Peter Wickham Should Apologize To All Barbadians

Peter Wickham

Peter Wickham

The controversial Peter Wickham is at it again. He continues to use the studios of the Caribbean Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), a media house which is subsidized by the taxpayers of Barbados to propagate the message  Barbadians are xenophobic.

BU has identified in previous blogs the great irony concerning Peter Wickham. He uses quantitative techniques and analysis in his line of work as a leading pollster in the region. Yet without hesitation he continues to bellow across the national airwave his opinion that Barbadians are xenophobic.

In the same way Peter Wickham agrees Shridath Ramphal crossed the line when he used his now infamous intimation of ethnic cleansing reference to Barbados’ new immigration policy, so too Wickham shoulders a similar responsibility.  He needs to be more guarded when sharing his opinions given his prominent regional profile as a leading regional pollster. He should be sensitive to the fact his profession relies on the use of quantitative analysis and decision making.

BU gives credit to Margaret Gill who we think is a UWI lecturer in history. She was the last caller to his show today and severely rapped him on the knuckles for the loose talk he has engaged referencing Bajans as xenophobic. Clearly Peter Wickham has demonstrated great insensitivity by loudly sharing his opinion given the prevailing concerns about immigration matters, especially as it related to the growing ethnic population.

We respect Peter’s right to vocalize on issues as he sees fit but to label Barbadians xenophobic is highly subjective and injudicious behaviour at this time. He must be aware that traces of xenophobia can be found in any country, sometimes nationalistic behaviour maybe construed as such.

The recent change in government has seen Wickham rejuvenate his career as a social commentator on the CBC network. He is now easily the leading talk show personality in Barbados. Peter is intelligent to know to whom much is given much is expected.

200 comments

  • “Drink a good bajan rum and don’t be so tightarsed.”
    spoken by: Sea Cat
    Sea Cat // August 12, 2009 at 4:56 PM

    Well the Plumber might have to say sain(something) bout dah yeh !

    Like

  • PB // August 12, 2009 at 3:23 PM

    Wunna know Peter Wickham is ‘married’ to a man and the evidence is there to prove it. He should be sent to Jamaica, then he could talk (if he lives!)about about homophobia instaed of xenophobia.

    spoken by PB
    PB // August 12, 2009 at 3:23 PM

    JAMAICA has more homosexuals than Barbados. The Police Force in Jamaica it has been reported has a big problem with the many homos in the Force. So if you looking to punish the man, you get tricked cause yuh now put the man in his briar patch.

    Like

  • David, “Barbados is still a democracy” to quote our esteemed Prime Minister. LIB has his blog site, you have yours. Express yourself, man. As the PM said, “there are those who should know better! but…”

    Ramphal was involved in the destruction of Guyanese democracy. Ricky Singh is a PPP racist. Wickham got fired from UWI politics department for intellectual weakness – his thesis on Caribbean Integration was piss poor.

    Does that help you? What we really arguing bout, nuh?

    Like

  • livinginbarbados

    @The Scout
    “Arrogant people like peter Wickham I ignore. I have made a concerted effort not to listen and call any call-in programme he is hosting. If the caller does not agree with him, he either tries to belittle the individual and talks over the caller’s comtribution or have them cut off.”[I can’t quite remember, but I recall this kind of thing going on elsewhere very recently–on the Internet, I saw it. I’ll try my best to remember soon.

    Like

  • So Barbadians are xenophobic? Good to see that the house negro spirit still resides in sunny Barbados. Why would a Bajan national incriminate his own countrymen/women? Are some Bajans xenophobic? Listen your average Bajan, probably, has never heard this word spoken and probably would not be able to spell it.
    Nobody has asked the question: does Peter Wickham know what the word Xenophobic means and when it should it be employed.
    Do not waste your precious time berating this unfortunate wretched soul. He’s probably been paid by somebody or has converted to the religious order called the Church of Uncle Thomas. Remember him in your prayers. God bless.

    Like

  • livinginbarbados

    Some of you may wish to cast your minds back 18 months or so, to when the local papers gave true recognition to the local blogs. Here’s a refresher, http://livinginbarbados.blogspot.com/2008/01/blogging-local-press-takes-note.html. Has this blog advanced, regressed, or stood still. Has it turned out to be closer to the actual newspapers or RADICALLY different in how they operate and what they do. Is sensationalism necessary to maintain readership?

    Like

  • In the book “Darwin and International Relations” by Bradley A. Thayer expresses the roots of Xenophobia using evolutionary theory and ethnic conflict as barometers to explain a phenomena which is intrinsically apart of emerging nations and societies.

    This is also relevant to the parallel post on Rwandan genocide…

    Darwin (who I believe is responsible for much of the evil in our world) argues that in Pliocene, Pleistocene, and Holocene conditions in which humans evolved, strangers were unlikely to be related to others living nearby and were likely to be competitors for scarce resources and perhaps a threat to the group.

    Competition for territory and scarce resources seemed to be the central plank of phobia in humans…

    Xenophobia is presented as a descriptive concept of a socially observable phenomenon.

    Historical and contemporary expressions of xenophobia in the Caribbean can be examined and compared with cross-cultural scholarship on negative attitudes toward immigrants.

    Study is needed to explore the sociological, social psychological and multicultural research to examine the causes of negative attitudes toward immigrants providing suggestions for how social psychologists can integrate an understanding of xenophobia into their practice, training, research, and public policy advocacy.

    To avert internal social strife and social mayhem, proper education, mutual understanding and respect coupled with solid public policy on the part of governments is critical.

    Anything else is a recipe for what we saw in Rwanda…

    Like

  • X-man,
    Listen your average Bajan, probably, has never heard this word spoken and probably would not be able to spell it.
    ++++++++++++++++++
    So if he cant spell unemployment he can keep his job?

