NIS NOT an ATM, it is OUR Lifeline!

Submitted by Ann Gittens

The CEO of the QEH has been making utterances about a health care scheme. We all know that elections are due shortly and both the Minister of Health and the Minister of Finance will be wary of introducing new taxes. So they have passed the baton to the CEO of the QEH.  I just want to let them know that the NIS scheme was established inter alia  to provide benefits for persons on extended sick leave, maturity leave, persons injured on the job and is unable to work and pensions for persons who contributed to the fund.

I would also like to let the CEO to know that the senior citizens of this country contributed to the NIS scheme and therefore are entitled to the benefits they are receiving. In addition we also paid taxes when we were working and still are paying taxes on our pension. The taxes we pay are supposed to provide us with social services such, as health care, transportation and so on.

The NIS scheme was not established as a bank account for any government. The taxpayers expect that the money they pay into the public coffers would be used to provide them with the necessary social services and not as a sloshed fund for politicians! I say a big fat no to any additional taxes irrespective of what scheme or “eme” it is for.

If the government wants money let it go and collect the VAT from the registrants. The NSRL could never raise as much money as VAT. The Minister of Finance boasted of the large amount of money he collected from the NSRL in a short period. So wanna can imagine how much VAT is being collected by the registrants!

Tags: ,

40 Comments on “NIS NOT an ATM, it is OUR Lifeline!”

  1. Caswell Franklyn October 25, 2017 at 4:44 AM #

    This is what happens when the electorate fall for the entertainment and salacious gossip that is delved out on political platforms. The country ends up with a government, whose members are not qualified to run a snow cone cart.

    Unfortunately, ministerial jobs are so lucrative, in terms of salary, pensions and other perks that these incompetent ministers would do anything to hold on as long as they can. They will do so, even if it means bankrupting the country since most of them know that holding a ministerial job is the best they will ever do. Once they demit office, they will return to the status of unemployed or unemployable.

    Like

  2. David October 25, 2017 at 4:48 AM #

    NIS blackout
    Herbert cries foul over lack of transparency

    Added by Marlon Madden on October 24, 2017.
    Saved under Local News
    1
    One of Barbados’ leading actuaries today cried shame on the authorities, saying the lack of transparency within the National Insurance Scheme (NIS) was “worrying”.

    In light of recent assurances given by Minister of Labour and Social Security Dr Esther Byer-Suckoo that the island’s social security scheme remains financially sound, Founding Principal of Eckler Limited Charles Herbert today demanded hard proof in the form of a copy of the latest actuarial review.

    However, he said despite repeated requests for a copy of the official document in order to carry out his own detailed analysis, to date he has not been able to access it.

    “The National Insurance [and Social Security] Act actually gives a mandatory date for them to have audited accounts and for them to be laid in Parliament. So it is just one more case where we are actually breaking the law,” Herbert told participants at the fourth annual Eckler investment review seminar at the Lloyd Erskine Sandiford Centre today.”

    Like

  3. David October 25, 2017 at 5:09 AM #

    The following is an exchange between the BU blogmaster:

    Vincent Haynes replied · 1 Reply

    Colin Daniel

    Colin Daniel So why has the government not asked for equity to fund the Sam Lord’s project from the Barbadian public? Why was the bond issue to fund berth 6 not issued to the public but was placed with one of the banks to manage?

    Like

    · Reply ·

    2

    · 20 October at 09:17

    Remove

    David King

    David King The government via the central bank colluded with the banks to manipulate the rates to reduce their interest cost.

    Like

    · Reply ·

    1

    · 20 October at 10:24

    Manage

    Colin Daniel

    Colin Daniel I don’t have a particular problem with the government doing what they have to do to reduce the cost of borrowing to the people of Barbados. But once they liberalized the interest regime, they should taken action to increase the reserve requirements to …See more

    Like

    · Reply · 20 October at 11:18

    Remove

    David King

    David King You just reinforced the point I made, if there was a ‘deal’ to remove the minimum interest rate rule why would you expect the government to increase the reserve requirements? Surely it is more than maintaining spreads, don’t the banks keep an eye on s…See more

    Like

    · Reply · 20 October at 11:29

    Manage

    Colin Daniel

    Colin Daniel The MoF is supposed to drive fiscal and monetary policy. He failed in that regard by not completing what was necessary in the interest of the country.

    Like

    · Reply · 20 October at 12:14

    Remove

    David King

    David King It is very difficult to list options open to the MoF at this time given the narrow fiscal space he and his advisers have ring fenced for the country.

    Like

    · Reply · 20 October at 12:34

    Manage

    David King

    Write a reply…

    Justin Robinson

    Justin Robinson but David interest rates have fallen significantly since the central bank eliminated the minimum savings rate. The cost of funds for potential entrepreneurs seeking to borrow funds is how much lower.

