A Time To March Against Crime And Lawlessness

Submitted by RUSERIOUS

On August 3rd gunmen killed a business owner and his son in law during a robbery at their residence.

Only in Barbados can you kill someone during the commission of a crime. Get charged for murder, plead guilty to manslaughter before the trial and get sentenced to 10-15 years. This although the maximum penalty for manslaughter is life in prison.

Only in Barbados can you get charged for forty armed robberies, plead guilty to all at the same time in the lower court, and receive a two year concurrent sentence on all of them.

Only in Barbados can you kill your wife and dump her body in a well and then say sorry in court and receive a ten year sentence.

Get used to old Barbados in its final days, and say hello to the new era; where armed robbers troll the streets during the night and day while unarmed Police cower in the Police stations and police vehicles. What you are seeing is the final phase in the death of a paradise and the ushering in of Trinidad/Guyana/Jamaica style criminal take over.

Until the ordinary law abiding citizen supports the police, until the judiciary passes lengthy sentences for violent offenders, enjoy violent offenders on a rotation basis as they are released in short term from prison.

March against crime and lawlessness, it could you or someone you know next.

0 thoughts on “A Time To March Against Crime And Lawlessness


  1. Living like a prisoner in my own home since an incident at my home…I am prepared to march. I remember in 1981 telling my good friend, the late Jeanette Layne-Clarke that the days of keeping one’s doors open even in the day were done. Drugs had taken over the area I lived in then. She was shocked at my words but soon after was convinced that I was right. Things have escalated since then…guns have come into play. But one should ask how do the drugs and guns get in here so easily? And yes! I am ready to march for my freedom ’cause I want it back…I want to be safe. I want my children to be safe. I want my grandchildren and great-grandchild to be safe. I want all my family to be safe. I want all of Barbados to be safe.

    And it is my human right to want it.

    My heart goes out to the Chadderton family at this horrible time. May they find strength in their love for each other.


  2. The Bartel March, The 8% March, what both have in common is the BWU. The people must be mobilized by a leadership which has a significant membership. Our trade unionists have become fat and lethargic with Sirs and other titles conferred by the politicians.

    Our tourism and offshore products must be protected.


  3. This is a very important article. We must also remember that solutions to crime cannot all be based on punishment of offenders.
    We need to also focus on solutions that relate to prevention and not cure.
    why are Bajans turning to crime? How do we get theses guns?
    Are we raising little monsters under our roofs and then expecting police and judges to clean up our mess?
    These crimes are being committed almost without exception by home grown talent.
    Andrew


  4. The problem in Barbados is that we “react” to shocking acts after the fact, rather than act against the little “not so bad ones” over time. Andrew brought another perspective to the issue. The outrage here is understandable, but how many of us are truly willing to “walk the walk” ourselves, while “talking the talk” to our officials in authority and at the same time “keeping our own houses in good order.” Nothing less than all three of these at the same time will solve or ease our problems.


  5. It is quite obvious that a person’s LIFE in Barbados is worth very little when it comes to the law courts. Criminals come to your home with weapons yet if you draw your weapon first you are wrong. Something is sadly wrong with our system.

    Andrew… Barbadians are turning to crime because they can get away with it. Look at the amount of white collar crime that has been allowed to go unpunished, the mini buses and ZR’s are allowed to ply their trade even though they continue to break the laws of the land. How are these persons getting the guns? We may have a large underground criminal element in our society. These might include many prominent citizens who can assist because they know someone big up and those who will look the other way for a few bucks. It seems like it is survival of the fittest. The music and drug culture as well as the movie industry are also influential. Lack of proper parenting in the homes have created a sub culture of young people who feel that we owe them. That is why our work ethic has declined, our civility towards each other has been dangerously eroded and a flippant attitude towards the police is so apparent.

    Our whole judicial system needs overhauling, when we see attorneys and elected officials getting away with crimes how can we expect our citizens behave?


  6. Nice try Str8 Up. But people commenting here actually have commonsense and are serious about the deadly turn our society is taking, and we are devastated by the loss of more innocent lives. No one today has time for ignorant trolls like you who are trying to divert attention away from the real issues affecting us.

    Ok, moving on……
    We allowed too much rot to sink in for far too long and now it is too late. The steps Andrew Pilgrin outlined above are what is needed, but will take a lifetime to sort out.
    We need to start by policing our communities more. Many communities turn a blind eye to lawless behaviour – i.e. smoking weed, cursing, etc. I read the column in The Friday Nation where they visit neighbourhoods that are considered “undesirable.” Many of the people there are like: “Oh, the fellas does smoke a little weed from time to time, but everybody here does live peaceful.”
    Hello, how do you think the murderous behaviour we are witnessing now starts? From these so-called harmless acts. We need to set moral boundaries and have zero tolerance for this type of thing.


  7. Str8 Up hit the nail on the head.. we boys have a different approach and profile.. we pimping jamacan girls and we are known to all and sundry then we rob stores and burning everything thing down including pregnant women inside..
    ” even better than the real thing ..give me half a chance…”


  8. Let’s face it Jamaica, T&T, St lucia, all those countries have seen a spiral rise in crime, it is just a matter of time that Barbados falls in line. Our administration, mainly polic, are sticking their heads in the sand, yes, crime might be down but the seriousness of crime is increasing and unless be accept that and put measures in place to curb it, it will get out of hand quickly. We have to stop slapping criminals on their hands when they commit serious crime, I’m afraid is something is not done soon Barbados can seen a vigilante backlash developing here. The big problem, we now have a large number of regionalists living here, some are here looking for work others are here for devientcy.