    Like

  • Terence M. Blackett // August 12, 2009 at 7:00 PM
    If Competition for territory and scarce resources seemed to be the central plank of phobia in humans… would that not make Xenophobia more likely where this applies? 166 sq miles. Very high population density, look at world atlas http://www.worldatlas.com/aatlas/populations/ctydensityh.htm

    Like

  • @ David
    “If LIB’s arguments are weak expose them. Isn’t that the honourable approach?”
    ***************************************

    Man D, wisdom is a funny thing, and I don’t mean funny as in ha ha…

    You see LIB, Peter Wickham, Dr Don and now the wanna-be-Dr Brathwaite, these are all examples of persons driven by the need to be ‘somebody’.

    Their methodology is well documented…. Sir Hilary, Frank Alleyne and many others- used it make their name….

    The plan:-Become so opinionated, controversial, and ‘up-front’, that Bajans come to think that you have some special talents…..

    ….by the time we find out that they are everyday idiots, they already have their ‘Sir’; sit on 50 boards; or they running a major national organisation (into the ground).

    Where these modern wannabes have miscalculated is that they do not really understand the power of the BLOG….. On BU no one cares who you are… if you’re talking $hite, you will be flushed.
    ..and if you are only talking because you have to say something (like LIB), you will become a laughing stock….even if you occasionally have good points (as anyone with google can do)

    So David, exposing LIB is not about exposing his arguments or his bragging about how many languages he speak, how many countries he lived in, or how many jobs he held…. It is about exposing his scheme to come here and scam Bajans with his male bovine excrement…(which used to baffle brains)

    I put it to you that if he really wanted to make a contribution, he would first offer his expertise to his countrymen who are in much greater need than us Bajans. ….but then again, maybe his own flesh and blood have little to offer LIB in return….. and therein lies the test.

    …….so will you tell ‘e now David?? …as a gentleman you could put it nicely and suggest that he concentrate on his own blog and hint that we will check in on him from time to time (ha ha LOL LMAO).
    …or why not just let me or Bimbro tell him to F’ off….’cause Bonny done give me power of attorney for BU, (LOL)

    Like

  • @Terence M. Blackett
    If you are an educationalist; or a member of a government think-tank; or even worse a member of this soi-disant government. I beg you, please step down. Bajans are tired of outside theories that are not applicable to Barbados. What they require are visionary pragmatists who will serve their country men/women with distinction and honour.

    Like

  • livinginbarbados

    @Bush Tea // August 12, 2009 at 7:33 PM
    “You see LIB, Peter Wickham, Dr Don and now the wanna-be-Dr Brathwaite, these are all examples of persons driven by the need to be ’somebody’”[Maybe having your contentions challenged is new. I have been somebody already–several times over. I remain somebody, in a different arena, and with the leisure to enjoy doing it in my own way. Most recently, try being an Ambassador-equivalent for 3-4 years…Is yours the voice of a wannabee, a has been, a never was?]

    Like

  • livinginbarbados

    If I closed my blog could I come and play here? Such strange logic. Because I have my own house I don’t visit other people’s? That could explain why neighbours dont talk.

    Why do you need to ask David’s permission to do things (“…or why not just let me or Bimbro tell him to F’ off….’cause Bonny done give me power of attorney for BU, (LOL)”)?

    Like

  • livinginbarbados

    What I find truly amazing is that people supposedly from the country ranked highest on the human development index among developing countries aspire to remain low down, despise any sense that others have improved. I’ve thought about this for a few days, because it holds keys for whether this economy/country really has a hope of getting out of the recession.

    That’s one reason why I am tending to discount what I read here, because it does not make sense.

    Like

  • livinginbarbados

    @David
    Work through the logic. High literacy was core to country’s post independence success. Current sentiment that those who have high educational achievements are to be despised (or similar). Discourage children to go high on education. Educational levels drop. Country produces people less capable of finding work. (This is similar to the vicious cycle of some chronic poor. But Barbados starts from position of relative wealth.) What has gone wrong? Have I missed the point?

    Recall the Minister of Education/PS expressing recent concerns about declining literacy levels? Recall also comments in the press (I think) about the decline in language abilities that seems associated with this trend.

    Like

  • livinginbarbados

    Looking at Bush Tea’s remarks again, “It is about exposing his scheme to come here and scam Bajans with his male bovine excrement…(which used to baffle brains)” How does one scam someone from whom one only buys goods or services? I can postulate some ways, but that would not be as educational. Empty rhetoric always just rings hollow.

    Like

  • @LIB

    We have had this discussion already.
    Barbadians talk when confronted with challenges, we talk and talk and then we act.
    It is our way, it is our culture and of course there is room for tweaking the process.
    The BU constituency is an interesting group.
    Their philosophies straddle the extremes.

    Like

  • livinginbarbados

    @David
    Indeed we have. But, my concerns are that however you cut it, the ‘voices’ are really few.

    I have not added up all the handles but I cannot get it to be 1% of population, not even 0.1% if I were to be generous, hence my also saying there is a credibility issue. I cannot discuss how such a small group can straddle extremes.

    I would not dispute that anyone is interesting. That’s God’s gift.

    My contact with people (and it is not always direct, as one can hear many conversations without being in them) gives me a different picture. So, I have to reconcile that difference.

    Like

  • @LIB
    What are you doing? Feeding your ego? What’s your traffic like?

    Like

  • @LIB

    A couple flaws in your assumption. Not all to BU chose to comment but the numbers continue to grow, as a statistician what inference would you make?