    Like

    · Reply · 20 October at 12:29

    Remove

    Hide 16 Replies

    David King

    David King You of all people must appreciate what a lack of confidence in the market and dwindling FDI have mitigated against the contrived low interest rate regime? Note the lack of confidence is on the demand and supply side with banks tightening credit policy. We are in a bad place, we need a new mandate. We have to rebuild the economy by reordering the economic fundamentals.

    Like

    · Reply · 20 October at 12:45

    Manage

    Justin Robinson

    Justin Robinson you so said the central bank conspired to do something. the central back liberalized the interest rate regime. i agree that the confidence issue is a much larger and more important. but life and the economy goes on while the politics plays out. people still have to take advantage of rhw opportunities out there. I know many entities are refinancing their debts to take advantage of the low interest rates.

    Like

    · Reply ·

    1

    · 20 October at 13:06

    Remove

    David King

    David King Really? The politics over-arches all we do on this little island. Your compartmentalized view of how the actors behave in our economy is naive (?) at best.

    Like

    · Reply · 20 October at 14:59

    Manage

    Justin Robinson

    Justin Robinson Maybe I am naive indeed.

    Like

    · Reply · 20 October at 16:13

    Remove

    Justin Robinson

    Justin Robinson David I am.aware of many actors who can walk and chew gum at the same time. They are engaged in vociferous political advocacy and taking advantage of the available opportunities at the same time

    Like

    · Reply · 20 October at 16:21

    Remove

    David King

    David King The government is responsible for enabling the marketplace; business facilitation etc. There will always be the relative few who have the resources, extraordinary acumen, benefit from a dose of luck and so on to survive the swim upstream. The challeng…See more

    Like

    · Reply · 20 October at 18:08

    Manage

    Justin Robinson

    Justin Robinson not really sure how to respond. I am getting a sense that you think I am.trying to.either defend the administration or minimise the role of government. Neither of which is my intent. the liberalisation of interest rates by the central bank is a policy reasonable people differ on. I simply said the policy has led to lower interest rates in the market that some are taking advantage of.

    Like

    · Reply · 20 October at 18:58

    Remove

    David King

    David King I am suggesting that it was a policy position taken not to spur economic activity but to reduce government’s interest expense. I also have some concerns about the downside risk of offering 5% on savings bonds in a market where commercial banks offer le…See more

    Like

    · Reply · 20 October at 19:12 · Edited

    Manage

    Justin Robinson

    Justin Robinson does it solve our economic challenges? of course not.

    Like

    · Reply · 20 October at 19:12

    Remove

    David King

    David King Justin Robinson now that I have you on the channel would appreciate if you can advise when the 15th NIS Actuarial Report will be available for public consumption.

    Like

    · Reply · 20 October at 19:14

    Manage

    Justin Robinson

    Justin Robinson it will be available as soon as the Minister lays it in parliament

    Like

    · Reply · 20 October at 20:42

    Remove

    David King

    David King Given the wide interest in the fund at home and abroad can we expect that this will be done before the next general election? This harks back to the early exchanges to do with government’s responsibility to infuse confidence in the market.

    Like

    · Reply · 20 October at 21:40

    Manage

    Justin Robinson

    Justin Robinson I won’t try to speak for the Minister but I dont see why not

    Like

    · Reply · 20 October at 22:24

    Remove

    Justin Robinson

    Justin Robinson Hi David. cutting government’s borrowing costs and stimulating the economy through lower interest rates are not incompatible.

    I would be surprised if savings bonds were included in any debt restructuring

    Like

    · Reply · 21 October at 11:31

    Remove

    David King

    David King The last part of your comment is good to hear. It must be said though that government’s fiscal and monetary policy of late has been reactive which could mean nothing is off the table.

    Like

    · Reply · 21 October at 12:33

    Manage

    Justin Robinson

    Justin Robinson true. savings bonds are a relatively small part of the total debt and it would be surprising if they were included in any debt restructuring exercise.

    Like

    · Reply · 21 October at 14:35

    Remove

    David King

    Write a reply…

    David King

    David King Dropping this here Justin Robinson ! "NIS blackout

    Herbert cries foul over lack of transparency

    Added by Marlon Madden on October 24, 2017.

    Saved under Local News

    1

    One of Barbados’ leading actuaries today cried shame on the authorities, saying the lack of transparency within the National Insurance Scheme (NIS) was “worrying”.

    In light of recent assurances given by Minister of Labour and Social Security Dr Esther Byer-Suckoo that the island’s social security scheme remains financially sound, Founding Principal of Eckler Limited Charles Herbert today demanded hard proof in the form of a copy of the latest actuarial review.

    However, he said despite repeated requests for a copy of the official document in order to carry out his own detailed analysis, to date he has not been able to access it.

    “The National Insurance [and Social Security] Act actually gives a mandatory date for them to have audited accounts and for them to be laid in Parliament. So it is just one more case where we are actually breaking the law,” Herbert told participants at the fourth annual Eckler investment review seminar at the Lloyd Erskine Sandiford Centre today."

