The Grenville Phillips Column – The BLP’s Own Goals

An own goal is when a sports team scores a goal for the opposing team, by sending the ball into their own goal. The BLP has scored many unnecessary own goals during their first year in Government, and are showing no signs of correcting this habit. Coincidentally, during the same time, we have been forced to pay significantly more taxes.

Outside of a destructive war, the greatest threat to a national economy is political corruption. This type of corruption is normally in the form of bribes paid to politicians when governments contract to buy products. The bribes are normally included in the inflated costs of the products.

To pay the bribe component of the cost, taxes on citizens must be increased. One way of significantly reducing the size of any bribes, and any resulting tax increases, is to allow competitive tendering (or bidding) with an impartial evaluation of the bids.

Before the General Election, the BLP assured the public that they would not be engaging in any of the gross corruption of which they were accusing the DLP. To convince us that they were serious, every single BLP candidate swore to protect us with a Contractor General, who would review government contracts, including those of State-Owned Enterprises.

No-bid contracts are not illegal, since our laws allow for them in specific circumstances. But they are, by their nature, corrupting. The allure of corrupting no-bid contracts has proven too much for many politicians of other countries to resist.

The very least that we could have reasonably hoped for, is that the promised Contractor General would be appointed before any corrupting no-bid contracts were signed. Having a Contractor General is not effective if a politically compromised person is appointed to that post. However, it is better than the nothing that we currently have.

During their first year in Government, the BLP has reportedly signed an astonishing amount of no-bid contracts, for well over $100M. Tragically, there was no oversight by the Contractor General, who each BLP politician promised, on their sacred honour, that they would provide to stop political corruption. This is definitely not in our best interests.

By refusing to allow the promised oversight of their no-bid contracts, the BLP invites unnecessary speculation. Why do the prices seem so massively inflated? Why allow only one business to tender when there was no urgency? Why were other more competent companies excluded from tendering?

The way of no-bid contracts is the proven way of political corruption. To stay on that path is to invite rigorous public scrutiny of all no-bid contracts. To stay on that path, while disallowing the promised oversight, is to attract valid suspicions of gross corruption.

The BLP administration has only itself to blame, because they can correct this mess whenever they wish. If they choose not to, then we can expect them to score more own goals. However, if we are forced to pay more taxes after each of their own goals, then we should no longer assume that it is coincidental.

Grenville Phillips II is a Chartered Structural Engineer and President of Solutions Barbados. He can be reached at NextParty246@gmail.com

156 comments

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    If governments believe they will get away with intimidating anyone in this new going down, they better think again.

    http://www.nationnews.com/nationnews/news/239780/whatsapp-security-breach-targeted-human-rights

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    Ask Israel, they developed it. Or Khashoggi’s buddy. They have a patch to fix the issue. Wicked, the malware could be activated by a call via WApp whether you answered it or not. Every hacker-government’s dream.

    Liked by 1 person

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    Corrupt governments who are CONTROL FREAKS are in for a rude, rude awakening, the lowlifes.

    they claimed the fixed it, but Israell is not much different.

    Like

  • The blogmaster endorses this message from Grenville and Solutions Barbados. There is a rush by this government to do many things, FOI and Integrity legislation appears not to be attracting the same urgency.

    Like

  • William Skinner

    Nationnews paper June 1st. 2018

    Mottley said that on May 23, hours before Barbadians went to the polls, tax concessions were granted to the Hyatt Hotel Division Developments Inc., inclusive of import duty, excise tax, Value Added Tax (VAT), tax on all supplies, motor vehicles, food, alcohol, beverages, and even construction supplies

    Barbados today 5/15/19
    Marshall said the acquisition will continue as Barbados badly needed investments such as the Hyatt to turn around the economy….In the meantime the acquisition will go ahead because the business of rebuilding Barbados stops for no man.

    Barbados Today 5/15/19

    The land is being acquired for the Hyatt Centric Hotel project which Atherley said had ” much negativity and controversy ” surrounding it not too long ago.

    It’s all football Grenville

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ William

    Two key points here: governments are not bound by the contractual arrangements of previous governments, although it is custom to honour them.
    Second, why is government intervening in what should have been a private sale between Hyatt and Mrs Ram? So, and this is a real case, if a potential investor drives along the west coast and sees a spot of land they like, they can get government to compulsorily purchase it and throw the rightful owners off so the investor can ‘develop’ it?
    Whatever happened to the rule of law in Barbados?

    Liked by 1 person

  • William Skinner

    @ Hal

    Nationnews 5/19/19

    Payne told the House: “I have determined as Minister of Housing that as part of Government’s plans to revitalise Bridgetown and to enhance the tourism product, the property which is owned by Tiny Tots Ltd, currently occupied by an enterprise under the name of Liquidation Centre, would be required for tourism development.” He added Cabinet agreed to the acquisition on February 14 and it was expected “that after the acquisition, the property will be vested in the Barbados Tourism Investment Inc, which in turn will transfer the property to a private developer”.

    Perhaps the above would give you a clearer understanding of how the Duopoly operates. I find this very interesting” : ….Cabinet agreed to the acquisition on February 14 and it was expected “that after the acquisition, the property will be vested in the Barbados Tourism Investment Inc, which in turn will transfer the property to a private developer”.
    “which in turn will transfer the property to a private developer”

    Duopoly football.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @William

    Do you know if the private developer- not Hyatt- tried to purchase the property?

    Do you know if the amended TP application is contingent on the additional property being required?

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  • @ William,

    Compulsory purchase is legitimate for public policy purposes, but NOT to transfer ownership from one private owner to a preferred private owner. This is gangsterism. The courts must throw out this bid. The price of the offer does not come in to it.
    This means that if you have a nice home in a preferred area and a party supporter likes it, government can compulsorily buy it and hand it over to the supporter. There is no difference with Hyatt v Ram. The proposed temporary ownership by the Barbados Tourism Investment looks to me like a device, a gloss to legalise the transfer. It is certainly not an ‘investment’.
    What is worrying is that the prime minister is a QC, the attorney general is a QC and the minister is a QC. As I understand it, in private practice the attorney general and minster operate from the same chambers.
    Barbados is a failed state. It will end in tears.

