The Grenville Phillips Column – A Fair Educational System

Our educational system is currently designed for those whom we label early learners. The only difference between an early learner and a late learner is that one understood taught material earlier than the other. However, both types have the same aptitude for learning. If different material was being taught that the ‘late learner’ understood first, then the labels would switch.

Since our children are taught and examined only on what our early learners are expected to understand, then our late learners will consistently score lower, and can get frustrated and disinterested in learning. If they believe the lie that it takes an exceptional brain to understand the information, and that they do not possess such a brain, then they tend to give up, and a slavery mentality is perpetuated.

How can we improve our educational system so that we do not perpetuate a system that assigns privilege to some and hardship to the rest? How can we improve the system so that all of our students can benefit and our early learners can excel? How can we make the system fair to all? That is the subject of this article.

The primary school is a time when children develop a foundation of learning. They can learn anything that they want to the breadth and depth of their interest. The more time that they spend learning something, the better they may perform when tested.

When children enter the secondary school, they should have the capacity to understand and record information to the level of a children’s novel, and perform basic calculations to the level of purchasing items in a store.

While our early learners may be capable of understanding advanced information in a newspaper and performing complex engineering calculations, the Common Entrance Examination should be limited to the basic foundation information. Therefore, the test should fairly examine basic knowledge and attitude – those who are careful will likely score higher than those who are careless, but all should understand.

In secondary school, the students should learn the easier-to-learn and fun practical aspects of subjects before the more complex theoretical aspects. Therefore, they should first learn conversational language, where they learn by building up a vocabulary of words, much like how everyone learns to speak when they were infants.

Those who are very interested in the subject will spend more time learning many more words than those who spend their time on another subject that interests them more. But they will all build a vocabulary that they can use. They can then learn the more complex verb conjugation in later classes.

In music, students should learn music by playing an instrument. Those who are more interested in an instrument will spend more time practising, and will become better. But all students will have a basic foundation on which to build a career if they choose. They can then learn the more complex music theory in later classes.

In home economics, all students should learn to cook by cooking. Those who are more interested will try a wider range of recipes and be better than those who are more interested in another subject. But everyone will have developed the skill of cooking. They can learn the more complex chemistry of vitamins in later classes.

Why do we insist on teaching the more complex and harder to learn theoretical components of subjects that only our early learners will grasp? Why have we resisted, for the past 2 decades, first teaching the easier to learn practical aspects that all of our students can grasp?

The reason appears to be our mistaken belief that some students will never understand complex information. Therefore, the early teaching and testing is intentionally made difficult in order to identify these dull students so that they can be mercifully reassigned to less challenging intellectual work – to serve the privileged.

Grenville Phillips II is the President of Walbrent College who has trained over 1,000 late-learners across the Caribbean region. He is also the founder of Solutions Barbados and can be reached at NextParty246@gmail.com

80 comments

  • Interesting “introductory article” but you haven’t outlined HOW we get a fair system.

    Also, an educational system is much more than the curriculum, sequencing and learners’ interaction with them.

    It is really the sum total of multiple interlocking parts (and people) which can often be at odds with each other. A fair system needs to start a clear vision AND a noble purpose AND bold leadership.

    Just observing

    Like

  • Well Well & Cut N' Paste At Your Service

    My observation is, unless politically or otherwise connected both fast learners and those students who would excel better learning at their own pace outside of the educational rat race created for them, all end up working in the same low paying fast food dumps, low paying construction sites, low paying small stores in Swan and Broad Streets, low paying hotels and restaurants for the same low salaries, unless they start their own businesses…which is the better option…these number in the majority, outside of those who excel and most often leave the island for that same reason…better opportunities, better paying jobs than will ever be found on the island, given the miseducation in the flawed education system..

    Like

  • I agree there are many students that learn the work at primary school level easily, while others may take a bit longer the grasp what is being taught.

    However, in MY opinion, confining children into categories of “early learners” and “late learners” is a much too simplistic approach to a complex educational system, without evaluating each child’s ability or finding out what problems may be preventing them from learning.

    What about those children Grenville Phillips II categorized as “early learners” who may have passed the CEE for a “good school,” but experience difficulty transitioning from primary to secondary level and find the work at that level to be challenging? Conversely, some “late learners” may have performed poorly in the CEE and passed for what is considered not to be a “good school,” but go on to excel at secondary and tertiary levels.

    Unfortunately, our educational system is one where students are tested individually, thereby creating an environment where they compete against each other. How about exploring the idea of creating collaborative learning environments as a means of encouraging students to work, discuss issues and explain their thinking processes with each other.

    Like

  • Home schooling is the best, by far

    Measured by all metrics.

    Stop thinking the industrialization of everything

    Sometimes smaller is better

    And home schooling does not mean – no internet resources, no student participation, no interpersonal skill sets, no continual assessment etc

    Like

  • @Pacha

    The prevailing mindset does not support homeschooling. A few months ago we had the well publicized case of a rasafari family taken to court by the ministry of education because they dared to buck the system.

    Like

  • David

    We are well aware, but resist still

    The products of all these years of institutionalized learning has gotten us nowhere.

    There is a good case for the reverse

    It’s difficult to avoid the judgement that that type of ‘schooling’ has made any qualitative differences to national life, development.

    To us there is only a constellation of well-credentialed’ slaves forming what some call the political-managerial class, expecting other

    And much too much is centred around an ability to pay bills.

    Like

  • ………………. others to employ them.

    Like

  • Why reverse and not modify the existing?

    Like

  • The contributions by Artax andWell were my thoughts. At some stage the wheat and the chaff must be separated. The main problem is that we focus on one and not the other.

    The exams may be a poor attempt to do this separation, the timing disadvantages some student but no perfect system exist

    Like

  • pieceuhderockyeahright

    @the Honourable Blogmaster

    You have asked the $64,000 question

    But the second part of that question is “how , how do we “modify” the system?”

    Let us accept Granville’s hypothesis of rates of education acquisition as having some merit.

    How can we implement an adaptive educational system, one which identifies the slower ones and then seamlessly permits their appropriate streaming in a matrix consistent with their less rapid development?

    De ole man would, in the face of the supporting education mechanism, suggest that said utopian optimization that Grenville speaks of, would not work, purely because the method by which identifying, and then apportioning, the appropriate school for these variously talented students, would fall back to people in the “ole boy network”.

    And under such a system one can reasonably expect that my grandson gine end up as a casualty of the “roulette choices” of some administrative officer at the Ministry of Education, lock way in some under performing school, as happens with exhibitions and bursaries.

    BTW ammmmm de ole man has a question for Grenville.