    Like

    · Reply · 28 mins

    Manage

    Justin Robinson

    Justin Robinson I can’t speak for the Minister. The law says it has to be laid in parliament before being made public. The issue with the financials is well known. A lot of resources have been expended to get the financial statements prepared so they can be audited. when i went on that board in 2008 the last set of audited statements paid. the former chair Mr. Marshall committed a lot of resources to get statements prepared for 1999 to 2014. the auditor General was unable to handle the volume of statements and outsourced the years 2001 to 2009 to ey. the ey audits have taken much than expected because the audit trail is quite cold.

    Like

    · Reply · 9 mins

    Remove

    David King

    David King Herbert is not questioning whether the document has to be laid in parliament. It has to be laid so do it! How difficult can it be to lay a document? What is the process? I suggest it is a bureaucratic hurdle being used for political expediency sake. The NIS is an important fund. We are tired of the BS to be honest Dr. Justin Robinson.

    Like

    · Reply · 4 mins

    Manage

    Justin Robinson

    Justin Robinson So as Chairman I will can lay it in parliament or make the Minister pay it?

    Like

    · Reply · 2 mins

    Remove

    Justin Robinson

    Justin Robinson lay it

    Like

    · Reply · 1 min

    Remove

    Justin Robinson

    Justin Robinson I love to engage in robust and constructive discussions. Not the gotcha type discussions.

    Like

    · Reply · Just now

    Remove

    David King

    David King I understand it is the minister who has to lay the document BUT in your capacity you can exert some influence given the public concern. Surely if the minister insist on dragging his feet on this matter you have options?

    Like

    · Reply · 1 min

    Manage

    Justin Robinson

    Justin Robinson But I am not going to advise my Line Minister in public. I would find that most unprofessional.

    Like

    · Reply · Just now

    Remove

    David King

    Write a reply…

    Justin Robinson

    Justin Robinson the situation of being behind is not good enough. but it’s not an overnight problem. it s not being ignored and much progress has been made.

    Like

    · Reply · 8 mins

    Remove

    David King

    David King https://barbadosunderground.wordpress.com/…/nis-not-an…/

    NIS NOT an ATM, it is OUR Lifeline!

    Submitted by Ann Gittens The CEO of the QEH has been making utterances about a health care scheme. We…

    barbadosunderground.wordpress.com

    Like

    · Reply · Remove Preview · 4 mins

    Manage

    Justin Robinson

    Justin Robinson could not agree more.

    Like

    · Reply · 3 mins

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/340182829425699/permalink/1291671380943501/?comment_id=1297338100376829&notif_id=1508921742404744&notif_t=group_comment_reply

    Like

  4. Well Well & Consequences Observing Blogger. October 25, 2017 at 7:16 AM #

    What a big fat growing mess.

    Why was NIS used as a bank to give money that has never been repaid to 4 seasons scam…60 million US…dollars, pensioners money.

    Why was NIS used as a bank to “loan” hundreds of millions to Cow Willians which is unlikely to be repaid……who can answer that,.

    Who else have they given away the pensioners and taxpayer’s money to, these walking fools.

    NIS is not a bank, let the private sector go to commerical banks for loans, not the pension fund..and not the treasury. .

    It is a simple equation, how could “educated” ministers of government get it so wrong..

    Like

  5. Gabriel October 25, 2017 at 8:10 AM #

    WW&C
    Wild boys my dear WW&C,wild boys.The vagaries of the ballot box.Idiocy and ignorance reigns in Bay St since ’08.Oh for the time to come when men and women of substance will rise to wrest the devils incarnate of their lust for money and power.All transitory but they have not been nurtured in the virtues of a good upbringing among people and institutions which place greed at the bottom of the totem pole.

    Like

  6. Well Well & Consequences Observing Blogger. October 25, 2017 at 9:28 AM #

    Gabriel…that alone should guarantee that they are never elected to parliament in Bim again…ever.

    Like

  7. Eric October 25, 2017 at 12:28 PM #

    I wonder what the average time delay is after qualifying for and applying for your NIS contributory pension after you reach 66.5 years . Understand from others that it can be a year or so. Hopefully if you can wait they eventually do come . The NIS staff are very courteous, but really this is a bit poor . Timely pension payments are a serious concern for those that even partially depend on them.

    Like

  8. Simple Simon October 25, 2017 at 2:23 PM #

    @Eric October 25, 2017 at 12:28 PM “I wonder what the average time delay is after qualifying for and applying for your NIS contributory pension after you reach 66.5 years.”

    Actually I was advised to apply six months in advance. I did so, and my pension application was approved. I received written notice and exactly 6 months later my pension appeared in my bank account. And it has appeared seamlessly since then. That was March of 2016 when I began receiving my contributory pension.

