A Heather Cole Column – OFFC: Creates a Kanye West Moment

Submitted by Heather Cole

The Oistins Fish Festival is having a Kanye West moment. All will recall that this popular Hip Hop artist Kanye West changed his name to Ye but it has never caught on and the public has not missed a beat in referring to him by his given Christian names.

Many were in shock and disbelief when in an Easter Sunday recording at the Festival, the Chairperson of the Oistins Festival announced that the name of the festival had been changed. It appears that the name was changed 2 years ago. This name change does not resonate well with the public from the outrage that was expressed in the comments to the live recording so it is unlikely that this name will ever catch on, making it indeed a Kanye West moment.

To me, both Oistins and fish are inseparable, both are nostalgic as they take me back to another era. In my primary school years, every fishing season my brothers and I would trek down to Oistins from Cane Vale to wait for Nobby to come in. He was a fisherman and my grandmother’s cousin. We spent many evenings waiting behind the old fish market waiting for him to come ashore, help take the flying fish out of the nets and get our supply of fish. I don’t even have to close my eyes to remember the splendor of those evenings long ago. There was the sound of women from the front of the market saying “fish! Fish! who calling? get yuh flying fish! 10 ah dollar! There was the peace at the back of the market broken by the cries of sea gulls as they occasionally scooped down in search of fish guts and the sound of waves gently lapping on the shore. As the evening sun lowered its gaze, casting shades of bright orange in the sky, and with the backdrop of pink and white sands on the shore and a shimmering blue sea, the place looked magical. It was away from the hustle and bustle at the front of the market that I looked out at those moses coming near and waited for Jesus to appear. To the child in me it was the Sea of Galilee.

At Emancipation, many of the former enslaved persons from the nearby Plantations came to Oistins and became fishermen. There used to be houses on the beach belonging to the fisher folk and all are now long gone. The old fish market too is long gone and has been replaced by another one, but it has remained the most prominent fixture in Oistins. One cannot think of Oistins without thinking of Fish. Fish is still the common thread in the community. Oistins was where young people would meet. Almost everyone’s father, grandfather or great grandfather was a fisherman. Without having to ask anyone, all you must do is to view the baptismal records from Christ Church Parish Church of a few generations ago. So, if you ask me, it was fish that created genealogies.

Long before the first fish festival was created. My grandmother told stories of going to Oistins at night to get fried fish and I am sure it was happening long before her time.

So why change the name? Although the name Oistins is unique, what happens there has nothing to do with its name. It is a fishing village but by Bajan standards we call it a town. It is one of the last strong holds of Barbadians on the Southcoast of Barbados that has not been overtaken by tourism. It is a place where the people congregate. They came to buy fish. It is what made it popular. Fish is the brand of Oistins. Brand identity must be consistent. The change from Oistins Fish Festival to Oistins Festival is like removing the main character from a novel; like a chef removing a popular main course from the menu.

The Oistins Fish Festival has never concentrated solely on fish. In her address the chairperson expressed that the name change would allow them to get more sponsorship to do more not just concentrate on fish. Sponsorship should not change a brand’s name. The sponsor agrees to a sponsorship because it is a way for him to get exposure by attaching himself to a well-known product or event. It is therefore a win-win situation for all, The sponsor, the company, and the consumers. Under normal circumstances a sponsor’s name usually comes before the event and at times after it. Sponsors usually showcase or sell their products at the event but there is no change in the name of the brand as this will cause it to lose its identity and appeal.

It was not stated what would define the new brand. It leaves one to wonder if with the new name of Oistins Festival that the festival will take on a more historical outlook. Perhaps they are going to showcase the Austin Family. Oistins is a corruption of the name of that prominent family who owned most of the land in the bay.

Perhaps it will take on the significance of a colonial festival with a reenactment of the signing of the Barbados Charter which was negotiated and signed at the Mermaid Tavern in Oistins in 1652.

Yet again the focus could be the history of black entrepreneurship as it is a fact that the town was one of the locations in Barbados that created the earliest black entrepreneurs, but this still leads back to fish.

Oistins, is not a resort town like Holetown with its many hotels so one cannot say that the aim is to successfully create a festival that is predominately for the tourist.

One is at a loss as to what the name is to connotate since the Oistins Fish Festival has never concentrated solely on fish. There is also an abundance of arts and craft, music, and entertainment.

Truth be told, the Oistins Fish Festival is now a national treasure of our cultural heritage that has outgrown its private ownership. One thing that I wish to state is that back in the mid-seventy’s night life in Oistins was hanging on to a thread and the Oistins Committee branded and enhanced an activity that was already there and turned it into a successful cultural festival with several other attractions. So perhaps now that the committee is at the crossroad and devoid of ideas to take the festival forward, now is the perfect time to pass the baton on to the National Cultural Foundation for that body to take over and take the festival into the future.

One thought that comes to mind, is to have fish festivals during the Lenten Season in other fishing communities. One up North, one on the East Coast, one on the West Coast and the grand finale on the South Coast at the Oistins Fish Festival on the Easter Weekend.

While there is always room for brand improvement, there is a lot to a name and as the second last line of the national anthem states, we must be “strict guardians of our heritage.”

197 comments

  • Artax
    “Is VP an entry level position?”

    Ask the Salemite, after all she worked at JP Morgan 20yrs ago…it seems. Somehow over the course of 3-4 posts she has redefined VP every post. She would do well to add the initials to her BU handle– Vociferous Prevaricator.🤣🤣

    Liked by 1 person

  • Who is responsible for the music playing at oistins?

    Like

  • “Who would want to listen to Connie Francis while nothing by Wendy Alleyne is being played.”

    @ Mr. Skinner

    Who ‘said’ “NOTHING by Wendy Alleyne is being played?”

    You seem to have misinterpreted my comments, perhaps purposely so, while attempting to give credence to Waru’s comments.

    All I’m ‘saying’ is that, TRADITIONALLY, locals and tourists gathered at ‘Lexie’s Bar’ on Friday and Saturday nights to dance to a VARIETY OF MUSIC, which was played by the late ‘Bill Black’ (‘Bill Black’s HiFi’)….. including ‘oldies,’ old reggae music, in addition to sessions of LOCAL MUSIC, calypso, dance hall reggae and current songs.