    Your profile brief, which you may have composed, reads “Grenville Phillips II is the President of Walbrent College who has trained over 1,000 late-learners across the Caribbean region…”

    Who refers to Walbrent College which is incorrect since the college is inanimate and can only be preceded by which or that.

    Such a mistake does not reflect kindly on you particularly when you are speaking about education and ever more seriously, have trained over 1,000 late learners whom you have let go across the Caribbean region

    Like

  • More comedy! What is Walbrent College reaching these “late learners”? Medicine, engineering, architecture, accounting, dentistry, computer science? Note, no mention of STEAM. Stupse

    Like

  • @enuff

    What Grenville do you again?

    Like

  • David

    Because it has gone into a cul-de-sac

    Like

  • pieceuhderockyeahright

    Sorry not “ proceeded… “ but “followed by…” heheheheh I like I went to Walbrent

    Like

  • piece or you need to go to Walbrent. murdaaaaaaaa

    @David
    My opinion on GP/Solutions is no different to many on here. Arrogant and delusional. Not one seat.

    Like

  • @Enuff
    Did Grenville mention if these problems can be solved using ISO9001?

    Like

  • Prodigal Son: April 5, 2018 7:59PM

    “@Enuff: Did Grenville mention if these problems can be solved using ISO9001?”

    @ Prodigal

    Don’t be too harsh on Grenville……..although the idea of introducing ISO 9001 into the public sector did not originate with him……. his intensions are “genuinely honourable.”

    In March 2009, the Barbados Air Traffic Services became the FIRST one within the English-speaking Caribbean, and one of the few Government agencies in Barbados, to receive ISO 9001:2008 certification.

    “Air Traffic Services Inspector, David Broomes, said the Quality Assurance Programme emanated from ICAO requirements that, in the interest of safety, Air Traffic Services worldwide should implement programmes including documented procedures for controllers; methods for inspection and testing; monitoring of equipment operations and internal audits.”

    “As you know, by the very nature of the work in Air Traffic Services, the window for error is very, very small. So we need to put [measures] in place to monitor the system and implement corrective actions,” he explained.

    “Mr. Broomes noted that the programme initially STARTED in late 2006, but was interrupted by preparations for Cricket World Cup (CWC). He added that, however, after CWC, they “went full steam ahead” to the extent of hiring a management consultant to assist in the preparation.”

    Like

  • @ Piece
    The subject of the statement is ‘Grenville Phillips II’ – who is the president of …. and who has trained….

    @ Prodigal
    There is nothing wrong with ISO9001 – apart from the fact that it makes much more sense than anything currently being proposed by your favourite party… or any other for that matter…

    @ Enuff
    Grenville somehow seems to have you by the short and curly…. LOL

    Grenville’s misguided ideas on education are based on the invalid premise that the objective is to produce hoards of highly certificated graduates who have successfully passed lots of shiite exams.
    In fact, “fairness’ has no place in the objectives of an education system..
    The genesis of an education system is that it be FIT FOR PURPOSE.

    Do we focus on ‘fairness’ among candidates in preparing a winning olympic team?
    …or do we look for talents like Usain Bolt and focus resources on his preparation for the task?
    Would you waste the same resources on Artax as you would spend on Bolt – if you wanted a 100M champion?

    If you change the system to facilitate ‘slow learners’, all you will do is reverse the current mess – and frustrate ‘fast learners’ instead.

    The PURPOSE of an education system should be to identify the VARIOUS talents that students possess – and THEN to focus needed resources to maximise the effectiveness of those talents.
    ‘Fairness’ does not come into the picture – community effectiveness should be the overriding driving force….as ALL the various talents are recognised and facilitated accordingly.

    Bushie would hold ANNUAL 11+ type exams for ALL students, EVERY year, to determine where their strengths and weaknesses are – and then MOVE THEM around the system to various centres of excellence designed to cater to their various talents.

    Of course the raison d’être of an education system is to teach students the PURPOSE of life (as understood by that society), AND to pass on the society’s accumulated ethics, experience, and knowledge – with the expectation and intent that every succeeding generation will ADVANCE that society more towards a ‘perfect’ society.
    It is instructive that Barbados has been REGRESSING in that regard now for decades….

    A ‘FAIR’ education system is as misguided a concept as is our current eddykashun system that produces brass bowls with degrees – who mostly work for albino-centric strangers ….and spend their working lives begging for ‘raises’ in pay…. while peddling off the family silver that had been accumulated and passed on by hard-working ancestors….to buy shiite.

    Liked by 1 person

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @Pieces, good Lordie aren’t you being overly harsh on Mr Philips? A broad literal reading of his sentence , abbreviated as “… the President of Walbrent College who has trained over 1,000 late-learners…” coukd easily identify the pronoun as referring to president.

    A strict literal meaning would get us to your position, I suspect.

    Alas reminds me of the old Ms Patricia Symmonds broadside joke: A gent charmed overtime by her wiles was finally moved to enquire…”my dear Pat, can you marry me”. With utter indignation the later to be Dame Patricia remarked, it is rumored “What, you mean ‘MAY I marry you” !

    She died, and blessed was her awesome cintributions, a spinster!

    Cut the brother some slack on his phraseology 😁🤣

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    Oops….my apologies….not re the joke but terribly inopportune death notice,

    Me Symmonds I now recall is very much with us…it is other of the Symmonds clan that have passed on!

    Triple ooops.

    Like

  • @Grenville, I applaud you for trying to think through the challenges in overdue reform to our educational system, but I regret that you are so reluctant to do the research which might better inform your opinions. In the professional literature on education and pedagogy “early learner” refers to those who begin the education process as children before they are old enough to start kindergarten. There is no widely used definition of the term “late learner” although it is used to describe those who pursue post secondary education later in life, attending university for the first time post retirement for example.

    Like

  • @Bushie 10:33

    Take a bow.

    This post should be required reading for every politician, policy maker and educational practitioner.

    Just observing

    Like

  • @ Observing
    Thanks bro….
    But it would not help us – even if they read …and actually understood it.

    The extent to which misguided priorities have overtaken our society has now passed the point of orderly correction.

    Pacha is right about the unavoidability of chaotic, revolutionary reconstruction…..
    But what Pacha has not yet been able to grasp – is that this intervention ALSO needs to be supernatural and spiritual….
    …perhaps because that would correlate too closely with the bible (that he so soundly disparages…..) LOL

    Like

  • I don’t mean to divert the “discussion,” but I’ll use this forum since my concern is political in nature.

    I read with interest a story in today’s Weekend Nation about the National Assistance Board “helping a homeless man” by providing him with accommodation at “their shelter.”