    I have 43 years and 3 months in the system

    No complaints here.

    Like

  9. Simple Simon October 25, 2017 at 2:36 PM #

    NIS advises that contributory pensioners apply 3 months in advance of the time they wish to receive the pension. You should ensure that you have your ID card, and I think your birth certificate. You should also check now to ensure that your employer is actually paying your contributions into the NIS. Most employers do, but human nature what it is, you should certainly check now

    Like

  10. Hal Austin October 25, 2017 at 2:42 PM #

    Simple Simon,
    Isn’t providing a birth certificate and ID a bit of duplication? And don’t workers get a record of employers’ contributions with their weekly/monthly pay slip? In any case, is it not the job of the NIS to make sure employers pay employees’ contributions?

    Like

  11. Simple Simon October 25, 2017 at 2:49 PM #

    @Ann Gittens “the NIS scheme was established inter alia to provide benefits for persons on extended sick leave, maturity leave, persons injured on the job and is unable to work and pensions for persons who contributed to the fund.”

    True.

    But the NIS was never intended to provide funds for the QEH, nor for the polyclinics; and contributions to the NIS are NOT structured to provide the funding REQUIRED by the QEH, polyclinics etc. I have had the good fortune to have a conversation with Mr. Nunez one of the architects of the NIS in Barbados and in other small commonwealth countries.

    I am glad that the government is looking at a model which will provide ongoing funds for health care for all of us. However I am sceptical whether they will get it done before May 2018. If they do not I would hope that whichever party is returned to office–note I said office–not power will take the best possible advice about establishing a sustainable health care model, and will in fact establish such a model.

    In fact well structured, well managed universal health care systems tend to cost less that free market capitalist systems.

    But be warned the insurance companies will not like it and some physicians in private practice will not like it either because they will fear that it will cut into their income. Yes it will cut into the insurance companies income–and why not? what health care do insurance companies provide?–it is however unlikely to alter the incomes of physicians much, and that is partly because if well managed it should eliminate bad debt currently carried by doctors.

    And I declare AGAIN.

    I am not a “B”

    I am not a “D”

    Like

  12. Simple Simon October 25, 2017 at 2:53 PM #

    Hal Austin October 25, 2017 at 2:42 PM “Isn’t providing a birth certificate and ID a bit of duplication?

    A simple response: Yes. But I am uncertain about the birth certificate bit. I was speaking subject to verification, since I have to run to do the school run and don’t have the time to verify now.

    And don’t workers get a record of employers’ contributions with their weekly/monthly pay slip?

    A simple response: Yes. But in a small number of cases that money deducted may not actually reach NIS. Human nature.

    In any case, is it not the job of the NIS to make sure employers pay employees’ contributions?

    A simple response: Yes. But it never hurts to look out for yourself.

    Like

  13. millertheanunnaki October 25, 2017 at 3:28 PM #

    @ Hal Austin October 25, 2017 at 2:42 PM

    Brilliant!

    OMG, two aces in a row of scintillating wisdom!

    You are right Hal, it is not so much the falling foreign reserves that is a major threat to the economic sustainability of Barbados but the kind of bureaucratic nonsense afflicting the public sector manned by a backwardly performing so-called educated class of citizen. A pure case of ‘educated’ stupidity replacing ‘simple’ commonsense.

    Doesn’t the process of obtaining a national ID card involve the presentation and validation of the applicant’s birth certificate? So why the duplication of unnecessary documentation?

    Why would the NIS be contracting-out its inspection and enforcement duties to powerless and in most cases timid employees many in fear of losing their jobs?

    So why put the onus on employees to police their employers’ statutory responsibilities when these duties are already enshrined in law with the NIS management given the powers to force the employers to comply not only through moral suasion but also through the imposition of penalties or even the possible incarceration of the directors of the same recalcitrant businesses?

    Like

  14. Artax October 25, 2017 at 4:09 PM #

    @Simple Simon

    I have a friend of mine retired medically unfit since June 2016 and as at today, she has received only two (2) invalidity benefits from the NIS.

    She called the NIS office last week Monday and was told she should receive a cheque by Monday, October 23, 2017…… this is now Wednesday 25.

    The answers she received from previous queries included:

    (1) the cheque is in the mail
    (2) the cheque has not been printed
    (3) the system is “down”
    (4) the NIS Director changed the system, which prevented the printing of cheques
    (5) the contribution has not been calculated as yet.

    And according to which customer service officer answers the query, these answers come in any order.

    What is disturbing is the fact that a CS officer said since she is medically unfit, she can no longer receive survivor’s benefits and this was stopped several months before the invalidity process commenced. This meant she was without income between June 2016 and when she received her first benefit in March 2017.

    Like

  15. NorthernObserver October 25, 2017 at 4:18 PM #

    “a third threat is the possibility of a debt restructuring of Barbados government debt that includes a significant haircut ( a reduction in the amount of the principal). any debt restructuring is unwelcome, but the fund can work with reductions in interest rates and/or extensions of maturities. what would really hurt deeply would be haircuts.”

