Guyana President should Take Lie Detector Test In Roger Khan Drug Case

Submitted by Caribbean Guyana Institute for Democracy (CGID)

Roger Khan

Roger Khan

NEW YORK: The New York based think-tank, the Caribbean Guyana Institute for Democracy (CGID) Monday upped the antae against Guyana’s President, Bharrat Jagdeo, in the Roger Khan saga. The Institute accused Jagdeo of complicity with the convicted drug dealer and of lying about what it described as “a close relationship with Khan, whom CGID had branded – “The Al Capone of Georgetown.”

A confessed Guyanese drug baron, Khan last week pleaded guilty in Federal Court in New York, to eighteen counts of importation of cocaine into the United States, conspiracy, weapons possession and witness tampering. He is expected to be sentenced next month.

President Jagdeo upon learning of Khan guilty plea told the media that he did not know Roger Khan and that if Khan is guilty then he should “face the music.” However, the Institute said Monday that Jodgeo’s “Statements were at variance with truth and fact and are irreconcilable.” It added that “Every time he pronounces on the Khan case, those comments appears to be mendacious, self-protective and shifty, and raise more questions then answers.”

In addition to his conviction, the US Federal Courts also ruled that Khan is head of a violent gang in Guyana called the “The Phantom Death Squad,” which has committed hundreds of murders for hire with impunity, as well as hundreds of separate extra-judicial killings and drug related executions.

CGID asserted that “President Jagdeo must be made to explain how Khan was able to export billions of dollars worth of cocaine into the US, other parts of North America and Europe, allegedly direct hundreds of cold blooded murders for hire, extra-judicial killings and drug executions – with impunity and in full view of President Jagdeo, his government and the Guyana Police, with out being detected, arrested and prosecuted by Guyanese law enforcement.

The Institute further posited that it is ludicrous and pretentious for President to now call on the US government to provide intelligence information on Khan’s criminal enterprise to the Guyana government when it is obvious that the Jagdeo Administration was fully aware of Khan’s activities, and that Khan operated within a network of Presidential and governmental protection in Guyana. “Guyana is the only country where local drug barons, dealers and couriers have been pursued, detained, prosecuted  and convicted by the US and other countries, while there have never been as much as an arrest in Guyana,” CGID stressed.

There have been allegations that Khan had been operating in partnership with individuals at the highest levers of the Jagdeo administration. In 2005, when his business establishments were raided by Police, allegedly at the behest of the US government, Khan issued a full page ad in local newspapers in which he claimed that he had engaged in “law enforcement” activities on behalf of the Guyana government.

Recently it was revealed that President Jagdeo’s signature allegedly appears on a government document which vested ownership of huge chunks of Guyana government lands to a company reportedly owned by Roger Khan.

Defending the allocation of the lands to Khan, President Bharrat Jagdeo last week claimed that his government did not lease land directly to Roger Khan. He said land is leased by public tender and that “Unless you have a conviction against a person, then you should not tender for public land and the vesting order… is after a public tender where after several people were allowed to bid and this company won the tender. That is how the vesting order was issued…it was in the name of the company and it was through a public tender,” Jagdeo claimed. “Roger Khan was not called in by the government and given this land on the site with a vesting order; it went through a public tender,” he added.

However, CGID’s Director of Communication, Jevon Suralie, Monday dismissed Jagdeo’s comments as as “a pathetic and unconvincing excuse for their harbouring and enabling of a criminal.” He noted that “CGID believes that President Jagdeo and other members of his administration are guilty of unquestionable complicity with Khan and his criminal enterprise.”

“Now that Khan has been determined to be guilty and has been convicted, President Jagdeo is apparently suffering from self-diagnosed amnesia. He is undoubtedly now attempting damage control and has been engaging in an unpersuasive fishing expedition to distance himself from his convicted felon associate – an alleged murderer and a convicted arms and drug dealer, with whom allegedly exists a nefarious, association. However, his denials are too late. The damage has already been done,” Suralie said.”