    It is a known fact that, when people of a certain age gather together, they prefer to listen to ‘oldies.’
    The traditional dances, karaoke and ‘Q in the Community,’ are examples.

    The ‘Bay Garden Friday night lime’ is essentially an extension of Lexie’s idea, and does not have anything at all to do with marketing or planning by politicians.

    Baxter’s Road has been ‘dead’ since the early 1990s and every attempt to revive it, has failed.
    The ‘parroes’ and poor service essentially ‘killed’ the once popular street.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ David

    If Mr. Skinner went to a ‘dub fete,’ all he would hear the DJ playing, for its duration, is Jamaican ‘dance hall reggae.’

    That is the music the youngsters enjoy.

    He’ll probably ‘say,’ at least its Caribbean music being played.

    Yes, I appreciate local music. And, if he wants to host events at which he chooses to play local music an entire day, then so be it. He won’t last too long.

    It’s about variety…….. and any good DJ knows how to mix the music to keep the crowd entertained.

    You cannot play one genre of music or local music only. Your days of being a DJ will be ‘short lived.’

    Liked by 3 people

  • @Artax

    The blogmaster is sure you are aware of that era when senior Barbadians listened to oldies. One suspects this has to do with liking a Sloan down style of music. That said we want to see similar appreciation for local music as well.

    Like

  • If I could chime in on a part of
    the discussion – without picking sides.

    In most large organizations a VP is usually a senior position and is higher than a director.

    But the size of the company is very important. As an example, the CEO of Pfizer is quite a different beast than the CEO of a 2-man company. The second guy in the company is probably the President and janitor.

    BTW, my company has many VPs and VP has several levels
    VP
    SENIOR VP
    EXECUTIVE VP

    Our top guy title is chairman and CEO.

    A title by itself, does not say much.

    Like

  • They always find a way to blame blacks for the many social illness
    Growing up Baxter Rd and Nelson Street where thriving
    No politician ever put any interest in seeing Baxters Rd or Nelson Street generate interest where those things coming out our culture can be visible to tourist visiting the islands
    What I see happening with the Oistins Fish Market venue is a marketing strategy removing a history of the black culture and replaced it with a strategy that is meant for white interest with a Total control of name and products involve
    Snakes still crawling around and devious as ever looking out for their own interest unfortunately there are intellectual blacks helping them

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    Wuh Loss!! . I never saw a tree with so many” low hanging fruits”. There should be a BU Law to edit out provocative statements. I hope this Blog is still about keyboarding one’s opinion whether it agrees with the blog master’s or the posters’ position.We are not here to seek validation but to agree and disagree with the original moot.
    There are leaders and leaders. Each one should stamp his mark on the organizations he/she leads. That is what progress is about. I may or may not approve of what new leaders do but I will defend their right to make a difference. That is the platform on which progress thrives. A leader cannot and will not win the approval of all.
    Go Toni Thorne. VBC is behind you.

    Like

  • @ Artax
    I am talking about Oistins and marketing Barbados. I have a very wide collection of dub music but that’s for my personal entertainment.
    When we are marketing anywhere in Barbados as a tourism product we must put real Barbadian culture up front and Centre .
    You are clearly missing my point. I was of the opinion that festivals and so on were to fill the obvious voids in the tourism product.
    I sat down here this week and listened to Maurice Norville playing for Maurice Norville. Not a single local artiste.
    Now you have thousands of people visiting Barbados to hear Lionel Richie. Really.
    You mean to tell me if out of those thousands , five hundred hear a local song and opt to buy it that will not save a few dollars in foreign exchange . Multiply that by a few thousand and you get at least a few hundred thousand dollars in sales and your culture/ entertainment is paying dividends. But you mean we ain’t even giving it a blasted chance.
    No wonder we take the fish out of Oistins; no wonder a german marketing Barbados .
    My brother , respectfully: we don’t have a clue about how to really sell the island as a tourist product. That’s why the tourists numbers increase but the spending never does.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ David
    Stop putting me in your damn boxes. I know what Q in the community is . That’s for lovers of oldies. It’s creative that they have successfully carved out that product. I don’t see that as a tourism product. I have attended a few and totally enjoyed myself.
    Cut out the blame politicians bull shit.
    My comments were in relation to Oistins . Oistins is actually in the heart of the west coast tourist net.
    It can be exploited as a tourist attraction if well marketed . That’s all I am saying.
    Gimme a frigging break.
    Oistins should not be highlighted only at the Oistins Festival. With or without fish in the name. Move beyond that . It’s so hard for us to see beyond or noses. So frigging hard.
    Now ho ahead and call me emotional and have an orgasm.
    Peace.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @William

    No it isn’t.

    It is a group of senior Barbadians having fun enjoying music they prefer. The same occurs at Oistins where locals hangout to enjoy themselves.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Switcharoo

    Like

  • You see William what you are missing is that Oistins is a local festival first. As Artax indicated the oldies segment is enjoyed by locals however it is not the only music played.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ TheOGazerts at 9:52 AM
    A VP is a position determined by the organization at which the executive works. The question of entry level is irrelevant, If the applicant has all the requirements as listed in the advertisement . He/ She is interviewed to check that he fits the posts. In the particular case,attitude,qualifications and past relevant experience determine whether the person gets the job. Those who have been following the career of the person under discussion should not be surprised at her recruitment. JP Morgan is an investment bank.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    “BTW, my company has many VPs and VP has several levels
    VP
    SENIOR VP
    EXECUTIVE VP

    Our top guy title is chairman and CEO.

    A title by itself, does not say much.”

