Was Don Blackman Correct About The Shadows?

Submitted by BarbadosFirst

Horse Racing at the Garrison Savannah

There are some key fundamental issues splitting the parliamentary group of the DLP down the middle. For instance, David Thompson wrote off $19.2 Million in taxes to the Barbados Turf Club for which he states it was to get it back in a stronger financial position to be able to secure funding to develop night racing (lights and other infrastructure etc).

This now impacts on the work that had been ongoing for the designation of a Heritage Site status for Bridgetown and its Historic Garrison. Now in comes new PM Stuart who says he is not supporting night racing at the Garrison because it will have a negative impact on his constituents in St Michael South getting a good night’s rest etc. So out goes the idea of the the Thompson faction of having night racing.

But check this out – guess who is one of the biggest sponsors of events and sports teams in Minister Sinckler constituency? None other than Sir David Seale, Chairman of the Barbados Turf Club who is relentless in his attempts to establish night racing at the Garrison (remember his letters to the press earlier this year?) despite the protests of the environmentalists who said it would affect the turtles nesting on nearby beaches and the “ladies of the sex industry” who said the lights might run away their best paying customers in an already bad recession.

There are also other players like LeRon Gibbs with interests in the Barbados Turf Club who have been sponsoring teams and hampers in the St Michael North West (Sinckler’s) constituency as well as St James South (Inniss’s) constituency. Can you see now why his business Scotty’s was awarded the contract to operate the new canteen at the QEH as well as other government establishments such as at the NIS building in Collymore Rock?

I say all that to say this – these private sector backers are the ones behind the CADRES poll commissioned in June 2011, there was also one in January of this year…and it was more than just 4 key constituencies. Do some digging, ask around – there is definitely a move by those who control the purse strings to destabilise Stuart as Prime Minister. Peter Wickham knows a lot more than he is willing to tell. Do you remember the DLP meeting held at Queens College earlier this year when Stuart was out of island and at which Hartley Henry spoke? We cannot let ordinary Barbadians get shafted by the interests operating behind the veil of the palace coup…Don Blackman spoke of white shadows and he knew full well of what he spoke back then

33 thoughts on “Was Don Blackman Correct About The Shadows?


  1. @ David

    Nice piece. I like it bad.

    The real movers and shakers behind the Thompson legacy rogue faction of the DLP are the construction fellows down st. lucy doh, how come you give them a pass? Them want FS gone, he don’t want to meet them, he don’t want to be in their pockets and them aint like that one bit. them fellows want to be able to make a PM jump thru hoops when they say so.

    Bunch of Bjerk-offs.


    • The word in the Barbados business community is that the DLP has been asleep on the job. In fact there is similar antiDLP sentiment as there was in the Sandiford era.


  2. Quoting Barbados First “ladies of the sex industry” who said the lights might run away their best paying customers in an already bad recession.”

    I am sure that if we gave the ladies of the sex industry $19.2 Million and told them to bugger off, they would.

    The food in the new QEH canteen is very good.

    LeRon Gibbs ain’t white.


  3. I agree David, don’t expect PM Stuart to do a thing at least not yet. He will let them sweat it out and see how this conflict with the nation news plays out first.


  4. Note how the position has shifted.

    Source Barbados Today, Dec,15, 2011.

    Quote:
    “The Nation said today, and we will continue to stand by our position, that we will continue to publish all demands, while holding onto the letter written on behalf of the eight ministers and the three back benchers,” she said in a radio report.

    A letter is now alleged to have been written on “BEHALF” of the famous eleven, not the same as was written before.

    He -Stuart- looks like a Bajan, he talks like a Bajan and he is a Bajan; some of the movers and shakers who are in the congo line don’t like it….but so it is.
    And a “MAN” of the people will rise up and wear the crown placed upon his head and he will lead his people to a place they want to be.


  5. If i were he PM and i wish I were, there would me a new Minister of Finanace and hs name would be David Estwick. That would be he only change that I would make. I would make peace with Mr. Wickham and have nothing to do with the King maker. Nrvertheless, i would communicate more with the Barbadian public and show more assertiveness, Thats the type of PM Barbdians like,


  6. ifr as it is rumored that 11 members of mr stuart’s party including 8 cabinet members want to see the back of mr stuart; then it is mr stuart who should be sweating. it only took four to remove mr sandiford not 11.


  7. Many perceive that the BLP has enjoyed a better relationship with the private sector compared to the DLP. It goes without saying if there is not trust between the owners of capital in Barbados and the government someone needs to dial Houston.