  9. @ islandgal246. I agree with what Andrew said, but I am not sure that you do. I believe that when Andrew said that we need not only to address the crimes, but also the society that causes these crimes, he was, in fact, generalizing what you have specified. I would be very surprised if he disagreed with you. If you are going to treat the society (and it is the only truly effective way to halt the crime-spree) then you must do so at ALL levels, including the levels you have correctly pointed out.


  10. This is my personal view as I am not a lawyer, but it seems to me that for some time now, punishment and crime do not correlate. I would not want to go so far as to say that the authorities have gotten soft on crime, but it would be interesting to do an analysis of court cases involving murders committed during the last fifteen years and see whether by using scientific methods, some pattern can be demonstrated to prove what is essentially a gut hypothesis on my part.i.e. that sentences handed down for murders committed have become more lenient over time. Are victim’s rights watered down and de-emphasized in the new dispensation of rehabilitation and criminal’s rights?
    Yes, we now live in dangerous times..I still don’t feel my personal security here in Barbados as threatened as I did during the eleven years I spent in Jamaica, but I do have a growing sense of unease.
    The issue of crime and punishment is a complex one, but over the years, I have taught many secondary school teachers and like a mantra, they have told me of the consensus among so many of their young students who attempted to explain attitudes to violence among their peers by saying that..”Miss, murder is easy to commit..they don’t hang and you just spend a few years and come out.”
    It is interesting to see that in the UK, the politicians are now talking of revamping the law to give householders greater protection, if in the course of protecting their homes against criminal invasion, some injury to or death of the perpetrator results.But is it too late? Are we facing an inevitable slide as Toynbee forecast into chaos? Events seem to be overtaking us…the slaughter in Norway is but one example or the beheadings in Jamaica…are the stable doors open and all the horses gone? We need to debate these issues and arrive at some consensus.


  11. @ Andrew Pilgrim (assuming you really are the attorney of the same name) and Amused,

    When do we start to demand that each and everyone of us have a duty to abide by the law and to be our brothers’ keeper? For all its faults, Barbados makes a magnificent effort at giving all of its citizens (and then some) a chance in life – free education, free health care and many programs which attempt to help young and old get ahead, subsidized housing, school meals, free text books, free bus transport for students, free summer camps and more. The Government just spent millions repairing the homes of those whose homes were damaged by Tomas. The Government didn’t say “break fuh yuh self!” In the Barbados that I live in, people are encouraged, spoken to, lectured to, pleaded with, rewarded with prizes, accolades etc, to do the right thing. No one can honestly say that in Barbados there is any public approval of crime, violence, dishonesty or immorality except by the bleeding hearts (which includes some politicians (of dubious morality), the criminal justice system and the moral relativists like the Catholic church) who want to argue “it’s not their fault, it’s society’s fault that they kill, rob and maim!” Unfortunately they control the punishment end of the system of social control i.e. the courts and the prisons. These most evil of persons (i.e those who equivocate and defend the criminals) facilitate such absurdity as a manslaughter conviction for someone that killed (with a shot to the back of the head) a taxi man whose hands were bound and then sentence the killer to 4 years in prison because he said he was sorry! I believe it was the same Andrew Pilgrim who defended the killer if my memory serves me right. He was quoted in the press at being surprised at the leniency of the sentence which was increased to 8 years on appeal by the DPP.

    Karl Watson and NIa thank you for your posts.


  12. Andrew and Nia’s comments are bang on. Yes our murder rate is still a manageable number but the type of murders we are witnessing reveal a worrying trend rooted in a subculture coming out of a general indiscipline Bajan society which has not been a characteristic for which we are known. . Why would a robber kill a person because they took too long to open a safe? A word of advice, you see a person brandishing a gun show respect.

    Let us get back to community policing.


  13. @Ping Pong

    Much of what you said has merit and other things are open for discussion. However, I believe that you have gone away from reality and justice when you explicitly condemn a trained and practising lawyer for doing what he is qualified and expected to do. Firstly, a person is under the criminal law presumed innocent until proven guilty. Are you attempting to say that anyone who is accused of a criminal act must not have defence including that as an attorney? Is it okay that an innocent person who is not afforded a defence could be convicted? While I may understand the emotive response and sadness that I too share in respect to the crime situation in Barbados and elsewhere in the Caribbean, it is reprehensible to make culpable the lawyer for defending the accused and later convicted. We live in a system where the rule of law still is a principle factor. Let us try to take control of the society; let us impart strong values in the society, let us do less of condemning persons and more of promoting the need for personal responsibility in ensuring that Barbados takes a zero tolerance to crime and especially the horrendous crimes that have been recently taking place. Maybe it is not the economy, but statistics globally do show that declining employment and opportunities carry symptoms of increased crime.
    For those persons who wish to bury their heads in the sand and say that the crime could not have been perpetrated by Barbadians but may be more likely the act of other nationalities, all I would say think again. What if you are wrong in this instance; and if you are right in this instance, is it a constant that horrid crimes are out of the reach of Barbadians?