    Theo…you are dealing with people who don’t know much about anything, except how to attack what others say, i did not even bother to tell them about the inbetweens and they thought they heard something…

    problem here is even though some try to bring a semblance of intelligence to the blog, we know it is not based on any human rights or education….largely political pimping and yardfowlism so any attempt at education…is largely wasted and many..and they are proud of it and love to show it up…

    .VPs are hired by the HUNDREDS. thousands, tens of thousands…….they are necessary for certain levels of operations ONCE TRAINED and or experienced….with necessary qualifications…it is cookie cutter, nothing EARTH SHAKING…

    what i don’t like are these wannabes acting like when they come with their misdirections that no one knows anything and should be IMPRESSED…no, the only people impressed are the ones who think at the SAME LEVEL…

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    William…don’t know if you have heard any recent rumblings, but keep your ear to the ground…

    Like

  • 🔥 🔥 Cool Your OVERHEATED BRAIN (from ‘Water Up Fire Down’ by Ilchi Lee) – 10 Minute Daily Routines

    Constant stress and worries overheats your brain. When heat stays in your brain for too long without being released, it creates symptoms like headache, brain fog, migraine, tinnitus, dry mouth, dry eyes and more. Try this 10 minute routine to cool an overheated brain and also do a quick self-test to see if you carry more heat in your brain than you think.

    Like

  • After all the ado, I still believe that the “fishiness” of Oistins it what makes it stand out. The festival should be built out around that. Sargeant gave some examples of how these things are done.

    I agree with WURA that all it needs is a little creativity. I also think that local music and culture should be at the forefront. There is great talent out there in our communities struggling for an outlet. Our problem is that we allow certain favourites to hog the show. Shout out here to Osbert McClean who did try to offer such opportunities over the years. Why, even Donna and “her children” got an “invite”.

    Foreign music and variety should be offered only at night for dancing.

    And finally, when you bring certain people on board there will be the natural tendency towards “gentrification”. There must therefore be input from the regular folk to keep it real.

    This should be a collaborative effort.

    Like

  • @VC
    V BC
    Wow.. 2027 this year?

    Like

  • Repeating:
    VP means different things depending on the size of the organization.

    A Merck/Pfizer VP is not a dime a dozen.

    Liked by 1 person

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    “A Merck/Pfizer VP is not a dime a dozen.”

    that is not the corporate world of banking or insurance etc, that is BIG PHARMA….

    a whole different universe..

    Like

  • THE YEAR IS !2 MONTHS AND EITHER 365/366 DAYS.

    THERE IS ROOM FOR 2 DIFFERENT FESTIVALS IN OISTINS MANY MONTHS APART.
    OISTINS FISH FESTIVAL
    OISTINS FESTIVAL

    TO TARGET DIFFERENT AND IN SOME CASES SIMILAR AUDIENCES.

    THE 2 x 3 ISLAND SUFFERS TOO MUCH FROM TUNNEL VISION.

    Like

  • “You are aware one of the most popular ‘socials’ in Barbados is Q in the Community which is mainly patronized by senior citizens? You want to guess the genre of music most played? And you blame the politicians right?”

    But he boastfully declares others can’t market nuttin. If I weren’t familiar with his thinking, I’d swear he thinks Oistins only for tourists, I do, however, agree with him that yuh should hear some Wendy Alleyne. The point is that the eclectic music mix and foxtrotters add to the Oistins experience. Duck into Boats Bar and Grill or Surfers Cafe and there are live performances. Culture is not static and certainly not immuned from external influences. Bashment soca anyone? Have the foxtrotters made the moves distinctly Bajan? Do tourists experience the type of public dancing seen in Oistins anywhere else? The dances of old at Buddies etc are/were uniquely Bajan? Are events such as Q and Oistins providing a space for folks who went to these dances? Is this an example of a once popular Bajan ting evolving?

    Liked by 1 person

  • The gentrification mentioned is well on the way within the credit union movement. William you will be sorry to hear?

    Like

  • William Skinner April 29, 2022 10:31 AM #: “You are clearly missing my point.”

    @ Mr. Skinner

    You are correct.

    I was focusing primarily on the FRIDAY NIGHT LIME in Oistins…….. NOT the ‘Oistins Fish Festival’ or marketing Barbados.

    However, I agree with you that Barbados’ tourism marketing strategy is and……. has always been……… questionable.

    I also understand your point about local music and marketing local culture. But, I prefer to examine issues rationally, while ‘facing reality.’

    Let’s look at Barbados’ main cultural event, the ‘Crop Over Festival.’
    Visit the hundreds of stalls that line the ‘Mighty Gryner Highway’ and the surrounding environs, at ‘Bridgetown Market’ and ‘Kadooment Day’……..

    …….. and you’ll realize the majority of the owners are playing Jamaican dance hall music.
    Not the ‘old time’ calypso by ‘Romeo, Mighty Liar, Pitch Up, Viper, Black Pawn, Speedy, Bumba, Carew, Structure, Seranada, Gryner, Gabby, Playboy, Johnny Ma Boy, Ras Isley’…. just to mention a few.
    AND, there are SEVERAL other calypsonians that provide us with wide selection of calypso to choose from.

    I mentioned in this forum previously, about playing local music during the festival, which was dismissed with disparaging remarks by your comrade. Was not bothered, because his m.o is to ‘hate the player, not the game.’

    Listen to the radio stations on Tuesday after ‘Kadooment Day,’……… ‘Vibes Kartel and Popcaan’ in yuh RH.’
    A few days years ago, the day after ‘Crop Over’ ended, I heard a popular radio DJ say, “Crop Over dun, I cud now play music.”

    You mentioned “Maurice Norville playing for Maurice Norville.”
    Listen to any of the FM stations and ask yourself who they are “playing for.”

    Even at competitions, majority of the contestants sing their variation of international ‘hits.’ They are not creative enough to compose their own songs.

    If this is the type of mentality that prevails the society, then, any progressive strategy to market the island will be useless.

    We seem satisfied with avoiding discussing issues, preferring instead in attempting to force our beliefs ‘down the throats of others.’

    Like

  • @Artax

    This is a different period of our existence, unfortunately. Ask yourself how many live bands are there in Barbados performing the circuit and why. Everything is connected, it doesn’t happen standalone.

    Like

  • We all have expectations of what should or not occur at ‘Oistins Fish Festival, as well as embracing our culture and local music.

    All good intentions.

    But, I’ll invite you to visit the many stalls at the festival and tell what music is being played.
    With the exception of ‘Cou Cou Village’ and a few others, the main music isJamaican dance hall reggae.

    THAT, is the reality of the situation.