    WOW. This is potentially worse than I imagined. I thought it was an “interest/maturity haircut”, obviously a “principal haircut” would be a disaster. It is one thing to try and screw an external bond holder, but screwing the NIS?

    Like

  16. NorthernObserver October 25, 2017 at 4:19 PM #

    @Artax
    (6)..I promise not to come in your mouth !!!!!!!!!!!!

    Like

  17. Simple Simon October 25, 2017 at 6:12 PM #

    @Artax October 25, 2017 at 4:09 PM “I have a friend of mine retired medically unfit since June 2016 and as at today, she has received only two (2) invalidity benefits from the NIS.

    Sorry to hear about your friend.

    My experience with NIS customer service was very good.

    Once I submitted my documents NIS responded in writing giving me the calculation. A written response from a business place is always good, as it makes any required followup much easier.

    I don’t know if it helped that I had never claimed any NIS benefits before. No unemployment, no sickness, no maternity, no survivors.

    Like

  18. Simple Simon October 25, 2017 at 6:25 PM #

    @millertheanunnaki October 25, 2017 at 3:28 PM “Why would the NIS be contracting-out its inspection and enforcement duties to powerless and in most cases timid employees many in fear of losing their jobs? So why put the onus on employees to police their employers’ statutory responsibilities when these duties are already enshrined in law with the NIS management given the powers…”

    Please don’t try to mislead people from 4,000 miles away.

    NIS hasn’t contracted out its inspection and enforcement. But the same way we check our bank statements (even though we are paying the banks very, very well to manage our investments) it is WISE, even though not a legal requirement to check to see whether our employers are being honest.

    But if you want to put your earnings in other people’s hands and never check for any dishonesty then you go right ahead.

    i won’t be joining you.

    Like

  19. millertheanunnaki October 26, 2017 at 2:22 PM #

    @ Simple Simon October 25, 2017 at 6:25 PM

    Now tell us Simple S, how would the ‘lowly’ domestic worker or a meek and mild ‘simple’ shop attendant go about checking contributions and payments that ought to have been made on their behalf by ‘recalcitrant’ employers?

    By looking at their weekly pay slips which would show only what has been deducted from their small earnings as their share of the NI contributions?

    Do think these small-fry employees have access to payroll and payment records of those employers who would be only too keen to fire such uppity workers trying to ‘check into’ the financial affairs.

    An efficiently operating NIS should have in place control mechanisms to trigger warnings of payment default thereby flagging those employers who have missed reporting and payment of contributions deadlines for the last 2 or 3 months. What do you think should happen next?
    A call to the lowly workers to bring their pay slips for the last 3 months along with their ID to the NI Office?

    Like

  20. Simple Simon October 26, 2017 at 2:49 PM #

    @millertheanunnaki October 26, 2017 at 2:22 PM “Now tell us Simple S, how would the ‘lowly’ domestic worker or a meek and mild ‘simple’ shop attendant go about checking contributions and payments”

    Regardless of how meek or mild, or lowly, or domestic most people in Barbados have access to the internet, they have access to wi-fi, they more than likely have a smart phone right in their hands right now, since a basic level smart phone cost as little as $149 BDS, And if you are really poor and don’t want permanent wifi access you can purchase wi-fi access for as little as $5 at a time, or maybe $1 at a time as I believe I saw advertised lately. And thse meek, mild, lowly domestics have children or grandchildren have such devices. All of them have email addresses too. Or people can access the internet at a cafe for as little as $2 a time.

    Go to NIS on your vacation day or off day. Present a piece of government issued picture ID. Complete the required form and NIS will grant you access to our own account. YOU, not anybody else controls the password to that account.

    Once a week, or once a month you can check to see whether or not your employer has paid in your contributions.

    There is no reason for employers to have the power to fool anyone anymore.

    And in any event how does this meek, mild, lowly square with the common perception that black women, especially black working class women are aggressive/assertive.

    As Ronald Reagan said “TRUST BUT VERIFY”

    Like

  21. Simple Simon October 26, 2017 at 2:52 PM #

    And if these meek, mild, lowly people can’t do this themselves I am sure that they have a child, grandchild, cousin, niece or nephew who can teach them how to do it.

    Like

  22. millertheanunnaki October 26, 2017 at 3:39 PM #

    @ Simple Simon October 26, 2017 at 2:52 PM

    Come off it SS, you can do better than that. We know your moniker does not stand for the “Schutzstaffel” as it operated in Nazi Germany.

    We are talking about a set of statutory obligations. Paying NI contributions is mandatory. It is not an option on the part of the employee unless unofficially ‘self-employed’ or earning income below the weekly threshold.

