were done a while ago. This is a reinterpretation of the law that was never intended. I( may not be an attorney but I bet I could argue that case in a court of law and win. The government may not wish to admit it and instead prefer to put out the myth that they are being kind and considerate by reinstating the pensions. But they can fool who they can fool. The law is NOT on their side.

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  • Donna

    The NIS categorize invalidity benefits as a benefit or pension, as is evidenced by their web-site and information I have to access from personnel of that department. However, using both terms interchangeably is “neither here nor there.”

    http://www.nis.gov.bb/benefits/invalidity-grant-benefit/

    Any individual retiring from work medical unfit, if eligible, is entitled to an invalidity payment. If invalidity continues until that person reaches compulsory retirement age, which, effective January 1, 2018, is age 67 years, the payment is converted to an old age pension equal to the invalidity benefit.

    I don’t know what you’re trying to infer by mentioning, in upper-case letters, “all logical and unbiased people.”

    However, I suggest you also read the information found on the following links.

    https://treasury.gov.bb/content/government-pension-information

    https://treasury.gov.bb/content/considerations-when-calculating-your-pension

    Like

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @Ironside at 7:51 a.m. “doing her doctorate,all expenses paid by the Board”

    My response: Boards don’t pay for anything. The TAXPAYERS PAY FOR EVERYTHING. But sadly too many Boards “B” Boards and “D” Boards seem to believe that they own the money, and that it is theirs to dish out to family, friends, and party loyalists, and that they can use our money to buy loyalty for their party.

    And we trust that people EARN their doctorates, instead of doing them.

    Like

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @Ironside at 7:51 a.m. “don’t expect anything to move at a speed other than the usual “slow’ and “stop”

    I disagree with you.

    The TAXPAYERS have every right to expect that those people paid out of their tax money will work hard and will work well.

    Anything else is indeed sabotage.

    If “B” people do it it is sabotage.

    If “D” people do it it is sabotage.

    Like

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @Greene at 10:49 a.m. “If one is required to manage an entity at a certain level there ought to be a requisite experience or experience close enough to qualify.”

    But experience can only be gained experientially.

    Like

  • Sunshine Sunny Shine

    @SSS

    Hal Austin
    You bettas re-read what you wrote. Your defence in this matter, particularly the one about sending the person to do a management course is the stuff made for laff-it-off. This is a top position. We assume the person hired for the position already got all the expertise(Quote)

    I do not know how management operates where you are, but in the UK, even FTSE100 company CEOs regularly go on management courses. It is about improvement. Senior (and not so senior) executives also have mentors. Our CEO at the FT often went on management courses.
    Further training is a crucial part of your annual appraisal – both training you think you need, and what your firm thinks you need. It is about preparing one for the next step up.
    In interviewing new recruits, I always asked where they hoped to be in a year, two years, three years. And in any good

    Hal Austin

    Management, where I am, operates the same. The difference is that to reach the top posts in my firm requires that all mid-managers (like me) must attend the company’s core training management courses (certificate and diploma courses). These are spread out over several years. They are intensive courses that run for 6 months into one or two years. Top managers do not go on training courses. They would have gone through all the training courses needed to be where they are today. No one is placed in a top post unless you can show qualifications that attest that you have undertaken the company’s core training courses set up with two Management and Marketing Faculties we pay thousands of dollars to facilitate. A degree in Management will get you into our company, heck a masters or a PhD even, but promotion up the ladder comes from doing the CTMC certificate and diploma courses. This is strictly set up for our companies and was created by our company’s founder in collaboration with top management professors. The courses are now being embraced by other affiliate companies. What top level Management attends are two-a-year arrange symposiums.

    I suppose I am looking at the position of the BCC top post from my company’s perspective. However, we are very much aware that Barbados recruitment into top posts is necessarily not based on experience or qualifications but political affiliation or friendship. It is the reason why the square pegs in round holes effect, affects so much of the going-forward process in a downward spiral. So I concede, in the atmosphere that is Barbados, the position that this lady holds could be improved with further training courses.

    Like

  • @SSS

    Whether continuing professional development is based on in-house or external training, it is additional training. The fastest growth area in management training in the UK is now business coaching for executives and training for non-executive directors, all people with experience. Think cricket: because you are a top test batsman does not mean you do not have coaching sessions. It is about improvements, ironing out faults.
    About 50 years ago I joined the UK civil service and the first thing they did was to send me off to the civil service college in Berkshire, where I was formally taught about the ethos of the service. Nowadays it is done online. The net result is no matter which government department you go the culture of service is the same.
    Good organisations have structured training systems in place. The Barbados public sector ought to too.
    To return to the substantive point, whatever training and qualifications the new principal of the community college has had, she should have a formal induction course. That is not rocket science, it is elementary, and takes place in every well-run organisation.