    Liked by 1 person

  • William Skinner

    @ David

    No ! Do you ? Please share.

    Liked by 1 person

  • William Skinner and Hal

    All yuh continue to amaze me.

    Maloney became owner of the old harbour police site under the last government and submitted a planning application, which was approved under the last administration. Commissiong filed a JR on the basis that the decision to grant permission was an error because no EIA was submitted. In other words the process was flawed. All now Maloney can start to build his hotel if he chooses. If he submits the EIA and the court is satisfied, he has the right to build. Given the location of the site, neither an EIA nor a SIA will raise any issues that would be so severe to conclude that development is unacceptable. The assessments, however, would more than likely identify mitigation measures to address any likely adverse impacts. Why therefore would he go and buy land from Ms.Ram? The government, however, has an interest in ensuring the strategic objectives of Bay Street are met and hence would be and is interested in acquiring Ms.Ram’s property.

    Anyone with a modicum of development planning experience or understanding would tell you that on small sites for big projects, the sensible thing to do is to encourage master planning–meaning seek to make the site bigger by consolidating adjoining properties where possible. By doing so, the USES and viability of the development are maximised and the design quality enhanced. All the government appears to be doing is acquiring the run down property next door to facilitate a more comprehensive redevelopment of that part of Bay Street, supported by environmental and social impact assessments. Furthermore, imagine a brand new Hyatt and Ms.Ram warehouse next to it.

    Y’all need to stay off the blog when y’all have nothing sensible to contribute. The pick-a-noise agenda needs to stop!! #alwaystalkinboutwhatwunnadoanonstand

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  • Hal Austin

    Again talking shiiite! Case law does not support your position on compulsory acquisition.

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  • William Skinner

    ” Y’all need to stay off the blog when y’all have nothing sensible to contribute. The pick-a-noise agenda needs to stop!!” #alwaystalkinboutwhatwunnadoanonstand

    AGREED !!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Enuff

    I hope you are neither a lawyer nor politician. You do confirm why it is best some people remain anonymous.

    Liked by 1 person

  • William Skinner

    Enuff January 14, 2018 8:07 AM

    Sunny sunshine stop making yourself look foolish do, swearing for the integrity of Solutions’ candidates. This article is about the shady dealings of a businessman……………………

    Like

  • William Skinner

    Posted by David

    “At the BCCI luncheon in November 2017 Mia Mottley- the featured speaker- shocked many with the revelation that one company (individual) in Barbados was able to secure ONE BILLION dollars in government contracts. The company (individual) is Preconco (Mark Maloney) of course.”

    in the thread quoted above Mark Maloney is referred to as a the businessman with the shady dealings

    Like

  • William Skinner

    You may continue. #pearlsbeforeswines

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  • “David” posted articles re the Gov’t intended acquisition of land in Loveridge’s tourism column, why is the discussion about Hyatt here?

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  • Enuff

    Sir William Skinner is quite right!

    There is no certainty, unless as politically derived, in saying that merely attaining the requirements of the court will remove all possible other hurdles in the construction of the hotel, and what may from which flow.

    As Enuff will know, Comissiong’s court action was limited to a few procedural errors. In developments like these there could be a myriad of causes for action. Public interest may find more reasons for preventive action.

    Enuff, this write has more than a modicum of understanding about project development and master planning. To say an inherent requirement in project development is to seek expansion, though generally associated, is not necessarily a precondition, as you seem to assert.

    This argumentation, given limitations, historical ownership patterns, and so on, plays into the notion that lands in Barbados are to be forever a commodity subject to economies as designed by developers and master planners with interests inconsistent with what these things should be about.

    What this is about is the continuation of the consolidation of wealth into the hands of a few bacra boys in Barbados.

    We have never found you so naïve to believe that any modern government of Barbados will seek to make an acquisition of land, next to a proposed project, in these circumstances, to serve anybody’s interests but the moneymen so associated.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Sargeant:

    Every single BLP candidate (including Atherley) swore on their sacred honour, that they would protect us from being forced to pay grossly inflated contracts that tend to facilitate political corruption. Every one of them promised us a Contractor General to try to ensure that we got value for money. Yet they have signed well over $100M in corrupting no-bid contracts without the promised oversight.

    Hyatt is only relevant to this article if tax-payers had to foot the bill. Since the BLP administration will not provide the promised oversight, then the only thing left for citizens to do is unnecessary speculation.

    Why would any Government get involved in facilitating a private transaction between two willing parties? One likely scenario is that the willing seller wanted to sell at a price that was too high for the willing buyer. So taxpayers must pay the willing seller’s price, and recover some of that cost from the willing buyer, who gets it at a lower price. The taxpayers are forced to pay the difference.

    The BLP Administration, with all of their PR resources, must recognize that such speculation is not beneficial. So their refusal to allow the promised oversight is baffling.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Grenville

    Well stated.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    Wuh Loss

    The plot deepens. There is none so blind as he who does not see.

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    “So, and this is a real case, if a potential investor drives along the west coast and sees a spot of land they like, they can get government to compulsorily purchase it and throw the rightful owners off so the investor can ‘develop’ it?
    Whatever happened to the rule of law in Barbados?”

    There is no rule of law, these pretend compulsory acquisitions by governments…ARE THEFTS..COMPLETE WITH THREATS to the real owners..

    …..but Ram is having none of it, she will bring their backsides down first, she is the one with the ammunition to bring them all down if she gets no market value for the property that am sure she and them all know how she acquired it to begin with……they took too many of her brown paper bags…now she got them by the short and curlies..lol

    they are all to licorish and corrupt.

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  • Pachamama

    There is a Pierhead Redevelopment Plan that establishes the principle of redeveloping Bay Street for commercial activity. The government’s emerging policy encapsulates this approach to Bay Street. So, the Court determines that in the absence of an EIA the decision to grant permission should be quashed. Maloney reapplies with all the requisite documents, on what basis would the TPD refuse his application bearing in mind the recent permission and the emerging policy? This brings us back to my initial point, that what the current government appears to be seeking is the correct approach to redeveloping that area of Bridgetown–consolidating lots to achieve a better outcome.

    Kindly list the uncertainties that are relevant to granting or refusing permission.