    Like

  • livinginbarbados

    I dont really care about traffic–certain figures are on the site. AH seems to track such things and reported numbers similar for LIB, BU and BFP. But as I said, blogging is not a pageant contest for me, nor is it a money earner. It’s an ideas pad.

    Like

  • At the end of the day LIB is but a Jamaican. Treat to him as such. I tekking MUBB advice. When someone is talking a lot and actually saying nothing, then there is no need to respond. But before I finish wid him I am very committed to causing a little confusion in his life. ha ha lol!

    Like

  • livinginbarbados

    @David
    “A couple flaws in your assumption. Not all to BU chose to comment but the numbers continue to grow, as a statistician what inference would you make?”[Lindsay or Peter [being a pollster] may take a different view, but I would say that the sample is far too small to make inferences.]

    Your ‘interesting audience’ (taking ROK’s recent comment) seem to be very focused on traffic, which is odd for commentators. It’s the view one would expect of a stakeholder, not a consumer.

    Like

  • @LIB

    Link popularity is one measure there are several depending on the objective the idea is to monitor those indicators which fit the objective of the blog.

    On the other matter that’s your opinion and we rest.

    Like

  • livinginbarbados

    @AH
    Logic is really very simple. When people comment a lot about things they say are nothing at all, they merely prove their statement to be null. Why validate nothing with something?

    So you say “When someone is talking a lot and actually saying nothing, then there is no need to respond” yet feel compelled to reply.

    Like

  • Bush Tea // August 12, 2009 at 7:33 PM. I couldnt agree with you more. Peter Wickham was an advocate for the firing of all nurses who didnt want to join the QEH Board and after there was a shortage, an equally aggressive advocate for the nurses from Africa and Phillipines . He was and is so myopic, he couldnt see that those nurses were using Bdos as a stepping stone to go to USA. He has refused to accept that he was wrong instead citing cases about what happened in T&T. The solution was enrolling more nurses into BCC!

    He also wanted BLP through Mia to pass legislation allowing gays to marry although the majority of people in Democratic and predominantly Christian Bdos rejected it. I guess he knows more about political suicide than political statistics.

    Like

  • livinginbarbados

    David, “Link popularity is one measure there are several depending on the objective the idea is to monitor those indicators which fit the objective of the blog.” is hard to follow without punctuation. I think there are 3 sentences. Correct?

    Like

  • livinginbarbados

    How do people use Barbados as a stepping stone to the USA? The visa requirement is the same from here, and there is no land border to skip. Nigerians would stand a better chance from the UK. If that were true one would expect to see a lot more ‘suspicious’ nationalities transitting the country, given its hub status.

    Like

  • Sorry LIB but we have confidence you will figure it out if you try 🙂

    Like

  • Peter Wickham confessed that he did not know why a plumber or carpenter was paid less wages in comparison to a Prime Minister when both of them are equally needed. Peter I only have 4 CXC certificates and I know the two factors which influence pay are:1. Uniqeness of skill 2.Demand for the skill.

    Last week he was advocating people should only eat fish and no other meats. He thinks he can now live peoples’ lives!I think if we lived in Peter’s world we would be a bunch of opinionated fruitcakes.

    I know all my posts are directed to him but I was waiting patiently on him to falter. I cant attack him on 100.7 because he would cut me so i will blog. I am waiting on Hilary Beckles also.

    Like

  • LIB The Filipino nurses used Bdos to have experience in an English-speaking country. None of them intended to stay here. i work at the QEH so I know. Nothing is wrong with them bettering themselves by whatever means but we should not be so myopic to think it was the solution.

    Like

  • David the Jamaican LIB is not to be trusted. He seeks to dismiss any interest site traffic and statistics, yet at ever turn he is filling BU with links to his blog. The most popular way to ultimately drive traffic to your site is to have as many links on other sites to it. Once your popularity ratings are high all the big search engines will list your pages in high order on what ever word or subject ect that you associated it with. Companies and individuals will check for and seek to advertise on the most popular sites out there. Typicla behaviour of today’s Jamaicans and guyanese, cukoo birds all. lol! Just so you know.

    Like

  • @PB
    Continue please I am listening. lol!

    Like

  • Livinginbarbados

    @AH
    You know how much I dislike and distruct exaggeration (“yet at ever turn he is filling BU with links to his blog”) Really. Surely, it would only matter if people thought it worth their while visiting. Which if there is nothing of interest would mean no visits.

    I may be back in the US much sooner than even I expected, so if a university slot is what is next, Boston, despite its harsher weather, is of course very tempting.

    You seem so knowledgeable about the trafficking business, almost like a marketing manager.

    But why would people want to advertise on sites that have nothing of interest? Just for sheer volume? Cuckoo logic is there somewhere.

    Like

  • Livinginbarbados

    @PB
    “The Filipino nurses used Bdos to have experience in an English-speaking country.” But that does not give access to the US, which has no language test. They still need visas–which are discretionary–and I do not see how being in Barbados accelerates that process. I wont even begin to figure out why someone would travel from south east Asia to the Caribbean for English language experience, when they have Australia at hand, England closer too. In fact, why bother with the US when they have Australia?

    Like

  • David I am telling you LIB is excited about link popularity, and checks is site stats very regularly. The more links the more likely that his site will be vying for number one spot for anything Bajan. In the hands of a Jamaican that is not going to be a good thing. But I am going to deal with his site. ha ha ha lol!

    @ESSO:
    Give us the details about Peter and UWI.

    Like

  • Peter Wickham Should Apologize To All Barbadians :

    To all:
    Please stick to the subject.

    Like

  • The point I am driving at is that the impasse cannot and should not be seen in a narrow player vs. management terms. To do so is to arrive at narrow conclusions which apportion blame and create a situation of guilt and innocence which is unhelpful to the mediation process. This is not to say that that there is not enough blame to share around. But it’s this inflexibility that doomed the Federation five decades ago and drowned the Grenadian revolution in blood two decades later.
    DAVE HINDS.

    http://www.guyanacaribbeanpolitics.com/commentary/hinds.html

    We are going to bury Norman Girvan, Shridath Ramphal, Ricky Singh and other socialist/commies before they see the results of any force freedom of movement for all. Not in your lifetime.

    Like

  • Livinginbarbados

    @David
    What I have figured out from you is: “the [BU] numbers continue to grow…”; “Link popularity is one measure…”; and “the most popular way to ultimately drive traffic to your site is to have as many links on other sites to it. Once your popularity ratings are high all the big search engines will list your pages in high order on what ever word or subject ect that you associated it with. Companies and individuals will check for and seek to advertise on the most popular sites out there.” (courtesy of AH).

    I can rest with that.

    Like

  • Livinginbarbados

    @X-MAN
    The discussion on blog traffic is relevant: it goes to how widely opinion can be spread; in this case an opinion counter to that Mr. Wickham espoused.

    The discussion on nurses is also relevant if one is considering xenophobia (Filipinos and Nigerians are very different from Barbadians in many ways, yet they were sought to work in local hospitals).

    Like

  • @LIB
    “But that does not give access to the US, which has no language test. They still need visas–which are discretionary–and I do not see how being in Barbados accelerates that process.”

    I see you still have a lot to learn.

    Like

  • @LIB
    “The discussion on blog traffic is relevant: it goes to how widely opinion can be spread…”

    You really have a stake in blog traffic, don’t you? We have a saying in Barbados about the higher a monkey climb.

    Like

  • livinginbarbados

    @ROK
    If you are implying circumvention in some way, then Barbados would tend to be lower on the list of points from which to try–the Bahamas, on the other hand…. Though, maybe the nurses were fine swimmers, or like pig, could fly.

    Like

  • livinginbarbados

    @ROK,
    Actually, I dont have an interest in traffic. If I did then surely I would not write so that people would write comments such as “Dull”, “Still dull”.

    I had when I first started if only to see how things like Adsense worked. But you can scour the site and see that it has few links. It was AH who brought this to my attention.

    Again, like black-white and cryptic not sitting together, dumb and smart dont.

    Like

  • X-MAN i agree with you.

    Peter Wickham is attempting to pick up and move on with his “pro-integration” stance without having to fully address what is clear to all who reads his Accident by Birth 1 and 2 articles. How can we move forward with freedom of movement with the intractability of the Afro and Indic ethnicities in Guyana and Trinidad at full blown stage?

    @David that is one way. The other and most incisive approach is to use an email list. Trust me BU is ahead of the game. More people know of this site and as a result more people read this site than any other bajan blog. I will be encouraging others to drop LIB since it is not a Bajan blog. lol!

    Like

  • livinginbarbados

    @David, maybe fitting for a last comment. I would have no objection to your removing links to my blog from yours. You should let me know if you wish yours to be removed from mine.

    Like

  • @LIB
    “I would have no objection to your removing links to my blog from yours. You should let me know if you wish yours to be removed from mine.”

    Man, you real powerful.

    Like

  • What I find truly amazing is that people supposedly from the country ranked highest on the human development index among developing countries aspire to remain low down, despise any sense that others have improved. I’ve thought about this for a few days, because it holds keys for whether this economy/country really has a hope of getting out of the recession.
    _________

    Translation: You damned Bajans need to be punished for your success. We despise your arrogance which is based on the parable of the foolish and wise virgins. Barbados was given few talents but made the best of them and we (LIB and other inquirers) hate you for it.

    And we hope you suffer like Jamaica (that great nation of social and economic failure) and Trinidad (ditto) because you don’t deserve your success!

    Why don’t you say what you mean LIB?

    What you might find is that you are whistling in the wind. Barbados has a quiet and sure way of battling the odds. And it will happen again!

    Like

  • @LIB
    “Barbados would tend to be lower on the list of points from which to try…”

    Does that nullify Barbados? I know for myself that many West Africans trying to get to Barbados. They used to bombard me everyday and I know they were bombarding more Bajans.

    I received a message from one of my friends quite recently asking advice on an African man who wants to come to Barbados.

    They know the bureaucratic routes to get here too. An invitation sent on their behalf to the Ministry of Tourism. That is supposed to get them status as a tourist.

    Whether they imagine better through Barbados or not, Africans from Ghana, Kenya and Nigeria especially are trying to get to Barbados. Because of that fact, your logic don’t hold water…

    So let us suppose that a person from another country is here in Barbados living and working and applies for a visa to take a vacation in the USA, maybe it will be easier for them as opposed to a native Barbadian?

    And suppose when they get to the USA they are able to scout for a job and find one, then it is only a matter of returning to Barbados and prepare to return to the USA as a worker.

    Like

  • Peter Wickham is a GENIUS !

    He will always be remembered in Barbados for his 20/10 vision in 2008 !!

    What we as Barbadians should be paying more attention to…..is the statements of Sir Charles Williams !!

    After all the contracts from the Gov’t of Barbados……he now talking ’bout LAY OFFS !

    Oh HOLY…COW !

    Like

  • @Veritas
    In one of his article title “On the trail of Snark”

    someone replied with the following.
    ——————————–
    venturemike said…
    Barbados is not alone – both you, Dennis, and islandgal246 could be describing Scotland, Ireland or many other places with an identifiable indigenous community where some citizens practice a sort of reverse snobbery – if you leave us, travel and return or move in from elsewhere, don’t think you can bring your smart ideas with you ! It’s even true of country towns where to head for the big city, means you’re a ‘stranger’ when you return.

