Post Covid 19 World Demands New Approaches from Government and Private Sector

The Adrian Loveridge Column usually occupies this space on Monday mornings. The blogmaster takes this opportunity to thank Adrian for being a strident social commentator over the years and willingness to enter the BU fray, especially as it relates to promoting and defending the tourism sector he is very familiar. The BU household extends best wishes as he takes a voluntary timeout to ‘recharge’ – David, blogmaster 

The market certainly doesn’t know! The massive public financing in many places is nothing more than a band-aid, it is when that dressing is removed, we will see who has healed and can function, and who needs an amputation or worse. For Barbados, the acid test will be employment.

NorthernObserver

The raging COVID 19 pandemic has hammered home a reality- individuals, organizations, governments are being forced to change business model. Specifically as it relates to E-commerce and doing business in a digital space. The new way of doing business demands a reskilling and redeployment of the workforce that must be equally supported with reallocation of budgets. In a January report prepared by Hyun Song Shin titled E-commerce in the pandemic and beyond 3-takeaways are identified:

  1. E-commerce has ramped up during the pandemic around the world. The growth has differed across sectors and over different stages of the pandemic.
  2. The growth of e-commerce has been higher in countries where there were more stringent containment measures and where e-commerce was initially less developed.
  3. Some changes in consumers’ shopping habits and payment behaviour may be longer-lasting. This may have implications for structural change and the growth of the digital economy.

There has been robust discussion in this forum recently about how we foresee business being done in Barbados. The blogmaster sides with the argument supported in the report mentioned that even before the pandemic wrecked global economies and livelihoods, there was a push to shift business and other activity from bricks-and-mortar to the digital space. Covid 19 has accelerated the shift. Welcome to a view of what a post COVID 19 landscape will look like whether we like it or not.

Another forecast coming out of the pandemic is that people will have to coexist with COVID 19 AND other viruses likely to follow. It means in the future traditional supply chains and business related travel will be disrupted. Individuals, businesses and governments are already adjusting to a post COVID 19 reality with greater use of the digital space defined as the new normal.

As expected some countries start with an advantage in the new normal space- the so-called developed world. Barbados unfortunately has been lazy to rely on manual, redundant models not fit for purpose exposed in the current environment. Our private sector is not far behind if we accept reports of disruption to large companies being attacked by ransomware, supermarkets and essential businesses unable to efficiently manage spikes in demand for services and distribution during lockdowns and so on.

What is required is a nimble approach by public and private sectors supported by NGOs to strategise next steps how as a country we narrow the gap between existing and the new business model to sustains livelihoods in a post COVID 19 world. In fact the blogmaster will be disappointed if after a year of managing the pandemic this is not a work in progress.

The blogmaster is sympathetic to the current leadership of the country demanded to manage in unprecedented times. Let the blogmaster be clear, leadership is defined as government and private sector. For too long Barbados has relied on government to lead in all areas of managing the country.

The big question: what is the strategy to reposition Barbados to be able to compete in a post COVID world?

#socialpartnership

178 comments

  • Bro they have changed the Press Conference to 8pm

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  • The Press Conference has been changed to 8 pm

    Like

  • DullardFebruary 16, 2021 4:09 PM

    Did you know that the oldest slave on record was 114 in 1817 and that there were several slaves who centenerians and super centenerians in the 1817 census?

    There is a record of a burial at Westbury of a woman after 1878 who was 120 years old.
    The oldest person I have come across was in the early 1800’s.

    Elizabeth Philips was buried at the age of 126.

    +++++++++++++++++++++
    @ John
    These numbers have little scientific merit. They are probably due to age exaggeration and/or recording error. It is highly unlikely that there were any super centenarians at that time and nigh impossible that Elizabeth Philips died at 126.

    But I am still intrigued. Where did you get this data?

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Parochial Registers available on the internet and slave registers from 1817, also on the internet.

    Go look and see!!

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  • Oldest slave in 1817 in Barbados was Moll, 114 years old, a super centenarian.

    Another super centenarian two years younger, was Margaret, also a slave in 1817.

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  • Instead of swallowing the propaganda and lies peddled by historians, go and look for yourself here!!