    The NIS is a regulatory and enforcement agency operating under an Act of Parliament which grants No rights to employees to delve into or examine their employers’ financial affairs.

    Next minute you might be overreaching your argument by putting the blame on the CLICO policyholders for the management’s squandermania.

    Were these Ponzi-type schemes facilitated by the failure of the ordinary policyholders and pension contributors to check on how their premium payments were being put to ‘jet-set’ use?

    Should these old ripped-off ‘suckers’ (not in the Bajan parlance) still send their children, grandchildren, nieces or nephews to show a ‘thing or two’ (in real Bajan parlance) to the likes of Duprey, Greenverbs and the entire CLICO Board comprised of the cream of the professional crop in the Bajan society including a former top banker and chairman of the same NIS Board?

    Like

  23. Caswell Franklyn October 26, 2017 at 4:16 PM #

    Miller

    I don’t know if you know how right you are. There are many employers in both the public and private sectors that do not pay National Insurance contributions.

    In the public sector, places like the Community College and the Ministry of the Environment and Drainage are employing workers and calling them private contractors and refuse to pay contributions.

    They have joined private sector players like Goddard Enterprises who also employ lower level workers and refuse to pay contributions.

    Workers do not complain for fear of losing their jobs.

    Sent from my iPad

    Like

  24. Gabriel October 26, 2017 at 4:20 PM #

    Miller
    Just wait a few more months.MAM will appoint Darwin to the Senate and have Philip swear him in as Minister of Justice.Then all hell will break loose in the ranks of the DLP.The first to do the ‘perp’ walk will be lowedown.The second will be michael de drug connexions guy outta sin fillup,the third will be Greenverbs.

    Like

  25. Vincent Haynes October 26, 2017 at 4:28 PM #

    Miller

    I heard today that the CLICO workshop was being used for drying Hemp by some bright spark……at least somebody has put a part of it to use.

    Drove through the area today and must ask the Question”

    What thinking lies behind the total neglect of buildings and fields by this govt,which if maintained could have offset some of the monies from our taxes to pay the policy holders of CLICO?

    Like

  26. NorthernObserver October 26, 2017 at 4:35 PM #

    @Caswell

    is the private sector contracting out or outsourcing to get around it, or simply refusing to remit?

    Like

  27. Well Well & Consequences Observing Blogger. October 26, 2017 at 4:50 PM #

    It’s about time 7 or 8 ministers in DLP….do the perp walk on TV, along with at least 15 business people in the minority community to start….the island needs a clean up, to start fresh….from the blight if extortion, bribery and corruption.

    Like

  28. millertheanunnaki October 26, 2017 at 5:13 PM #

    @ Simple Simon October 26, 2017 at 2:49 PM #
    “Go to NIS on your vacation day or off day. Present a piece of government issued picture ID. Complete the required form and NIS will grant you access to our own account. YOU, not anybody else controls the password to that account.
    Once a week, or once a month you can check to see whether or not your employer has paid in your contributions.
    There is no reason for employers to have the power to fool anyone anymore.”

    OK SS, so the lowly workers are now emboldened and empowered with a smartphone and have gone to the NIS only to be told that their employer- a statutory corporation or a private sector employer with close connections and a possible financial backer of the political party in power at the time- has not paid in contributions for the last 6 months.

    Now what? Should that (more than likely) same black working-class “assertive/assertive” woman visit her employer’s place of business and carry on like a hag in a black hat by cussing, mooning and carrying-on as if she is from the ghetto instead of the heights and terraces?

    Why do you think the NIS is owed millions in unpaid contributions? Because of the failure or refusal of workers to use their smartphones to spy on their employers or to visit the NIS to check on their ‘contributory’ status?

    What next are you demanding of workers? To check to see the VAT forcibly paid over to businesses is sent to the Treasury to ensure monies are there to buy toilet paper and medicine for the QEH or fix the pot holes?

    Like

  29. Caswell Franklyn October 26, 2017 at 5:37 PM #

    NorthernObserver

    The workers are on the payroll but somehow the employers deem them as self employed.

    Sent from my iPad

    Like

  30. NorthernObserver October 26, 2017 at 6:19 PM #

    payroll or payables? Sounds like a “contracting out” scenario. Do the employed get benefits? Likely not. What makes them an employee vs an independent contractor? Usually some form they sign?

    Like

  31. Caswell Franklyn October 26, 2017 at 6:58 PM #

    The First Schedule to the Employment Rights Act would help you to determine if a person is self employed or an employee.

    Sent from my iPad

    Like

  32. Simple Simon October 26, 2017 at 7:15 PM #

    @millertheanunnaki October 26, 2017 at 3:39 PM “We are talking about a set of statutory obligations. Paying NI contributions is mandatory. It is not an option on the part of the employee unless unofficially ‘self-employed’ or earning income below the weekly threshold.
    The NIS is a regulatory and enforcement agency operating under an Act of Parliament which grants No rights to employees to delve into or examine their employers’ financial affairs.