    Like

  • When the powerful elites want to have total control by way of govt intervention
    It is there way or no other way
    Why now after all these year a word matters

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  • There is nothing wrong with sharing different views about how the festival must evolve to be successful. There is no right or wrong perspective, the takeaway is that there is room to improve and all should be encouraged to offer comment.

    Like

  • The blog started out to probe why the word fish was removed from the name of the festival. It remains a valid question because Oistins is and probably will be for time to come as a fishing village and meeting ground to buy raw and cooked fish.

    Like

  • Like any other business when a take over happens
    If the business was not performing positively by way of assets the name is replaced
    Also as I stated that when blacks have a hand in events that shows progress
    The business class waits and gazed with much interest to secure ownership and the name goes along with culture
    It is then up to govt to step in and secured a safe place in history for the name
    If govt ignores then uh know why

    Like

  • Mr Skinner you cannot be serious about Mr Maurice Norville not playing local music.Mr Norville in my view is one of the most professional radio announcers in Barbados for years.He plays a lot of local gospel music from the likes of Joseph Niles, Basil Yarde, Sister Marshall and groups like Promise along with calypso from RPB and Gabby etc.In addition he promotes local plays by the late Alfred Pragnell, Marvo Manning etc.However what i like most about Mr Norville and also Mr Ronnie Clarke is they do not entertain all these same callers sending out greetings to everybody in Barbados which is a welcome relief.Therefoe you have to have another listen to Mr Norville.As for tje festival i see nothing wrpng in rebranding the festivsl if it is to improve down the road for the same fish vendors.I gone.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    Everything is so messy, don’t hold ya breath, cause it;s only going to get messier….can’t stand pretenders…but it will all come out in the wash as it does all the time…no matter how long it takes..

    Like

  • “No politician ever put any interest in seeing Baxters Rd or Nelson Street generate interest where those things coming out our culture can be visible to tourist visiting the islands.”

    “it is then up to govt to step in and secured a safe place in history for the name. If govt ignores then uh know why.”

    @ ac

    You seem to believe ‘government’ intervention is required in every aspect of society. Perhaps such a mindset that fuels your penchant to politicize every issue.

    I’ll invite you to visit Clement Armstrong’s ‘Fisherman’s Pub,’ in Sand Street, Speightstown, St. Peter, for his Friday night limes. Here is an individual who has been able to bring together locals and tourist to ‘lively up’ that ‘dead’ area of Speightstown.
    Travel from there through ‘Six Men’s’ to ‘Moon Town’ and observe the socialising taking place in those communities. And, then ask yourself if the success of those activities depended on political intervention, or the innovation and creativity of shop, stalls and bar owners?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Artax

    What about the popular Martins Bay lime?

    Like

  • Isn’t the copy right act not part of the reason why bajan music is not played as often as some would like ?

    Like

  • @ David

    I’ve been hearing about the Martins Bay lime for a long time. Unfortunately, I’ve never attend it.

    @ John2

    You may be correct.

    I’m reminded of Copyright Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (COSCAP).

    Like

  • The Star of A Story

    Like

  • There is no excuse for Baxters Road and Nelson Street to be looking like a shanty in 2022

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  • Batters Rd and Nelson Street deserves better
    Before all the big time conglomerates took over the tourism industry those two places were known for weekend hangouts any and everyone looking for food and dance on Friday and Saturdays met there
    I know cause a family member was a proprietor there
    So don’t come here telling me about those areas
    Those areas served tourist well.as well as govt

    Like

  • For a dollar.
    When did big business take over the tourist industry?

    Like

  • Flying Fish

    Like

  • angela cox April 29, 2022 4:55 PM #: “There is no excuse for Baxters Road and Nelson Street to be looking like a shanty in 2022..”

    Why 2022, and not from 1986 or 1991?

    The problem with you is, you want to attribute the ‘demise’ of Baxter’s Road and Nelson Street to particular political party.

    Are you suggesting “all the big time conglomerates took over the tourism industry” and encouraged tourists not to visit Baxter’s Road and Nelson Street?

    If you want to politicise the issue, then, it would be FAIR to ‘say’ both streets continued “to be looking like shanty towns” under BOTH administrations.

    Name the bars on those streets at which people used to “dance on Friday and Saturdays?”
    But, then again, you may be referring to the 1950s.

    Otherwise, I am putting it to you that you don’t know what you’re “talking’ about.

    Like

  • @ Sargeant,

    I don’t agree with the name change but there must be a good reason. It’s a BLP idea so it has to be ok. lol

    Like

  • @ Sargeant,

    Thanks for posting the video.

    Like

  • Artax @ac

    Name the bars on those streets at which people used to “dance on Friday and Saturdays?”
    But, then again, you may be referring to the 1950s.

    Otherwise, I am putting it to you that you don’t know what you’re “talking’ about

    Xxcccc
    Don’t have to prove anything to u I know a baxters Rd that was full of life and florish

    Like

  • Bridgetown Early…..
    Before Oistins Bay Gardens was the best Friday night entertainment spot, Baxters Road was considered the King of the City and the place to be for frolic, food and festivities.
    Xxcccc
    Xxcccc
    I believe baxters road was deliberately left to dwindle and die because big tourism saw it as a threat
    A place which captured night life for entertainment and partying would have drawn many tourist away from the hotel environment onto baxters road where culture would have reign supreme cutting into the pockets of big hotel industry

    Like

  • @Artax April 29, 2022 4:18 PM “I’ve been hearing about the Martins Bay lime for a long time. Unfortunately, I’ve never attend it.”

    You should give it a try. I’ve gone a few times, always in the daytime. A good lime, good fish dishes, other good food, good drinks, fresh sea breeze, woman selling really, really good traditional homemade Bajan sweets. And you may get to enjoy the company of some “overseas” Bajans whom you haven’t seen for years or maybe decades.

    Good fun.

    Like

  • Unless one does not have a car don’t see of any reason not going to martins Bay
    Been there several times more of a laid back atmosphere
    Scenic views and a big black.owned restaurant that does good business
    There once used to be a white Bajan that sold homemade wine down there which was very tasty
    Bought a couple tasted just as good as any name brand on the market

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  • You don’t need a car to go to Martins Bay. Just take the bus. I have been going since it was a shack and you ate outside on picnic tables right beside the beach. Food was always good with a banks. I always order the fish. I always go in the day. Lots of seniors go and spend the entire day. I was told they are there mostly when their cheques come in. Some go every week, other every two weeks. I have spoken to many down there.