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  • David

    What are these $100M no bid contracts? I hope Grenville bid for his road repaving consultancy as advertised in the newspaper. lol

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    Everything just seems to be going sideways isn’t it…

    wuhloss..Piece

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  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    “What this is about is the continuation of the consolidation of wealth into the hands of a few bacra boys in Barbados.”

    Complete with enuff, enuff syphoning and funneling of taxpayers and national Insurance pensioners money and nuff, nuff MILLION DOLLAR BRIBES..same MO…since the 1940s and the bar associatioin criminal syndicate setup.., no deviations.

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @nextparty246
    By compulsory acquisition they can “beat down” the price. So rather than acquiring high and selling low, the GoB can use its powers to buy low and sell low. In other words, acquire the land at the price the developer wishes to pay.(taxpayer takes no loss) In either case, they are involving themselves between two private interests.
    Can we expect the “uncommon transparency” to continue where the acquisition documents of the land, the transfer to BMTI and the sale by BMTI are all laid in parliament?
    However, nothing stops the private buyer from BMTI from reselling the land?
    Developers can find ‘uncommon value’ when it comes to selling assets between related parties. Even room for finders fees and the like.

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  • Can anyone differentiate between this compulsory purchase and the rise of oligarchs in Russia under Putin? It is state capture by a small group of well-connected people.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Any of the mouttas in here have any experience in development planning, urban regeneration, land assembly, urban design, strategic planning, master planning or architecture? Or like debt restructuring, just talking? Local authorities in the UK acquire private land through compulsory purchase orders to facilitate private-led regeneration all the RH time. The knowitallism driven by pickanoism is astounding. Go read these docs and enlighten wunna self:
    http://www.compulsorypurchaseassociation.org/filesCPA-ourchase-final.pdf
    http://www.london.gov.uk/sites/default/files/gla_gains_report_pdf

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  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    Emininent Domain does not = tiefing land from original owners and selling it to private owners, that is THEFT..

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  • Compulsory purchase in England and Wales is for the public benefit, the public good. The transfer of property from one private owner to another is not in the public good, no matter how that is interpreted. Land is compulsorily purchased to extend public transport, to build social housing, to build hospitals, schools, etc. All public goods.
    A top end hotel is not – cannot – be in the public interest; in fact, in an over-crowded hotel accommodation market in Barbados, it cannot even logically be said to contribute to our tourism sector.
    This is what happens when there is no public debate on policy. Had there been, that part of Bay Street would have formed part of a much wider City development – as part of a wider economic drive to stimulate the economy – which would have been at the heart of a 24-hour leisure economy. But such an idea contradicts BERT.
    In any case, it contradicts basic public policy.

    Liked by 2 people

  • If you want to see how in other countries owners have the right to refuse to sell their property and their rights had to be respected, then check the 2 examples below.

    Spiegelhalter family vs Wickhams Department Store.

    Nail houses vs China state.

    No the houses were not made of nails, they were given that name because no matter how China state tried they couldn’t get the owners to budge. Hence they were given the name ” Nail Houses” as they appeared nailed to the ground.

    It’s interesting and shows the extent some people will go to hold on to their property for one reason or another and how might could not win over right.

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  • @ Enuff

    Despite all your lies, denials and objections IT IS VERY OBVIOUS YOU ARE PART O THE BARBADOS LABOUR PARTY BRIGADE DEEPLY INVOLVED IN THEIR DECEPTIONS AND CONSPIRACIES AGAINST THE SUFFERING TAXPAYERS OF BARBADOS.

    EVEN STEVE WONDER A BLIND MAN CAN SEE THAT.

    Like

  • Georgie Porgie

    q Everything just seems to be going sideways isn’t it…

    a no. things going DOWN!

    Like

  • I am coming to the conclusion that you believe Bajans should vote and then disappear for five years.

    We know nothing about “development planning, urban regeneration, land assembly, urban design, strategic planning, master planning or architecture” Or “debt restructuring”

    We should just keep or mouth shut and go along with your gods.

    Once I said that you “were bad for Barbados”. I believe so even more than yesterday.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Hal I like you have serious concerns with how this is unfolding. First let me state I would love to see a hotel built in the area providing it meets all the relevant environmental concerns. What I am however uncomfortable with is government’s involvement in the matter. As I see it they are 2 private property owners involved in this. If 1 of them wants more for their property than the other is willing to pay, well let the potential buyer either pay it or simply walk away. If the original Hyatt plan was viable when only one parcel of land was involved, then return to your original plan. I don’t like this approach where government steps in and by acquisition buys a property by force from one private entity, only to then sell it to another private entity. So where else will this approach be applied in the future? If a developer wants next to build a hotel in the north say and the local owners refuse to sell, will government then act as a real estate dictator and purchase the land by acquisition, only to then sell it on to the said developer? I don’t like where that approach can take us and as a result have to say let private business people negotiate without your interference. If a sale can not be found then let the developer return to plan A which only involved the 1 parcel of land as was outlined in the original plan.

    Liked by 1 person

  • I bet you will not question our knowledge/ experience of scams, scammers, crooked ‘ pollutians’, taxes, being laid-off, and being lied to.

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  • The corruption allegations are pure speculation at the edge to slander honorable government members. The ten years of economic terror by Chris Sinckler and Donville Inniss are reality, no speculation.

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  • Barbados Underground Whistleblower

    @ Tron

    Another Barbados Labour Party Stool Pigeon.

    You are saying that George Payne and Dale Marshall are Honorable men.

    Then Bajans must like being bulled without vaseline.

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  • The-O-Gas
    But I should keep quiet because I am out numbered? Or accept nonsense without any fact to back it up or that I know is wrong? GTFOH!! This is how wunna does operate:
    Enuff-the sky is blue.
    Pickanoisettes-no it’s not.
    Enuff-here is a picture.
    Pickanoisettes-that is photoshopped, the camera lens blue.🤣🤣🤣
    Deny that govts can, and do, acquire private land to facilitate urban regeneration or any development with private sector investors. Deny that such action was upheld by the courts in Antigua. Apart from Pachama who made an attempt, not one of wunna can present a plausible response to the substance of what I wrote. Cuz wunna reading to respond not to understand. I keep telling wunna I am not ac.🤫

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    They have no shame…they are even stabbing their fellow crooks Pornville and Sinkler in their backs now.

    …..dey brekking fuh they self.

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  • Local authorities in the UK acquire private land through compulsory purchase orders to facilitate private-led regeneration all the RH time (Quote)

    Name them. I repeat: compulsory acquisition of land in England and Wales is for public policy purposes, the public good, such as social housing, hospitals, public transport, etc. In no case s land compulsorily acquitted and then passed on to a private enterprise.
    What in principle would stop this or a future government from compulsorily acquiring Cave Shepherd and selling it to a preferred private enterprise?
    The argument about case law (@Enuff 8.15) shows policy illiteracy. Courts do not make law in our system, they interpret legislation. Policy is about influencing legislation, not about the certainty or not of court decisions in small jurisdictions.
    Because it is not part of our culture to debate policy, we try to legalise issues all the time. In t hat way we feel comfortable.

    Liked by 1 person

  • We like to refer to British law when it suites so let me share this case with you that has many similarities to the Hyatt scenario.

    In London’s east end in the 1960s Wickmans department store wanted to buy out a small private building that stood in the way of their new store planned for London’s East End. This was a small building owned by the Speigelhalter family. After numerous attempts to buy all to no avail, they went to government and told them if they did not get this small space they would build their deparrment store else where. They were told by the powers that be at the time that it was a private matter between you and Mr Speigelhalter not one that concerns government. To cut a long story short in the end Wickhams built their massive department store around the little jewelry store, which went on to become a major tourist attraction. Both businesses have since closed, but even up to now people in the East End still refer to that case as David vs Goliath. The point was that unless the government of the UK needed the space for public infrastructure, they decided there was no case for acquisition by state to be an option, even if it meant losing the development of The East End by the Wickams company.

    So take that outcome and apply it here in Little England and what do we have?

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  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    Land thieves, don’t know how they helped Ram get that property,who poor old person and their beneficiaries got robbed blind that many years ago… but now the same tiefing ministers/lawyers…. want it back…so they are just TAKING IT BACK…whole bunch of frauds.

    “GOVERNMENT HAS MOVED to compulsorily acquire the lands in Bay Street, The City, owned by businesswoman Asha “Mrs Ram” Mirchandani.

    “Probe Sam Lord’s Castle acquisition”…
    Yes…probe Sam Lord’s Castle acquisition…which minister Doyle helped in that scam…

    A contentious debate in the House of Assembly yesterday saw Minister of Housing and Lands George Payne (below) clashing with Opposition Leader Bishop Joseph Atherley over the acquisition of the property which is earmarked for the planned Hyatt Centric Hotel development.

    The resolution seeking approval under Section 5 of the Land Acquisition Act for the compulsory acquisition by the Crown of 7 328 square metres of land at Lower Bay Street “for the public purpose of tourism development”, was introduced by Payne.

    He said the land was “being acquired for a public purpose in the area of tourism development from an individual”. He added it was “the intention of Government to engage a private developer with respect to the tourism aspect of it”.

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  • Firepool is situated towards the northern end of Taunton town centre opposite the County Cricket Ground and lies on either side of the River Tone. The Firepool scheme will secure the redevelopment of three areas of under-utilised and semi-derelict brownfield land within Taunton town centre, but will offer a sustainable development given the proximity to Taunton town centre and the railway station.
    Taken together, the Firepool areas extend to approximately 18 hectares.

    <strongWhat was the project?
    Delivery of the wider Firepool scheme is expected to take 12 years in total. The riverside site is made up chiefly of the former livestock market north of the River Tone and the surface car park in Priory Bridge Road (“Priory Bridge Road Car Park Site”), together with existing properties between the railway station and Canal Road. Part of the Priory Bridge Road Car Park Site contained residential buildings which, in order to assemble the site and progress development, the Council had to acquire. Whilst a number of residential buildings located on the Firepool site were acquired by an agreement with the Council, some of the properties could not be acquired
    in this way. The Council accordingly resolved to utilise its compulsory purchase powers under the TCPA 1990.

    Who was the promoter?
    Property developer St. Modwen
    was responsible for delivering the project, which is being delivered in partnership with the Council.

    Project process
    St. Modwen signed a Development Agreement with the Council in April 2009. A planning application for the first phase of commercial and residential accommodation was then approved in November 2010. This allowed for the development of the 4.5 acre Priory Bridge Car Park into 113,000 sq ft of offices, with the potential to incorporate a hotel and new apartments overlooking the river. The CPO was made on 7 April 2011 pursuant to section 226 (1)(a) TCPA 1990 for the purposes of securing a mixed use development at the Priory Bridge Road Car Park. Objections were made to the CPO.

    How was the development achieved?
    In December 2010, St. Modwen completed a development agreement with Viridor to relocate its current head office operations and over 110 members of staff to a 27,000 sq ft building at Firepool. Construction of the headquarters was completed in June 2012. Delivery of the residential homes (by Acorn Homes) commenced in July 2015. The residential development has proved to be very popular: at the time of writing, only two of the homes remain unsold. Without the use of compulsory purchase powers, the redevelopment of the Priory Bridge Road Car Park Site could not have progressed.

    Your comment about policy and case law is an attempt to save face. I never mentioned case law to prove any policy. I cited case law to prove that the acquisition of land to facilitate private development has been deemed lawful by the Court after you asked “whatever happened to the rule of law in Barbados?” The regeneration of Bridgetown, however, through land assembly is policy, is a public good and suitable for compulsory acquisition.

    Your humble policy illiterate.

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  • “Payne told the House: “I have determined as Minister of Housing that as part of Government’s plans to revitalise Bridgetown and to enhance the tourism product, the property which is owned by Tiny Tots Ltd, currently occupied by an enterprise under the name of Liquidation Centre, would be required for tourism development.” He added Cabinet agreed to the acquisition on February 14 and it was expected “that after the acquisition, the property will be vested in the Barbados Tourism Investment Inc., which in turn will transfer the property to a private developer”.