  14. @George Brathwaite

    the “rule of law” as it now stands makes it nigh impossible to convict a killer of murder done in the commission of a crime, so says the DPP! I never intended to imply that an accused person should not have a defense attorney BUT what I do explicitly want to observe is that attorneys will not comment on the difficulty to legally prove murder, the relative leniency in sentencing (even where Mr Pilgrim expressed surprise) and the message that is “out there” that the courts are “soft” on crime. I totally reject any argument that does not first start with the promotion of personal accountability. A presently appointed Supreme Court judge posted on facebook (an hour ago) in the course of congratulating someone on their 20th wedding anniversary – “Twenty years! Congratualtions! You could kill a man and get out in less time…”


  15. @Ping Pong

    Fair retort and statement. Keep talking, the discussions need inputs from persons like you who are willing to stand up for something or some cause.


  16. Condolences to the Chadderton family.

    Until you are prepared to give up some of your freedoms more innocent people will die at the hands of vagabonds.

    While you are trying to change the behaviour of the young people, deal appropriately with the thugs and vagabonds already on the street.

    The Police have a job to do.


  17. This crime spree in Barbados is based on many factors. I strongly believe that parents and the whole community need to be more involved with the young folks from an early age; It seems like the days when we were raised by the whole community, and children knew what **RESPECT** was is gone; These things lacking will bring on the results that we are having now; If a person commits murder, then that person should face the death penalty and not being sent to prison with a pat on the back for taking a life; We have to make sure that crimes goes punished to the fullest extent;
    Focus more on our children being responsible and respectful towards self, which will make it easier to be respectful towards others; Many parents needs to set better examples for their children. And make them accountable for their actions; It seems like the days of family is gone, and the children are grown at an early age doing whatever they care to do; I am not blaming all parents, but some don’t give a shit as long as they don’t have the problem getting something from what the children are doing that’s not legal. I do not disagree with the march against crime. But in doing so you still need to make sure that after the march steps are taken to clean up your communities collectively. If you continue to show fear towards the criminals who are in your communities, then you will become hostages in your own homes.
    People are now finding it very hard to listen to the church when they aren’t even practicing what they preach. Lots of these crimes are done to be accepted as bad boys to be reckon with like what they see in the movies or see happening in other countries;
    One thing is for sure if this isn’t addressed as a matter if life and death Barbados is going to gain a name that will scare people from wanting to visit which then will lead to more problems;


  18. some leaders lovecrime they may be able to control a section of society with the use of crime. I am now at a stage where I believe that they almost engineer the criminal activities. One of the countries mentioned had the British offer to establish a security system. They refused it and now crime is worse. They attack the news paper telling them that they put the crime at the front page and that they are chasing away what little tourist the country may have had. If you guys do not get out and chase the criminals out of your country they are going to take over.


  19. Read my Earlier article, “Bajan Anarchy “Laidback and Slow but Effective””, posted Jan. 5, 2011.

    This is just another cog in the wheel of ANRCHY.


  20. @Str8 Up | August 3, 2011 at 8:23 AM | That type of heinous crime sounds like non-nationals did it, probably Guyanese or Jamaicans.
    —————————–
    There’s always someone who would make an idiotic statement like this. I heard the same thing being said after those six young women were burnt to death in the Campus Trendz robbery.


  21. “If you guys do not get out and chase the criminals out of your country they are going to take over.”

    George where de rass dem gine go when dem belong to wee? Home at yuh? Yuh is one nin come pooper. Shut yuh mout doo eff yuh ent got nutting sensible tah say!


  22. I believe it was the Attorney General who said two or three weeks ago that crime in Barbados in under control, while comparing this year’s murder rate with the same period last year which was very close. The AG should understand that just because the murder rate may be the same as last year for the first 6 months, doesn’t mean that crime is under control now because it wasn’t under control then either. Then again he is the same AG who told us there was no rift between the COP and his deputy.


  23. @Zack…

    Just putting this out there for consideration…

    Is it safe to assume that you don’t actually live here in Barbados?

    If you claim you do, what do you think of the “Wildey Triangle”?

    And what gas station do you turn ~160 degrees around when going west when you want to go north when you are 2/3rds the way through the triangle?


  24. @Andrew Pilgrim.

    All crime isn’t the problem. I can tolerate a purse snatcher. But not violent offenders. If lengthy prison sentences are not the answer for violent offenders then you tell me what is.

    I bet if you had been robbed and beat or your mother/father shot to death brutally you would not be singing the same tune.

    Again I say, solution to crime is not to punish, but the solution to violent crime is to protect the innocent, and lock those guilty away.

    Armed robbery, shootings etc…for all other minor crimes, I recommend more resources for counseling, supervision sentences etc…


  25. @Ping Pong | August 3, 2011 at 10:16 AM. I am not suggesting for one moment that the “fault” for crime lies solely at the feet of society. That would be ridiculous. From one second to another societal pressures change and Barbados is no longer a forgotten little island. Barbados is a part of the global community. 50 years ago, our tourism industry was small and now it isn’t. Our people on the lower and middle end of the financial spectrum have the opportunity of seeing their counterparts from other countries (who do the same jobs in those countries) availing themselves of things in Barbados which those same Bajans could not hope to afford themselves. The fact that some of these same tourists who manage to afford their holidays in Barbados are unemployed and dependant on handouts from the governments of their countries merely widens the issue. The “envy factor” has to be recognized. This is just one example of the pressures of Barbados today as a part of the global community. The only real solution is social change. However, social change, like society itself, requires constant review and updating.