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  • AC

    So what happened to the pierhead and the “gap”?

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  • I am speaking under correction but buses go to Martin’s Bay both from Speightstown and Bridgetown, but check the Transport’s Board’s website first. No need to drive if you don’t feel like it.

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  • Dame+Bajans April 29, 2022 10:29 PM #: “You don’t need a car to go to Martins Bay. Just take the bus.”

    @ Dame+Bajans

    Surely you should’ve realized by now that angela cox DOES NOT THINK, but keyboards the first thing that goes into her head.

    Transport Board provides a service to Martin’s Bay and I think there are about 2 privately owned mini buses plying that route as well.

    Like

  • angels cox April 29, 2022 10:21 PM #: “Unless one does not have a car don’t see of any reason not going to Martins Bay..”

    @ac

    Supposed an individual isn’t interested in going to Martin’s Bay?

    Unless you’re suggesting it’s COMPULSORY for people to visit there.

    Like

  • angels cox April 29, 2022 9:44 PM #: “I believe baxters road was deliberately left to dwindle and die because big tourism saw it as a threat
    A place which captured night life for entertainment and partying would have drawn many tourist away from the hotel environment onto baxters road where culture would have reign supreme cutting into the pockets of big hotel industry.”

    @ac

    Your above comment is a clear indication that you don’t know anything about the tourism industry.

    Some people are of the mistaken belief all tourists are rich. Some of them ‘save-up’ to come here. Nowadays, you’ll find them taking TB buses and privately owned PSVs.
    And, because of the high hotel prices, they also patronize local restaurants. Why buy a beer from the hotel for $8, plus service charge and VAT, when they could get 4 for $10 at a local bar?

    Is “big tourism” seeing Oistins or Martin’s Bay as threats as well?

    Additionally, ‘government’ undertook infrastructural upgrades of St. Lawrence Gap, including repairing the boardwalk at its entrance.
    And, despite consultation with stakeholders (I’m sure you’re aware there are several hotels, guest houses, apartments, bars and restaurants in the the ‘The Gap’) to revitalize the area,……….. it remains ‘dead.’
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Cuhdear Bajan April 29, 2022 10:04 PM

    I’m always saying I’ll “give Martin’s Bay a try,” but have never been able to.

    Like

  • @ Angela Cox
    The Paros became a nuisance and menace often washing peoples’ cars without permission and then demanding payment.
    It was also a question of many popular shops closing and so on. There was a decline in the hotel workers from such places as Paradise when that went out of business.
    Demographics also had an impact and other areas such as St. Lawrence Gap started to pick up with vendors selling street food that could be obtained in Baxter’s Road.
    The younger crowd partied at After Dark and when they came out., the vendors were right there.
    Furthermore. once Oistins started to gain momentum. it was obvious Baxters Road
    could not compete.
    Oistins is also a safer venue and the Paros could not disrupt patrons to any large extent.; it was therefore considered a safer spot.
    Nobody or business, big or small and no government B or D can be seriously blamed for the fading of Baxters Road.

    Like

  • @ Artax
    “You seem to have misinterpreted my comments, perhaps purposely so, while attempting to give credence to Waru’s comments.”
    That level of response is extremely puerile to me . You are way above such nonsense. Why would I “ purposely” do anything to appease @ WURA or anybody on this blog.
    Why couldn’t you just reply to William Skinner without such .
    I would leave it there for now but …………….

    Like

  • William Skinner April 30, 2022 12:10 AM

    You are correct.

    I remember, as a youngster, Baxter’s Road was the ‘place to go’ after the ‘Crop Over Finals.’

    The ‘Pink Star’ was frequented by ‘overseas Bajans’ who came home for the festival.

    Like

  • Did you know that Edward Oistin came to Barbados in 1627 and had bought 1000 acres in what became Crist Church?

    Oistin is another spelling of Austin which became a standard Bajan family name.

    He was Irish and is described as follows in Ligon who was here between 1647 and 1649, just before the rise of the Society of Friends.

    From A True & Exact History of the Island of Barbados, by
    Richard Ligon in 1657, pages 25-26 we find: “Three
    Bayes there are of note on this Island; one, to the eastward
    of this, is called Austin’s Bay (Oistin’s Bay), not in
    commemoration of any Saint, but of a wilde and drunken
    fellow, whose lewd and extravagant carriage made him
    infamous in the Island; and his Plantation standing neer
    this Bay, as it was called by his name. The other two. . .”
    In Sir Robert H. Schomburgk’s A History of Barbados
    published in 1848, on page 220, one finds: “At the infancy
    of the colony, the most easterly plantation in the parish
    belonged to a person named Oistin, from whom the large
    bay in the neighborhood received its name. Ligon does not
    speak in very flattering terms of the character of this man,
    whom he calls profligate; nevertheless, as the population
    increased, a number of houses were erected in the
    neighborhood, which received the name of Oistin’s town.
    The bad repute of this person was probably the reason that
    an attempt was made to call it Charlestown; but this failed
    and its original name was retained.

    Like

  • Edward Oistine was buried on 9th August 1654 at Christ Church.

    Christ Church at the time was located in Maxwell Coast Road, close to where I used to live until I was 9 years old.

    Some of the graves and vaults remain to this day in the corner between Sandals and the Sea by what used to be Mr. Waithe’s Shop which became “The Tourist Trap”.

    The story is a hurricane passed by and the sea came in and swept out numerous coffins.

    The Parish Church was moved to its present location at the top of Oistin’s Hill.

    His son, also Edward Oistin, became a Quaker.

    He made provision for a Burying Ground for Quakers in his will in 1669 when he died.

    1669 – Edward Oistine of Christ Church gave half an acre of his land “unto the People called Quakers in this Island … for a burying place … which shall be in part before my Garden which is encompassed with Plantaine trees where I desire that I may be buried”.

    You will find the reference here.

    http://www.caribbeanfamilyhistory.org/quakers/

    Good chance, given the location of the Oistine Family on the 1680 map that this was what we call today, “the largest example of a Slave Burial Ground in the new world”!!