He added that Jagdeo’s claims that he does not know, or has never met, Khan are silly distortions which are laughable and incredulously fallacious. “It was this same President Bharrat Jagdeo who boldly defended Khan when he was arrested by US Federal law enforcement authorities in Trinidad and Tobago in 2005, and labeled his arrest a case of “US rendition,” Suralie observed.

He contended that “An established Guyanese businessman said that he decided to immigrate to the United States after, upon his arrival at the Office of the President for a scheduled appointment with President Bharrat Jagdeo, he was allegedly forced to give deference to Roger Khan, whom he said was meeting with Jagdeo at the time.” This claim, along with other hard evidence and attestations, have led CGID to contend that President Jagdeo and other members of his Cabinet, know and have had a relationship with Khan.

Suralie called on President Jagdeo to take a lie detector test and said “We have been assured that the US government is aware of Jagdeo’s and his government’s alleged association with Khan. We therefore call on the Obama Administration to probe any possible involvement of President Jagdeo himself as well as other members of his administration, in Khan’s vast criminal enterprise.”

The Institute also called on United States District Judge Dora Irizarry, the presiding Judge in Khan’s trial, to ignore the alleged fifteen year sentence proposed by the United States Attorney for the Eastern District of New York, and to fully consider the copious impact of the crimes for which Khan has pleaded guilty and to impose the maximum prison sentence allowable under the law.  It noted that the proposed fifteen year sentence would be an affront to the victims of Khan’s crimes and a gross miscarriage of justice.

24 comments

  • We know Guyana Consul Norman Faria frequents BU. We would have thought by now that a response to the repeated accusations from the CGID on the Roger Khan issue is warranted. They must know by now that the pesky Internet media will not go away.

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  • Well at least the US knows this clown is just that—a clown, i’m happy to know that they have known for years, we in the caribbean have always known that.

    This Clown is the only one pushing that dead beat CSME thing, can’t feed and manage the country so he trying to get as many as the people out to feed off the rest of the caribbean.

    Guyana is so messed up that people there don’t vote for policies they vote for RACE, but this is that clown last term in office, Guyana needs someone who can bring Guyana into the modern times and build up the countray.

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  • I am happy that BU has brought this issue of Jagdeo administration & Roger Khan to this blog.

    This Roger Khan was the mastermind behind the phantom gang that murdered hundred of Black Guyanese men & boys.Clement Rohee the minister of justice in Guyana is a close associate of Roger Khan and was implicated in many of his schemes.

    I would like David & BU to bring the report of the UN representative who visited Guyana last year and reported on the race relations in Guyana.That report had in it almost everything I posted about the race relations in Guyana.Part of her report was in yesterday edition of the Starbroek News.

    I hope Norman Faria,Peter Wickham and all the Guyanese supporters really read and understand what that UN lady really said about the race relations in Guyana.

    Barbados fate is similar if we do not act with a matter of urgency to rid this country of the Indo-Guyanese hum bugs.

    David Thompson please read and analyse what that UN lady said.

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  • As the monkey said when they cut off his tail “It wont be long now ……”

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  • David don’t expect Norman Faria or even Randy Persaud for that matter to have the time to respond to us. They have a bigger body to attempt to convince that they are a serious and worthy government.

    It is a failed state, and whether it is Adrian Hinds, BU, David, Pro. Gibson, callers on VOB, The US stated department, the Canadian Government, and now the UN, the truth about Guyana cannot be contained.

    The report:
    http://daccessdds.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/G09/115/59/PDF/G0911559.pdf?OpenElement

    Guyana’s State party response:
    http://daccessdds.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/G09/121/12/PDF/G0912112.pdf?OpenElement

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  • these people are dangerous
    drug kingpins, getting help &
    land reward from friends in high places !

    Guyanese drug trafficker admits plotting to scare jury

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/ny_crime/2009/03/16/2009-03-16_guyanese_drug_trafficker_admits_plotting.html

    this week’s news

    st. kitts is rounding them up
    16 Guyanese among illegal immigrants taken into custody
    http://www.sknvibes.com/News/NewsDetails.cfm/9040

    t&t too.
    Cops arrest 4 in raids
    http://www.trinidadexpress.com/index.pl/article_news?id=161455892

    Guyana’s president clears air on land issue with admitted drug trafficker
    http://www.caribbeannetnews.com/news-15169–13-13–.html

    My question’s – why are illegal allowed to remain here unchecked
    why aren’t they sent back to guyana?