    What strikes me as odd is the journalist referred to Dr. David Durant as “CHAIRMAN of the NAB.”

    It is my understanding that since there has been dissolution of parliament, SENATORS, for example, are no longer paid.

    I believe similar actions should be afforded to political appointees to the boards of statutory corporations.

    If this is true, why is Dr. David Durant STILL BEING PAID by the taxpayers of Barbados and FUNCTIONING in the role as Chairman of the NAB?

    And are board meetings still being convened and are the other board members being paid?

    These are fair and reasonable questions.

    But as usual, concerns such as these will not come under the scrutiny of BU.

    Like

  • millertheanunnaki

    @ NextParty 246:
    “The reason appears to be our mistaken belief that some students will never understand complex information. Therefore, the early teaching and testing is intentionally made difficult in order to identify these dull students so that they can be mercifully reassigned to less challenging intellectual work – to serve the privileged.”

    Could you please explain what you mean by your last phrase: “to serve the privileged”?

    Are you referring to the social filtering process designed to identify the cooks, cleaners, gardeners, child minders, porters, ‘waiters’ and, most importantly, gravediggers needed to ‘free-up time’ for those engaging in professional pursuits like yours?

    Unlike your taxation proposals and dictatorial prescriptions for imposing your brand of morality on the society, we must support you on your workable proposals for improving the teaching and learning environment in Barbados to make it more suited to a 21st century internationally competitive world.

    However, what you have failed to discuss is the integral role ICT can play in bringing about your desired education model for Barbados.

    Don’t you think that ICT can provide that ‘bridge’ between the fast-lane and slow-lane learners?

    Don’t you think that properly designed ICT-based teaching and testing systems could go a long way in bridging the gap between the educational ‘haves and ‘have nots’ created by social and economic inequalities (some deliberately made by human biases based on perceived social superiority)?

    Is there room for the presence of AI to improve the teaching and leaning processes where the ‘teacher’, in whichever form, can take on the role of ‘Facilitator’ and not the didactic dummy carrying many social chips on its shoulder like the PM and regurgitating from some textbook written in the most off-putting technical jargon?

    Like

  • @Bush Tea
    Grenville’s misguided ideas on education are based on the invalid premise…
    +++

    You are right again here Bush Tea. The current educational system is based on a British model which was designed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries to produce either government or church functionaries from the elite grammar schools, or factory workers from the lower class comprehensive schools. Not only is it a century out of date even for Britain, it was always a poor fit in the Caribbean.

    It was designed to produce citizens who would know their place and be compliant in following orders. It was designed to replicate and perpetuate society’s class structures. That is why it emphasizes rote learning.

    Children who enter primary school this September will not be retiring from the workforce until 2077 or later. We do not have the first bloody idea exactly what challenges they will face over their working life… anyone who tells you that they know is either delusional or a liar. It would be like asking someone in 1958 to predict the invention of computers, the rise of the internet and social media, global climate change, and recombinant DNA. The best minds of that era did try, and they predicted flying cars, atomic powered everything, underground cities, and colonies on the moon.

    The only way to properly equip our children to cope with their future is to teach them the skills they will need to adapt to uncertainty. This begins with reading, ‘riting, & ‘rithmetic of course; however, despite the current infatuation with STEAM, they will need deeper understanding of critical thinking skills as well as exemplary skill in innovation and creativity. For their generation even more than our own, they will need to adapt or die.

    Like

  • Pieceuhderockyeahright

    Whuloss…!!!

    Oh Sage Annunaki you gine kill he?

    You like you talking to me grandson secretively!!

    The issues here that become so apparent with fellows like Gr3nville and Bernard? and others is that they DO NOT COMPREHEND WHAT “ICT” IS AND WHAT IT CAN DO.

    Let de ole man explain this with this example

    De woman in the InterAmerican Development Bank s Digital Transformation Report spoke about GIS mapping of flood zones and its benefits pre and post a natural disaster

    But the thing that was missing and that she AND OTHERS CANNOT SPEAK ABOUT is what is missing in her Digital Transformation

    What is “The Missing Link? Sage Annunaki?

    She nor others, do not speak of manufacturing sensors which, in addition to all the highfalluting Digital Transformation she is espousing, register automatically the extent of the damage in the floodplain, independent of human intervention.

    None of the lookers on have thought of a bolt on tool and interface which obviates the need for human intervention in the assessment of the damage occassioned by the flood and which insurance companies require as part of their compensation cycle.

    Oh Sage you see why De ole man does steupseee me teet when I does be reading dese cuntributions by Grenville and de Bernard’s here?

    Cause dem is de visionaries upon which we rely to train thousands of “late learners” and early learners

    Steupseee

    Like

  • Bernard Codrington

    Artax at 9:39 AM

    Mr. Durant by law and convention is still chairman of NAB. He was appointed in his personal capacity. He may only be removed by his minister. And he can be removed by an incoming minister. His minister is technically still in place. And he is entitled to BOD fees.

    Like

  • pieceuhderockyeahright

    @ The Honourable Blogmaster, grateful if you could retrieve an item from suspense thank you

    Like

  • Bernard Codrington

    Okay, point taken…..…..and thanks for the clarification.

    However, since “his minister is technically still in place,” does this means Durant’s appointment as chairman comes to an end, similarly to the tenure of parliamentarians, on nomination day?

    If not, would he be legitimately recognized as chairman of the NAB between nomination day and when a new administration is elected………… or is he required to “tender his resignation” at that time?

    Do you believe such an arrangement is fair where these yard-fowls and party supporters (including parliamentary secretaries) can continue to “feed from the trough,” after dissolution of parliament…….and at the expense of taxpayers?

    Like

  • Bernard Codrington

    I don’t want to belabor this issue……….but, please bear with me.

    Hugh Foster, for example, is a member of the DLP and has canvassed for Marilyn Rice-Bowen, Derek Alleyne and James Paul in the St. Michael West Central constituency. He was “rewarded” by being appointed as a consultant to the Ministry of Tourism for the past 10 years.

    Do the arrangements you described apply to politically appointed consultants as well?

    Like

  • Bernard Codrington April 6, 2018 11:31 AM

    “His minister is technically still in place…..”(Quote)

    There is nothing technical about the minister still being in position. He is legally still in his post until the result of the general election is officially announced – unlike ordinary members of parliament. You are also right about appointees to statutory boards. They remain in position until they either resign, or are invited to resign by the minister. That is the Westminster/Whitehall rule.

    Like

  • Given the “as is” configuration of the Barbados school system, I support the retention of the 11+ exam as the best of bad choices in transferring students from primary to secondary school.