    Recent analysis of human remains uncovered at Newton show their owner(s) at the time came from Bristol.

    Like

  • Maybe my observation sees a difference in politics between Baxters Rd and St. Lawrence Gap
    Saying the above that parros would never have been given the opportunity to maintain a presence in St. Lawrence Gap in the same manner they did in Baxters Rd
    I am of the opinion that a place that was culturally and historically sound was allowed to failed and with sinister motives attached politics and power structure involved
    Have heard all the reasons for Baxters Rd economic failure but none can convinced me that parros alone was the reason

    Like

  • Artax @ac

    Supposed an individual isn’t interested in going to Martin’s Bay?

    Xxcccc
    Really makes for a 😂😆

    Like

  • Just take a look at the predominantly black areas that thrive
    Baxters Road
    Nelson Street
    Bay Street
    All mostly thrived by economic self empowerment
    Today are simply shells of neglect and no govt hands on financial intervention
    The image tells a story of a people lacking the aide and resources which were given to areas and business which are located on the West Coast and South Coast of this island
    No one can deny that financial resources and govt intervention was not part and partial for the West Coast and South to maintain a visible and economic life span over the years
    Some black folks needs to opened eyes and look into a past history as well as the present political environment that would be the betterment for one percent of society while the majority is tossed to wind and driven like tumble weed
    Just cast eyes first to understand and see the truth

    Like

  • First the powers in charge dismissed black relevance
    Next black presence
    Slowly but surely a picture is created in the minds of black of having no worth
    This creation deprives the mind any attempt to deal with self worth
    The picture becomes thicken with self doubt anger and hopelessness
    That is the long and short of a psychological dumbing and draining of the black mind resulting in a mind that think less of itself and relying on the minds of others to think for us
    Hence we have no reason to fight for what is rightfully there’s
    That image is also associated with how the black person can be easily manipulated and the truth snatched from before their eyes and replaced with facades and gestures and half truths

    Like

  • Another factor that send Baxter Road down the drain was the gun shots in and around the area including Country Rd and New Orleans. How many time youngest some one was shot on BAxter Rd and the gunman escaped by running through the orleans ?

    Like

  • Youngest = you heard

    Like

  • John2April 30, 2022 7:26 AM

    Another factor that send Baxter Road down the drain was the gun shots in and around the area including Country Rd and New Orleans. How many time youngest some one was shot on BAxter Rd and the gunman escaped by running through the orleans ?
    Xxxccxc
    As if the same never happened I’m the West Coast and South Coast
    Also in a shopping mall in Warren’s
    Difference being govt steps up.and does due diligence for those areas
    Who the cat likes the cat licks
    Try another excuse as to why govt allow Baxters Road to become derelict
    I would wager a bet that if white business investment was tied up.in that area the environment.would present a different picture

    Like

  • Which government u blaming?

    How often did u hear people getting shoot in the mall at warrens?

    What are some of the things you would have like government to do / done in Baxter Rd ? Be specific

    Like

  • I think the speightown bus used to travel to Bathsheba. I am not aware if they extended it to martins bay

    Like

  • Whenever I went to Martins Bay, I took the bus. It is jam packed and empties at the restaurant. It is a beautiful ride with scenery you don’t see up north and the chatting, joking and laughing reminds me of bus excursions. The Speightstown bus goes to Bathsheba not Martins Bay. But if you take an early bus, you can walk along the coast from Bathsheba to Martins Bay. We did it as kids. With comfortable shoes, it should take less than an hour.

    Like

  • @Dame Bajans

    It is a beautiful side of the island, of late the sargassum has been a nuisance and muddied the experience.

    Like

  • angels cox April 30, 2022 5:29 AM #: “Maybe my observation sees a difference in politics between Baxters Rd and St. Lawrence Gap
    Saying the above that parros would never have been given the opportunity to maintain a presence in St. Lawrence Gap.”

    @ ac

    You have a silly habit of politicizing every issue.

    The parros, drug pushers and male prostitutes are some of the main reasons why ‘The Gap’ is ‘dead.’

    Baxter’s Road was redeveloped and new stalls with bathroom facilities were built for the fish fryers, taking them from selling on the sidewalk.

    You need to research the facts, rather than ‘talking’ about what you ‘feel’ happened.

    Like

  • Stalls yeah that is what the small
    black business person must settle for
    As for the Gap it goes through periods of recession but the Gap has never been allowed to become an eye sore like Baxter road

    Next

    I get that some blacks would settle for anything
    Not me though

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    “Did you know that Edward Oistin came to Barbados in 1627 and had bought 1000 acres in what became Crist Church?”

    ya mean TIEF, who that criminal….bought land from in 1627…..the thieves who stole the island from the indigenous inhabitants…our Afrikan ancestors and other indigenous people…..ya really need to stop…

    the little vp should have REMOVED the criminal name Oistin….and NOT THE NAME FISH…

    Like

  • @WURA
    I agree with your post at 10.52. hahaha. John does not know when to stop, or how to stop. hahaha.

    Liked by 1 person

  • AC
    What are some of the things government did/ does for the gap that you would like to see don’t for Baxter rd?

    Like

  • @Waru: April 30, 2022 10:52 AM
    (Quote):
    “Did you know that Edward Oistin came to Barbados in 1627 and had bought 1000 acres in what became Crist Church?”

    ya mean TIEF, who that criminal….bought land from in 1627…..the thieves who stole the island from the indigenous inhabitants…our Afrikan ancestors and other indigenous people…..ya really need to stop…

    the little vp should have REMOVED the criminal name Oistin….and NOT THE NAME FISH…
    (Unquote).
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    That was a hard slap to the face of John; and deservedly so!

    From whom did the old brigand “Oistin” bought the land?
    From the Arawaks the same way the same European thieves bought the lands from the natives in the Americas, Southern Africa and Australasia using vi et armis as the currency of exchange?

    The patented twister of Bajan history knows no bounds when it comes to the history of Barbadoes.
    From asserting that sugar was never profitable until after World War 11 to claiming that the Quakers freed the slaves to that of asserting that the Africans came to Barbadoes as a result of fleeing from their Muslim oppressors or on their own accord along with their pet green monkeys and black belly sheep with many of them living to a ripe old age on the plantation called Paradise.