    Sentencing has to reflect the increasing options available to society. Psychiatric medicine and counselling is constantly improving and if we start to look on sentencing not only as punishment, but also work towards rehabilitation, this is far better. Punish by all means, but also we need to provide the framework of counselling so that, once released, the chances of reoffending are reduced so that these heretofore criminals can live lives that are of service to the community. I would rather have it this way than see my tax dollars go to support an increasingly large prison community. One is a drain on society and the other enhances it.

    It is a terrible up-hill task to work on the basis of the problem and as far as possible cure it, rather than just locking the problem away and throwing away the key.

    Also, sentencing is not as arbitrary as you may think. Once a guilty verdict is handed down by the jury, the judge then has to work hard. He or she has to examine many factors from both the convicted persons and the victims. In doing this, the judge must weigh so many different variables with the main consideration being the ultimate good of society as a whole. I think it is timely, for the public good, for judges when delivering sentences to explain fully their rationale for those sentences. This transparency is another necessary change that needs to happen in a highly educated society like Barbados.


  26. @Christopher Halsall | August 3, 2011 at 3:56 PM |

    What’s your point Chris? What does the Wildey triangle have to do with the topic at hand? Did someone get shoot there recently?


  27. @Zack: “What does the Wildey triangle have to do with the topic at hand? Did someone get shoot there recently?

    The point is, Zack, to connect the dots since you don’t seem to be able to (or choose not to) is…

    Perhaps, just perhaps, Zack, you are trying to spread what is known as “Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt” (FUD) here on BU.

    I’m happy to be proven wrong….


  28. @David: “Let us keep the lobby going, you will never* get everybody onboard.

    I asked you this on another of your blogs: “Could you (or anyone) tell us all when was the last time the Peoples of Barbados mobilized since Independence (1966.11.30)?

    It seems a little strange that you haven’t answered this question.


  29. i sense that some angry poor black youths are in barbdos and there sole purpose in life right now is to drive fear in the hearts of people so that they can control them….
    extortion is the game ,pretty soon barbados will have neighborhood watch,and entire neighborhoods been patrolled by payed security…please barbados ”’it is a disease thats spreading across the caribbean ,dont catch it barbados,… eradicate in now..nip it in the bud…


  30. It has been stated already, the pedestrian la de dah approach to fight a new type of crime taking root in Barbados is best left for the PR gallery. The nice speeches designed to placate and deliveries from Commish Dottin is bullshit at work and lack imagination.


  31. Andrew asked “Are we raising little monsters under our roofs and then expecting police and judges to clean up our mess?”
    The answer is yes,and not only the home has to carry the blame but the community and authorities as well. A classic example is the parent who gives a child a bicycle for his birthday, with no instructions on its proper use.That child rides that bike at nights with no lights,and under the nose of the police. H e ride on the side walk, on the wrong side of the road and through stop lights, regularly observed by police patrols. Nothing is said to that child by either the parents, the public or the police. In a few years time that child become a ZR Driver . Why should he be bother now about blatantly breaking the rules and laws of the land. The seeds of disrespect for the police and society are sown at a tender age, and no amount of pulling our hairs out now will change that boy’s views. The old saying is still workable, Bend the tree while it is still young.
    We have a lot of ex young bicycle riders in all walks of life in this society.


  32. @BU.David: “It has been stated already, the pedestrian la de dah approach to fight a new type of crime taking root in Barbados is best left for the PR gallery.

    So, then, are you saying that Barbados is not willing to fight it’s position?

    Roll over; play dead?


  33. @Oneil. If there are some disgruntled poor black youth out there who are bent on striking fear into the hearts of Barbadians ,then we should view this as Terrorism and deploy the BDF on joint patrols.


  34. When it occurred in Guyana we sat back and said it can’t happened here.
    When it occurred in Jamaica we sat back and said it can’t happened here.
    When it occurred in Trinidad and Tobago , we again sat back and said it can’t happened here.
    Now its on our own door steps.
    Reminds me of the time when cane fires on the island was still a spectacle drawing large crowd. A lady ventured about 5 miles from her home to watch a fire, and as it began to threatened a home and she was called upon to assist in putting the fire out, she let them know ” Not me boah, my house is five miles away.” Her house was safe ,she did not need to take precaution ,monitor the situation or assist those in need. As (bad)luck would have it the wind speed picked up and the fire was soon at this very woman’s door step and now she was calling on heaven, hell and the moon to assist her. Many of us who live in our enclaves are like that woman.


    • Do a search of BU to find the blogs which are about weeds which have started to protrude on our lawns for a while now.


  35. if these people start eluding the law and start getting headline in print and electronic media ..it becomes a cult following thereafter,..do not let up until the criminals are found….


  36. @Zack: “There is good reason to fear what’s happening in Bim these days…don’t you think Chris?

    @Zack… I don’t agree there is good reason.

    @Zack… Perhaps you can inform me as to why you think there’s value in fear here in Bim (or, for that matter, anywhere)…


  37. @Chris

    Pardon me for being frank, but you really come across as the nerdy eccentric person. Fear can sometimes be very useless, it can save your life in some cases. Fear makes people more cautious…take less unnecessary chances. Certainly someone with the ability to figure out the squareroot of -1 square, is sensible enough to understand how fear can work to one’s benefit. I hope you never have to confront the masked men with guns at your own home.


  38. @Zack: “Pardon me for being frank, but you really come across as the nerdy eccentric person.

    I take that as a complement.

    @Zack: “Fear can sometimes be very useless, it can save your life in some cases. Fear makes people more cautious…take less unnecessary chances.

    On the other hand, freedom from fear can be quiet liberating.