    A Simple Response: I agree with you that NIS has its responsibilities. Nothing I have written suggests that I believe that the NIS should be relieved of those responsibilities.

    But sensible employees–even without access to their employer’s books–would do well to look out for themselves. After all it is the employees’ deferred wages which funds NIS. So if it is my money it behoves me to keep a sharp eye on it. Again. TRUST BUT VERIFY. Trust no man–or woman–with your money.

    @millertheanunnaki October 26, 2017 at 3:39 PM “Next minute you might be overreaching your argument by putting the blame on the CLICO policyholders for the management’s squandermania.”

    No I will not. Don’t you try to put words i my mouth. However I did not invest in CLICO, even though I could have, because as well as having sharp eyes, I also keep my ears to the ground, and I did not trust the CLICO principals, neither did I trust David Thompson, so I NEVER voted for the DLP while he was party leader. I trust my own very good judgement.

    Like

  33. Simple Simon October 26, 2017 at 7:20 PM #

    NorthernObserver October 26, 2017 at 6:19 PM. “What makes them an employee vs an independent contractor? Usually some form they sign?”

    You know the “gig” economy.

    https://www.thestar.com/opinion/contributors/2017/10/26/the-era-of-big-government-isnt-over-it-may-be-about-to-start-salutin.html

    The ugly, nasty face of capitalism.

    Which I have never trusted ANY employer.

    I know that my employer is looking out for his/her/their own interest.

    I look out for ME.

    Like

  34. Simple Simon October 26, 2017 at 7:32 PM #

    @millertheanunnaki October 26, 2017 at 5:13 PM “Now what? Should that (more than likely) same black working-class “assertive/assertive” woman visit her employer’s place of business and carry on like a hag in a black hat by cussing, mooning and carrying-on as if she is from the ghetto instead of the heights and terraces?”

    No.

    There is a procedure to report the employer’s failure to NIS. Use that.

    And Unions are good. See: Caswell

    And if affordable use a lawyer.

    And best of all start looking out for a better employer. If you are a really good employee chances even in a labour market as tight as Barbados’ some good employer is looking for a superior employee.

    And if the opportunity arises do like you and Hal and Hants and Northern and lawson and migrate.

    Don’t ever let anybody feel like that can kick you forever.

    Eventually the really bad employers are left with the really bad employees. The two deserve each other.

    I know a number of CLICO employees who were encouraged to leave CLICO even before and during the time David Thompson et. al were talking up the company. A relative of mine told them that they were too good to work for CLICO and they left. All found better work/better employers.

    Like

  35. millertheanunnaki October 27, 2017 at 10:08 AM #

    @ Simple Simon October 26, 2017 at 7:32 PM #
    “There is a procedure to report the employer’s failure to NIS. Use that.
    And Unions are good. See: Caswell
    And if affordable use a lawyer.”

    There you go (again), putting the onus back on the hands of the poor employee.

    Since the employee has already reported ‘her’ concerns to the NIS officers (more than likely female like herself and ought to show some solidarity) shouldn’t the matter be taken up as ‘serious’ and immediately investigated urgently?

    Why not bolster your ‘feminist’ perspective by recommending that the NIS officers should take over the matter much in keeping with their legal responsibilities and managerial mandate of protecting the interests of the contributors?

    Don’t you consider that the employer’s action of deducting contributions from the employee’s earnings but refusing to pay them over to the relevant agency with the specified timeframe is tantamount to fraud or downright theft?

    Like

  36. NorthernObserver October 27, 2017 at 12:16 PM #

    @SS
    The author, being like me (he is old….er), may not appreciate the irony in his article. He can stab at the Globe, but he also worked for them for years.
    I had (i’m retired) a client who had a business. He always had employees. Then the younger ones, wanted to be ‘contractors’. He couldn’t understand why? After all, he had worked for years in order to institute all the benefits he now was able to offer employees. At first, he made off-hand remarks about ‘all these young immigrants’. Then a few began resigning. Then more.
    He didn’t understand the mindset. To be honest, neither did I. At least initially.
    The millennials don’t expect to be ‘taken care of’. They get it. They are not afraid of debt. And they understand the tax system is skewed towards those who take care of themselves. They can deduct all kinds of expenses, unavailable to them as an employee. They WANT to be contractors.
    They are accustomed to ‘immediate need satisfaction’. What is this bullshit about being laid off due to seniority? That old fart can’t even do my job? And not only do the old farts get paid more, they have some benefit to keep their job they cannot do as well as me?
    They don’t want to pay into some unemployment insurance fund. Keep that money, and they’ll take care of themselves. They understand the politicians rarely do what they promise. And they take care of themselves first. What pension fund? They have seen parents robbed of what they said was their ‘security after 65’.
    They also know as contractors, they can cheat the system.
    So like you and me, they are just looking out for ME. And they do not trust any employer, or government. They trust in ME.
    And when you read the last NIS review, who can blame them? It says, the NIS maybe there in our lifetime, but unlikely in their lifetime.

