Time to Make a MOVE!

Submitted by Ambassador DAVID A. COMISSIONG, President, Clement Payne Movement

After hearing Prime Minister Mia Mottley speak at the Opening Ceremony of the Barbados Workers Union’s 77th Annual Delegates Conference this morning– Saturday the 25th of August 2018 — it motivated me to share that portion of the Peoples Empowerment Party’s comprehensive economic development programme (entitled “Time To Make A Move : Saving Barbados From Recession”) that most succinctly coheres with the inspiring message of shared and collaborative transformation that Ms Mottley delivered.

Here is the segment of ” Time To Make A Move : Saving Barbados From Recession” that I would like to share with Government Ministers, Trade Unionists, Private Sector leaders, and ordinary Barbadian citizens alike :-

“At the very core of our plan to save our country from the economic crisis that it currently finds itself in must be a strategy to re-energize production in Barbados’ agriculture, construction, manufacturing, tourism, and international business sectors!

It goes without saying that we have to be brutally realistic and practical, and that we must therefore start with the enterprises and production capacity that currently exist in these five crucial sectors of our economy, and bring to bear state sponsored initiatives that will lift them to higher levels of performance and cause them to multiply.

One of the state sponsored initiatives that we have in mind would consist of an effort by the governmental administration to establish a close and intimate ‘partnership’ between Government and these five sectors – a ‘partnership’ in planning; a ‘partnership’ designed to literally invent comparative advantage for enterprises in these sectors by extending to them a wide range of incentives, privileges, assistance and institutional support; and a ‘partnership’ in ensuring that the plans jointly constructed by Government and the representatives of these sectors are carried out and actualized.

And when we speak about a “partnership” between Government and these sectors of the economy, we are contemplating a relationship that is much more profound and intimate than the currently existing Social Partnership or than the Manufacturers Association or the Chamber of Commerce meeting with the Minister of Finance and presenting him or her with a wish list two or three weeks before the annual Budget presentation !

Rather, we are talking about a process of intimate and institutionalized planning, in which the two parties routinely sit down together and work out in detail an expansionary developmental strategy for each sector, under-girded by the deliberate and conscious use of the formidable power of the State.

In addition, we are especially urging that this Government / Private Sector collaborative approach be applied to all Barbadian produced “products” that are so much a part of our indigenous cultural heritage that they may be considered “national Assets”.

As far as we are concerned, the “national assets” of Barbados include our sugar, rum, Sea Island cotton, Black Belly sheep, beersolar technology, classic Bajan furniture, Bajan pepper sauce, pottery, Cricket heritage, music heritage, literary heritage, processed flying fish, and the list goes on. And – sad to say – all of these assets are currently under-developed and under-exploited commercially!

What is required to properly develop and market these assets internationally is a systematic and coordinated programme based on the Government and Private Sector working together as partners and collaborators!

As indicated above, our Government possesses the unique power and capacity to literally invent “comparative advantages” for our  Barbadian manufacturers and other relevant business-people by extending to them a wide range of incentives, privileges, assistance and support; and it must use this power to assist genuine Barbadian enterprises that are developing authentic national products!

There should therefore be such a close Public/Private partnership where these “assets” are concerned, and such collaborative Private/Public planning and coordination of efforts that no longer should we witness the head of — say–the Rum Producers Association, having to resort to a public forum to complain about lack of Governmental support for critical measures required to preserve the rum industry.

All of the newly industrialized countries that have successfully made the transition from Third World to First World status have done so on the basis of a close collaboration and partnership between the Government and relevant Private Sector entities.

Please note, however, that we are not making a case for Governmental largess for the usual Private Sector parasites that tend to be favoured in Barbados! Rather, we are advocating for truly productive enterprises (of all sizes) that are attempting to manufacture and commercialize products that are authentic components of our Barbadian heritage.

A Cooperative or People’s Sector

There is also no reason why the Barbados economy should not contain a full fledged “Cooperative Sector” comprised of a whole host of business enterprises that are owned and run by the trade unions, credit unions, churches, and other cooperative or people-based organizations of our country, in collaboration with the thousands of young Barbadian university degree and technical diploma holders who graduate from our University of the West Indies and Samuel Jackman Prescod Polytechnic every year.

(Indeed, thousands of our young tertiary level graduates should be able to find good careers for themselves in such a “Cooperative” or “People’s” sector of our economy.)

And what we are proposing is not unprecedented! Take the example of Singapore. The trade unions of Singapore — facilitated by the Government of Singapore — were able to develop a chain of supermarkets, retail stores, a telecommunications company, insurance companies, a major public transportation company, hotels, and a country club and condominiums for workers.