    Is it a sin to be proud of the community of which you feel part (however you define ‘community’)? And, a sin to be defensive to the point of giving offence to those who criticise? Even if that appears “cobwebbed”?

    (Isn’t it strange that Jewish, Polish or Irish people tell the best Jewish, Polish or Irish jokes but resent it when a ‘stranger’ tells the same joke?)

    I’m part of a community now which seems to want to open the door to all comers – leaving a minority group wondering just exactly where their identity can be found. I can’t tell whether that’s good or bad. (There’s a sneaking feeling in me that says that some ‘outsiders’, with little to contribute, are taking unfair advantage of a society which my ancestors have worked hard to build)

    I’ve long admired Australians for their ability to be fiercely defensive of their national identity, proud of their convict past (even to the point of boasting which convict ship their ancestors arrived in!), remorseful and rectifying about their past treatment of the aboriginal community, and yet welcoming of in-comers who can add to the ‘common wealth’. How do they do it – and are they getting it right?

    Is it good to be proud of who you are and where you hail from? Or is it bombastic and boorish to defend what you have against what you percieve as threatening change from the outside world?

    Keep going Dennis, but you’ll probably disover that the inner Bajan has the same look as most of the rest of world ! Like a stick of rock – it’ll have the words “human being” running right through the middle !

    Mike

    ANOTHER ONE SAID:

    Anonymous said…
    Mike,

    You are spot on! And I truly thought that someone like Denis (who I only know from his writing) would understand this.

    I urge Denis to read a little piece by John Hearne (a perceptive, thoughtful Jamaican writer) writing in the New World Journal at the time of Barbadian independence that investigates in a forthright way what the Barbadian means to him. This inquiry by Denis is not new or perceptive. It is as old as the Dominica Hills.

    I find Denis’ treatment of this subject to be a superficial, weak and surface dismissal of the real strengths of Barbados and Barbadians.

    We have had little but we have done alot with it and those who don’t like it can go and jerk chicken!

    Like

  • @ROK
    look out for the name Kofi Blankson Ocansey. He thinks Bajans are “”Shiftless” Black people”. Althought he was quoting LIB.

    Like

  • Peter is right and David and BU are wrong.

    And I love Peter too.

    Like

  • Livinginbarbados

    @ROK
    I can understand English-speaking west Africans trying to come to Barbados to stay, not to hop off to the US, which seems like looking for trouble. (Nigerians especially are already under heavy suspicion because of the 419 scams.) But, their already close ties with the Commonwealth/UK and existing UK networks would seem easier to exploit. I know from some Nigerian contacts that business opportunities here look interesting, but they have had a lukewarm reception at best–I think the scam business may again be hurting their image. Both Nigeria and Ghana have huge economies and Barbados could be a launch pad for getting into the region. But, I recall the bad experiences of African coming here, the last batch of which just got out of prison and are due to be sent back to their homelands. That should send a clear warning.

    For Filipinos, it makes no sense.

    However, if Barbados is being suspected as being a weak link in border control that could explain the move by the British High Commission to stop processing British passport requests in Barbados (for Barbadian and East Caribbean country nationals) with effect from August 3. Passports now have to be sent to Washington DC (see http://ukinbarbados.fco.gov.uk/en/passports/). This change was reported in the Advocate, but I did not see it in the Nation. This is a major inconvenience, of course, to those Bajans and their families who have UK passports. Clearly, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs was not able to stop this move (though I do not know if they tried). Such moves do not usually send good signals to the international consular world. It may also be another repercussion of Barbados not having applied firmly its immigration rules.

    Like

  • Livinginbarbados

    @Veritas
    I thought I said what I meant but I see it was lost in translation. I’m not sure which program you are using to translate from standard English to Bajan, but I think it would be good to get it checked and/or buy the upgrade.

    Like

  • Livinginbarbados

    @AH
    I see that despite the lack of interest in my blog you are trying to drum up interest. Two things. The poster of the comments has been in touch with me by e-mail several times, though I never met. He says he’s an executive for a large NGO and is a former journalist (whose CV is extensive). I’d be very glad to try to put you in touch with him. He says he has been coming to Barbados for many years and is connected to some of English families who are prominent on Barbados west coast. I cannot verify that, but I’m sure you can check. He has also commented on the blog about why he wont be planning on vacationing in Barbados again anytime soon, and that might also be interesting to circulate.

    Second, I received some comments on my blog signed AOHINDS (your handle of choice for my blog). I find them a bit strange sounding (ie quite complimentary, though I admit that you have given some compliments to me on BU) and have not yet published them. As I cannot check IP addresses, I do not know if they were truly sent from the same place as other comments with that name. Anyway, I tend to publish so long as there is no profanity, as you know.

    Like

  • Livinginbarbados

    @AH
    Sorry, to clarify. The executive is from a UK NGO, and I have verified his professional bona fides with them, when we were exchanging e-mails. I did not check his claimed personal contacts here, though I did see him in a picture of a charity event here earlier in the year.

    Like

  • @LIB said;

    Such moves do not usually send good signals to the international consular world. It may also be another repercussion of Barbados not having applied firmly its immigration rules
    ————————————–

    Lol,What have we been trying to promote on this blog ?

    Considering how many Brits visit Barbados,it is quite an unusal move by the UK !

    Then again some of the much newer UK immigration rules being promoted are completely ridiculous like a points based system for UK citizenship or a bar to UK citizenship for anti-government comments.

    Anyway,Barbados isn’t the UK or US & I could care less what either think right now.What is currently happening in Barbados is an internal sovereign problem that must be dealt with by we the citizens of Barbados pressuring our government for action.