    Like

  37. Simple Simon October 27, 2017 at 12:40 PM #

    Yes I raised a few millennials myself and they are different. They know that promises of “I will take care of you” whether made by governments, political parties, employers, or spouses/partners [38% to 41% divorce rate in Canada] can’t always be depended on.

    Like

  38. NorthernObserver October 27, 2017 at 1:09 PM #

    Again the irony is…..when I went to University, the computer was some big monster we fed with punched cards. And we needed about 10,000 sequenced cards to get it to do conceptually simple tasks. Screw up the sequence and nothing worked.
    About 5 years later, the basic desktop computer and dot matrix printer were available. 5 years later and for $6000, IBM made a portable, the size of a suitcase, with a tiny little black and white (orange-yellow) screen. The floppy disk was king, and I needed as a young employee about 100 floppies, one for each product. The “floppy” got less floppy and soon we had smaller and sturdier diskettes, which could store more.
    I could continue,,,,but you get my drift.
    Yet, we have the same income tax system (with minor rate and rule changes). Similar concepts behind so many other institutions. And we wonder why they are not being embraced?

    Like

  39. Well Well & Consequences Observing Blogger. October 28, 2017 at 4:38 AM #

    I believe this is what Caswell speaks of all the time…blatant disrespect for the country and tiefing from the people.

    http://www.nationnews.com/nationnews/news/101637/road-leads-manager

    “The general manager of a coral rendering company will be summoned to appear in December after the District “A” Magistrates’ Court found that “all roads [led] to him” yesterday.

    HEATHER-LYNN’S HABITAT: Joe’s River…
    The company, Telling Caribbean, has been accused of failing, refusing to or neglecting to furnish, inform or to produce documents which were required by a National Insurance inspector on November 21, 2016; that the company failed to pay contributions since 2010 for its employees who are/were employed at the company and that the company failed to produce or furnish the National Insurance Office with the contributions schedule in respect of the employees that are/were employed between 2010 and present.

    The matter had suffered a number of adjournments as the National Insurance Department sought to find who should be standing in the dock.
    General manager Wayne Gonsalves, who first appeared on behalf of the company, said he was not the owner of the company.

    The department then sought to bring director Michelle Wood, but Philip McWatt, the attorney for Telling Caribbean, told the court she was overseas recuperating from breast cancer and wasn’t sure when she would be returning.

    Both parties undertook to find the name of the corporate secretary and submit it to the court, but discovered the company did not have a corporate secretary.
    And yesterday, attorney McWatt sought leave to withdraw from the matter saying director Michelle Wood revealed she had no plans to return to the island.

    “She basically has informed me that there are no other directors that can be served,” said McWatt.
    “I told her this was unacceptable and that she needs to take better responsibility. I have told her that her actions have become a professional embarrassment and that I would be seeking leave to withdraw,” the attorney told the court.

    “It seems to me,” said Trevor Gibbs, the attorney for the National Insurance Department, “that the accused is treating the court and the complainants with scant regard.
    “It seems to me that the accused is aware of the matter and she has refused to appear in this matter. It leaves me no choice but to proceed in her absence.”

    Like

  40. Simple Simon October 30, 2017 at 7:57 PM #

    @Well Well & Consequences Observing Blogger. October 28, 2017 at 4:38 AM “The company, Telling Caribbean, has been accused of failing, refusing to or neglecting to furnish, inform or to produce documents which were required by a National Insurance inspector on November 21, 2016; that the company failed to pay contributions since 2010 for its employees…General manager Wayne Gonsalves, who first appeared on behalf of the company, said he was not the owner of the company. The department then sought to bring director Michelle Wood, but Philip McWatt, the attorney for Telling Caribbean, told the court she was overseas recuperating from breast cancer and wasn’t sure when she would be returning. Both parties undertook to find the name of the corporate secretary and submit it to the court, but discovered the company did not have a corporate secretary. And yesterday, attorney McWatt sought leave to withdraw from the matter saying director Michelle Wood revealed she had no plans to return to the island.”

    So many questions:

    Not paying NIS contributions since 2010?

    How will this affect the pension rights of the employees?

    If Michelle Wood cannot afford to pay the NIS contributions for the company’s employees, how then can she afford breast cancer treatment overseas?

    Is breast cancer treatment cheap overseas?

    If so is this cheap treatment extended to foreigners?

    Is Michelle a foreigner or a Bajan?

    And if she is a Bajan who then is funding her presumably expensive breast cancer treatment overseas?

    And if she is a Bajan and without permanent status overseas, how can she according to the company lawyer “have no plans to return to the island.”

    And are the immigration authorities in the other place aware of this?

    Like

Join in the discussion, you never know how expressing your view may make a difference.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: