The Grenville Phillips Column – Messy Business

grenville-phillips

Grenville Phillips II, Leader of Solutions Barbados

Corruption trials are messy affairs. If the receivers are tried, then the payers will likely be revealed and reputations can be damaged. Charging politicians with corruption can also lead to speculation that every procurement decision within that ministry had a bribe component.

Based on the experiences of other countries, simply charging and convicting people for corruption does not stop subsequent bribes from being paid and received. This is because the system that encourages corrupt practices has not been changed. The private sector can still justify paying bribes as a cost of doing business, while the receivers can still justify it as the cost for certain business to participate in the national economy.

Charging persons with corruption increases the risk that the transaction will be made public. In business, the normal consequence of an increased risk is to charge higher costs to compensate for that increased risk. Therefore, the bribe percentage will likely increase.

When government purchases have bribe components, then the public must pay this additional cost of doing business. For the benefit of any who may still be unaware, on construction projects globally, the corruption component is typically 10% to 30% of the cost of projects with no effective oversight. The bribe component is normally recovered from the public through increased taxation.

Politicians are skilled at the art of getting over-taxed populations to feel grateful for the privilege of paying additional taxes. A typical method is to identify an essential service that the public is already paying multiple times over the actual cost of a well-managed service. The public is then informed that additional taxes are required to maintain that service.

Since most people want to maintain health-care, education, sanitation, water, police and other important services, then they willingly pay what is demanded. However, this system of extracting additional taxes relies on political operatives to denigrate anyone who happens to question the necessity of the additional taxes.

Is there an effective solution to get corrupt persons to repay us the amounts they forced us to pay through increased taxes, without a messy spectacle of a trial? Fortunately there is. Solutions Barbados designed a very simple, very economical but highly effective system to achieve both objectives.

First, a 3-month amnesty allows any person who received or paid a bribe to refund taxpayers with the full value of the bribe. Thereafter, anyone with knowledge of corrupt practices can anonymously report them and be rewarded with the full value of the bribe. However, both payers and receivers must then pay a fine of 10 times the value of the bribe.

This fair method does not require the high costs to manage the highly complex Integrity in Public Life bill, with its glaring loopholes for guilty persons, unfortunate removal of protections for innocent persons, and political management that leaves it highly vulnerability to partisan political control.

Grenville Phillips II is a Chartered Structural Engineer and the founder of Solutions Barbados. He can be reached at NextParty246@gmail.com

65 comments

  • Grenville,

    Do not worry about corruption in Barbados. The last gov solved this problem.

    Given the excessive debt load and the lack of investments there is little room anymore for new contracts attracting bribery and nepotism.

    Nothing is left for bribery.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    The receivers of bribes must be tried, the payers must be exposed and also tried, and they must all receive mandatory prison sentences for not less than three years. Anything less makes us collaborators in the corruption.

    Like

  • They must also pay a fine and or forfeit assets.

    Like

  • I am having a great deal of difficulty understanding most of what you wrote above.

    What was a golden opportunity to harpoon the DLP and fire a warning volley across the bow of the BLP became a whimper – almost muted.

    This was a chance to be a law and order guy, a chance to promise that you will pursue the corrupted and punish them. But you seem to waffle in the first three quarters of the presentation. The one redeeming phrase is ‘However, both payers and receivers must then pay a fine of 10 times the value of the bribe”

    Given that the bribes could be as low as thirty thousand dollars, I would suggest rephrasing
    However, both payers and receivers must then pay a fine of 10 times the value of the bribe or half million dollars, whichever is the maximum”

    See PLT prescription above

    Come on Grenville, you have to be harsher.

    Like

  • Prime Minister Mia Mottley hinted that a corrupt action resulted in the process to procure 15 garbage trucks was compromised. When will Barbados see these trucks landed on the rock? It is embarrassing to have to see grown men loading garbage on a dump truck.

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  • That satisfies the punishment component.

    What about the prevention component. Is this not the real social objective ?

    Bribes increase the costs of projects to the taxpayers. They rob citizens of essential social services e.g potable water, basic health services,education,police services,roads etc.

    They prevent the private sector from providing non essential goods rather than essential goods that are more cheaply provided by the public sector. The profit and bribe components do not distort the price of essential goods.

    Just trying to be provocative.
    .

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  • “Charging persons with corruption increases the risk that the transaction will be made public. In business, the normal consequence of an increased risk is to charge higher costs to compensate for that increased risk. Therefore, the bribe percentage will likely increase.”

    “Is there an effective solution to get corrupt persons to repay us the amounts they forced us to pay through increased taxes, without a messy spectacle of a trial”.

    This is flawed thinking. Part of the process must be exposure of corrupt act to all citizens. Exposure of corrupt acts can be as punitive as imposing excessive fine. It is only then that citizens can be fully aware that the rich and powerful are subject to the laws of the island.

    The love of secrecy is a part of the problem.

    Like

  • I have not even mentioned that politics will no longer attract the entrepreneurial politician. Those that want to increase their wealth at the expense of the taxpayers. I am reasonably sure such politicians do not exist in Barbados.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Vincent

    You touched on a useful point. The blogmaster is of the view that the majority of political aspirants represent the bottom feeders of their profession.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    Democracy cannot survive without transparency. I am shocked and appalled that Grenville appears to be suggesting that we should hesitate to prosecute wealthy bribe givers because “reputations can be damaged.” If wealthy people give bribes and are convicted of the offense I want their reputation not just damaged by destroyed… anihilated… I want them to live the remainder of their lives in ignominious infamy after they have served a stiff prison sentence.

    Like

  • So breaking the law is ok as a cost of doing business ?

    Until the laws are changed, paying a bribe and accepting a bribe to obtain a government contract is a crime.

    Liked by 1 person

  • People in Barbados get lock up for stealing food from a supermarket.Just saying.

    Liked by 1 person

  • peterlawrencethompson

    Grenville, giving or accepting a bribe is a much worse offense than breaking and entering, ganja dealing, or any of the myriad offenses that we habitually lock up poor people for in Barbados. We must deal with it resolutely and harshly.

    Like

  • I love to read the BU crowd condemning others—–seeing that they are all themselves NOT without sin
    HILARIOUS!

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  • There seems to be some naïve understanding that the receiver and payer of bribes will both be domiciled in Barbados and easy to trace and identify. First of all, without a whistle blower somewhere within ICBL we would still be behind the eight ball, no doubt people who are apt to solicit bribes have taken notice and will change their tactics. Finally, not all bribes consist of funneling cash to someone in the traditional way there are many ways to fly under the radar e.g. I could arrange to purchase an asset from someone far below market value and who would be the wiser?

    I know and have heard of some other ways but as a public service I will not be providing anyone with ideas.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Hants

    My contention is that the emphases are being put on the punishment and restorative components of legislation.
    They do not achieve the overriding social objective of provision of goods and services at the lowest possible costs to the taxpayers.
    The profit component to the contractor, the bribe to the public officers etc.augment the costs.
    The criminal always believes he can get away with the crime. He can raise the value of the bribe. He can increase his profit margin. He can reduce the quality of the good and service provided using less or cheaper inputs.

    There is no substitute for competent,ethical and diligent public servants and politicians. That is where the effective deterrents exist.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Hants
    September 3, 2018 8:42 PM

    People in Barbados get lock up for stealing food from a supermarket.Just saying.

    +++++++++++++++++++++

    …. and after they have served their prescribed sentence they are released.

    If they choose to do it again they are punished more harshly, if not, they just get on with their lives and make a contribution to society as best they can.

    Then they pass as we all must.

    Liked by 1 person

  • One way of dealing with bribery is to make the money laundering that results as difficult as possible!!

    That can be accomplished by cooperating fully with the outside countries also fighting to end it.

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  • If we go after money launderers and make it as difficult as possible for them the result is they are hit hardest where it hurts most.

    They lose their beloved money!!

    Beautiful thing is we don’t have to go it alone.

    The world is after putting a stop to it!!

    We just become a cog in the wheel that grinds their money to dust!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    The solution offered by Mr Phillips is simple, understandable and in theory readily effective….It is also nonsensical and lacks practical perspectives.

    As @Theo and @PLT also highlighted the fact the Mr Phillips appears to appease bribers is distressing and confounding. His arguments are definitely very flawed as noted.

    –This solution adoes not modify the system to fundamentally change corrupt practices. Having…“a 3-month amnesty [that] allows any person who received or paid a bribe to refund taxpayers with the full value of the bribe” will entice about 1% of offenders…so to trial these will proceed.

    –His voluntary repayment would have to be completely private in order to forestall “…the risk that the transaction will be made public” as he otherwise opines?

    –He proposes that the whistleblower will be awarded the full value of the bribe….Wonderful theorem but this DOES NOT differ fundamentally from ” simply charging and convicting people for corruption” which he otherwise opines has been shown to “…not stop subsequent bribes from being paid and received”.

    Those who recall Enron will surely recall also Jeffrey Skilling the then CEO…He is about to return to society (early it seems) after his sentence of 24 years and fines of $45 MILLION for his part in the corruption scandal. I mention him because he was in the news recently re possible release.

    Before and since Skilling there have been ENDLESS business corruption cases…where folks were fined and whistle blowers compensated yet corruption, bribery, insider trading et al is rampant…Mr Phillips solution does nothing so differenty to modify any of that.

    There are still “the high costs to manage the highly complex Integrity in Public Life bill” because 1)Whistle blower protection processes would yet have to be implemented, 2) The legal process of investigation and prosecution must still be completed thus “glaring loopholes for guilty persons” can yet be exploited there.

    And how would he be able to alleviate “political management that leaves it highly vulnerability to partisan political control” is beyond comprehension.

    Kudos for his attempt at simplicity…amazing that he continues to tout simplistic so called solutions that are so unfit for purpose.

    Liked by 1 person

  • “The receivers of bribes must be tried, the payers must be exposed and also tried, and they must all receive mandatory prison sentences for not less than three years. Anything less makes us collaborators in the corruption.”

    Let’s hope Grenville is aware from now that not one voter is going to elect him with that crap he is still spouting…government ministers and their bribers in the business community need to go to jailed without bail….for violating the public’s trust and stealing from the public purse…a very clear message must be sent.as a deterrent….end of story.

    He remains intent on ENABLING these criminals who give and take bribes, corrupt and pollute the island with their criminal acts…with sissy fines and he still does not understand that they will find any excuse not to pay if they have it or don’t…and will still end up in prison….no one needs such uniformed leaders who lack vision….and Grenville refuses to up his game to match the times we live in….steuppppsss.

    A total waste of energy.

    Like

  • “The blogmaster is of the view that the majority of political aspirants represent the bottom feeders of their profession.”

    They are mostly lawyers, who are already bottom feeders. Lawyers then become judges – super bottom feeders. Don’t look for any of those filth to commit their own to prison. It will take a popular revolution, and since Bajans are so easily bought for a bowl od puddin’ ‘n souse, that ain’t gonna happen.
    To borrow a phrase from a man who understands deep state corruption – the swamp needs draining – it stinks worse than Graeme Hall.

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  • As we know and the electorate suspected…Grenville would have presided over an exceedingly corrupt government given some of the players in his party AND he would have covered it up…we knew that…and here is…confirming same.

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  • All talk about fighting corruption in Bim is a waste of time.

    Corruption belongs to the Caribbean like crime, calypso, sun and rum. It is a matter of fact that this part of the world will always be a politicial and social backyard without any rule of law. Those few academics in the Caribbean who studied abroad and who share the naive belief that they live in somehow “developing” countries on the way to higher standards are wrong and do not reflect the people´s and politician´s convictions.

    Talking about corruption is like trying to make Barbadians more productive. That is impossible. The cashiers in the supermarket will always walk like turtles when they have to check something. The civil servants and clerks in the offices will always chat and check their iPhone during their work time and the judges will always have the biggest backlog in the whole Caribbean.

    To change the rotten attitude towards corruption and work, you had to exchange nearly the whole population in Bim. We all know this is impossible so we need to find solutions fitting to the rotten habits and to the low standards.

    And this solution is called devaluation for the Mickey Mouse Dollar. It so easy to implement, even the locals cannot mess it up.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Tron
    I may have an even more dire vision of the future than you do.

    But I curbed my tongue and lob soft balls into the lobby.

    We should not discourage those who still have a vision of a beautiful future.

    @Hal
    Don’t start the ‘failed’ state routine. We still have men with vision and with hope. One of them may right the ship, no matter how difficult the task.

    I would say ‘all hands on deck’ but our current system limits it to around 50%.

    Like

  • Have a look at this story. Corruption is everywhere!

    St Lucia airport corruption allegations attract US media attention
    Posted By Ben Anson On September 3, 2018 (6:33 pm) In DJ, Featured, MCT-News, Saint Lucia

    By Melanius Alphonse
    Caribbean News Now associate editor
    melanius@caribbeannewsnow.com

    CASTRIES, St Lucia — Long-standing allegations of corruption involving government ministers and other officials in Saint Lucia and a South Florida businessman have attracted the attention of the widely-read Florida newspaper, The Miami Herald.

    In a lengthy article on Monday, Herald reporters Adiel Kaplan and Aaron Leibowitz described how Antonio Assenza, who came to the United States from Venezuela in 1990, became tangled up in a corruption scandal involving a proposed $157 million redevelopment project at Hewanorra International Airport (HIA) in Vieux Fort, Saint Lucia, in 2009.

    In 2014, the government of Saint Lucia requested assistance from the United States in relation to a criminal investigation into suspected bribery regarding the airport redevelopment project.

    The targets of the investigation were initially said to be Assenza and Guy Joseph, Saint Lucia’s current minister for economic development, housing, urban renewal, transport and civil aviation.

    However, from court documents filed in US federal court in Fort Lauderdale, which although meant to be kept under seal were instead filed publicly in the Southern District of Florida, the investigation also focused on Andre Edgar, a businessman in Saint Lucia, and Sean Matthew, former head of the Saint Lucia Air and Sea Ports Authority (SLASPA).

    According to Saint Lucian authorities, in 2009 SLASPA requested proposals for the development of a new airport, which was an estimated $157 million project. After evaluating the submitted proposals, SLASPA was to present its recommendation to the Saint Lucian Cabinet, which would make the final determination.

    https://www.caribbeannewsnow.com/2018/09/03/st-lucia-airport-corruption-allegations-attract-us-media-attention/

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  • Grenville Phillips II wrote ” The private sector can still justify paying bribes as a cost of doing business, while the receivers can still justify it as the cost for certain business to participate in the national economy.”

    I hope this theory gets tested in the Barbados courts hopefully when the Donville / ICBL case is tried.

    We could also suggest that the 3 ICBL former employees have already been punished by them losing their jobs and their reputations tarnished so no need for them to be charged in Barbados.

    As for Donville he is in the hands of the USA justice system ankle bracelet and all. He will have to spend at least 10times the bribe in Lawyer fees.

    Like

  • Grenville Phillips II wrote “on construction projects globally, the corruption component is typically 10% to 30% of the cost of projects with no effective oversight.
    The bribe component is normally recovered from the public through increased taxation.”

    Liked by 1 person

  • It is unrealistic to expect to end corruption in an environment that is built around albino-centric greed and selfishness – as its very definition of success.
    The challenge is not really to end corruption, it is to create a NEW environment where ‘success’ comes to mean something COMPLETELY different. In other words, it is NOT about ending corruption VI ET ARMES, but about getting brass bowls to the level of MATURITY where they CHOOSE a better way.

    Grenville’s proposal is simplistic and short sighted – much like how WADA seeks to end drug abuse in sport by using deterrents such as testing, bans,, loss of medals etc… WHEN THE WHOLE ATMOSPHERE AND AWARDS SYSTEMS IN SPORT continue to make the use of performance enhancing substances a top method of achieving ‘success’.

    A proper understanding of the REAL purpose of life would reveal that in order to test the authenticity of the REAL DIAMONDS (Saints) of life, corruption should be so EASY to get away with, that – only a true, genuine, COMMITTED GEM of a person would turn their backs to such temptations and say – “Kiss muh…. oops” … Get thee behind me Satan….

    Wunna keep on thinking that this life is an end in itself, – and that ‘success’ is an ideal world with everyone having nuff money…. nuff fun and nuff sport…..
    LOL – what a joke.

    Life is NOTHING BUT a production plant for ‘Saints’.
    These are the ‘DIAMONDS’ that BBE have had in production now from since time began…
    Corruption is but one of the ‘quality assurance tests’ being applied at these final stages of production, to ascertain the ISO certification of the final products…. LOL

    In the REAL scheme of things therefore,. … who cares that some shiite fake glitter frauds fail the quality tests…..?
    THAT IS the point….

    Liked by 1 person

  • “As for Donville he is in the hands of the USA justice system ankle bracelet and all. He will have to spend at least 10times the bribe in Lawyer fees.”

    Lol..hahaha. .yep, the American way.
    ,

    Like

  • millertheanunnaki

    @ Hants September 4, 2018 7:54 AM
    “We could also suggest that the 3 ICBL former employees have already been punished by them losing their jobs and their reputations tarnished so no need for them to be charged in Barbados.”

    What about members of the Board of the statutory corporation involved?

    Wouldn’t the chair have colluded with Pornville by taking instructions in how to perpetrate the now well-established bribe?

    Why should the ‘poor’ porn kid take all the licks?
    Why not name the person ‘planted’ in the chair at the time?

    Like

  • Why should the ‘poor’ porn kid take all the licks?
    Why not name the person ‘planted’ in the chair at the time?
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Bushie HATES it when you ask questions to which the answers are blatantly obvious….

    BECAUSE if authorities EVER officially turn over the FIRST ‘corruption rock’ in Barbados, there would be so much ‘locking up and shame’ that we may have to put the innocent people INSIDE Glendairy… and house the wicked SOB’s on the outside….

    Their BEST plan is the “Carrington plan”
    ….where a coalition of the guilty gets together and put a lid on the situation…. and then try to let time do the rest…

    LOL
    But BU, Naked and FaceBook keeps lifting the lid ….and kicking the rock…..
    Murda…
    ha ha ha

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Grenville

    It’s no wonder your political party failed badly during the last election polling if this is any example of your SOLUTIONS. I’LL give you credit for the first part of the article, however from the solution down it’s more of an indication of what’s wrong with Barbados society. Also I’ll give you credit for not throwing 9001 in as a solution. I’m a firm believer the third political parties missed a golden opportunity to make changes in Barbados during the last election, it’s too bad non of these attempts were sufficiently coordinated to resonate with the electorate.

    Tron, Wily and a few others Know the SOLUTION, devalue the MICKEY MOUSE DOLLAR and from there everything will begin to fall into place.

    Like

  • @ TheOGazerts September 4, 2018 6:31 AM

    Theo,

    We must search for alternative solutions for Barbados which do NOT rely on the rule of law, high productivity etc. pp. Examples: casinos, gambling, legalizing some drugs, beaches for nudism, selling citizinship to wealthy foreigners …

    OK, Bush Tea might roll his eyes … But this might be the only way to fulfill the population´s wish to live like in the North, but behave like the South.

    Like

  • In 2014, the government of Saint Lucia requested assistance from the United States in relation to a criminal investigation into suspected bribery regarding the airport redevelopment project.

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    I believe we should ask The United States to investigate every lawyer, politician and judge in Barbados.

    … anyone in a position of public trust.

    Banks, accountants whoever!!!

    Perhaps we should start the “security clearance” process for anyone entering the arena where public trust can be betrayed.

    We just do not have the ability to realise when we need help!!

    … and we need help … big time!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • ” When will Barbados see these trucks landed on the rock? It is embarrassing to have to see grown men loading garbage on a dump truck.”

    Haven’t seen a garbage truck in my neighborhood for 3 weeks… I call once a week and the response is” they will be there over the weekend. The non collection of household garbage is a public health and safety issue. It is also setting bad examples to the young that clean environs do not matter. This is truly a “shite hole” country.

    Liked by 1 person

  • John,

    Are you saying Barbados is a failed state?

    Like

  • LOL @ Tron
    What roll what eyes what??
    Bushie agrees with you…

    The ACTUAL problem IS in “the population´s wish to live like in the North, but behave like the South.”
    The ONLY realistic end of such a plan is devaluation.

    Bushie was hopeful that the population could see their way to seeking out the TRUE value of life, and the REAL measure of success…. but Caswell refused to BUP….
    Grenville tried his best, but the race is not for the bright….. it is for the ‘CALLED’….

    LOL
    …as you will shortly come to find out, those actually living ‘in the North’ will ALSO find their donkeys in close proximity to the grass….just like us Bajans….
    But that is a different story altogether…

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Vincent codrington

    There is no substitute for competent,ethical and diligent public servants and politicians. That is where the effective deterrents exist.

    You hit the nail on the head. Question is how and where in this 166 sq mile island do you find employees or politicians with those qualities??

    Like

  • “I believe we should ask The United States to investigate every lawyer, politician and judge in Barbados.

    … anyone in a position of public trust.

    Banks, accountants whoever!!!”

    I wholeheartedly agree, did Marshall NOT ask the US Ambassador for help with Supreme Court…but without giving them the specifics of WHY the court is in its current NONFUNCTIONAL state and WHAT they will be confronted with when attempting to help fix it..they can’t exactly hide it anyway…I spent one year there and met all the corrupters and saw for myself how they managed to cause the judicuary to collapse into itself.

    To avoid any further embarrassment to her government…unless she is enjoying it and don’t mind…Mia needs to swallow her pride and ask the US for help in the clean up phase re corruption at every level of government, the bar association and the judiciary..the banking/financial and insurance sectors…and all of the abovementioned.

    .it will be better and cheaper in the long run and will eliminate scandal after scandal…like what now obtains.

    The US is quite experienced with corruption and corrupters polluting everything and everyone and know how to weed them out.

    Am still giving her the benefit of the doubt.

    Like

  • millertheanunnaki

    “Charging persons with corruption increases the risk that the transaction will be made public. In business, the normal consequence of an increased risk is to charge higher costs to compensate for that increased risk. Therefore, the bribe percentage will likely increase.”

    If you GP were to spend more time imagining and creating more innovative ways of deterring corruption in public life as you spend peeping into big people’s bedroom watching porn then you might just attract some ‘real’ morally upright people to your party’s philosophy.

    In the past you have proposed some really ‘draconian’ methods for curbing the viewing of porn by grown-up hardback men (and women) in their own private homes.

    Where is that morally-infused energy in dealing with corruption?

    Isn’t the real purpose behind exposing people who like to watch porn (not ‘authorized’ by your moral police of which you will be the chief peeping tom) the same as exposing those involved in corruption involving the hard-working taxpayers’ money?

    Isn’t the objective, at the end of the day (and night), one of publicly naming and shaming (social ostracism) of those porn lovers, sex perverts and crooked financial lepers?

    Man GP, it seems you are getting ‘soft’ in the head since that electoral reality check.

    Like

  • 45 govt and Tron
    A standing ovation is in order for both of you.

    Like

  • A fairly rambling article where the reader can clearly see author at war with himself as to whether bribers ought to be punished or not.
    Perhaps the author should settle this war with himself first before he tries to convince others.

    Separately, when will the powers that be let the MMD* float?

    Is the purchasing power of 1 MMD really equivalent to 0.5 USD?

    *Micky mouse dollar

    Like

  • @ millertheanunnaki September 4, 2018 9:30 AM

    “In the past you have proposed some really ‘draconian’ methods for curbing the viewing of porn by grown-up hardback men (and women) in their own private homes.”

    No wonder he lost the elections. I guess Grenville “the nun” is fuming just now about our ideas to improve the inflow of forex 🙂

    Like

  • Let’s cut to the chase; The Integrity Bill in its present configuration is a complete waste of time ! Any Billthat has no retroactive powers is a lion without teeth. Imagine people I elected are giving a Civil Servant a secret envelope with their assets. Transparency demands that the assets be made public.

    Liked by 1 person

  • “Wouldn’t the chair have colluded with Pornville by taking instructions in how to perpetrate the now well-established bribe?”

    There is so much more to that scandal that may or may not be revealed.., if the US investigates further, they will find it, if they haven’t already,

    Like

  • Has more been heard about the garbage truck conundrum? The exact link to impropriety.

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  • sirfuzzy (i was a sheep some years ago; not a sheep anymore)

    @ Tron,

    Help me understand how does monetary devaluation curb/eliminate corruption, low productivity, transparency. etc?

    Devaluation is a monetary device. The corruption productivity transparency are social and moral(personal) ills.

    If it was so black and white the first devaluation in Brazil or Argentina and any other country where it was instituted a few decades ago should have solved all their corruption & social & transparency & productivity issues.

    But i think they still have them up to this time. Devaluation as u see it is a tool to inflict pain; pain has pain killers; like ladderS are for TALLER fences. Its like the frog in the every so Hotter water; we ADAPT but it seems we never really CHANGE..

    Just my take

    Liked by 1 person

  • Piece Uh De Rock Yeah Right

    @ Grenville Phillips II

    There was a time de ole man was prepared to support a Third Movement Initiative to disband the entrenched BDLP duopoly.

    You were part of that alternative universe but, after a while, it became obvious that, notwithstanding your good intentions and integrity, you did not have what it takes to manage this country.

    You are a good guy, but you are also a poor leader, incapable of dealing with the task of governing barbados with this we are going to say 10 Hail Mary’s absolution strategy.

    I PRAY THAT YOU WILL NEVER BE ELECTED AS PM OF BARBADOS and, while i will not pray such attends your ongoing political aspirations, it is my personal observation that THE HoA would be better without your puerile contributions to good governance.

    In military parlance there is a word for this “wuss” and this stupidity about how the briber should be punished and the blatant absence? of punishment for the bribee is incredulous to say the best AND ABSOLUTELY CERTIFIABLE MADNESS to say more

    Nonetheless, I am glad that you come here periodically and give greater insight into your way of thinking because one is able to see who you really are and what you bring to the table.

    I going have to pledge not to comment of jobby no more

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  • Piece Uh De Rock Yeah Right

    @ the Honourable Blogmaster.

    Your assistance Please with an item about the matter at caption

    Like

  • Piece Uh De Rock Yeah Right

    @ All

    As it relates to blogs by people who are seriously looking for resolution of these instance of corruption and in prosecuting the “bidees” here is an item for your consideration.

    The Parties that seemed to have been in the position of Board members at the BIDC during the period being referred to

    Board of Directors

    Minister: The Hon. Donville O-Neil Inniss, M.P. – Minister of Industry, International Business, Commerce and Small Business Development

    Board of Directors

    Mr. Benson Straker ( Chairman)
    Mr. Junior Allsopp ( Deputy Chairman )
    Mr. Erskine Thompson
    Mr. Paul E. Gibson
    Mrs. Gail Niles
    Mr. Adrian Padmore
    Mr. Cedric Murrell
    Mrs. Karlene Nicholls, Representative of the Barbados Manufacturers' Association
    Representative of the Barbados Workers' Union
    The Permanent Secretary (Commerce), Ministry of Industry, International Business and Small           Business Development (Name of PS not provided in the BIDC article http://bidc.com/board-directors which is online for all and sundry to see)
    

    Note is to be made that the CEO of BIDC has sole signatory power of payments of $50,000 without referral to any Board of Management

    Like

  • sirfuzzy (i was a sheep some years ago; not a sheep anymore)

    Northern Observer September 4, 2018 10:42 AM

    Has more been heard about the garbage truck conundrum? The exact link to impropriety.

    I am also wondering if the garbage truck issue has any thing to do with the BWA slow on issuing the August bills. Maybe a certain man was seen on the compound therefore they had to delay the printing? lol

    Like

  • Last week Minister Prescod confirmed that the delivery of the trucks is still on scheduled whatever that means.

    Like

  • Jean at 9:27 AM

    We have more than 1000 fer square mile. Citizens with these qualities seldom blow their own trumpets. They are citizens of action.

    Like

  • @ sirfuzzy (i was a sheep some years ago; not a sheep anymore) September 4, 2018 10:56 AM

    Sir Fuzzy,

    Devaluation does not remedy corruption etc.

    However, it might remedy low productivity to an unknown extent since
    (1) Barbadians will have to worker longer, harder and better to achieve the same lifestyle as before (which is solely debt-driven so far)
    (2) will force them to start a private business with incoming forex
    (3) will drive people out of the public service with its very low productivity into more productive private business since the public service cannot offer any forex but only devalued local dollars.

    Liked by 1 person

  • sirfuzzy (i was a sheep some years ago; not a sheep anymore)

    @ David September 4, 2018 11:38 AM

    Last week Minister Prescod confirmed that the delivery of the trucks is still on scheduled whatever that means.

    Partof our problem is that we condone and promote and tolerate “jobby” from anyone that is in a leadership positon.

    Min Prescod know we are having garbage collection issues. Then comes and says “they are on schedule” and like lambs lead to the slaughter or lemmings we swallow ; digest and regurgitate “the crap”.

    Whose schedule? What is the schedule Mr Minister? So when do u anticipate there arrival at Bridgetown Port? What brand of truck has been selected Mr Minister?

    Many questions can be asked because we want to “know” butt we still operating in the “business as usual mode” accept the
    mutterings and feel go that the Min chose ot spek on the pressing issue.

    Earth to Min Prescod; MAM told us “this is not business as usual” so get with the program! Unless she told him privately “stick to the script ma boy; we will see this thrru together”; just need to find another nickel to put i the ole PR machine.

    Like

  • Yes, we do not hold our officials accountable.

    We constantly short change ourselves.

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  • sirfuzzy (i was a sheep some years ago; not a sheep anymore)

    @ Tron September 4, 2018 12:04 PM

    I think you maybe correct. Like i said “we adapt and never really change”.

    Now since you admit it will not cure corruption; then the idea must be floated that devaluation may not be needed. becuase all these other problems/issues may be had without devaluation.

    A bad attitude at 2:1 may bring about a worse attitude at 6/5/4:1. When Money talks usually ppl listen; unless you are deaf or dont need money?

    Just saying

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  • When Money talks usually ppl listen; unless you are deaf or dont need money?

    ++++++++++++++++++++

    … or there is something far more valuable at stake!!!

    Some things money can’t buy!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ sirfuzzy (i was a sheep some years ago; not a sheep anymore) September 4, 2018 12:30 PM

    The politicians here and there lie a lot about economics in general and devaluation. Politicians can only provide the framework, not a staturory plan to prescribe GDP and growth. All gov “plans” for economic growth failed in the past, just look at the former Soviet Union. You could now check me and cite China. If the numbers about China are correct? I doubt very much.

    The same with devaluation as an adjustment of the market value of a currency. The Barbadian politicians will not devalue their beloved local dollar. The market, the lack of forex will do that for them.

    Barbados would be the first country in such a big malaise without devaluation.

    Like

  • sirfuzzy (i was a sheep some years ago; not a sheep anymore)

    @ Tron September 4, 2018 1:29 PM

    We all live in Hope?

    Hope is a city in Hempstead County in southwestern Arkansas, United States.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Sirfuzzy
    “Part of our problem is that we condone and promote and tolerate “jobby” from anyone that’s in a leadership position”. So true. Echoes of the slave mentality.

    MAM told us “this is not business as usual.”
    Tell me. what is it then? What I see and hear repeatedly is the SAME OLE SAME OLE “as usual,” Man can say but MAM cannot execute all. She has a hell of job on her hands-may God guide her
    and surround her with some sensible caring VERB people. Here in Bim we all know how Somethings must MUST SEEM to be done, and not Actually done.

    Barbadians- and some of the non-Barbadians who share our island, have become super careless and nasty in their habits of garbage disposal. Walking through an area yesterday I could not help but marvel at the STINKING SPLENDOUR too many people sat in and were surrounded by. cigarette butts, food containers, fruit and vegetable peelings, bits of rags. You name it. Everyone carried on their business, eating and dropping what they did not want along with the containers at their feet.
    Think the Ministry of Education will introduce care of the environment and cleanliness into the school curriculum? Will such people ever be fined for such thoughtless acts??

    Re the Water bills for August, arrived today. Font size changed to accommodate the added charges. Mine shows “current sewage contribution $7.75. I was disconnected from that disastrous waste of Millions, environment and health hazard since March 17, bills sent by the same BWA monthly who did the disconnecting up to July for the non service total $82.49.
    SSA Garbage Contribution $38.75 (3 supermarket bags almost full in 2 weeks).Again thanks to the Sewage which made my home a “shiiite hole” I had to relocate. No sooner than I return for a few days than I get sick and have to leave again. Yep, some $ thousands spent because of this.
    Water July- 2 Cubmetres=$35.20, August- same 2 Cubmetres=$38.40. $3.20 added on for same usage . Is there now some hidden charge or a change in accounting staff?

    I have a question – what does contribution mean? Doesn’t this denote something freely given? And Sewage Contribution? Is everyone paying this?

    Today I was told that if we do not pay the SSA TAX our water will be disconnected. Telling wunna, if Bimshire did a next nuddah island ALL de peope would refuse to pay, but we is we and as SirZuzzy so aptly put it : Part of our problem is………..”jobby” from anyone that is in a leadership position.

    Have a great September all.

    Like

  • “Think the Ministry of Education will introduce care of the environment and cleanliness into the school curriculum? Will such people ever be fined for such thoughtless acts??”

    Never…they allow the nasty kids to litter in the schools..then call on other innocent kids to clean it up…claiming they are disciplining them…but no discipline for the dirty little kids who threw garbage around and if the innocent kid refuses to pick up other people’s carelessly thrown litter,…they .expel them.

    That is why you have a nasty, garbage strewn Barbados…from in the schools..they do everything ass backwards, that is why from parliament on down, nothing can get done the right way, nothing,

    Like

  • Look like Grenville laid this on us and ran away.
    The blogmaster should let him withdraw the post.

    Like

  • pieceuhderockyeahright

    @ Theophilus

    This is precisely why Grenville lost his deposit

    THEY DO NOT understand how to keep their audiences engaged

    He published this poop and gone for about 4 weeks.

    Then he will return with another senseless submission…

    Like

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