    However let me indulge in some fanciful thinking.

    It must be admitted that traffic congestion is dramatically reduced when school vacations occur. I wonder if ALL children went to a school within walking distance of their homes if this would assist in reducing the traffic congestion, improve participation in sports and cultural activities and make school more important to children’s lives. The obvious problem is that schools are not located with reference to housing distribution. In order to allow for full zoning of schools many new schools may have to be built. Apart from the cost of building new schools, space may not be available. So we are stuck with what we have….or are we?

    Maybe if we consider the tremendous cost of 80 to 100 000 vehicles stuck in traffic for about 2 hours, twice a day, 5 days a week for about 40 weeks a year then is it possible that the money for a revolutionary reorganization of the school system may be found? What about the other benefits of having no primary and secondary schools only schools for children age 4 – 15 intimately associated with the neighborhoods in which the schools are located? These schools would be no larger than 500 pupils. That would mean Barbados would need about 100 such schools. So imagine a set of small schools very closely associated with the communities in which the children live, working not only to improve cognitive development but also in reducing the number of children lost to crime, drugs and other risky behaviours?

    Steups where do I think I am, Cuba?

    Like

  • Bernard Codrington

    Once again, please bear with me………because I’m finding it difficult to understand how a member of parliament could remain a minister after dissolution of parliament, the announcement of the date of general elections and nomination day.

    According to the Constitution of Barbados:

    Tenure of seats members of Assembly (1) The seat of a member of the House of Assembly shall become vacant:

    (a) upon the next dissolution of Parliament after he has been appointed;

    Additionally, according to http://www.parliament.uk

    “When Parliament is dissolved every seat in the House of Commons becomes vacant and a general election is held.”

    Bernard, if “the seat of a member of the House of Assembly shall become vacant….upon the next dissolution of Parliament after he has been appointed……….. and after dissolution the “minister is technically still in place”……….

    …………..could you please explain if there are any fundamental differences between being an elected member of the House of Assembly………….. and being a member of the House of Assembly and appointed as a minister?

    Perhaps you could direct me where I could find the relevant information.

    Like

  • Bernard

    I continued reading the Constitution and Section 73, Subsections 1 and 2 satisfied my curiosity.

    As such, you can disregard my questions.

    Like

  • @ Ping Pong
    Why would you want to make ‘less traffic congestion’ a raison d’être for the design of an education system?
    Congestion may well be a worthwhile price to pay for an EXCELLENT education system.

    But your suggestion has significant merit.
    Multiple small schools – with a variety of specialities to cater to various talent needs could work wonders.

    The cons are obvious;
    – cost of replication of plant and equipment
    – scarcity of specialists teaching staff
    – challenges with establishing and maintaining high standards across the system
    …plus, you still have problems when school ends at 3 pm, and the horny children have the “run of the house” while parents are safely away at work until late evening…. ask Simple Simon about “that” challenge…

    How about another plan –
    Suppose schools are configured such that the different schools concentrate on different areas of excellence. These can range from academics, to sports, to STEM, to music, Art, software, politics, even comedy…
    The annual examination would be available for students to compete for placement in the centres of their preference based SOLELY on merit… with poor performers being lower down in the placement priorities.
    EVERY YEAR, each school position would be up for review and reallocation.

    Facilities could also be installed for boarding by students and teachers (as was the case with the Lodge) – and school runs from Monday morning to Friday afternoon. (Teachers can also be hired to work shift periods to cover the 24 hour period)
    Obviously various exceptions could apply – such as where student lived nearby; where families needed to have students at home for special reasons etc…

    Results (inter alia):
    – Less traffic congestion…. (LOL)
    – SIGNIFICANTLY more teaching and learning time…
    – SIGNIFICANTLY less time for idle hands to be groomed on the blocks
    – You immediately have DOZENS of ‘Harrison College type’ institutions (each highly sought after in its own area of excellence) with the corresponding numbers of students who see themselves as ‘elite’.
    – The whole curriculum can then be revised away from the stupid 1950’s type classroom drudgery of a teacher standing in front of rows of robot-like students reciting shiite – period after period – … to a MUCH more interactive, casual, realistic type of setting – as, for example, happens now at the local Hotel Training school in Hastings.

    Of course, neither your suggestion, not Bushie’s – would ever see the light of day – too many vested interests in the existing shiite system; too much ‘thinking’ involved in executing change; too much money involved (that could otherwise be channelled to baloney)
    …in short – too much brass bowlery… 🙂

    Like

  • Bernard Codrington April 6, 2018 11:31 AM

    The Government does not resign when Parliament is dissolved. Government ministers remain in charge of their departments until after the result of the election is known and a new administration is formed.
    The Prime Minister is appointed by the Sovereign. Ministers are appointed by the Sovereign on the advice of the Prime Minister. These appointments are independent of the role of MP. Ministers retain their ministerial titles after dissolution, but those who were MPs can no longer use the MP suffix.(Quote)

    I have called previously for the return of GCSE and A level British Constitution. It is the best way of teaching citizens how we are governed.

    Like

  • millertheanunnaki

    @ Hal Austin April 6, 2018 1:52 PM
    “I have called previously for the return of GCSE and A level British Constitution. It is the best way of teaching citizens how we are governed.”

    Trust you are not referring to Barbados with your proposal?

    Barbados already has a ‘written’ Constitution and is scheduled to become a republic ‘shortly’ when anything monarchical should be thrown through the Royal window with the remaining colonial dirty water?

    So why reinvent the colonial wheel by suggesting that such ‘academic’ irrelevance be incorporated at the CXC or CAPE levels when there is a course at the Tertiary level styled Government & Politics (in the Caribbean)?

    Like

  • In the period immediately before an election or referendum there are restrictions on the use of public resources and activities of civil servants. During a general election Ministers remain in office and in charge of their departments but it is customary for them to observe discretion in announcing initiatives that are new or of a long-term character in their capacity as a minister. It does not prevent ministers from campaigning on their party manifesto in their role as politicians seeking election, but they must not use official resources from their ministry or department(Quote)

    This is the Westminster/Whitehall system at work.

    Like

  • Bush Tea

    50 years and two days ago, a very special man was killed in the USA. He made the phrase “I have a dream..” memorable. The problem today is that nobody is dreaming about anything.

    Reduction in traffic congestion was not the raison d’être of my suggestion. It was more of a catalyst and an example of how the present system may actually have very large unintended costs (in this case increased fuel consumption, increased foreign exchange use, increased pollution, decreased productivity, etc).