    Payne said the relevant notices had been published and the authorisations under Section 4 of the act were signed by the Acting Governor General on May 2”

    http://www.nationnews.com/nationnews/news/239791/government-moves-ram-land

    We need the opinion of a qualified lawyer.

    The only way this acquisition could be reasonable is if the owner is paid market value for the land.

    That is my layman’s opinion.

    Liked by 1 person

  • William Skinner

    Perhaps Mr. Maloney will consider putting some squatters in the Hyatt. I recall he was once told to put some squatters in the then empty houses at Coverly. I think it was Heather Cole who had supported that idea , first suggested by Trevor Prescod. It got a lot of support from some on BU.
    Of course those houses all went to the students of the recently opened medical school.
    Well that was a short time ago. I read right here on BU that the Hyatt should be placed on some lands at Mobile or somewhere up by the Aquatic.
    It was even suggested that we should forget the jobs and put Barbados first. At least one writer in this thread bitterly opposed Hyatt being built on the present location.
    However I have learnt that since then, Mr. Maloney has become a born again Christian. He is no longer a “ corrupt “ thief and “shady businessman “and he definitely had a real come to Jesus moment.
    It is to Mr Maloney’s credit that he was able to find God in George Street and Jesus in Roebuck Street. He is truly a believer in the biblical meaning of seek and you shall find.
    Mr. Maloney is now elevated to Priest in Charge of the Church of the Duopoly.

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  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    Then ya got Beckles, knowing full well that the rights of the Rastafarian community have been violated ACROSS THE CARIBBEAN by all the lowlife governments, knowing full well that black people’s rights have been violated across the Caribbean by LOW CLASS BLACK CORRUPT GOVERNMENTS..but there he is, pimping for Reparations from Uk in paper form…..

    oh no you don’t…oh hell no you don’t…

    https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fmetro.co.uk%2F2015%2F09%2F29%2Fbritain-owes-us-billions-of-pounds-in-reparations-for-slavery-jamaica-tells-david-cameron-5413110%2F%3Ffbclid%3DIwAR3kUuMS20z76uC_0Gf57iPUrox6_NbAE59AR64p–zjnn7cq32jH_bZ57E&h=AT35UvQSZm9MRL-AHtEyNPRZuAzKl1oTaA_07xsKOsgWYxcOnuxZJECeL8e4j1GiEFws97wgDCFZxmN12zL43m1PxSsMJNHQ8s8LIFJWHqHkOcMWhfzd_cbWjJ9xPLYJewvjRg

    This poster said it well..

    “No reparations in the form of paper money, there must be a better way, you all are too crooked and corrupt and you violate the rights of the Rastafarian Community, you violate the rights of your own people, combined with too much corruption and thefts.”

    They are real goddamn brazen and got real goddamn nerve though, after all those human rights violations against their own people in Barbados and the Caribbean …decades worth of violations, they got the nerve to go after reparations..in paper form.

    Like

  • First…If a Private Person was putting down a road, it was going to go through property, and that person who owned the private property decided he does not want to sell, he does not want to move, he is happy where he is. To allow the road builder to compulsory acquire the man’s land whither it be through the Government or by Force or whatever strategy is used that is wrong. You have taken one individual rights and put it above another’s individual rights.

    Second…If the road builder was the Government and the road was to be a public road you could say that the Government would have the right to purchase the property for the public’s good. However, the Caveat being that the Government must pay a Fair Price.

    The Third possibility is that the road builder being a Private Enterprise and the land on the other side of the private man’s land belonged to the Government. And that the Government finds that it is indeed desirable that the road is built and all the land be joined and is a party and partner with the private road builder. The question is can the Government enter into such an arrangement? The Answer must be yes. The only question remains is what is Fair Value for the man in the middle’s property.

    With all the Hoo-rang and all the Discussion, what is to say that the Government does not have a Steak in the Hyatt…They Already own the Two Properties adjacent to Mrs. Rams Place. As Enuff stated, “Deny that govts can, and do, acquire private land to facilitate urban regeneration or any development with private sector investors.”

    As pertaining to Hal’s comment… Since when do you determine what is in the Public’s Interest or the Public Good? Where There Is No Vision The People Perish…Were you ever an Entrepreneur. Do you know what it takes to take Risk at your own Expense?

    It is always necessary to Upgrade and Enhance our Tourism Product. We have many A Class Hotel Facilities but we have a great deal of aging Hotel Facilities and many Dilapidated Buildings in between. Barbados is an Expensive destination it therefore makes sense to have more A Class Facilities and let the market shake out how it will. The Older Properties will Spruce Up and cater to the Value End of the market and that will be the effect of people putting down more High-end Accommodations.

    What have we against upgrading the whole environment of Bridgetown or for that matter all of Barbados!

    BTW the people are not Immune to Selling they are just Haggling about the Price, who you expect less of Mrs. Ram?

    Like

  • @ Enuff

    Again talking shiiite! Case law does not support your position on compulsory acquisition.(Quote)

    Your comment about policy and case law is an attempt to save face. I never mentioned case law to prove any policy. I cited case law to prove that the acquisition of land to facilitate private development has been deemed lawful by the Court after you asked “whatever happened to the rule of law in Barbados?(Quote)

    Second, why is government intervening in what should have been a private sale between Hyatt and Mrs Ram? So, and this is a real case, if a potential investor drives along the west coast and sees a spot of land they like, they can get government to compulsorily purchase it and throw the rightful owners off so the investor can ‘develop’ it?
    Whatever happened to the rule of law in Barbados?(Quote)

    You read but do not understand. Read your edited submission again. Is the government of B’dos going to be part-owners of Hyatt?

    Liked by 1 person

  • “our comment about policy and case law is an attempt to save face.”

    hahaha

    The Apologist get show up again?.

    All the BLP doing is bluffing and winging it, while bamboozling the uninformed.

    No policy, no plan. Just spin and PR guff.

    The Dullard see piece a land he like. Somebody put in a good word wid Mugabe fuh muh hear..

    Like

  • Hal
    Is the Council in my post above going to be part owner of the hotel or the office building or even ALL the apts? The article even makes it clear that the regeneration would not have happened without the Council’s CPO. In the era of scarce public, urban regeneration projects are driven by private sector developers, government facilitates and seeks public goods in return; but at the end of the day, the scheme must be VIABLE for developers and the standard developer profit in England from what I know was up to last year 20% on market housing and about 15% on commercial.