    Like

  • Livinginbarbados

    It’s interesting, as usual, that AH gives only the parts of the stories he likes and leaves out the rest. But, there you have it. The venturemike comments, seem to say to me that a fear of strangers and searching to protect national identity is human, as I thought I had also said. But some people here seem to want to deny that they too have this human trait. I remain curious.

    Like

  • Livinginbarbados

    @Jay
    Britons (including those of Bajan origin) LIVING IN THE UK and visiting Barbados are likely to be the least affected; they are likely to check their UK passports are valid for the whole of their visit. The Bajans may, of course, also have a Barbados passport and could return to the UK on that if it were still current.

    Britons and Bajans LIVING IN BARBADOS who hold UK passports will be much more affected by the need to send documents to the US, rather than just down the road. (The East Caribbeans may find it’s not much difference between having to deal with Barbados or Washington). This change is very new so I have no idea what kind of hiccups there will be. (I recall the US switch to online applications and courier for passports and visas had some severe teething problems when it was first implemented in Barbados).

    I would not write off what the UK and US think so hastily; they are big donors and investors, so it could be costly literally later. (Concerns about foreign investor confidence have their roots somewhere. The Paradise/Four Seasons project is the most obvious casualty so far.)

    No argument on national sovereigty aspects.

    Like

  • Good to see that the level of debate has been raised. The situation for Barbados is grave. This nation has to mobilise all its forces. The parties of Thompson and Owen (sorry forgotten his/her name!) have not only failed their public; but seem intent on selling out their compatriots. Given the urgency surrounding the future of Barbados, let us aim our arrows at those incompetent, corrupt and arrogant leaders or organisations/individuals who have no loyalty to this country. Is there an alternative political party in Barbados? What is happening at the grass roots? Are Barbadians prepared to remove the present incumbents and all they stand for through the ballot box? Spread the word to your compatriots that the BU is not like the insipid Nation or Advocate. Organise, mobilise and rally for a better Barbados. Allez-y Barbados.

    Like

  • X-man, what have you read here that forced you to come to such an idiotic conclusion?

    ****

    LIB, any more bad news about Barbados to report today? Any translation needed?

    Perhaps you might like to hear: Barbados goes to IMF, proud Bajan MP’s are also US citizens, murder rate is highest in region, new US crime advisory, head of Youth Commission fired? And Jamaica-like news to report, for example?

    Institutions versus Policies: Read a Tale of Two Islands by Peter Blair Henry and Conrad Miller. The essence? Why Barbados succeeded and Jamaica failed…

    Like

  • Clearly, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs was not able to stop this move (though I do not know if they tried). Such moves do not usually send good signals to the international consular world. It may also be another repercussion of Barbados not having applied firmly its immigration rules.
    ____

    Rubbish! From the time the new visa arrangements with the European Union came into being, this was to be the new arrangement with passports.

    Read the damn fine print LIB: emergency passports will still be issued in Barbados!!!

    What are you really trying? What is your aim? And objective? I have to ask because I first heard you on the debate with Mascoll and those guys on Budget debate night. and I sensed a guy who just likes to talk, and talk and talk! For the sake of it.

    Like

  • livinginbarbados

    @Veritas
    Rubbish? I think you are confusing what Barbadian passport holders may need to do. My comments refer to British passport holders. That seems pretty clear.

    But, if you are sure I am wrong, I guess you should tell the High Commission to correct its website and pull back the notice that was in the Advocate. I understand.

    I’m a fine reader of fine print. The site says: “In the meantime The British High Commission in Bridgetown will continue to issue Emergency Passports for people who need to travel quickly.” Note “quickly”. That ‘meantime’ could have been for the period up to August 3, but that is not clear.

    For those who feel they may be affected I would suggest clarifying for your self. Feel free to call the HC to get clarification. I would hate for anyone to miss a trip for want of a little checking.

    I knew what I had to do, and it was done BEFORE August to avoid a need for messing about with DC.

    The current High Commissioner is on the way out so I’m sure he would not like to leave a little admin mess trailing behind him.

    On the budget debate, perhaps you should listen to the recording again–I recall Clyde talking animatedly for a long time. Sen. Boyce too had plenty of air time. Anthony Johnson and I spoke as the moderator directed. Maybe you should check with Pat Hoyos–it was his program.

    Sorry to ask you to check before you write. But, it’s so much better in the long run. If you are confused then do not pass that on to others.

    Like

  • livinginbarbados

    @Veritas
    You seem to suffer from a notion that things other people or institutions do that may have an adverse effect represent ‘bad news’. There are some good sides too in things that seem bad.

    On the specifics:

    1.I read the papers for most of my news. I see nothing about IMF deals (Governor Williams took it off the table for now, I had read). But an IMF deal does mean more money rather than less, and that can be good.
    2. I read (Advocate front page, Nation page 3) about Sen. Kerrie Symmonds being summoned on assault charges (also just aired on the radio).
    3. I do not know if the Barbados Constitution is the same as Jamaica’s regarding dual nationality as it affects MPs. The good thing about the Jamaican cases is that INELIGIBLE MPs got themselves eligible and new elections were called so that people could vote correctly for ELIGIBLE candidates. I think that is good for democracy. I read that another case is pending in Ja., but the opposition has decided not to contest the seat.

    I’ve not finished reading, but will see what pops up.

    I know the paper. I did not think much of it, but they are entitled to their views. The analysis is overly simplistic and the cases have few real points of common overlap except in time. I do not recall the US government interfering in Barbados, which they are known to have done in Ja., but I really did not follow Barbados that closely over the past 40 years.

    Sorry to the other people who want to stay with the main Wickham topics. I do not know if this exchange reflects xenophobia. Some might see traces (for clarity, I am the stranger).