    @Zack: “I hope you never have to confront the masked men with guns at your own home.

    I have very little likelihood of that.

    BTW, you haven’t yet answered me if you live in Barbados….


    • The country is to blame for where we are today.

      We ignore that Dottin and Bertie have been at loggerheads and feel that avoidance is to deal with the matter?

      What message by your actions AG do you send to the rank and file?

      We have resorted to playing politics with everything under the sun.


  39. Someone today suggested a fine of 15 to 20 years for some-one caught with a gun. While this might sound harsh, some drastic measure has to be taken as every little Tom, Dick or Harry from these gangs are sporting a gun. As more drugs are taken in police raids, there will be more violence as these guys have to find the money to repay the “big boys”.


  40. @Chris

    That should have read fear can sometimes be very useful (rather useless).

    Fear comes as a result of threatening elements. Fear is not a preferred state to be in, but it is sometimes forced upon us. Remove the threats and then you can feel more liberated. Until then we will have reason to fear. I live in Barbados Chris…anything else?


  41. @Zack… Fear comes as a result of threatening elements. Fear is not a preferred state to be in, but it is sometimes forced upon us. Remove the threats and then you can feel more liberated. Until then we will have reason to fear. I live in Barbados Chris…anything else?

    Yes.

    Why are you fearful?


  42. THE DPP MUST GO, SOMEONE PLEASE TELL ME HAVENT WE HAD PEOPLE SENTENCE TO DEATH AND HANGED WHO WOULD HAVE COMMITED MURDER DURING THE PROCESS OF A ROBBERY? WHY ALL OF A SUDDEN NOW OUR CURRENT DPP IS SAYING IT’S NOT MURDER? NO LEGAL LUMINARY IM LOST


  43. @All…

    While Zack tries to deal with his little problem, let’s “break the forth wall”…

    You see, some want to keep you afraid; some others want to show you that in fact there is nothing to be afraid of — despite what some might say….

    Oh, wait! Zack might possibility return to the stage shortly.

    Don’t tell him I talked to you through the fourth wall — it would spoil the joke!!!


  44. @Chris
    You’re no threat to my comfort zone Chris, but the degenerates who are prowling around with masks and guns robbing and killing, are a threat to my comfort zone. Why don’t you be my hero and find them and eliminate them?


  45. @Zack (suddenly returning to stage): “You’re no threat to my comfort zone Chris, but the degenerates who are prowling around with masks and guns robbing and killing, are a threat to my comfort zone. Why don’t you be my hero and find them and eliminate them?

    Funny, I don’t find many degenerates with masks and guns robbing and killing.

    But instead somehow I find many (like you) claiming many scary things…

    (I would put that in a high voice if I could; but I can’t.)

    Laaaaaaa!!!!


  46. If the perpetrators are Bajans, I bow to all of you. For now, I will wait and see. A number of Guyanese and Jamicans are in Barnados illiegally and refuse to leave, with no work they have returned to their former ways from whence they came. They have brought a gang mentality to Bajans and are recruiting our young boys who seem spell-bound by their music. I know this wont be a Campus Trendz event. This is the work of non-nationals so i will take my licks and be proven right. The guys from Campus Trends didnt intentionally kill those girls, those guys from teh Chadderton incident went to kill- teh work of those damn illegal Gts and Jamaicans. And i do not retract my statements.


  47. Blame one of the former AG’s who said that it was illegal for the RBPF to stop and carry out searches on cars. This aided the transmission of firearms and drugs, not to mention the continuing brisk trade in praedial larceny.
    We need to concentrate on the apprehension of illegal firearms. Without a firearm, many of these culprits are under 6 feet tall, runts in fact.


  48. in need of guidance | August 3, 2011 at 8:21 PM |
    THE DPP MUST GO, SOMEONE PLEASE TELL ME HAVENT WE HAD PEOPLE SENTENCE TO DEATH AND HANGED WHO WOULD HAVE COMMITED MURDER DURING THE PROCESS OF A ROBBERY? WHY ALL OF A SUDDEN NOW OUR CURRENT DPP IS SAYING IT’S NOT MURDER? NO LEGAL LUMINARY IM LOST.

    Perhaps Ratko Mladic, the Bosnian Serb General should have opted to be tried in Barbados instead of the Haig.


  49. @Str8 Up…

    Ah, and now the second…

    Without balls, like the first, but making the same claims…

    It’s a little sad when the first and the second don’t have the balls to step forward like men…

    But what do we expect from ball-less men?

    Hey, an honest question from a man with balls.


  50. @Chris
    You’ve proven to me that you are an asshole. Should it take an army of degenarates with masks and guns for Barbadians to become concern? Do you have some way of counting how of them are out there? Isn’t 20 murders in 7 months enough reason for Bajans to be concerned. Do you know who or where they will hit next? People like you only talk crap until you or someone close to you becomes a victim. You can have the stage for yourself pal.


  51. We should be outraged that a 79 year old man and his son in law have been senselessly murdered in their home.

    It will take 20 years to raise a generation of honest young people.

    One way to reduce the current level of criminal activity in Barbados is by stiffer penalties especially for crimes of violence and possession of illegal guns.

    You don’t hunt rabbits,birds or monkeys with a hand guns.
    They are intended to shoot to kill human beings.
    Sentences for illegal possession of a gun should reflect that.

    Some young criminals can become useful citizens if their time in jail is spent learning a trade or skill.

    Prison should not only be for punishment but also a process to help those who can be helped to live productive lives.


  52. @Str8 Up | August 3, 2011 at 9:35 PM |

    Now how the hell can you be certain that the Campus Trendz fire bombers didn’t intend to kill? Because they used fire rather than guns? Do you know what were in their minds? Didn’t they understand the potential danger to people’s lives. Didn’t they do the same thing in Bank Hall at the chicken outlet the previous month and see the outcome. Those two should be boiled alive like lobsters.


  53. str8 countries that are way more developed and sophisticated than bds have crime problems what say we?dont put bds in a vacuum ,the inequalities that affect people all over the world does exist in bds ,people feel marginalized and neglected ,listen to music of marginalized and neglected and form in the mental there own rebellion which manifests in incidents like these..


  54. This is not the time for finger pointing or remonstrating, there will be more than enough time later. The task of all good citizens is to assist the RBPF in apprehending these two cold blooded murderers. In an island the size of Barbados someone knows something or saw something which will be beneficial in an investigation.

    The Police need all the help they can get on this one.


  55. @Zack | August 3, 2011 at 10:09 PM |

    I guess a man is no longer innocent until proven guilty. As long as the police arrest and charge you, it is all over bar the sentencing.

    Beware of that slippery slope.


  56. You know what’s worrying too, the police have been doing a supposedly good job of apprehending violent criminals throughout the year so far, they have carried out raids and confiscated a number of weapons, but they still seems to be more and more violent criminals on the streets with guns.


  57. Zack | August 3, 2011 at 10:09 PM |

    @Str8 Up | August 3, 2011 at 9:35 PM |

    Now how the hell can you be certain that the Campus Trendz fire bombers didn’t intend to kill? Because they used fire rather than guns? Do you know what were in their minds?
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Zack | August 3, 2011 at 11:16 PM |

    @Raw Baked
    I’m voicing my opinion with confidence that they have the right men in custody. What is your point? Have you been following the news and heard
    that one pleaded guilty to manslaugher? I’m saying he knew the potential danger of what he was doing and he should be boiled alive…I’m not moving from that position.
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    I have no point, just an opinion if that is allowed. BTW, this article does not state if the other accused also plead guilty to any charges.
    http://news.barbadostoday.bb/barticlenew.php?ptitle=Guilty%20Plea&article=6318


  58. My condolences and sympathy go out to these families. The people of Barbados feel your pain at this time and our prayers are with you.

    Dis nonsense gotta stop. We gotta start popping dese criminals neck. We pussy-footing too long and de lawyers n psychologist finding all de rasshole excuses fa dese vagabonds. Hanging is not a deterrent, it is a punishment fa murder. ya kill, ya surrenda ya life ta de state. tummuch long tawk n dese criminals walkin up ta Glendary smiling. POPP dem necks.

    Crime down fa tru. Um down in St.Lucy, um down in St. James, um down in St.Michael,um down in…………………………..

    De powers dat be, wunna get serious n start poppin offf sum a dese good-fa-nutton necks do, fa croiss sake man. stupseeeeeeeeeeeeee


  59. BARBADOS HAS DECLARED WAR ON CRIME.
    Anybody who does not have a good reason to be on the street after 8 pm at Night and who does not have a valid area pass from the joint police/BDF Operation Restore Barbados Office will be jailed at Harrisons Point.

    Area passes wlll be issued to the relevant workers,
    All major Roads to be patrolled by joint Police / BDF PATROLS


    • We are a scared people, appearing helpless, we need tough enforcement of our laws, penal reform and for Barbadians to be civic minded and assist the police.

      The anti-police culture which is so prevalent today is a problem.


  60. Dear Str8 UP you wrote ” The guys from Campus Trends didn’t intentionally kill those girls”

    Dear Str8 Up you are a complete idiot.

    Anyone who sets fire to a store full of textiles and people intends to kill or is indifferent as to whether or not his actions will kill.

    The Campus Trendz men are a half foolish fatherless lot but they are murderers never the less.


  61. Dear Str8 Up.

    You will find that these murderers are our VERY, VERY, OWN..

    You will find that they have been raised in a house with an absent or indifferent 100% BAJAN father.

    Or a hostile 100% BAJAN stepfather.

    We have to stop blaming foreigners/immigrants/other people for OUR VERY OWN FAILURES.

    Our failure to love our sons.

    Our failure to socialize our sons.

    Our failure to provide our sons with Christian instruction.

    Our failure to provide our sons with Christian examples.

    Our failure to discipline our sons.

    Our failure to teach our sons any useful skill.

    Our failure to teach our sons how to earn an honest decent living.

    If we want to know the cause of these problems. Look in the mirror.

    If we want a solution, look in that same mirror.

    I gone.


  62. @David
    “Yes our murder rate is still a manageable number “.
    I would tend to believe that though the murders in Barbados is at a manageable rate even one murder is too much.


  63. Without offering any opinion, let me say that negotiating a deal for a lesser charge saves the State a lot of money. The expense of a trial is fierce and it comes out of the taxpayers’ pocket. Having said that, let me be very clear that deals ought only to be offered if the Crown is unsure that it can prove the greater charge and sell it to a jury. Remember, we have a little thing called double jeopardy. Should the crown’s case fail, that person is free and cannot be re-tried. And having said that, I have no idea what the Crown’s case in any of the cases where pleas of guilty to a lesser charge have been agreed. So, I am not able to give any opinion on the wisdom (or lack of it) in negotiating a lesser charge. Certainly I agree that greater transparency is necessary and, in cases that make the public feel unsafe and insecure, I see it as the duty of the Crown to explain precisely why deals have been done – but the inevitable problem that has to be overcome is right to privacy. Having said that, I fail to see how the right to privacy of an individual can possible be more important than the public good, which includes the right of the public to feel safe. There has to be a way of accomplishing this. I would suggest that this is via proper reporting by the so-called Fourth Estate and clear press statements (properly reported) by the DPP.

    Bonny, my love, good to see you again.


  64. de way wunna talking tells me that wunn aint know wha gine ,so i will be brave enough to tell wunna part of de problem.people in barbados does smoke alot of ganja from de top right down to de bottom,just look at some of the amounts held by police 800lbs 1200lbs etc dont feel de boys pun de block does smoke all of that all kinds of ppl in bajan society does use it and just like bulling some does hide cause they have to either because of who they are of what they do.last year and this year operations have made ah serious dent in this demand and supply trade and have cause the price to skyrocket so,the violent ones among us who rely on this plant to sell and live when their is ah shortage like what is going on at present the violent ones will take up their guns and choke and rob in order to get money to purchase what lil supply they have left back.and to make up for the lost in income due to their 800lbs sitting in de police station.wunna live in bim so long and aint know that is de cause of all of these recent shootings .watch and see as them get back some things gine ease off.but as long as they aint none it will go on,and another thing one time it use to be ah rasta thing in de 70’s early 80’s but more young ppl using as young as 13 and it real sad in that 13-20 age group and the most violent are the 16-27 age group all of this fueled by negative lifestyles from Jamaica and north america


  65. I heard the Attorney General with my own ears say last night on CBC that although there has been a ‘recent’ spate of criminal activity, and the Police Force is on the alert, Barbados is still safe, and Barbadians and visitors alike can continue to feel as safe as they did in the past. So me ent know what all ya talking ’bout hear? Oh! forgot the best part….after the AG finished his speech, we got some advice from CBC to help the Police Force by calling 211 when we see anything suspicious…Could this be the same 211 that nevah answers???? Could this be the same 211 that the gentleman held up at gunpoint on Rendezvous Ridge who followed the car with the men who perpetrated the act, who on seeing where they landed – in Sargeant’s Village – called and and called without hearing a peep on the other end? Bless. Remember peoples we are safe.


    • Perhaps the times has come to take up Andy Armstrong’s suggestion for the government to outsource the drafting of legislation, the CPC Office seems to be woefully slow at it for whatever reason.

      For example we have a situation where cash for gold and the purchase of scarp metal is a big issue affecting crime but by the time legislation is proclaimed Barbados would have gone to hell in a hand basket.

      Yet the irony remains when we had to pass sunset legislation for CWC it was a breeze.


  66. @bk

    You have asked a good question.

    Policemen reflect the culture born into.

    Are we recruiting fit for purpose?

    Is the government allocating adequate resources to safeguard law and order?


  67. I found the AG’s response yesterday to the current situation very cliched, wishy-washy, and not reassuring at all:
    For example:
    “I believe the time has come for legislation to deal with Cash for Gold”?!?

    How about instead: “Legislation WILL be implemented post-haste to deal with Cash for Gold.”
    It’s just weak, spineless language. No wonder the criminals out there are laughing and doing as they please.

    And can he PLEASE stop with this nonsense that because our crime rate is lower than most other Caribbean territorties we shouldn’t worry so much?


  68. lord have mercy “the cash for gold and scrap metal trade is before prlmnt
    in ja ,bahamas and barbados and i guess right across the carib,…jamaica last week has shutdown that industry permanently and will be closing down the cash for gold soon”’bahamas has done likewise …we are small island states that dont generate much in terms of scrapmetals ..so those trade can only be good for a few short months after which they will start to take your gates and pipes out your yard….shut it down””’


  69. @David
    I couldn’t help but notice your disclaimer just above the text box for entering comments. Maybe you can clarify something for me. Your disclaimer says, “Comments that appear on the site are not the opinion of Barbados Underground”, so I really need to know who is BU? Aren’t your comments the comments of BU? If not, then who on this blog represents BU?


  70. @Nia | August 4, 2011 at 10:51 AM | I found the AG’s response yesterday to the current situation very cliched, wishy-washy, and not reassuring at all:
    And can he PLEASE stop with this nonsense that because our crime rate is lower than most other Caribbean territorties we shouldn’t worry so much?
    ——————————
    Thank you very much Nia. If he’s going to compare Barbados with Jamaica, T&T, or Guyana, he’d have to compare per capita. Those countries are larger than us in size and population. But as you rightfully said, telling us that our murder rate is lower than theirs is a comfort to a fool.


  71. Thank you Nia …our leaders are wish washy when it comes to decision making for themselves and Bajans. When it comes to foreigners they cut straight to the bone. Someting reel wrong wid dat kinda leadership.


  72. What a country,when little stripling of women, have the courage to come forward and enlist in the police force , while big muscular men prefer to sell coconuts ,ackees and snow cones by the wayside.


  73. How irresponsible of the Nation newspaper yesterday to speculate that the intended target ,during the deadly encounter might have been the victim’s brother,and then went on to point out the difference in location of the two homes.
    On another note, I do hope that the Lotto and other prize givers do take into account the existing climate ,and defer from publishing the photographs of winners.