    Like

  • William Skinner
    You can search for my old comments as much as you like. You will never see me opposing a hotel. I always spoke about the characteristics of the proposal (design, massing, product, scale etc) not the principle. I also spoke about how the then proposal could prejudice the development of other sites. By consolidating the lots you should get a better designed scheme. Please have a seat and stick to talking about things that led to you losing your deposit.#bitterlikealoes🖐🏾

    Like

  • Dullard
    You must have been drinking. I said no such thing! Y’all don’t get tired tho, sure suckers for capitulation and annihilation Exits stage!#wasteoftime#pearlsb4🐖

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    Wuhloss…

    #notaseasyasyallthought

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @Enuff
    where you are missing the boat, is the proposed development on Bay St, is NOT a JOINT PROJECT between the GoB and a private developer. A public entity and a private one.

    Min Payne is quoted as saying “after the acquisition, the property will be vested in the Barbados Tourism Investment Inc., which in turn will transfer the property to a private developer”. This is a pure transfer play from the GoB to a private developer.

    Like

  • @Tron (May 15, 2019 3:43 PM)
    “The corruption allegations are pure speculation at the edge to slander honorable government members. The ten years of economic terror by Chris Sinckler and Donville Inniss are reality, no speculation.”

    As stated in my article, they are not corruption allegations, they are valid corruption suspicions – only because the BLP administration has so far refused to protect the public with a Contractor General. If people promise, on their sacred honour, to protect us from the corrupting no-bid contracts with a Contractor General, and then allow the signing of well over $100M no-bid contracts without the promised oversight, do you think that they deserve the title “honourable”?

    Like

  • Barbados better be nice to Hyatt.

    “More than 20 new Hyatt hotels to open in Canada”

    CHICAGO (May 14, 2019) – Hyatt Hotels Corporation (NYSE: H) today announced that more than 20 new hotels are expected to open in Canada by the end of 2022,

    Like

  • Enuff,do not pay these overseas bajans no mind,you got them good.All they good for is bellyaching here everyday.The likes of Ssrge,Hal Austin,Waru,Hants,SSS,William Skinner, and the j/a bandwagon hopper got four more years to bray.At the end of the day the voters will make their choice in 2023.

    Like

  • If the BT article (linked below) is accurate, then that is important evidence to consider.

    If there is a willing buyer and a willing seller, but there is a block in the negotiations, then the buyer has no standing to approach the court to force a sale. So, what is a developer to do but to appeal to the Government.

    The Government is not obligated to intervene in a private matter unless it is in our interests. This can be argued both sides, with valid supporting reasons for both sides. The people voted and it is for the BLP administration to determine whether they wish to intervene or not. They have chosen to.

    With no Contractor General or independent oversight to protect our best interests, it is left to citizens to scrutinize the Government’s actions once they have decided to pursue a course of action.

    We should be concerned if the Government wanted to pay an inflated cost for the property. However, it seems reasonable for the Government to try to objectively determine the value of the property through the courts.

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2019/05/15/off-to-court/?fbclid=IwAR3ebZugIyBPDClo-KEH1fLB57EiN7CCL7g-dP-KyzXlSabkqPvmLGTjYx8

    Like

  • “Sometimes you have to put people in their place and he came in here making several accusations. They were not just accusations against this Cabinet, the accusations were against the Government and the entire people of Barbados,” Payne said.
    ++++++++++++

    Wunnah should stop this criticism, it is not only against the Cabinet, the Government but the entire people of Barbados.
    A word to the wise is sufficient

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    Wuh Loss!

    Sargeant,

    Are you threatening me? Looka muh crosses nuh!

    Like

  • Will any of you BU bloggers benefit directly from the design, engineering and construction of Hyatt Barbados ?

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    “the Government but the entire people of Barbados.”

    Don’t mind them, they only use “the people” spiel when THEY GOT SOMEBODY TO ROB…, that’s the only time they even remember “the people” …..when it’s in their own self interest and when it’s time to inflate those greedy pockets….

    …..ah wonder where they plan to hide the money though..

    Like

  • “BARBADOS’ ECONOMY has stabilised, and now Prime Minister Mia Amor Mottley has her eyes set on transforming the country’s ability to perform.

    Speaking at yesterday’s Barbados Employers’ Confederation (BEC) annual general meeting and luncheon, she said Cabinet would now focus on legislation aimed at decreasing levels of bureaucracy, and encouraging the efficient facilitation of business, which would combine to help produce growth”

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    When yall bullying people these days to TIEF THEIR PROPERTIES, remember, most people have CCTV and all types of cameras set up around their houses, both inside and outside waiting for yall to SET THEM UP….so they can take ya photos and make yall facebook famous…lol…..lookee here.

    https://scontent.fbgi3-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/60336886_1029205913955614_8057440599566974976_n.jpg?_nc_cat=106&_nc_ht=scontent.fbgi3-1.fna&oh=9ce81d4594baa0445231870ecde95058&oe=5D6D3ED9

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    There is a disconnect….in the same BT article above, AG Marshall was quoted
    “to facilitate the construction of the 350-room Hyatt Centric Hotel at Bay Street, St Michael.”

    Now we know from multiple Hyatt sources that Centric, and they were 24 as of Sept 2018, have a room range of 100-250. When the Barbadian Hyatt was announced…it was 237 rooms with 32 Hyatt branded residential condominium units

    So WHERE does AG Marshall get Hyatt Centric and 350 rooms from? Something has changed? Is this change what now requires the developer to need more land?

    @GPII
    “So, what is a developer to do but to appeal to the Government.”

    The developer is to find land that fits within their budget, or ,build a structure which fits within the confines of the land they can afford. The developer can appeal to whomever they want. It is one thing for the approving body, TCP or similar, to alter the height, max units, use, set backs etc etc It’s another for a Government to decide a private project is of such great importance, they must intervene and use their land acquisition powers, because the developer and current land owner cannot agree on a price.

    Why not go and acquire the BYC, that would be a perfect site for a Ritz or Belmond.

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    Thuglife…make sure ya got ya cameras always focused and trained on them…send them live to FB..they are dangerous.

    THUGLIFE…the setups are REAL.

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    WHITE HOAX SCAM EXPOSED….ah done saying anything to president Enuff…she is a real, real, fraud.

    and yall want the UK and Europe to put billions of dollars of reparations money in yall hands, like it belong to hall and like if they foolish and like if we are even more foolish not to see the plan…the MASTER PLAN…the SETUP OF THE CENTURY.

    “Opposition Senator Caswell Franklyn has accused Government of getting into bed with White Oak Advisory without Cabinet approval and carrying out due diligence.

    In a heated presentation which was interrupted on several occasions by Government senators Lucille Moe, Rudy Grant and Kay McConney, the Opposition senator lambasted the ruling party for “giving away $27 million” to the financial advisory firm and demanded that someone should resign over it.

    “A mere couple of days after the Government has changed a contract is signed. First of all there was no Cabinet in place to approve this. You have taken 27 million of our dollars and given it to people for information that you could gotten from the whole lot of people here who you have given consultancies to.”

    The trade unionist pointed out that what took place was against the good governance and transparency laws under which Government has committed to adhere.

    “This is not the only company in the world that does this kind of business so if Government wanted to do something above board they would have put it out to tender and in accordance with the legislation we passed here last year and what existed previously.”

    Liked by 1 person

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    … like if it belong to YALL

    YALL better get those delusions out of ya crazy heads…

    how bout…we ask Europe and UK to pay those billions in reparations to our grandchildren and great grandchildren…AFTER ALL YALL DEAD…that way our ancestors would not have toiled in vain…

    …and that way yall won’t go to prison for TIEFING IT…

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    “Franklyn continued: “….I have here a copy of a letter from the office in England saying they will strike off White Oak Advisory if they fail to file their annual returns. We are not doing our due diligence. Government jumped into bed with a company who they know nothing about, that the corporate office in England knows nothing about. That is the problem I have. And we are spending all of our money making a company that is resident outside of Barbados that is failing to comply with the laws of England. But we want to put those same laws in place for Barbados. That is hypocrisy.””

    Crooks and thieves WHO CARE NOTHING about the people in Barbados, we have been telling yall bout them on BU for years longer than i have been here, now everyone sees for themselves.

    They are the…. FUNNELING AND SYPHONING OFF CREW.

    That reparations money will go to our future generations…after yall ARE GONE to the boneyard…minimize the chances of THEFT OF REPARATIONS..

    Like

  • I am still at lost trying to understand how govt can decided or make changes to design and construction for the Hyatt to their liking.
    It seems as if govt plans are not for the construction of Hyatt but for an unknown entity
    So far govt has shown by their back door dealings with White Oaks and Ross University that govt has the capacity to over rule the laws of barbados by throwing transparency out the door
    Cant see Hyatt shareholders and board members accommodating govt idea of rearranging and changing the design and construction model of the Hotel
    Right now all i am seeing is gun toting govt trying to get its way while getting in the way of what is in the better interest of the people

    Like

  • @VC
    Take it as friendly advice 😊 , I was channeling the Deputy PM who made the statement. I wouldn’t want you to be the face of any treason charges, but if it comes to that I am prepared to be a character witness on your behalf.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Sargeant

    It is comforting to have friends like you.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Mariposa

    I think I have stated this before on this blog. International hotel chains, such as Hyatt, seldom build and own hotels . They franchise their brand names and manage these hotels for use of name and management services. Their fees are a percentage of total revenues. In the case under discussion GoB or the Maloney group would be the owners,builders and designers.

    Like

  • Maloney would be the builder but as far as the design plan .The Hyatt are the owners of the design
    Maloney cannot nor govt change the signature design feature of the Hyatt
    Same goes for all Corporate Hotels groups
    It is near to impossible that Hyatt Corporation would allow any individual entity or govt to change the main feature design of the building and Hyatt placed the Name Hyatt on the property or building
    Not gonna happen

    Like

  • Northern:

    The Government desperately needs these projects to move forward. They have rejected the ISO 9001 international management system that could have significantly improved all of the Government’s management functions, and have adopted their current ad-hoc management style. So we must work with that. Our job is to see that whatever management style they choose, that the public is not disadvantaged.

    Yes, the Government could have stayed out of facilitating Ross, Hyatt and others, but they chose not to. Actually after rejecting the international standard for managing these sort of things, the Government had no little choice but to intervene. The other option was frustrate these businesses through decades of the Government managed bureaucracy.

    So, if you reject international management standards that can benefit all of us, the general public must tolerate our home-grown abysmally low public sector reform standards, and let our fruit die on the vine – while others are able to convince the Government that their projects are in the public’s (our) interest and receive favourable treatment.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    Mariposa at 9 :52 AM

    Obviously you have more up- to- date and inside information of the business model of Hyatt. For the time being, I will take that as a given. May I ask where is the net benefit to the people of Barbados?

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @VC
    you expect @ac to understand that? It doesn’t fit with her intended narrative, criticize the B’s. One only need go back to the Hilton issues to know she has little understanding of how hotels from the major chains operate.

    It would appear they have either dumped Hyatt for another, or changed the Hyatt BRAND to another of the 14 they offer. Wonder how the local narrative would change if it was Hyatt Zilara or Ziva (all inclusive brands). Or if it was learned the concessions given, and you know they are a bunch.

    Liked by 1 person

  • NorthernObserver

    @GPII
    really a s-t-r-e-t-c-h to link ISO with involvement between two private parties.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    Wuh Loss!!

    Neither hills ,nor fields ,nor shorelines are longer our own.

    This beach is yours you can do whatever you want.

    Talk about Neo-colonialism !!

    Just some rambling thoughts of one who thought he was leaving a legacy.

    Like

  • @ Vincent Codrington,

    Take a look at the Hyatt Centric FRENCH QUARTER NEW ORLEANS

    https://www.hyatt.com/en-US/hotel/louisiana/hyatt-centric-french-quarter-new-orleans/msyrf

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    Thanks Hants

    Architecture, internal and exterior, are very French.

    Do you think we will get a signature Barbados design?