    Like

  • livinginbarbados

    If people note my absence from commenting it will be for several reasons, not least needing to arrange for some new foreigners–delayed arrivals from another island, at midnight– to know the island and see about their school uniforms.

    I wish you all a good day and may the things that make you happy flow in abundance. I have my mangoes and this man must go. Iyah.

    Like

  • The invasion is here.

    I wonder why school children from the other islands would want to come here to barbados to go to school especially since we are constantly told by LIB how deficient we are as a people and our idiosyncracies.

    Is LIB bringing over his jamaican relatives to benefit from from CSME arrangements?

    I hope we the taxpayers are not subsidising the education of these non national children.

    Glad that we could be of some assistance.

    Like

  • Living in B/dos And Loving it,
    blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah,blahhhhhhhhhhh. You don’t come up for air? Jesus Christ man. You real sickening fa true.
    Look, depart in peace man.
    I could imagine you ‘courting’. Too much talking, while de poor horse starvin’.
    Any deliveries today.

    X-man,
    we like to ‘sway’ from de subject sometimes man. Got ta add a lil spice now an den. All in good faif.

    Bush Tea,
    Ya bitta. You is sir-see bush or wah? Ya bad, wuhlossssssssssssssssssssssss.

    Peter chan be ‘marrid’ caus dat is still illegal in dis hemisphere. I tink. He got he Trini luvva but he in marrid. If dah is he ting, ya chan kill he. Poor soul.
    I mek de same prediction as he in de las election, so wah sa genius ’bout he? I just in get de publicity, dah is all. (teehee).

    Like

  • @LIB
    “I can understand English-speaking west Africans trying to come to Barbados to stay, not to hop off to the US…”

    I tell you already that you have a lot to learn. I say no more.

    Like

  • @LIB
    “I would not write off what the UK and US think so hastily; they are big donors and investors, so it could be costly literally later.”

    I have a problem with statements like these. They tend to wring ones arm up their bask and forced onto a wall.

    You with your arrogance. How much is that going to cost compared to what we paid already and still paying today? Are we to continue paying? Are we to bow down to your philanthropists who get their money through spilling our blood in the first place and now come back to dangle carrots?

    I think that foreign investment will keep us underdeveloped as I stated earlier in another thread. It does not solve our problem for the need for foreign exchange earnings and my solution is simple. Let the banks stop discriminating and support businesses in Barbados; give them the opportunity to earn foreign exchange rather than keeping them down so we have to depend on foreign investment.

    Yes it is one big plot.

    Like

  • The paranoia on this site is getting real high and its easy to see what xenophobia is. Someone mention foreign children arriving and there’s squealing about getting benefits. Bajan parents have foreign children too. Also diplomatic people bring in children and most go to private school and they use private health. Some of just won’t listen to what people say just because you think they are not Bajan. But who is you is really a Barbadian. What is your Identity Number, or your mother’s house? This is so sad.

    Like

  • Some of you unfairing we Bajans. Rok say he know things then say nothing more. Just like Linton talking to Tony Marsall and cant give no facts but crying how Mia cant get on CBC television. then he say we dont want foreign investment and talk about plot. I need my job. You have a job for me? Explain to simple people what it mean for bank to earn foriegn exchange.

    The Bush Tea shout down LIB and cuss him off that he wrong about the passport. But I check withthe Commission and what IB say is right. Now I need to get mychildren passport renewed to go back England and they have to go to America. I never know that.

    So why David wont keep some order. We hear noise and we get confused.

    Like

  • Love ya Bonny Pebba. Let the BU amily send Peter a gift. I am thinking a femidom.. lol

    Like

  • PB,
    Luff ya too cup-cake. I agree wid you; sen’ a giff fa Peter. He’s a aightttt fella.
    Ya wicked.

    Like

  • @ BS
    “Rok say he know things then say nothing more.”

    You like you gone half mad. Your problems with getting your children out gone to your head? How you arrive at that?

    Who stopping you from keeping your job? You sound like somebody frantically afraid. LOL! About to start some type of scaremongering. Take it easy skipper.

    BTW, couldn’t help abbreviating your name. Nice letters.

    Like

  • @Bim-sis
    “don’t know whatever made me think it could b worth having a serious discussion with u!!”

    And where on this blog did you ever have a serious discussion?

    From your response I can see that you could very well be counted as a true statistic. While you in England, see if you could get a good grasp of the queen’s English.

    I expect that you would be eating salt-fish; and very rarely too. Read me again. You does eat yam and eddoe? What about coucou?

    Like

  • Don’t join in these threads much, as I believe they are a manufactured side-show to keep the people off the real agenda.

    But I just saw Lib saying he was lecturing to an MBA group at UWI.

    I may be mistaken, but amongst the myriad snippets of information Dennis has treated us to, portraying his LIB, has he not said 1) He is only here accompanying his wife. 2) He has no degree. 3)He’s been employed at UWI.

    As only graduates are granted freedom of employment within Caricom nations, are we to take it that he has contravened his status obligations and as such is Living In Barbados illegally? LOL.

    Awaiting your corrections.

    Like

  • Mr Jones was an IMF staff member and his educational qualifications, including degrees, are matters of public record, as he’s mentioned several times. Too lazy to check?

    Like

  • Thanks for your info, Anon.

    Will check back to his posting re: degrees.

    Like

  • The matter of him working at UWI if indeed he did say that, needs to be clarified.