Singapore is therefore but one example of how trade unions, credit unions, churches and other community-based organizations could collaborate in establishing a much larger and more developed Cooperative or People’s Sector of the economy. What is required, however, is that our Government systematically work with these institutions and consciously facilitate such a process of development!

And there can be no doubt that several commercial vacuums currently exist in Barbados and are just waiting to be filled by new indigenous business enterprises. There is, for example, not a single indigenous bank in Barbados! So why shouldn’t the Barbados Government facilitate the credit unions in their quest to establish a bank, or grant our credit unions the right to issue cheques so that they can expand their services and markets?

Why shouldn’t the trade unions of Barbados — in collaboration with such natural partners as the credit unions, churches, and university / polytechnic graduates — possess and run farms, supermarkets, medical clinics, mechanical workshops, garages, hotels, engineering firms, radio stations, a brewery , and other relevant business enterprises?

There is a whole new complex of cooperative enterprises waiting to be established through the joint, collaborative effort of Barbados’ trade unions, university and Polytechnic graduates, credit unions, churches and other community-based organizations!”

31 comments

  • What verbiage. All those organisations mentioned at the end couldn’t run a bath between them.

    Like

  • I have shopped at the TUC supermarket and bookstore in Singapore and if Bajans truly desired to WORK together to emulate this model it could work. Work is a 4 letter word in Bim. Bajans need an attitude adjustment.
    I wrote this a few months ago but have not pur meat on the bones yet:

    People are the only true asset of a small nation.
    Therefore the populace must be Educated according to the country’s needs. This approach has worked in Singapore, Malta, Mauritius, Estonia et al. Bajans must be encouraged and directed into areas that will be able to find properly paid work / careers. Bim does not require 500 Socioligists, Politcal Scientists or Lawyers per year so we must encourage students to take Accounting / Business, Computers / IT, Trades people etc where Bim currently imports/ requires people. We must also plan for which careers we will have requirements for in the future.

    Leaders must focus on engendering a Social Partnership and Cooperation between Workers, Government and Employers. Bajans must be told that the only way out of the current Economic and Financial mess is for everyone to seriously ask themselves what President J F Kennedy said over 58 years ago,”Ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country.” Bajans should be encouraged to work hard and stop this attitude, especially in some Ministries, that “I only wukking 2 hrs / day”. That attitude must change because we have to put our collective shoulders to the grindstone.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Money Brain,

    A saying in the gated communities of this island is: The Guyanese people erect the walls and roof in 4 months but it takes the natives of this island a year or another to finish the rest.

    Barbadian work is not only too expensive, but they also deliver too slow and with inferior quality. I do not know any workman on this island who works longer than from 9 AM to 3 PM with a pause of at least 1 hour. Barbadian workmen come and go at the construction site when they want. If you have three of them on your site, they quarrel and shout half of the time. And afterwards you need some foreigner for adjustments. The Barbadian legend of “educated” people is 100% bullsh… since they do not learn in school or elsewhere how to use construction materials and worktools properly. You need to hire somebody from North America or Europe to handle expensive items like Italian marble or a Hans Grohe shower.

    The work ethic is so rotten in Bim, it will never work – unless Barbadians gets some adjustment for their very overvalued currency.

    Like

  • Does the author understand the discipline of being a public servant? Is this the new Barbados, when public servants can participate in politics without fear? What next?
    Even the designation speaks to a nation in chaos: Submitted by Ambassador DAVID A. COMISSIONG, President, Clement Payne Movement.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Bernard Codrington

    The House of Wisdom is built on seven pillars. Always check the foundations for stresses . Or according to David BU fault lines.

    Like

  • Bernard Codrington

    @ Money Brain at !0 30 AM

    Did you notice anything peculiar about management , entrepreneurs and the investors in Singapore?

    Like

  • @ Bernard
    Seven pillars of wisdom…?
    Are you referring to PICERAS?
    How does this make sense in plain English…?

    Like

  • David Comissiong

    Actually, the document was submitted by “David Comissiong, Citizen of Barbados”

    Like

  • David Comissiong

    It is instructive to note that the City of Bridgetown Cooperative Credit Union was established and developed primarily by a group of young persons who were then recent graduates of the Cave Hill Campus of UWI. I think it is fair to say that COB is one of Barbados’ outstanding examples of achievement in business. It just shows what is possible.

    Like

  • are David the so called bloggmaster and David Comissiong the same?

    Like

  • What is it to you? Just post your comments and mind your business.

    Like

  • does David the so called bloggmaster not always talking about total transparency?