  74. Colonel Buggy | August 4, 2011 at 1:48 PM |
    What a country,when little stripling of women, have the courage to come forward and enlist in the police force , while big muscular men prefer to sell coconuts ,ackees and snow cones by the wayside.

    Colonel dem is pansies dat’s why.


  75. @islandgal246: “Foreigners I mean like Guyanese, Jamaicans and other West Indian islanders.

    So, then, are you arguing that the “whites” and the “yellows” are all OK?

    @islandgal246… If I may please be very frank and honest: in my opinion you are being manipulated to direct your anger, and your distrust, against those who should be your allies.


  76. Twenty people have been detained for suspicion of smuggling drugs into Barbados.
    They were caught after they came in on a Caribbean Airlines flight from Jamaica.

    Methinks we have a problem.


  77. @Chris Halsall….you have misunderstood me terribly

    When it comes to those who we call foreigners, that is our fellow Caribbean neighbours the leadership don’t mince words when it comes to their decision making, But when it comes to talk straight to Bajans the talk is wishy washy.


  78. @Hants: “Twenty people have been detained for suspicion of smuggling drugs into Barbados.

    @Hants: “They were caught after they came in on a Caribbean Airlines flight from Jamaica.

    Wow. Sucks to be them.

    Was it in their luggage?

    Or was it elsewhere?


  79. @islandgal246: “When it comes to those who we call foreigners, that is our fellow Caribbean neighbours the leadership don’t mince words when it comes to their decision making, But when it comes to talk straight to Bajans the talk is wishy washy.

    Please forgive me for this, but you have got to be kidding?

    Surely you have more balls than that?

    Even if you don’t have balls….


  80. Re the copper wire tiefin that has been picking up recently about here.

    Came across this article not too long ago regarding the massive stealing of copper and other metals for resale to scrap dealers that goes on today in the USA and England.

    Metal Thieves: Vultures of a Fallen Empire

    The once-mighty industrial giant called America, this formerly muscle-bound striding imperial colossus, these days more resembles an emaciated Gulliver lying dead in a weed-choked abandoned factory parking lot. Pecking at his rigid corpus are an unsavory assortment of human buzzards, scavengers, pack rats, hyenas, and scroungers—nearly all of them on meth, crack, or meth/crack cocktails—who busily pick apart the remaining sinew and marrow from his bones.

    Over the past decade America’s leading export to our imperial successor China has been trash in the form of discarded items such as waste paper and scrap metal. Since copper wire fetches higher prices than used toilet paper at the local salvage yard, a perversely entrepreneurial criminal industry has emerged to keep such exports booming.

    All across this once-fair and now-mottled land, faded emblems of a vanished industrial base—manhole covers, oil tanks, steel beams, aluminum bleachers, fire-hydrant control valves, sewer grating, plumbing pipes, rusty stoves, and any public monuments that appear to contain copper—have been showing up at scrap yards and sold for a fraction of their value by tweaked-out parasites itching to smoke and snort and shoot more brain-eating stimulants. The US Department of Energy has estimated annual losses of $1 billion due to copper theft alone.

    The thievery escalates as the economy plummets and metal prices soar. Entire apartment complexes and shopping centers are mercilessly denuded of their air-conditioning systems, which are not only rich in copper but also contain anhydrous ammonia with which to manufacture more slushy piles of meth. The vultures swoop in on houses foreclosed in the real-estate downturn, picking them clean of their metal riches and rendering them permanently uninhabitable. Six tons of scrap metal wind up missing from a Seattle biotech firm. Baseball fields and a skating rink in Colorado Springs are shorn of their electrical wiring. Eight miles of copper power cable disappear from Tucson and leave a two-mile stretch of the city without streetlights. An Arkansas Walmart, hospital, and mall get ransacked in one strike, leaving two thousand customers without power. Playgrounds, construction sites, train tracks, and electrical sub-stations get pillaged and torn open, the mess left for others to clean. Even scrap yards get hit, with the spoils sold to other scrap yards.

    Churches, graveyards, and other once-sacred public monuments are routinely shorn of their bronze, copper, and zinc. Bells, gravestones, plaques, statues, and coffins are hauled to grimy salvage yards and sold for pennies on the dollar. An estimated $500,000 worth of brass ornaments have been purloined from Chicago cemeteries. West Virginia headstones and veteran’s markers are picked apart for their bronze and sold for quick cash.

    In England, where empire is an even more distant memory, law-enforcement officials have described the theft of signaling cable as an enormous national criminal threat—second only to terrorism—that damages industry to the tune of £360 million annually. In 2005, Anglican churches filed insurance claims for 85 instances of metal theft; in the first nine months of 2007 alone, this had ballooned to an estimated 2,200 claims. The Guardian reported a fivefold explosion in the rate of metal track theft. Castleford copper thieves cause houses to explode. A Henry Moore sculpture valued at £3 million was stolen, smelted, and shipped abroad for an estimated £1,500.

    Read more: http://takimag.com/article/metal_thieves_vultures_of_a_fallen_empire/print#ixzz1U6cQmPkc


  81. @Green Monkey: “Re the copper wire tiefin that has been picking up recently about here.

    As usual, GM, you are not talking “’bout here”, but away.

    But you try to play it up as if it’s happening here in Bim.

    Trying to scare us.

    Hey, it’s interesting to note that you and yours are so afraid that you have to try to make us scared.

    Hmmmmm….


  82. @Chris I was referring to the decisions regarding the health care issue, where foreigners are concerned and the deportations of illegal Guyanese. Lawd yuh want blood man!

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