  8. “Thompson wrote off $19.2 Million in taxes to the Barbados Turf Club for which he states it was to get it back in a stronger financial position”

    I need to have my land tax, road tax and VAT written off as well to get back in a stronger financial position. Waaaait…….I only black and struggling so I doan qualify! Stupse …… ONE TERM ONLY AND THAT IS ALL WUNNA GINE GET. FOOL US ONCE SHAME ON YOU, FOOL US TWICE SHAME ON WE


  9. The DlP have goofed like only goofy can. If only they had gotten ITAL right at least they could say to Barbados we honoured one of the most important manifesto promises and what we could not honour, we will, after we stir the ship out of this economic whirlpool. However I got a few things I would like to say about some our politicians. For instance, the Prime Minister maybe the quietest and less talkative then all the others who went before him but I prefer him over that former crook and vagabond whose former ministers are now filthy rich. I prefer him over that late Prime Minister who gave Leroy Paris 10 million dollars to spend and felt that writing off 19 million dollars to the turf club..AIN’T NO BIG THING… I prefer him over that minister responsible for finance who comes over like wriggling snake and feels that he knows all yet bajans suffering under 17.5% increase vat; increase road tax (yet most roads in a poor – rakey state); obvious price gouging in the food retail sector and the obvious excuses use to hike the price of chicken that now got we paying nearly 25 dollars for a decent size bird. The DLP goof balls maybe goofing their chances in the next election but I prefer them over those 14 years thiefing lot only because that the current lot was not in power long enough to thief like their predecessors. I do not want to see the BLP in power ever again needless to say I do not want to see the DLP either.


  10. Sunshine Sunny Shine…….I do not want to see the BLP in power ever again needless to say I do not want to see the DLP either.

    Sunny go and live where the sun doan shine den


  11. the Dems got fourteen months to put their house in order if not the BLP finger smiths will return to where they left off stealing left right and center. vengeance is mine saith the Lord and Owen will be a lliliputian Jesus when he resurrects- his long knives go cut down opponents real or imagined like a mechanical cane harvester. Mama Mia is first name on Owen hit list.1994 in 2011 down to almost the same players. yes truth stranger than fiction.


  12. I understand Sunshine’s frustration too. So in light of all this, is there a real chance for one of the other parties to rise? Although some wish to deny its existence, we have the PDC. We also have the PEP. Will one of these parties or some other new political entity try to bring a more credible alternative to the people of Barbados? Or is it a straight two tribe scenario with the DLP and BLP?


  13. To david:
    I do not know of any modern, old or current society which does not have its shadows or powers/person behind the throne. In Barbados for some time we have seen this played out especially when governments are changed. Contracts shift; personnel shift and even social events shifts for many former ministers are surprised that their phones stop ringing and the ringing begins at the homes of the new ministers. The bad part of this cycle is that small businesses are devastated. The new victors begin with their labels of who is B or D and who got work from whom. But the big businesses continue forming the relationships, while the small ones are thrown to the winds of fate.

    But the worse part of the whole process is the vile nasty characters who inveigle themselves very very close to ministers and especially the Prime Minister, and openly and calmly without disdain wage warfare on every tom, dick and harry, while keeping these minsters and PM filled with a diet of nasty lies and innuendo. These are the men and women you have to contact when the ministers and PM are not available by phone or otherwise.


  14. @lemmie

    Could not agree with you more.

    Not sure how many read Sir Lloyd’s Independence speech delivered in Beijing, China recently but it contains fodder for the kind of national conversation which should be occupying our time – see BU sidebar).

    One area a forward thinking Barbados government should focus hard on is to stop appointing the old retired political hacks to foreign embassies and replace them with more fertile minds which would likely be more capable of identifying the kinds of opportunities we need to sustain our prosperity in a new world and at the same time protect the legacy of our forefathers.

    Sure BAFBFP would agree.


  15. … unless you want more of what you got in the past or you have your interests ahead of Barbados’ interests.


    • Is there an image of Don Blackman anywhere to be found on the Internet?

      Would like to insert it on this blog but unable to find one.


  16. @ lemuel | December 15, 2011 at 2:28 PM |

    Nice piece! Well thought out and presented! I know there was more to you than just a mule, even forty acres would agree.
    Excellent piece, once again!


  17. @David

    what abour some of our FX Affairs who are about fluff and nothing more. They dont know how to advise us to exploit economic opportunities. The times have changed and our officers in the missions shoulld be looking for economic opportunities for our business men, but then again diplomcy is about appearance and nothing more for our foreing officers.


    • @Aspiring Polittician

      We truly need to change the way we do business in a new world, the text books refer to as paradigm shift.


  18. David

    I most certainly agree.

    Must let you know though that this new format for the site had mah lost … I renew my page a few times to mek sure that I was in the right place 🙂

    BNB’s leadership is planning to change its name to that of its Trinidadian owners early in the new year. It does NOT want to be threatened again with political comments about repatriation. BNB will not pay bonuses to staff but will retain the maximum in profits so that it could fork out a dividend which it will repatriate to Trinidad in US CURRENCY.


  19. Business, and hence White (and Black) shadows in Barbados is not just about exploiting Barbadians, it is mainly about exploiting the fact that the Central Bank is obliged to fork out US CURRENCY for activity performed on Barbadians who do NOT work for that type of (real) money. Banks in Barbados are non-productive entities and frankly I think (with inflation as it is today) people would be better off investing in a good fire proof safe. F*ck the banks (who are the biggest shadows of them all)


  20. Aspiring Polittician

    Our Ex-UK high commissioner saw his role as a “meet and greet” campaign. We spent, what was it, four million dollars chasing behind Rihanna in South America on “meet and greet” campaigns. About four Ministers, and a host of PS’s who have NEVER sold a thing in their lives accompanied a few businessmen in Central America in September on “meet and greet” campaigns.


  21. Here is the startling truth about the CADRES poll. It was commissioned in June 2011 by senior members of the Democratic Labour Party, and with the knowledge and blessings of its leader Freundel Stuart.

    Mr Stuart was questioned about the results of the poll, it being so close to the election, and he simply stupsed and flew off to China.

    The members of the party are rightly concerned that its leader has little to say or do in response, the poll after all was not a free exercise. Mr. Stuart should do the right thing and step aside, before it is too late.


  22. @BAFBFP

    You continue to ask a man of integrity to step aside. Yet you want integrity in the country. Your style is not the PM’s style. It is not style that brings value and virtue to the country. Stop calling for a thief and a murderer and enjoy the love, loyalty, respect, dignity and unblemished character of the current PM for his season.

    PM is whom he is. Where is he incompetent? State that fact. When the survey was discussed were the constituencies selected among the team? A poll by Wickham is not a direct message from Almighty God who ordains and upholds love, forgiveness, family, marriage and ‘Thou shalt have no other gods before me’ as His commands and statutes.

    Come on – let’s support righteousness and try to bring about integrity legislation by first showing that we have integrity.

    If the PM is removed through a democratic process let it be – he still remains a man that cannot be bribed, is not seeking kick backs from giving contracts to the well-to-do, does not ignore the people but responds intentionally and purposefully. He has supporters just like you do.

    I support you for taking time to share. Thumbs up.


  23. Blackman – a ‘politician on top of his game

    CHARISMATIC AND POLITICALLY astute was how veteran political scientist Dr George Belle described the late Barbadian politician, Dr Don Blackman, who died in Broward County in Florida where he lived.
    Blackman, 86, held various ministerial posts such as Minister of Transport and Works and was considered a controversial politician. He was also well known for crossing the floor.
    However, Belle said while the habit of switching sides might have been seen as a sign of political instability in some politicians, such was Blackman’s appeal across the political divide that he was regarded as a powerful political tool, regardless of which side of the political aisle he chose to sit.
    ‘Very effective’
    “He was a very effective politician; he was a charismatic politician and a very powerful political asset. If you were to liken him to a weapon, he was one that both Barbados Labour Party (BLP) and Democratic Labour Party (DLP) wanted in their possession. He was with the Barbados Labour Party at first and was one of the weapons that they had that was instrumental in their success. He then went over to the DLP and then became a weapon for them as well. He was on top of his game when it came to campaigning and mobilisation of people, helping to swing the vote in the direction of the political party,” said Belle.
    The former UWI lecturer added: “He was an effective member of [the late prime minister] Tom Adam’s team, Blackman’s shocking crossover to DLP played a big part in the 86 elections. He became a big attraction on the Democratic Labour Party platform. I remember the night when he was presented to the crowd in The Ivy, he made a tremendous speech with people up in the trees attentively observing him.”
    At the time Blackman left the BLP in 1986, he contended, among other things, that the then ruling party was not doing enough to address the issue of racism as well as the bread-and-butter cost of living issues of poor Barbadians.
    This election turned out to be a watershed moment in Barbados’ political history as it was the first in the country’s post-Independence history that the loser of the two main political parties captured less than five seats.
    Three bind mice
    Out of 27 seats on offer, the Errol Barrowled DLP won 24 seats, with the late former Prime Minister Owen Arthur, Sir David Simmons and Sir Henry Forde, winning the only three seats for the BLP. The trio was commonly referred to as the three blind mice.
    Prior to this, Blackman, in his debut in elective politics, captured the St Michael East seat, marking the first time the seat went to the BLP.
    The man who eventually succeeded Blackman as the Member of Parliament for St Michael East, Trevor Prescod, described his predecessor as a man of strong convictions, who worked to assist the poor.
    “He would never stop saying that things like leadership was never something which he desired to achieve. He wanted to be able to give his service to the poor people, especially the marginalised persons and black people.
    “He did that well and, not just with the implementation of the home help programme, but with the building of welfare houses across Barbados for lots of poor people. I think that he
    was a remarkable man, strong in his convictions and his Pan Africanist principles.”
    Also paying tribute was Prime Minister Mia Amor Mottley, who said Blackman remained a dear and respected friend, extending the sympathies of her administration and a grateful nation to his family.
    “Today, I pause to pay tribute to a Barbadian who has contributed immensely to the robustness that characterises our current politics. Whether or not you supported his political stance, it cannot be denied that Dr Don Blackman’s brand of politics in the late 1970s and throughout the 1980s confirmed the maturity of our democracy.
    Sharp tongue
    “Blackman possessed a tongue that was as sharp as they came, an intellect that had to be respected, oratorical skills that were envied by many, and a fearlessness that won him friends as easily as it created enemies,” said Mottley in a statement released yesterday.
    She added: “No doubt, the style with which Dr Blackman espoused his position on subjects such as black power and the enfranchisement of the poor, always projected under a banner of “redressing past imbalances”, was the catalyst that drew some of our politicians of today into the political fray. And it is this style that today still makes Dr Blackman a household name in The Ivy and other districts of the St Michael East constituency he represented, first as a member of the Barbados Labour Party, and then with the Democratic Labour Party – more than 30 years after he walked away from the hustings with the same level of intrigue and controversy that accompanied his tenure.”
    “Dr Don Blackman tested our system of party politics, he tested our conduct of parliamentary debates, he challenged our conservative approaches to settling social issues and today our politics and our nation are the better for it. On behalf of the Government and people of Barbados, I extend sympathy to his wife and family, as well as those residents of St Michael East, to whom he remains a dear and respected friend.”
    (CLM)

    Source: Nation


  24. https://barbadostoday.bb/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/DSC_6567-copy-730×456.jpg

    PM Mottley pays tribute to Dr Don Blackman
    Article by Kobie Broomes
    Published on
    February 8, 2022

    Prime Minister Mia Mottley issued the following statement following the death of Dr Don Blackman.

    Below is the full statement

    Today, I pause to pay tribute to a Barbadian who has contributed immensely to the robustness that characterizes our current politics.

    Whether or not you supported his political stance, it cannot be denied that Dr Don Blackman’s brand of politics in the late 1970s and throughout the 1980s confirmed the maturity of our democracy.

    Dr Blackman possessed a tongue that was as sharp as they came, an intellect that had to be respected, oratorical skills that were envied by many, and a fearlessness that won him friends as easily as it created enemies.

    No doubt, the style with which Dr Blackman espoused his position on subjects such as black power and the enfranchisement of the poor, always projected under a banner of “redressing past imbalances”, was the catalyst that drew some of our politicians of today into the political fray.

    And it is this style that today still makes Dr Blackman a household name in The Ivy and other districts of the St. Michael East constituency he represented, first as a member of the Barbados Labour Party, and then with the Democratic Labour Party — more than 30 years after he walked away from the hustings with the same level of intrigue and controversy that accompanied his tenure.

    Dr. Don Blackman tested our system of party politics, he tested our conduct of parliamentary debates, he challenged our conservative approaches to settling social issues and today our politics and our nation are the better for it.

    On behalf of the Government and people of Barbados, I extend sympathy to his wife and family, as well as those residents of St. Michael East, to whom he remains a dear and respected friend.

    Rest In Peace.

    Source: Barbados Today

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