    Like

  • Nonsense, It demonstrates a lack of discipline. If diplomat wants the freedom to speak as an ordinary citizen then s/he should resign his/her public service appointment and enjoy that freedom. But then again, this is Barbados, we make it up as we go along.

    Like

  • Further comments along this line will be deleted.

    Like

  • Both public and private sector plouees need training in exceptional customer service, which is sorely lacking.

    Like

  • Plouees should be employees

    Like

  • Bernard Codrington

    @ James Greene at 9 : 02 PM

    The name of the Blog is Barbados underground. Disclosures/transparencies of contributors are optional.

    Like

  • thanks Bernard. i think i know the answer. no problem

    Like

  • Bernard Codrington

    @ Bush Tea at 1:11 PM.

    I think it is a quotation from the book of Proverbs.
    But you will have to go a little back to Mesopotamian/ Sumerian mythology to get a meaningful explanation. The resident authority on Antiquity , Miller A, may be able to shed some light.

    Like

  • Are we now censoring views and opinions, but not obscenities?

    Like

  • LLOYD BEST on VS NAIPAUL:
    ScIentIst as Well as ArtIst
    November 2001

    “…..To grapple with complexity, the treatment is simple. Naipaul adds to our self-knowledge. He rejects ideological impositions. The political sociology he devises is founded in scientific observation. The hardware of our Constitution may sound like Westminister but the software of our political culture makes a government and politics of its own kind. Novelist and writer that he is and artist supreme, craftsman of the prose, it is the scientist in him which, at this precise moment, has come to the fore.”

    Vidiadhar Surajprasad (V. S.) Naipaul

    LLOYD BEST on VS NAIPAUL: ScIentIst as Well as ArtIst November 2001 “…..To grapple with complexi…

    One can only imagine how BEST would have pummeled both Keith and Kamla if he was still here… A Great Man.
    http://www.theintegrationistcaribbean.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/ManuscriptFinal.pdf

    On Sunday, August 26, 2018, 9:47:52 AM GMT-4, TnT PATRIOTS tt.patriot@yahoo.com [JahajeeDesi2005] JahajeeDesi2005@yahoogroups.com wrote:

    Memories of V. S. Naipaul
    By Paul Theroux August 24, 2018

    With a sighing emptiness of soul, feeling that I was saying goodbye, I visited Vidia Naipaul in his hospital room in London. This was in June. He strained to speak, but we managed to hold a conversation, and he smiled when I reminded him of trips we’d taken together in East Africa, more than fifty years ago….

    ……I especially loved being in India with him, because it was his obsessive subject. But, one day, a strange thing happened. We were being driven to Amber Fort, outside of Jaipur. Vidia looked out the side window as the car was delayed in traffic at a crowded intersection. A small boy, no more than four or five, was seated on a triangular section of broken pavement between two busy roads.. The boy was neatly dressed, in a shirt and shorts, cross-legged on a folded square of cloth, at risk amid the confusion of traffic and pedestrians, sadhus, beggars, hawkers with baskets on their head, schoolchildren, bus fumes, pushcarts, motorbikes, and honking horns. The child was animated by the bustle, yet he was alone—no adult near him, no one attending to him.
    Naipaul stared sadly at this odd and overlooked boy, and studied the scene for a long moment. As our car began to move on, he said to me, “I see myself in that child.”

    https://www.facebook.com/221539174553116/photos/a.221555744551459/2289542817752731/?type=3&theater

    Like

  • David Comissiong August 26, 2018 1:43 PM /”…I think it is fair to say that COB is one of Barbados’ outstanding examples of achievement in business…”

    But who really owns the undistributed earnings since the permanent shares do not reflect this retained value for the members?

    Like

  • Piece Uh De Rock Yeah Right

    @ David Commissiong

    There are a few things that you said in this article that I decided i would comment on.

    I was avoiding your article since I noted that it was distinctly obsequious and genuflected to the interests of your Chairman Mia Mao Ze Jong with its introduction whose drive read “… the inspiring message of shared and collaborative transformation that Ms Mottley delivered…”

    You continued and I quote “…“At the very core of our plan to save our country from the economic crisis that it currently finds itself in must be a strategy to RE-ENERGIZE (my caps) production in Barbados’ agriculture, construction, manufacturing, tourism, and international business sectors!…”

    And if only to show that you too are entrenched in the sugar cane industry mentality there was no mention whatsoever to the Knowledge Economy not once

    You did however spend some time echoing? what the ole man said about Public Private Sector Partnerships almost as if you had read and then copied my proposal even as you spoke of “national assets”

    “Imitation is said to be the best form of flattery” I would have elaborated on that quote but i feared that i would have ventured into the domain of plagiarism and knowing you to be a lawyer de ole man would not seek to impute anything other than original thoughts to you Thought Leader comrade.