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @Hal, re your 1:52 is return of any such course work specifically needed….I must imagine that there are direct aspects of governance taught in course work in the CXC Social Studies cohort.

    Moreover there are cohorts of Critical Thinking that is also part of the overall CXC school leavers’ certification as far as I interpret.

    All that to say that it’s good Bajan common sense that an elected person and the official post of Govt Minister or a Chairperson of a Stuatory Corp CANNOT be conflated with or terminated by similar factors.

    The former sits in the House of Assembly by the grace of the voters; the latter two are in their roles by an official authorization of the state which is terminated only by another such official authorization…NOT by voters.

    And more simply not all ministers are elected representatives, anyhow.

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler April 6, 2018 2:35 PM

    “I must imagine that there are direct aspects of governance taught in course work in the CXC Social Studies cohort.”(Quote)

    That is not evident from some of the contributions in BU. Quite often people who profess to have been professionally trained do not understand the democratic system that governs us.
    As to ‘critical’ thinking, the obvious answer is no. Just look at the hostility and abuse we get from some of the key board warriors in BU when contributors have alternative views. Some become abusive and foul-mouthed and even talk about enemies and hate. It is also a good cover for ignorance. This is the mental dysfunction of people brain-washed by rote learning.

    Like

  • pieceuhderockyeahright

    De Ole Man is tired…I am dying, as are we all, so let us dispense with the gamesmanship

    The fact is that both Bush Tea and Ping Pong have faintly glimpsed where we have to go as a nation but neither has made that final leap which I am afraid we as a nation CANNOT SEE.

    Brother Bush Tea wisely posits

    “…How about another plan – Suppose schools are configured such that the different schools concentrate on different areas of excellence…”

    But then, in the following suggestion we come to a hitch which to all readers is insurmountable

    Now is is to be noted that both he and ping pong have enumerated the challenged which are

    – cost of replication of plant and equipment
    – scarcity of specialists teaching staff
    – challenges with establishing and maintaining high standards across the system

    Now imagine this

    What if the incoming Prime Minister we were to “configure” our schools so that Barbados advances Edutech and instead “…different schools (having to) concentrate on different areas of excellence…” all connected schools can administer any of the enhanced curriculii WITHOUT LIMITATIONS!!

    Because every school, both primary and secondary, would be connected to the enhanced Edutech, all the metrics that is now missing from the inept archaic system we have had since 1923 would now be available to every one of our students and that “ …annual examination would be available for (any) students …” based on merit.

    The constraints of which Brother Bush Tea speaks and Ping Pong confirms would all be deemed null and void because Barbados’ eclectic Digital Transformation for out Educational needs would use a virtual adaptation to meet our limited resources.

    The thing about where we are as a cuntry is AND WHAT IS NEEDED TO BREAK THIS MAELSTROM OF EXISTENCE CALLED THE DLP is vision

    And this vision is the one which Prime Minister Mia Mottley WILL BRING.

    I would ask those of you serious pundits here to understand that none of you is guaranteed tomorrow in fact none of you is guaranteed the next second of breath.

    We purport to be serious Bajans who love Barbados.

    Use this forum for serious submission and solutions that will give our country, AND THE WORLD, options that we, and denizens of the world, can be proud of, while we are here and after we leave.

    So, as a result of Ping Pong and Brother Bush Tea and de ole man discoursing, here is a solution dat addresses all de shortages in teaching staff and curriculum harmonization that wunna aptly outlined, problems that besiege the entire Caribbean.

    Of course we can only await de barrage that the gainsaying pundits shall now launch….

    We Is Not Ready as “Hewers of Wood and Drawers of Water”

    Like

  • @PUDRYR

    There you go attempting to introduce the benefit enhancing our education system by getting on the digital transformation train. Get on board or be left behind. It is so simple.

    Like

  • piece of the rock sorry to hear your dying but on the bright side you might make it into medical school

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @Pieces, 20 plus years after Edutech was first introduced and with the proliferation of whatt used to be called T1 lines is it really fair to project a connected school environment as such an advancement from the archaic policies and thinking?

    I hear the point but its not a gane changer…in and of itself.

    Connectivity, distance learning , one-to-one teaching or whatever you want to label it is almost a way of life today…yes it may not be standard among Bajan schools but surely the concept and process must be used extensively in various ways by the education officials.

    All the ideas broached (particularly Bushie’s) are in use …some places find them useful; others do not.

    There is no zero sum game to be played but rather a utilization of what works best for the locale. Thus similarly some of what Phillips says makes sense but also some absolutely does not.

    This is an important subject which can’t be done justice with any of our pithy remarks and although we have discussed it here several times there is always more ground to plough and develop again.

    Incidentally, one of the other things we really can’t be doing is the apparent radical change enacted by the DLP to do away with a school like Alma Parris and place those children clearly identified as needing special assistance back into the regular school population…the DLP I presume consider that as some form of stigmatization…

    …clearly Ms Mottley had a different perspective. We are too small for that type of complete change in education policy!

    Like

  • Bernard Codrington

    @ Artax

    I am sorry I missed your questions. But ,bright chap that you are ,you found the answers yourself. I was away paying bills etc.
    State institutions like private institutions must function despite there being no Parliament. Publicly provided goods and services must be supplied uninterrupted..

    Like

  • Shaking My Head In Amazement At Hal Austin

    “Quite often people who profess to have been professionally trained do not understand the democratic system that governs us.”

    Hal Austin

    never fails to make me shake my head in amazement.

    Is he trying to say that it a statutory requirement for anyone that is professionally trained is to be versed in the democratic system that govern us? Or is it a good cover for ignorance if some people choose not to be interested in politics, politicians or the political process.

    If one goes by his reasoning, a brain surgeon, engineer, physicist, chemist or IT manager cannot perform their functions professionally because they did not find it necessary to learn about the Westminster system.

    Maybe when he visits a doctor he asks him/her if they know about the democratic process that governs us, and if they do not, he sees them as being unprofessional and goes to other doctors until he finds one that knows the democratic process that governs us.

    UTTER NONSENSE!!!!!

    Hal Austin always writes about key board warriors. When you read his contributions you will see the contempt he has for people in BU and immediately realize he is describing himself as well. He is always looking for the slightest thing in other people’s contributions to deem them as idiots.

    When I read the rubbish this man writes, I can’t believe he was a journalist.

    Like

  • Shaking My Head In Amazement At de pedantic Dribbler

    “I must imagine that there are direct aspects of governance taught in course work in the CXC Social Studies cohort.”

    “Moreover there are cohorts of Critical Thinking that is also part of the overall CXC school leavers’ certification as far as I interpret.”

    de pendantic Dribbler

    you have me shaking my head in amazement as well.

    Do you mind telling me when it was a mandatory requirement for students to undertake studies in CXC Social Studies or when did CXC introduced a school leavers’ certification? Because I never had the privilege of taking those exams.

    It seems as though you and Hal Austin believe everyone is intelligent as you are and knows everything. If not, according to you, they don’t have common sense.

    Like

  • @Ping Pong April 6, 2018 12:31 PM “What about the other benefits of having no primary and secondary schools only schools for children age 4 – 15”

    A part of the reason of separating children by age, is that it is not prudent to have 4 to 12 year old girls on the same compound as 13 to 15 year old boys.

    Yes unfortunately, biology is still destiny.

    Like

  • @Ping Pong April 6, 2018 12:31 PM “Maybe if we consider the tremendous cost of 80 to 100 000 vehicles stuck in traffic for about 2 hours, twice a day, 5 days a week for about 40 weeks a year then is it possible that the money for a revolutionary reorganization of the school system may be found?”

    How about we do something entirely unrevolutionary.

    Instead of poor great poppets driving themselves and their children everywhere.

    How about we invest in decent sidewalks so that our little johnnies and susies can do something entirely old fashioned…walk to school.

    How about investing in a decent bus systems–and the only revolutionary thing we would add is solar powered air conditioning.

    How about if we include decent as RH bus shelters? With air solar powered air conditioning. And decent as RH passenger terminals, Decent as the airport terminal.

    I bet that this would cost a lost less than 100,000 cars.

    And our little johnnies and susies would not be little fatties.

    And neither would we be.

    Like

  • @Ping Pong April 6, 2018 12:31 PM “What about the other benefits of having no primary and secondary schools only schools for children age 4 – 15”

    There are good reasons why in the U.S. there is:

    Elementary school, for those aged 6 to 12, grades 1 to 6.
    Junior high or middle school for those aged 13 and 14, grades 7 and 8.
    And high school for those aged 15 to 18, grades 9 to 12. At this age these students can reproduce, their hormones are raging as the saying goes, most of them are old enough to marry. Best to keep some physical and social distance between these older teens and the little ones.

    Like

  • @ De Ingrunt Word aka De Pedantic Dribbler.

    I will forgive you for your seeming miscomprehension with this concept.

    First things first.

    No 2×4 island like Barbados has enough resources to deliver a harmonized curriculum for all our students whether they are primary or secondary school attendees.
    With a fiber optics ring across the entire island the T1 lines are a non issue
    What I said earlier and what I will repeat again is not the curriculum that should be taught at the schools in Barbados but the martrix that MUST BE SO PERVASIVE THAT IT ALLOWS THE EXISTING TEACHERS WHO ARE MAKING IMPACT AT WILKIE CUMBERBATCH TO BE PRESENT AT LAWRENCE T GAY.

    As usual you miss the forest for the trees.

    I am speaking about ground zero OR THE BEGIN POINT FOR ANY HARMONIZATION of a more pertinent education system for Barbados and while de ole man acknowledges that the disparate parts exists, as probably the cure for the common cold exists, I suggest that, given what was posited by Bush Tea and Ping Pong, per the pervasive issues, we must synthesize all available assets to address their points and try, as hard as it is for some of us, to move from Stonehenge log to locomotive

    I know that it will be hard for you to grasp the concept or to advance to a point where for example, said system auto-galvanizes the non performers at Alma Parris, whether they be teachers or students, to up their game to that of St Leonard’s BECAUSE DE BRIGHT TEACHERS AT THE LATTER SCHOOL TEACHING DE ONES AT PARRIS VIRTUALLY.

    But the again you are not an educator so you can’t understand the dynamic that will drive underperforming teachers at St Margarets to try to compete with Harrison College’s crime de la crop or Vice versa

    But, as harsh as it will be, you appear to be saying the same thing like the rest, namely, “distance learning already deah and T1 lines already deah so why improve pun dem”

    That IS NOT THE POINT DPD.

    The issue is reconvening the constituent parts like how Steve Jobs did with the iPad and streamlining it so that fewer bubbles comes from the old design when it is emerged in an aquarium

    But then again Jobs was a white man and dem have innovative genes but you and I is niggers and according to John we is a godforsaken backward people who his people liberate from our dark continent depravities.

    Your remonstrations and reliance upon the “20 years ago crutch” excuse only goes to reinforce my point about us niggers being hewers of wood and drawers of water heheheheheh

    Doan mind dat I have called you out as being part and central parcel of the holders rather wallowers in the status quo of BIM, I going still come visit you in the summer, Deo Volens

    Like

  • pieceuhderockyeahright

    @Honourable Blogmaster, a comment has stuck and I’d be grateful if you could retrieve it for me. Thanks

    Like

  • I was told that we are all equal in the sight of God.
    Perhaps as newborns that equality still exists.
    But as we grow older the differences between us begin to appear.
    We can talk till the cow come homes, but there come a time when we cannot treat every one in exactly the same way.
    And the debate begins again

    Like

  • Simple Simon

    The USA is not a model of schooling that I would follow.

    In Finland, basic education is provided from age 6 until age 16 in the same school.

    Your “biology is still destiny” would be an argument for single sex schools and for sharia styled schools where the teachers must be same gender as the students.

    Systems can be devised to reduce contact between the “primary aged” category and the “Lower secondary aged” category. In Trinidad there is a secondary school complex, Trinity College East, where the boys and girls schools are on the same compound using the same canteen and games facilities yet are separated during the school day.

    While I have no data on sexual activity among Bajan children, I really wonder if the claims of hyper sexualised pre and early adolescent students are not a just another urban legend but you are probably a teacher so I will defer to you.

    Finally I am proposing small schools which hopefully will allow for greater supervision of students by teachers.

    Like

  • @ Ping Pong
    You know and understand lots of things. However you do NOT use ZRs or mingle with the ordinary plebs of society like Bushie and Simple Simon do, so it is indeed best to defer…..

    Finland (and places of that ilk) do NOT (repeat – DO NOT) suffer from the level of “testicular inclinations” that places whose ilk tends more to that of Barbados…..
    TRUST BUSHIE (and Simple Simon) on this….

    Those fellows can (and do) safely put the girls and boys together – even to sleep – without fear.
    Bout here, the teachers only need to blink…. in fact – according to Caswell, you even have to watch the teachers….

    Shiite boss …. yuh can’t even trust Bushie with Islandgal or Simple Simon den….

    EDUCATION DESIGN MUST BE FIT FOR PURPOSE.
    One size does NOT fit all…

    Like

  • de Pedantic dribbler

    I must admit my ignorance of the Westminster system and the “political system that govern us,” hence the reason why I asked Bernard to enlighten me.

    If you or anyone believe that is a crime, it makes me less of a man or makes me perform my duties incompetently or unprofessionally………..so be it.

    However, likewise quite often people who profess to be associated with a professional organization from its inception until their retirement, come to this forum to make erroneous statements about that organization’s role in disciplining member organizations, thereby demonstrating they do not fully understand its disciplinary procedures.

    Much ado about nothing.

    Like

  • @Bush Tea
    Finland (and places of that ilk) do NOT (repeat – DO NOT) suffer from the level of “testicular inclinations” that places whose ilk tends more to that of Barbados…
    +++

    This is utter sexist and racist nonsense. The inclinations are not testicular, they are cultural, emotional, and cognitive. When we make excuses for sexist and abusive behavior among adolescents we simply breed another generation of fools that we will be making the self same excuses for throughout their lives. Finnish kids are just as horny as Bajan kids, but they are taught how not to be governed by their procreative instincts to the detriment of every other aspect of their personal development. If an adult male cannot trust themselves to behave with dignity, decorum and respect in the company of persons of the opposite (or same) gender, then they have been catastrophically miseducated.

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    Ok….first Mr.Shaking My Head In Amazement …. my friend, iI presume that like me you left our Bajan school class before much of the ‘new fangled’ data points listed as part of the current CXC curricula, so likely course work under their operational Social Studies cohort or Critical Thinking was not done specifically by either of us or the many here, BUT…

    … I covered governance and critical thinking at school in different ways.

    As I understand current processes the school curriculum actually starts students with a social studies cohort which then dove tails to more direct work under History and too Geography. In my day we started and ended with those subjects and learned about governing processes as part and parcel of that course work.

    Similarly in my day critical thinking was importantly developed in maths word problem solving, analysis of tomes like House of Mr Biswas and others from Shakespeare, Sartre, Golding etc.

    So that led to my remark about common sense. I certainly don’t expect all students to do the literature work I did but surely they will all do quite a bit of reading analysis and must be exposed to the maths stuff; just as surely they are exposed to social studies and thus matters of local governance and the like.

    That sir would fall under your “mandatory requirement for students…” and as such I must expect that YOU also “had the privilege of taking [ exams] within those foundational elements!

    We are as “intelligent” as we intend to be at any given moment by our careful analysis of the data we read.

    Like

  • Shaking My Head In Amazement

    “just as surely they are exposed to social studies and thus matters of local governance and the like.”

    Unfortunately, unlike you, I was never taught matters of local governance and the like at school and quite frankly I was not interested, but this did not prevent me from learning.

    I find that some of you people, more so you and Hal Austin, seem to derive great pleasure and satisfaction from trying to belittle other contributors, when from time to time you both post nonsense that questions your ability to carefully analyze the data your read, which is often highlighted by Bush Tea and Georgie Porgie.

    Barbados Underground should be an environment where people could learn from each other, share and discuss opinions on various issues. The way you and Austin behave is a true representation of keyboard warriors. It makes me think your objective is to run those who you believe to be less educated than you are, off BU.

    You guys need to relax and accept you don’t have the patent on knowledge.

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    …And that leads to Mr. Pieces…senor, you don’t generally misr-ead comments so perpexingly to then construct a retort that responds to a concern NEVER offered so you have me confused with your remarks at April 6, 11:10 PM.

    I suggests that the “miscomprehension” rests with you my friend.

    I have already agreed with your premiss that the ethos for a more profound technical awareness is needed. I disagreed on where the thrust of the technology can be most meaningful (which of course is about execution and where disagreements always show up).

    You are too savvy to conflate my remark about T1 lines to the perplexing retort: “With a fiber optics ring across the entire island the T1 lines are a non issue.”

    I said in part “…and with the proliferation of whatt used to be called T1 lines “.

    You of all people would surely realise that fibre optics/multi cable (wifi) is synonomous with ‘what used to be called T1…” so of course T1 are non issue! The entire point was to clarify that a cumbersome and expensive process of another time (but in our recent past) has been supplanted to a now very connected society well past that era.

    Your sentence therefore seems a non starter and unneccessary.

    So not to rehash your entire broadside; suffice to say I agree with you in principle on the need for better technological use and deployment within our educational system (your ground zero) but we disagree on some (likely very few, too) details for how best to implement same.

    If in that regard I have missed the trees and only see the forest then my critical thinking is truly amiss here.

    To close, until we can get each school on a Min of Ed network that offers a FUNCTIONAL web portal allowing parents to follow their kids homework, schedules, interface with teachers as needed and all the other freaking basic things other proactive school systems now offer then the solid idea for interchange between a HC and St. Margarets (?? Who be dat BTW) or Willie and St.Lawrence is just that… a great idea!

    Incidentally, teachers compete professionally more than we realize…just saying!

    And too..lets agree to disagree on aspects of your remark to wit…”…the concept or to advance to a point where for example, said system auto-galvanizes the non performers at Alma Parris, whether they be teachers or students, to up their game to that of St Leonard’s BECAUSE DE BRIGHT TEACHERS AT THE LATTER SCHOOL TEACHING DE ONES AT PARRIS VIRTUALLY.”

    Alma Parris was there for a reason…yes one can interface to St Leonard’s for key programs but frankly the teachers at Alma SHOULD BE the BRIGHT ones on specialized learning techniques etc as that was the population intended at Alma (underperforming teachers abound all over…some at the best schools, actually).

    So AGAIN, I fully accept your main thrust but implementation and execution will differ based on our different backgrounds and awareness coming in.

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    Shaking My Head In Amazement… dude are you freaking serious!

    I post a very bland, non attack response on governance which then linked in to other posts on school curricula and now I am being accused of “…find that some of you people, more so you and … seem to derive great pleasure and satisfaction from trying to belittle other contributors, when from time to time you both post nonsense that questions your ability to carefully analyze the data your read, which is often highlighted by Bush Tea and Georgie Porgie”.

    Brother, if I post nonsense then respond to it with facts and debunk my nonsense…that’s life.

    Cut this crying game folly; because you disagree with my position that does NOT mean mine is nonsensical.

    Good Lord can’t anyone accept a differing view, a clarification or even a warranted critique without getting their lipstick all smeared from angst.

    And incidentally, changing the handle but keeping the same line of attack is rather poor form…😁..Quite transparent and not good critical thinking !

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    David, awaiting moderation..oh dear…🤣😁

    Like

  • Dee Word

    Sometimes you have to allow balls to pass outside the off stump.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @TheGazer April 7, 2018 7:51 AM “we cannot treat every one in exactly the same way.”

    We may not be able to treat everyone is the same way, but we MUST treat everyone in the BEST way, and what was done to the Alma Parris students for example, was NOT the best way. They [and they know who they are] would not have done anything thing like that to the Harrison College students.

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler April 7, 2018 10:39 AM “without getting their lipstick all smeared from angst.”

    Not lipstick man. It is de fellers who always getting their sliders in a knot.

    Lolll!!

    Like

  • @Bush Tea April 7, 2018 8:16 AM “Finland (and places of that ilk) do NOT (repeat – DO NOT) suffer from the level of “testicular inclinations”

    In Finland it is nothing to do with “testicular inclinations” but rather to do with the cold white north fact that in those climes one has to wrap the testes and associated parts in about 10 layers of clothing during all of the school year. From September to the end of May it is very likely that exposed parts may freeze and fall off.

    When the thing put way in about ten layers of cloth, it hard for it to get anyone in trouble.

    Like

  • @ PLT
    If an adult male cannot trust themselves to behave with dignity, decorum and respect in the company of persons of the opposite (or same) gender, then they have been catastrophically miseducated.
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++=

    Mis-educated???!!!
    Is not that what we have all concluded about Brassbados long ago….?

    You rant and rave … only to conclude (as Bushie and Simple Simon has long ago) that education MUST be FIT FOR PURPOSE, and that the CURRENT REALITY is that one size DOES NOT fit all
    …. and CERTAINLY the local status quo is not transferable to Finland, Norway, Canada etc… or vice versa.

    You spent too much time working for those lukewarm international agencies …and clearly have become overly ‘touchous ‘ about certain ‘politically incorrect’ taboos….

    Bushie would not even touch your dismissal of ‘testicular impact’.
    You probably think that albino-centricity is also cultural, emotional and cognitive .. and you could even be right…(but you are not) 🙂

    Like

  • @ Simple Simon
    In Finland it is nothing to do with “testicular inclinations” but rather to do with the cold white north
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Bushie is surprised that you have erred in the same manner as PLT in interpreting “testicular inclinations” as some kind of CAUSE….. or other racial or cultural characteristic….

    Read the statement again and you will see that it refers ONLY to the REALITY of what occurs, and where…. not why? when? or if…

    It may well be mis-education….
    It may be temperatures….
    It may be cultural…
    It may be magic…

    The POINT is , that IT IS…..!!!
    Out education system MUST respond to what IS….!!!

    Note also that Ping Pong (to whom the comment was directed) has not responded (as yet)… since he is probably analysing his best response to Bushie’s response three iterations down the thread…..
    LOL

    Like

  • pieceuhderockyeahright

    @ De Ingrunt Word aka de Pedantic Dribbler

    Your response is Noted and I think we are on the same page (even though you ent invite me to you house in summer lol)

    The next iteration to be addressed is the curriculum which HAS to be updated but that is a whole other subject altogether

    The critical point is that virtual instruction will permit delivery of information to all students anywhere in BIM and the delineation of advanced or intermediate or beginner level then becomes a matter of the user name and password prescribing the subject matter.

    Of course we can expect all the political spies who are looking in on BU to come and teif the idea, I did not say Grenville nor Lynette.

    Fortunately Prime Minister Mottley is the progenitor of Edutech so credit for the idea can only go to her party and WHEN SHE ASSUMES POWER she should seek to implement what would be a logical successor to what she introduced before.

    De ole man would humbly suggest that no incompetent sector company be engaged to effect the solution (like last time) in fact no company should be allowed to supply any equipment until a comprehensive needs analysis is done by a reputable independent 3rd party entity.

    Some critical provisions to said supply

    (1) international warranty enforcement, if Dell gives 3 years for their free equipment warranty, then Barbados wants 3 years for any equipment it receives IN ANY SUPPLY CONTRACT, from the date of our receipt
    (2) with regard to any potential virtual education matrix expansion project, the supplier must deliver ALL OF THEIR EQUIPMENT BY THE AGREED DATES FOR EDUTECH 2019 rollout.

    Failure to do such must be penalized cause we want our equipment, on island, and in the schools and not in a wharehouse rusting OR AS USUALLY HAPPENS, DELIVERED 3 years later

    Surround yourself with advisors who first of all (1) love Barbados AND (2) WHO ARE COMPETENT because anything else WILL fail!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Grenville

    Listened to your earnest intervention on the Brasstack program today. It appears those in the lead on economic matters do not give your economic proposals a passing grade. What piqued the blogmaster’s curiosity was your response that if Solutions Barbados is elected you will defer the finance ministry to another. Is it reasonable to ask why was that person not encouraged to call in today or on other occasions to fully ventilate SB’s proposals?

    Like

  • David

    Do you recall Scot Weatherhead represented Solutions Barbados on VOB’s “The People’s Parliament” and I have a video of him articulating SB’s economic policies.

    Like

  • pieceuhderockyeahright

    @ Brother Bush Tea

    Dat “Piece” who posted at 3.13 pm ent me, just so that you know …..

    I like I going have to change my name to something like “I is not Fumbles” or “WeJonesing is Muh Faddah”

    Like

  • pieceuhderockyeahright

    Lolol alrighty Bowman you go girl….

    Like

  • So just how widespread is the deception in Canada? We obtain a secret list of about 800 Canadians who could have bought a degree from the world’s largest diploma mill in Pakistan. Engineers, legal clerks, CEOs, politicians, teachers…

    http://www.cbc.ca/marketplace/episodes/2017-2018/fake-degrees-exposing-canadians-with-phoney-credentials

    Like

  • @ Hants
    At lease wunna have journalists with some level of balls… to put such scammers on the spot.

    Bout here our shiitehounds just get together to snigger and whisper among themselves – while genuflecting to the guilty ..
    and probably exploring how they can quietly enrol themselves….

    Like

  • If we had these journalists here the fog about Denis Lowe’s PhD would have been cleared long time.

    Like

  • @ Bushie and David,

    If CBC Barbados was more like CBC Canada.

    They are both government funded broadcasters.

    Like

  • @David April 15, 2018 7:46 PM “If we had these journalists here the fog about Denis Lowe’s PhD would have been cleared long time.”

    What fog David? There is no fog. Below is the Bible of American universities. Can you find Dennis Lowe’s university there? Can anybody find it?

    https://ope.ed.gov/accreditation/
    The Database of Accredited Post Secondary Institutions and Programs

    Brought to you by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Post-secondary Education (OPE).

    Like

Join in the discussion, you never know how expressing your view may make a difference.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s