    Like

  • Memphis

    https://www.hotelnewsresource.com/article100947.html

    I have shown that Hyatt Centric hotels vary in design.

    Like

  • NO
    What u call a criticism is an observing which goes along with good busineess planning with a legal right to protect all that is solely attached to their property
    Of course your object is to plant political seeds of doubt on my comments
    However what you cannot dispute is that design and ownership are legally ironclad in an effort to dissuade illegal usage or an attempt to defraud consumers into beliving that the original plan or design is one of the same and was authorized by the original owners / corporations
    However what i will agree is that govt might be on a desperate move to revitalize bridgetown by using a different business model exclusive of Hyatt

    Like

  • @ Vincent,

    I am hoping that Barbados gets a design that the average Bajan likes.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Hants

    The final design is the developer (Maloney) and Hyatt the management company then meeting TP requirements?

    Like

  • “They have rejected the ISO 9001 international management system that could have significantly improved all of the Government’s management functions”

    You continually overvalue the impact ISO 9001 would have on government management. ISO is strongest in manufacturing or where a tangible product is involved because quantitative assessment of quality is easy to measure and analyse, thus making performance measurement straightforward.

    The quality of government services on the other hand is difficult to measure quantitatively and requires such measures as customer satisfaction and customer complaints which are subject to bias and political interference. Analysis is also a challenge because data gathered is questionable due to the aforementioned bias and the subjectivity of the measurements (customer satisfaction depends on the person).

    Government’s inability to properly manage is not due to a singular cause as you claim. Rather it is the result of lack of discipline, lack of accountability, lack of innovation, lack of skill, poor resource (including human) allocation and corruption/interference.

    Like

  • @ David,

    ” Hyatt Centric Carlisle Bay, Barbados

    The project will be led by international firm SB Architects and the hotel’s interiors will be designed by DAS Concepts.”

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Hants

    That is Shelby and Mapp, they have a reasonable body of work in Barbados.

    Like

  • @ David,

    SB architects is American.

    http://www.sb-architects.com/about-us/our-firm/

    SRM Architects Ltd. (formerly Selby, Rose & Mapp Architects Ltd.) is a highly respected and well recognized architectural firm operating in Barbados

    Liked by 1 person

  • Thanks Hants, confused the company with SRM.

    Like

  • Hi Redguard:

    ISO 9000 started out as a management standard to benefit the manufacturing of goods. The ISO9001: 2000 version was specific to both goods and services. Our service firm was the first to achieve ISO 9001 in the Caribbean. I am not overstating its benefits since other governments have benefited from its implementation.

    Like

  • Has anyone got a full list of Solutions spokespeople and their areas of responsibility?

    Like

  • @ Nextparty246

    I think it is great advice you do away with continued pushing ISO 9000.

    This is not appealing to Barbadians and will NOT get Solutions Barbados anywhere in terms of electoral support despite its benefits as pushed by you.

    I am the holder of a Masters Degree in Management from an Overseas University.

    What you and your party needs to focus on is the issues including corruption.

    If your Solutions Party is elected then you can roll out and implement.

    However as it is will never appeal to the masses who are comfortable with the current Status Quo.

    So my FREE unsolicited advice is stop trying to flog a ISO 9000 DEAD HORSE.

    Liked by 2 people

  • Mottley says she “surrendered” her political role to lead Barbados out of worst crisis

    Patrick Hoyos

    May 16, 2019

    Prime Minister Mia Mottley said on Wednesday that she had “surrendered” her role as a politician when she took on the responsibility of leading Barbados out of the worst crisis of its modern history.

    The changes going on in the world all around Barbados had imposed a “new reality” on the country which required an “anchor” so that its people could “soar” once again as they had done in the past.

    Addressing an audience of business leaders gathered for the 59th annual general meeting and luncheon of the Barbados Employers’ Confederation at the Lloyd Erskine Sandiford Centre, the prime minister said she would not allow politics to “constrain” her from doing sometimes unpopular things in order to keep the country on the right track.

    The prime minister, who led the Barbados Labour Party to victory in the election held one year ago on May 24, 2018, said at that time – with the Barbados economy sunk to its worst financial position in decades and the country facing the real possibility of devaluation – that she had established a partnership with the other stakeholders in the country, because the new government had “determined this was a journey we all had to walk together.”

    She said people abroad were “amazed” at what all Barbadians had accomplished over the past year in the effort to, as she put it, “stop the rot,” and build a “platform for transformation.”

    The new government had established the mission, which was the stabilisation and transformation of the country’s economy and institutions, and the major priority, she said, was to save the Barbados dollar.

    As a result of the efforts of the whole country, she said, the national debt had been reduced from 175% to 129% of Gross Domestic Product and the country’s foreign reserves now stood at $1.1B. All other economic fundamentals were going in the right direction.

    She added: “Our national mission is to be the best that we can be. It is an inclusive mission – we have to ask ourselves what constitutes excellence in every job and how do we fulfill it.” It was not a five-year mission, she added, and thus not tied to political considerations.

    The prime minister said the new government was embarked upon “deconstructing and reconstructing” every agency of the public service, and by reducing both corporate and personal income tax it was putting disposable income back into people’s pockets.

    She said that if the government undertook on its own the “Re-Re” programme – the so-called retooling and retraining initiatives necessary for transformation – it would be a lop-sided effort, as it required input from the other sections of society and the social partnership.

    She wanted to re-enforce the principle that many hands made light work, because the country was “on course to do something extraordinary but we must stay on mission,” adding that “What makes this journey special is that it is shared.”

    She noted, however, that systems take time to re-engineer, and so she needed every institution, business and household to redefine what it needed to do so that “we must be the best we can be.”

    Said Ms. Mottley: “We must all move out of our comfort zones in order to move forward.”

    Patrick R. Hoyos is a Barbadian journalist who focusses on business and the economy. He is CEO of Hoyos Publishing Inc., publisher of this website and the annual Who’s Who in Barbados Business.

    Like

  • the country is desperate for growth. desperate for fx inflows. desperate for jobs. the imf pain hasnt started to be felt yet and it will last for many years. but nothing justifies the govt compulsorily acquiring this land for a hotel.

    Liked by 1 person

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