    Then you added further dribble namely “…we are talking about a process of intimate and institutionalized planning, in which the two parties routinely sit down together and work out in detail an expansionary developmental strategy …”

    It was indeed a very saddening experience to read your and that drivel of your Chairman Mao which WITH ALL OF THIS intimate institutional planning is noticeably deviod of any Intellectual Property constructs and provisions.

    Can you imagine that you want to be “intimate” with Mr. Medford of the Specialized Mahogany Products and support him by these institutional outreaches euphemism for stroking him without vaseline because when he is is sharing his ideas others, BOTH competitors and government colleagues, can easily tek his ideas and run.

    And de ole man is sure that he cannot get any institutional support from the GoB WITHOUT SHARING THE CONCEPT, or can he? I forget that wunna does jes give way money as wunna like to your friends a la EGFL wuk up agency. Did I say hardwood?

    How do you propose to market the following assets internationally “…sugar, rum, Sea Island cotton, Black Belly sheep, beer, solar technology, classic Bajan furniture, Bajan pepper sauce, pottery, Cricket heritage, music heritage, literary heritage, processed flying fish…” without even making a serious investment in IP Protection?

    Imagine going to the best hotsauce in the world and telling him dat wunna got the marketing downpacked and that poor man’s IP gone to china to get teif and reproduced EN MASSE!

    THe problem that i have with your obsequious articles is that you have the legal skills to put all these enterprises in context.

    For every one of these 5 pillars (incorrect number by the way) that you mentioned, there is a missing component that this, and every previous, government has missed, and which you, with all your expertise, now persist to prop up.

    Liked by 1 person

  • I noticed off the list of national assets was fat old white broads, Is it true has one of the main stays of the local economy moved on to greener pastures? We must head this exodus off at the pass, open a golden corral,

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Tron August 26, 2018 12:01 PM. “You need to hire somebody from North America or Europe to handle expensive items like Italian marble or a Hans Grohe shower.”

    You can afford Italian marble and Hans Grohe showers?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Tron August 26, 2018 12:01 PM “A saying in the gated communities of this island is”

    A Simple Response: You really need to get out of the gated communities.

    @Tron August 26, 2018 12:01 PM “I do not know any workman on this island who works longer than from 9 AM to 3 PM with a pause of at least 1 hour.”

    A Simple Response: It may be that the people whom you hire hold you in contempt, just as you hold them in contempt. You really need to meet some real-real Bajan workmen. I met one on site yesterday, yes, yesterday Sunday. He said that he was going to get there at 3:30. He got there at 3:28

    On a previous occasion he said he would get there at sunrise, and arrived with an equally competent workman a few minutes before sunrise, and finished the job in time and in budget.

    Just yesterday I was admiring my parents’ kitchen cupboards. Simple working class kitchen cupboards. constructed by a Bajan workman in in the early 60’s, and except for the occasional lick of paint and new catches have required no repairs, and more than a dozen children were raised in that house. My mother’s dressing table constructed of bajan mahogany by a Bajan workman in 1940 graces my bedroom still, and has required ZERO repairs in that time, not even to have the drawer pulls replaced. I could probably sell it for $5,000 USD, but I choose not to. Its construction is much finer than that of furniture which I have purchased and which was constructed by leading North American companies, and which pieces are half the age of the exceedingly well constructed dresser, and other items owned by my family for generations. My own kitchen cupboards constructed in 1987 by Bajan workmen…in perfect condition. But then again I do not hold Bajan workmen in contempt, so they ALWAYS do excellent work for me.

    You are clearly mixing with the wrong crowd.

    Get thee out from the gated communities do.

    And stop hoping for a devaluation, so that you can get rich quick. If you want to get rich, or if you wish to remain rich, work hard, and work well. Don’t sit on ya fat bottom and hope to get rich off other people’s misfortunes.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @David August 26, 2018 1:56 PM “What is it to you? Just post your comments and mind your business.

    Hee, hee, hee.

    Like

  • @lawson August 27, 2018 6:58 AM “I noticed off the list of national assets was fat old white broads.”

    Wha’ happen lawson.

    The strong, young, healthy competition has left nothing for you?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Lol SS… money makes a great deodorant,

    Like

  • @ Simple Simon August 27, 2018 5:22 PM

    Can you hand me over his telephone number, please???

    Like

  • Nope. You are too disrespectful and too contemptuous. You deserve the equally disrespectful, equally contemptuous workmen.

    Liked by 1 person

Join in the discussion, you never know how expressing your view may make a difference.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s