    What next piece of Bajan ‘twistory’ will Sir John be regaling us with?

    That the pirate Stede Bonnet was a runaway slave of Quaker persuasion

    Or that the Bajan interbred mongrel, called the salmon tot retriever aka pot-starver, is really a direct descendant of the African wild dog?

    Like

  • @Rabbit
    “Did you know that Edward Oistin came to Barbados in 1627 and had bought 1000 acres in what became Crist Church?”

    It is amazing that even with Google we still see the big lie being brought to BU. If not our intelligence, then please credit us with a web browser and a keyboard.

    “The first English ship touched the island on May 14th 1625 under the command of Captain John Powell. The island was therefore claimed on behalf of King James I. On February 17th 1627, Captain Henry Powell landed with a party of 80 settlers and 10 slaves to occupy and settle the island.”

    What is next? Oistin was a Quaker? You were named after John Powell?

    Like

  • I see that others are anxiously waiting on installment #2 of Quaker tales: The Twistory of Oistins

    Like

  • This was something I wrote on FB April 30, 2015.

    “When I work from home I parked my TV on one of those salacious TV channels (Jerry/Maury).

    Was minding my business when I heard a man say the phrase “She was a prostitute from hell”

    I can only conclude “Since she was from hell, she was unable to take him to heaven”..

    Like

  • Amazing when whites want to reclaim ungainly possessions they resort to History whilst blacks have to bow and beg for recognition and ownership of what is rightfully theirs

    Like

  • A beauty waiting to be unclothed

    Another breathtaking view can be seen from a promontory just behind Edgecliff.
    By Peter Laurie Barbados has one of the hidden natural wonders of the Caribbean.
    Right now, if you visit the site you will catch only glimpses of its enchanting possibilities. Nature and humans have conspired to conceal the startling beauty of this geological phenomenon.
    What am I talking about? The majestic Hackleton’s Cliff, which rises to almost 1 000 feet above sea level, and straddles the parishes of St John and St Joseph. The most accessible part of it runs for just over a mile from St John’s Church to Cotton Tower Hill.
    From the cliff top, which is overgrown with bush, you get glimpses, at two or three points, of the Atlantic coast. If the bush were cleared you would enjoy a spectacular panorama of that rugged, windswept east coast from Ragged Point lighthouse to Pico Tenerife; a view so breathtakingly scenic that it would be unequalled anywhere else in the Caribbean.
    In the silent dense forest below you can find the site of an early settlement of the Irish and Scottish indentured servants and political prisoners deported to Barbados during the English Civil War.
    The most popular viewing site is behind Malvern Great House, on top of the burial vaults dating back to the 17th century. The access road next to Malvern is sign-posted.
    Local resident, Roger Moore, has dedicated himself to beautifying the area with the help of his wife, Nikita Boyce. With their love, care, and sweat of their brow, they have created a beautiful community mini-park. This is what Barbados is all about.
    Another breathtaking view can be seen from a promontory just behind Edgecliff.
    Heritage park
    The top of Hackleton’s Cliff would make a fantastic ecological and heritage park within the much more extensive East Coast National Park. A park, imaginatively designed and landscaped to complement the natural environment, in which, along the cliff edge, there might be walking and cycling paths with several designated look-out points and one rustic restaurant/rum shop.
    Since there is a drop of some 500 feet to the forest below you would have to erect a tasteful natural protective barrier. There might also be facilities provided for vendors of arts and crafts and locally grown fruit and vegetables. And what about a mini-museum and memorial to our indentured ancestors? There might even be an entertainment venue.
    The park might include a toll-based drivethrough with parking spaces set well back unobtrusively from the cliff. There might be picnic spots with shade trees with rustic tables and benches, and portable toilets.
    Hiking tours might be organised along the existing five trails down the cliff to the extensive forest below. Imagine all the possibilities.
    Three essentials: it must have minimal negative impact on the natural environment; it should provide employment and entrepreneurial opportunities for the surrounding communities; and it should be financially sustainable.
    It requires little imagination to see all the spin-offs for making enough money to support its sustainability.
    Result – a beautiful park around an exquisite natural wonder that would be a tourist attraction, a place for enjoyment and relaxation for Barbadians, and a commercial success, integrating rural development with community-based tourism.
    How would we go about doing this?
    The land along (and in some cases below) the cliff is privately owned by three major landowners and five small ones. It might be appropriate therefore for a public-private sector partnership, involving the landowners and the government, with the project being undertaken by a not-forprofit social enterprise that would develop the park in manageable phases.Think big; start small.
    But, please, the Government should facilitate, not design or manage the park.

    Peter Laurie is a former head of the Barbados Foreign Service and author of several books.

    Source: Nation

    Liked by 1 person

  • angela cox April 30, 2022 10:29 AM #: “Stalls yeah that is what the small black business person must settle for.
    As for the Gap it goes through periods of recession but the Gap has never been allowed to become an eye sore like Baxter road.”

    @ac

    Come on, my friend. The comparison is silly.

    I’ve told you on several occasions that you don’t think, but keyboard the first thing that goes into your head

    St. Lawrence Gap is lined with hotels, guest houses, apartments, resturants, entertainment venues ‘a handful’ of private residences and one or two derelict buildings.

    ‘Government,’ developed the infrastructure of
    Baxter’s Road and ‘The Gap.’
    The owners of businesses in both areas were responsible for maintaining their properties.

    Who’s at fault if the owners of businesses in Baxter’s Road allowed their properties to become derelict?

    Are you suggesting ‘government’ should have rebuilt or refurbished the shops in Baxter’s Road and built elaborate restaurants for the fish vendors?