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  • Adrian et al

    What role or function does Caricom play in the exercise? How can the leaders of the Caribbean meet at the same table as Jagdeo and don’t hold his hands to the fire?

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  • It could be stated that Caricom is being a facilitator to the racial divide in the failed state of guyana. I don’t think Jagdeo as WitchDoctors say, would , at this late stage be the singular champion of CSME if it were not to his benefit. It is also with Caricom’s
    blessing that Guyana is allowed to send their soldiers of cheap labour all over the caribbean to advantage the elites and disadvantage others. Roger Khan was caught in the US, he could have easily travel to any caribbean island to have a personal meeting with any leader that attempted to put Jagdeo in his proper place.

    I have no idea how Peter Wickham can live with himself.

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  • Thanks curious girl for those links.

    Adrian I agree about peter wickham,however if you if listen to him you will quickly realise he is a very insecure,intellectually weak not so young man,who sucks up to ricky singh and the like.

    Even though we are seeing less guyanese they are still here by the thousands.

    One day bajan workers will rise up against those companies that hire them before bajans.

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  • I really do not understand the workings of CARICOM.The issue with the removal of the former leader of The Turks & Caicos Islands by Britain and Britain taking full responsibility for those Islands merited a response from CARICOM.I have no problem with that,however,Guyana a member of CARICOM has been condemned by the USA,Canada & the UN for its human rights abuses especially against Black-Guyanese and yet CARICOM has never said a word about those abuses perpetrated against the Black-Guyanese by the oppressive PPP administration..

    I do not know if CARICOM protocol dictates that member states should not be able to comment on other member countries internal matters.

    I believe the issue of Guyana should be debated at CARICOM level and approaches should be sought to effectively deal with the problems affecting Guyana.I make this point and I will make it again Guyana should be suspended from CARICOM until that country gets it act together.It cannot be business as usual with in CARICOM and the abuses are continuing unabated in Guyana with the Black-Guyanese receiving the worst of it.

    All CARICOM countries should ban Guyanese from entering & living in their countries.No sort of status should be given to any Guyanese maybe for the next 5 years or so.Guyanese should be encourage to remain in their country and build it.

    Guyanese running away from your country will not save your country stay at home and build your country.Stop being the nuisances you all are in every Caribbean country you all go to live.There is not 1 Caribbean country that is happy with Guyanese .

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  • Try this link.

    http://www.unhcr.org/refworld/category,COI,,MISSION,GUY,4090ffe80,0.html

    Like

  • Negroman said:

    I do not know if CARICOM protocol dictates that member states should not be able to comment on other member countries internal matters.

    ————————————

    I don’t think there can be so called ‘integration’ without pointing out one’s weaknesses.It is quite apparent that Guyana is not only a failed state but that even its leaders do not stay in Guyana.Most of the news stories that I read concerning Jagdeo seem to showcase him being overseas from his own country when it currently has so many pressing problems,that is just sad.

    I see Mr. Thompson is also still talking about CSME & moving forward with so called “integration” & “free movement” while unemployment continues to rise in Barbados……..that is also sad.

    http://www.caribbeannetnews.com/news-15257–26-26–.html

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  • At least one Caricom country gets it,the Bahamas…..

    http://freeport.nassauguardian.net/editorial/28709069023459.php

    “Although the communiqué did not say so, at that meeting Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham made it clear that The Bahamas’ position with regard to CSME had not changed; that position being that The Bahamas has no intention of agreeing to certain aspects of CSME, particularly the provisions calling the free movement of people and a single economy.

    These matters were thoroughly debated in the country several years ago when the former Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) government, with then Foreign Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell acting as chief spokesperson, made every attempt to convince the Bahamian people that The Bahamas should sign on to CSME. The consensus among Bahamians generally, however, was overwhelming that CSME was not in the best interest of The Bahamas or the Bahamian people, and that’s hardly likely to change anytime in the foreseeable future.

    The well respected Council on Hemispheric Affairs, a Washington, D.C.-based research and information organization, did an analysis on CSME several years ago that pinpointed the problems faced by some CARICOM-member countries when some of that was being proposed. The analysis noted that the goal of CSME “is to establish an environment in which goods and services, people, capital and technology can freely circulate, thereby removing physical, monetary, legislative and technological barriers.”

    But it added: “It is quite contradictory, however, that in fact a number of CARICOM members would like to retain their complete national sovereignty while simultaneously going through the motion of establishing a single market – a move that necessarily would result in limited progress toward achieving the organization’s goals. Unless the change to a single market economy is accompanied by the creation of machinery that would radically alter and consolidate the decision-making process of CSME (much like the European Union Commission), the system eventually will end up providing little more than a parallel trading market within CARICOM.”

    With regard to The Bahamas, it had this to say: “The Bahamas, with the third highest per capita GDP in the hemisphere, and whose bustling economy certainly qualifies it for CSME, has decided not to join the system because it feels threatened by the ‘free movement’ clause, which could lead to a surge in immigration from the poorer islands.” “

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  • We find it interesting that the seminal work of Dr. Gibson (UWI), reports from UN sponsored people and other credible reports have been shot down by those who oppose by simply issuing a denial.

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  • I haven’t seen the U.N report in our Nation newspaper or maybe it is taboo for them.

    Like

  • I am seeing ads on tv in Central Florida for packages in Barbados where first night is free.

    Next time I see it I will post the website that has the details.

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  • So ms. Jagan dead well ….. Is a new beginning for Guyana? I was told that She was the true president of Guyana …….

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  • Sp the old hard line communist foreigner woman that well help f**k up Guyana gone.

    Not a moment too soon.

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  • Thank God people now seeing the light

    Like

  • mash up & buy back

    David

    You must check out an article in today’s Trindad Express newspaper which deals with the illicit drug trade.

    The person being interviewed is a Mr Darius Figuiera who has spent 20 years researching the illicit drug trade.

    Read the interesting yet unsurprising analysis he gives on who really owns the drug trade in Trinidad,the role of the ‘so-called black criminal’ and the ties to the Colombian cartel.

    He also believes there is a global network of drug dealers,with 12 drug ‘lords’ controlling that global trade.

    It would be interesting to get some bloggers comments on this.

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  • We had a read of the article earlier and it confirms what some us know already. The geo-political pressures will not escape the Caribbean. We like to think that the Caribbean is a zone of peace because of some blessing bestowed on us. In recent years with the US deporting hardened criminals back to the Caribbean, the instance of globalization which sees movement of people moving across disappearing national borders our small societies will come under increasing threat. To Peter Wickam and his lot who continue to spout integration when it is obvious we don’t have the governance systems in place to counter some of the security and other issues to sustain such a movement is simplistic at best.

    The immediate issue of how deeply the drug curse has infected out society has been rammed home by darius Figuiera. We can’t vouch for his source of information but those who have eyes let then see.

    Like

  • mash up & buy back

    David

    He has done some serious work and written extensively on the drug trade in Trinidad according to that article.

    Some time back I read some startling information he was giving on the same matter.

    One of the reason this stands out is some time back on this blog there was a discussion on the afro criminals who were killing each other in trinidad because they were protecting their drug turfs.

    The argument was then advanced by some that in fact these little black boys were being used by the real owners of that drug trade – that is – the whites,syrians and indians ‘so-called businessmen’.

    Now that theory is being confirmed by that writer Figueira in the Express article.

    Like

  • It was okay when Amerindian(indigenous),Portuguese and Indians suffer from 1964 to 1992 under Pnc which is a party consist of Afro Guyanese.Where is the Caricom organization when Maroon which is an African tribe in Suriname murdered Brazilian and Chinese immigrant in 2009.

    Like

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