    Like

  • As far as I can tell, the NIS categorize invalidity benefit as a pension simply to distinguish it from an invalidity grant which is a lump sum payment. I believe it was just a loose use of the word. Besides we have already looked at the relevant laws here on BU and it was quite clear that the pensions were meant to be abated at the age of retirement.

    If it is your contention that Errol Barrow intended for a person who sometimes through no fault of his or her own becomes unable to work, a person with minor children and a mortgage should suffer further by losing his or her home and having to live on the streets, then continue merrily on your way.

    Here’s the difference between persons of retirement age and persons who are forced to retire medically unfit –

    A person of age sixty -seven usually does not have minor children who need financial support and also would either have completed their mortgage payments or be owing just a few thousand dollars that can be managed. They eat less and hence their grocery bill is lower. The only bill that tends to increase is their health care bill. The government provides health care. Also a person of retirement age is not prohibited from working to supplement their income. A person on invalidity would lose the benefit for the easy task of growing a few herbs and selling them from home. Hence the “invalid” is condemned in their middle age to living the rest of their lives in poverty, unable to improve their lot.

    It is clear that lack of funds is causing this administration or its agents to look around for cost cutting measures, and this REINTERPRETATION OF THE LAW was intended to do just that. Look how quickly we were informed of EXACTLY HOW MUCH IT WILL COST THE GOVERNMENT TO REINSTATE THE PENSIONS. They are obviously trying to set a narrative that takes the sympathy of the general population away from the “invalids” by encouraging tax payers to think about the cost to themselves. I would encourage the public to think instead of the fact they could on this very day find themselves in the same boat as the “invalids”.

    I would also remind the public that INSURANCE is meant to compensate those who have suffered a loss. Those who have contributed to this INSURANCE SCHEME are therefore ENTITLED to benefit WHEN THEY SUFFER SUCH A LOSS. As for the pensions that these people receive from the Treasury – the time they put in at work also ENTITLES THEM to that. It is calculated accordingly.

    I suggest that the new policy that this government intends to come up with should be to remove one of the pensions of the MPs and increase their pensionable age and the length of time it takes for them to qualify. Most MPs usually have worked for higher salaries than the average person and also usually continue to work after they start receiving the pension. Their cup is full and running over whilst others are being asked to drink from a teaspoon.

    Come on Mia Cares Government! Serve the people and not yourselves! Or I will personally design the new posters for Janice so everyone can see your benefits as opposed to hers.

    In the event that any loss of is still foisted upon the “invalids” I would advise anyone who settled an insurance claim based on the expectation (understandable since letters would have been received with the details from each agency saying that you would) that you would be receiving invalidity benefit AND pension that you should sue the government for any loss that the insurance company would have been forced to compensate.

    Insurance companies pay loss of earnings UNTIL RETIREMENT AGE. If the government reduces your promised income AFTER THE SETTLEMENT then you would have lost out.

    Class action suits may be possible in these circumstances.

    Like

  • Correction – loss of income

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  • And Artax, I will ask you how long this INTERPRETATION of the law has been posted on the website and also I would remind you that this is indeed just an interpretation of the law.

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  • Damn foolishness! You pay into an insurance scheme . You work and become entitled to pension from the Treasury. commensurate with your years of service. When you suffer a loss in earnings capacity that could not be foreseen an insurance policy is supposed to compensate you for your loss. You have earned your pension from the Treasury and are entitled to it. All the insurance benefit does is return you to something like the net salary you would have been receiving had you not suffered incapacity.

    THIS IS WHAT IT WAS MEANT TO DO.

    Note also that reaching the age of retirement is not an unforeseen event that should be compensated by the invalidity component of the insurance just as normal wear and tear to property is not compensated by home insurance policies. And so those of retirement age who are complaining that people (the “invalids) who worked for fewer years than they are being paid more than they should understand this. The fact that you have paid more premiums does not entitle you to a payout equal to invalidity benefit. There is an added element as there is for most insurance policies that I know – settlements are only paid to persons who have suffered the loss.

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  • Donna

    RE: “As far as I can tell, the NIS categorize invalidity benefit as a pension simply to distinguish it from an invalidity grant which is a lump sum payment.”

    Nonsense. An invalidity grant is not “a lump sum payment.” The differences between an invalidity benefit and a grant are the methods used to calculate each and the payment periods.

    RE: “If it is your contention that Errol Barrow intended for a person who sometimes through no fault of his or her own becomes unable to work, a person with minor children and a mortgage should suffer further by losing his or her home and having to live on the streets, then continue merrily on your way.”

    Could you please indicate WHAT in my contribution caused you to arrive at the above conclusion? My friend, you’re reading things into my contributions that I have not written.