    Liked by 1 person

  • What some want to see and done for the black community is apparently different social financial historical and cultural wise
    The push back against my voiced opinion is expected
    As some one recently stated on another social platform which I acknowledge and agreed
    Words to such effect
    Barbadians blacks don’t like themselves
    The fact that anyone would want to tell me that the Gap is more deserving than Baxters Rd
    Tells the truthfulness and mentality of such a person ignorance of their History
    I gone speak about the issue all by self
    Better yet speak to the 👏

    Like

  • Magnificent a.k.a Magno – Yu Heard Formula: C₂₁H₃₀O₂ IUPAC ID: (−)-(6aR,10aR)-6,6,9-trimethyl- 3-pentyl-6a,7,8,10a-tetrahydro- 6H-benzo[c]chromen-1-ol

    Kanye West performs in Houston jail with his Sunday Service choir

    Like

  • Like

  • angels cox May 1, 2022 6:10 AM

    Last/last

    RE: “The fact that anyone would want to tell me that the Gap is more deserving than Baxters Rd….”

    YOU ARE A LIAR!!!!,

    So far, during this ongoing back and forth about St. Lawrence Gap and Baxter’s Road, NO ONE MENTIONED ANYTHING about “The Gap is more deserving than Baxters Rd.”

    RE: “Tells the truthfulness and mentality of such a person ignorance of their History….”

    There isn’t anyone on BU who displays more ignorance on any issue other than YOU.

    You DON’T KNOW ANYTHING about Baxter’s Road including its HISTORY, yet, you continue PRETENDING that you do, while SPEWING SHIITE in the process.

    But, we all know what you really want to ‘say.’

    That ‘government,’ which to you means the BLP, neglected Baxter’s Road in favour of St. Lawrence Gap.

    Remember, further infrastructural development of The Gap, was announced in 2013 by former Tourism Minister, Richard Sealy….. and occurred under your administration.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Key word =infrastructure

    Not the buildings / private owned properties

    Like

  • PEG farm got the jump on PL article
    They have from just below hackeltons cliff right down to cotton tower

    Like

  • The view from Hackleton’s Cliff was spectacular when I was a kid. There were woods and people lived below the cliff, but it was not a forest then. At end of term (St. Elizabeth) we got out early and we would walk up through the woods through the opening (called “the cliff mout”) and up onto the cliff and look around for miles to the South and North. You used your imagination as you had never visited the places you could see. We used to go with two mates, Amy and Cynthia, two sisters who lived under the ‘cliff mout’. And the view of the ocean from up there, took your breath away. They were fishing boats with sails then and they looked like specks on the water. When you are a kid, things are large, or as Bajans say, big, big, big. I think St. Joseph is the most beautiful parish.

    Like

  • (Quote):
    No wonder we take the fish out of Oistins; no wonder a german marketing Barbados .
    My brother , respectfully: we don’t have a clue about how to really sell the island as a tourist product. That’s why the tourists numbers increase but the spending never does.
    (Unquote).
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Speaking of name-changing of festivals, when is the new CEO of the Bajan tourism business going change the name of “Crop Over” in the BTMI promotional strategy?

    After all, there is nothing left to really market about the End of the Sugar Crop.

    What is the ‘current’ relevance of the sugar crop to that national festival?

    Why not call it The Bajan Wuk-up & Drink-up Bacchanal?

    We can always elect our Canadian white-boy Lawson as the first high priest.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    lol…and want people to take medical information about our ancestors and religious advice from him, and he don’t know anything about our origins….or where the religious crap he spouts on the blog comes from…better learn to embrace all ancestors, wuh if he could fall over himself licking slave master ass, he could embrace the small people in his DNA..

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    “We can always elect our Canadian white-boy Lawson as the first high priest.”

    with a guaranteed salary of 1/4 million or more and perks, am sure Lawson is already packing..

    Like

  • Edward Oistine got a good deal on his 1,000 acres.

    He only paid 100 pounds.

    You all can work out what that 100 pounds is worth today.

    Like

  • DavidMay 1, 2022 4:52 AM

    A beauty waiting to be unclothed

    The most popular viewing site is behind Malvern Great House, on top of the burial vaults dating back to the 17th century. The access road next to Malvern is sign-posted.
    Local resident, Roger Moore, has dedicated himself to beautifying the area with the help of his wife, Nikita Boyce. With their love, care, and sweat of their brow, they have created a beautiful community mini-park. This is what Barbados is all about.
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Did you know that those Burial Vaults contain the remains of Quakers?

    Foster of Foster Hall is in one.

    There are several other names.

    When they were broken open in the late 80’s when I started hiking, I saw the name John Thorpe Foster, 1794 on one lead coffin.

    I am told by a St. John Resident from under the Cliff at Newcastle that the guy who broke into them ended up going foolishy foolishy and turning a paipsy colour.

    Next time I see him I must remember to ask if he is still alive.

    There is another vault closer to Cotton Tower belonging to Colonel Byam it is said. He died in Antigua so was never interred there.

    Close to Edgecliff on Malvern Estate is what appears to be a large burying ground with a high wall built along the Cliff probably to avoid children and horses from going over when people assembled to bury their dead.

    The story goes that Hackleton rode his horse over the cliff because his wife was unfaithful but it might have been his horse bolted when he was at a funeral and carried him to his death.

    The guy who went into the grave of Henry Peter Simmons at Vaucluse to move the remains to accommodate the development of land in the area is said to have died within a year.

    Have to speak with Anthony Hunte about the Holder coffins and remains removed from Holders Hill and relocated to Castle Grant when development was undertaken.

    Holder was another Quaker family.

    These Quaker burials tell us where slaves and other Quakers were buried in the 17th,18th and 19th centuries.

    Those Quakers buried in marked graves are there fore two reasons, firstly to avoid going in the Anglican Church yard and secondly to mark the locations of the 100’s of unmarked graves buried around them to tell succeeding generations where other Quakers and their slaves are buried.

    The burials appear all over the island, Fields at Penny Hole, Rice at Rices in St. Philip, Skeete at Mangrove St. Peter, Greaves at Hope in St. Lucy, Collins at Searles, Frere at Coverly, Trotman at Ridge etc etc etc..

    There was no refrigeration so people are buried close to where they died.

    Like

  • … except for Nelson, his body was preserved in a cask of spirits for the voyage back home to England where he asked to be buried..

    “Legend has it that Pusser’s Rum is sometimes referred to as ‘Nelson’s Blood’, because after the great Admiral Nelson’s death at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805, in which his body was preserved in a cask of spirits, holes were drilled into the sides and the liquid drained.”

    Like

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