    Like

  • AH: Aug 12th 12.08PM

    Like

  • I’m reading these blogs from Europe and it would appear that Barbados is on the verge of a nervous breakdown. Can someone give me a prognostic as to where they see Barbados six months to five years from now. I would be interested in all your views. However I have several points that I would like to raise: 1) Will Thompson Remove all illegal immigrants? 2) Do Asians have a future in Barbados? 3) What are the chances of a third political party entering the political arena? 4) When will Barbados diversify and look at an alternative to the tourist industry 5) Is social unrest a possibility in Barbados? 6) Will Barbados look at creating an electric train service connecting the island 7) Will Barbados look at making the island greener? 8) Will the beaches be reclaimed? 9) Will Barbados start to look at green energy? 10) Would Barbados be better of becoming a British colony, a European colony or a state of the USA? 11) Does Thompson have a plan for Barbados? 12) What action will be taken to ensure that rich foreigners who have holiday homes on the island are taxed heavily? 13) When will someone assess the real cost to Barbados of cruisers and all-inclusive holidays?

    Like

  • Straigh talk is rasing an important point.

    Heard some weeks ago on the Sunday Brasstacks programme where Lindsay Holder participated on immigration,a caller told Gilbert Greaves the former chief Immigation officer and now P.S,that jamaican students who were coming in on student visas were enrolling at university and then taking up employment which was in breach of immigration laws.

    Nasty,corrupt Greaves could not deny it.

    Dennis Jones/Living in Barbados has been on this blog stating that he has not been able to work because of work permit problems,now we are told that he taught or is teaching at Cave hill.

    That man is either a dangerous liar or a very dishonest opportunist jamaican,that like most of the others want to curse barbados with one breath ,yet take all they can get from us.

    Shame.

    Like

  • Livinginbarbados

    @Straight Talk
    Have you checked? You can do that with the IMF, Bank of England and/or London University.
    UWI employed me as a foreign/external consultant, while I was still an IMF staff member,for which I needed IMF approval–not since; and that is also verifiable.

    You can also check employment aspects with current, past and designated Governors of Central Bank of Barbados, all of whom I have worked with over 20-30 years.

    Like

  • Livinginbarbados

    BTW, I have rights of abode in Barbados on several levels–Ministry of Foreign Affairs can confirm. I am also not employed, having resigned from the IMF under a separation arrangement for many staff during 2008–also verifiable.

    Like

  • @ Anonymous
    Lets not denigrate or curse out to loud our Jamaican brothers/sisters. On the whole most of them are good, and besides I grew up with them. My father always told me that if not for the Jamaicans than our people would never of survived in this part of Europe.

    Like

  • Keep your hat on Dennis, I cannot keep up with all your posts but I once thought you stated you had no degree.

    I never said it as a certainty and if you confirm I misheard, and you are in fact a graduate, naturally I will acknowledge my failing senses and congratulate your achievement.

    Like

  • livinginbarbados

    @Straight Talk
    As you may know I have no hair to keep on. My issue is that I would rather see checking before statements. You can see from the remarks after yours that people draw, and jump to conclusions, even ones that do not stand with a contention. I would like to sense a bit more thought before people lash out.

    It’s also bizarre that someone with a known identity is one of the few people whose credentials can be discussed/queried. That’s kind of nutty.

    Like

  • You still not told us Dennis.

    Don’t tell me it’s Sociology.

    Spit it out man, we know you’re not shy.

    Like

  • livinginbarbados

    @Straight Talk
    Oh, you want the full Monty. Economics (BSc) and Urban Planning (M. Phil.).

    Now, I want to get on with watching Federer, and figuring out how my friend’s kids adjust to moving country again.

    It’s not about modesty, nor is it about doing others down.

    I think every thing I say or write has a corroborating element–people and or things. It makes life easier.

    No one interested in Wickham anymore?

    Like

  • Thanks for the clarification and apologies for my impertinent mistake.

    Like

  • livinginbarbados

    @ST
    Graceously accepted.

    Like

  • "*Adviser to the President*"

    There are persons who predicted the 20/10 results : Such persons should be called genius too.

    Like

  • livinginbarbados

    @Adviser to the President
    “There are persons who predicted the 20/10 results : Such persons should be called genius too.”[I’ve never met Peter, personally, and I think I never was on the call-in circuit much when he was on VOB. I found that he was the only moderator who consistently challenged certain accepted views, and usually did it with good factual or analytical bases. I do not ascribe to all of his views but I applaud his approach.

    I visited Dominica recently and was struck by the way they seem to deal with controversial issues in the media. A commentator makes a very open, few punches held back, putting documented information forward for officials, decision makers, etc to refute–most recently with a deep scrutiny of their PM’s involvment in a financial deal that is going through the courts in BVI. (This style has been in play for many years in Jamaica, eg Ronnie Thwaites did/does it, and has been good at getting more openness from public and private organizations, who are routinely put on the spot.)

    I mentioned this to some VOB producers and I think they are looking into how and if such a change of format might come about here. I have not contact PW on it, given that I really have no link with him. But, others who think it’s a worthwhile change of style can run with the ball too.

    Like

  • Peter wickham is doing a survey for the government.

    I hope he asks the right questions so that government can get a true picture of how the voters are thinking.

    Like

  • I cant wait to hear Peter tomorrow on 100.7. He should comment on how he was treated on the blogs.

    Like

  • Archi Bull Cocks

    Peter ya sa handsome.. Come back by the library tonight and let us finish what we started night before. I 2 luvs ya. XOXOXOXOXOXO

    Like

  • Archi Bull
    Cocks,

    Oh dearrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr.
    Look, leff my man fa me hearrrrrrrrrr?
    I got my sissas in my bosom.
    Watchaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
    Move doooooooooooooooooooooooooo

    Like

  • [video src="https://barbadosunderground.files.wordpress.com/2020/01/peter-wickhams-wedding.mp4" /]

    Like

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