    Whereas your perspective on the issue is “more or less” based on emotion, as is evidenced by the content of your contribution…… I, on the other hand, prefer to discuss the facts.

    Social media is slowly becoming a forum where people seem to be ignoring facts. Their thoughts are guided by emotion….what they believe to be true…… and they are and concentrating more on illogical “conspiracy theories” and assumptions of untoward motives.

    Perhaps, it would be best if we “agree to disagree” and do not prolong the “argument” any further.

    Liked by 1 person

  • No sir, not nonsense at all. I see you have not answered my question as to when these “facts” were published on the website. When was this interpretation of the law taken as fact? Still talking to many insiders who never knew of this interpretation.

    By the way, this talk of being emotional is a typical sexist insult that I would have previously considered beneath you. I should think I would have proven myself by now. Why even the chauvinist Bush Tea who refused to argue with women was inclined to make an exception in my case. He wondered if indeed I was a woman.

    Show me the facts and I will change my opinion. I could join with others here and opine that you are determined to back up this government at every turn but I did not do that. Your disrespect is noted.

    Like

  • The trick of latching on to one little aspect of an argument and ignoring all the other valid points.

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  • Efficiency is the number one goal

    Why are so many schools still remained unopened
    This govt has once again broken another promised
    One would have belived that after Mottley utterances of ten years which boasted of a blp goverence to be accountable transparent and efficient
    That first and foremost education would be given top priority
    Instead govt has focused on playing political mind games on the people
    Meanwhile schools remained closed and studentsand parents and students given a daily timeline of political blabber of reopening

    Like

  • FACT- An invalidity grant IS A LUMP SUM PAYMENT, MR. UNEMOTIONAL KNOW IT ALL.

    “An Invalidity Grant is a lump sum payment equal to 6 weeks average insurable weekly earning for each 50 contributions actually paid or credited to the insured person’s account.”

    My source? The National Insurance and Social Security Scheme – A GUIDE TO BENEFITS, Revised 2011.

    I took the time to retrieve my copy from my filing cabinet. It’s not for the milk and biscuits mamma sen’ me to school… ah keepin’ me cool” Calypsonian Traveller.

    Like

  • My friend, you are being silly.

    RE: “I see you have not answered my question as to when these “facts” were published on the website. When was this interpretation of the law taken as fact? Still talking to many insiders who never knew of this interpretation.”

    I purposely refused to answer that question because I deemed it to be an insult. It was always a known fact that when an individual reaches compulsory retirement age or opts to retire early at age 60 years, the invalidity benefit stops and is converted to an old age pension. As to your mentioning of insiders, who are they? I have a personal childhood mate who worked has worked at the NIS for several years and he advises me accordingly. I do not have any reason to doubt his knowledge. He has dealt with several of these cases at tribunal level.

    RE: “By the way, this talk of being emotional is a typical sexist insult that I would have previously considered beneath you. I should think I would have proven myself by now. Why even the chauvinist Bush Tea who refused to argue with women was inclined to make an exception in my case. He wondered if indeed I was a woman.”

    Again, another silly comment. Are you so thin-skinned that you interpreted a GENERALIZED COMMENT to be sexist and meant specifically for you or any other woman? Or are you admitting only women argue from an emotional point of view?

    RE: “I could join with others here and opine that you are determined to back up this government at every turn but I did not do that.”

    Come off it, my friend. How can you and others opine that I’m “determined to back up this government at every turn,” when I SELDOM contribute to this forum? Or is it you’re that forming this opinion because I refuse to engage in illogical conspiracy theories and assumptions of untoward motives, but prefer to present my arguments and discussions based on facts? But then again, I don’t care what you and others think. This is not a fan club and I’m not here to be popular or join a particular fan club. Similarly to others, I present my opinions. You are free to agree or disagree… or scroll pass.

    How can we discuss facts when you immediately questioned the authenticity and creditability of the information I presented and preferred to ask when the it was uploaded to the Treasury’s website. You immediately made an assumption of an untoward motive, without conducting your own research to verify if the information was recent or not. What is even more ludicrous, is the fact that you made that assumption in the face of references to the Pension Act of 1975 and 1985.

    As I mentioned in my previous contribution, let’s agree to disagree and not prolong the discussion any further. Instead, you resorted to mentioning nonsense.

    Contributions such as yours is one of the reasons why I hardly comment on BU.

    Liked by 1 person

  • So much for the prolonged debate on invalidity payments
    Mottley stated it was cruel and inhumane treatment to have taken away the payments
    However what boggles the mind on whose instructions was the policy implemented to reduce or discontinue the payments
    Mottley can u answer that question or better yet Artax

    Like

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