    If you do, you will find I can’t make a poppet out of you so easily!!

    https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/1129/

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  • Tonight 8pm press conference cancelled until wednesday at 11am

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  • A. DullardDecember 3, 2018 6:24 AM

    @ JOhn
    I know from my research of a 126 year old, a 120 year old and also a 114 year old slave!!

    Elizabeth Holder at 120 was buried in Westbury in 1878 I think, need to check where she died.

    The 114 year old slave who appears in the 1817 returns I believe was Ch Ch or St. Philip but I would need to check.

    The 126 year old woman, Elizabeth Philips, was either Ch Ch or St. Philip, would need to check.

    That was in the 1800’s.
    ++++++++++++++++++++++

    Regardless of what your “research” said, this is 99.9% likely to be untrue. 126 years? In the 19th century? Slave?
    Sounds like nonsense.

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    Simple SimonDecember 3, 2018 7:36 AM

    In this instance John is probably right. The enslaved population was initially likely healthier than the slave holding population. Remember also that those people who were not super tough died on the journey across the Atlantic and never arrived in the Caribbean. I have a friend who will be 80 next birthday, she was born and raised in the upper St. Peter area in 1939. When she was a girl there was still a formerly enslaved woman living in her community. The woman was about 114, born in the 1820’s. Abolition was formally declared in Barbados in 1834. After a period of “apprenticeship” slavery was fully abolished in 1838.

    Even though they did not know her this formerly enslaved woman was a contemporary of my 2 elder siblings, who are in their 80’s

    So yes there are still Bajans alive who remember people who were enslaved. It is after all not so long ago.

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  • CAN ANYONE PLEASE KINDLY DEFINE FOR ME WHAT THE PHRASE “POST COVID WORLD” MEANS?
    oR AS THE QUESTION WOULD HAVE BEEN PHRASED IN EXAMINATIONS IN MY SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY DAYS………….

    Write short notes on a post covid world.
    If you were in Euna Moore’s N2 Biology class at UWI-Cave Hill (that so called third world university), you would have been required to present an outline before you proceeded.

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  • So MTA

    It suddenly dawned on me that when I was preparing for the hike in Guyana back in 1996, I had to take anti malarial tablets. Got them from the polyclinic opposite Enmore and seem to remember I took them in two instalments, once here and then again in Guyana.

    So, I’ve probably had some Hydroxychloroquine molecules running about in my body in the past.

    Apart from Cholera, I’ve had inoculations against Small Pox and Yellow Fever, Malaria quite apart from the normal inoculations against Typhoid, Tetanus (twice as it last 10 years), Diphtheria and Measles, Mumps and Rubella.

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  • MTA

    Here is the record of a burial of George W. Prescod from Sweetfield in St. Peter in February 1854.

    100 years old!!

    Typically 2-3 burials a day but not every day,

    In July, August, and September there were usually 20 or more burials per day.

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  • Hal Austin February 16, 2021 1:08 PM #: “If a child has died in Barbados from a CoVid related disease, this will be evidence that the president has been economical with the truth all along. She cannot be trusted.
    If it is not true, then we owe her an apology. But the government should make this clear as a matter of urgency….(Quote)”

    Quote and ‘requoting’ as many times as you care to, DOES NOT answer the question.

    How does a child dying from a condition brought on by COVID-19, be considered as evidence “that (prime minister) has been economical with the truth all along and cannot be trusted?” (Quote)

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  • WURA-War-on-UFebruary 16, 2021 2:58 PM

    Anyone with half a brain knows that Venezuela’s economic collapse has been driven by economic ostracism, not their internal method of government.

    In these reports, they never discuss the reason that the majority still vote for the ruling government. The country was for the wealthy few, with severe poverty, despite all of the oil wealth.

    The West has made the same mistake as it did with numerous other countries, from Guyana to Cuba. Thinking that economic ostracism would break the human spirit. Isn’t that something, that over numerous such ventures, they have never managed that?

    All the while, they hope to reinstall the former ruling elite. That they think such even possible is amazing. The people know what was before, they will not go back.

    The approach should have been to embrace the new government, accept ideological differences and move on. You know, just as they accept ideological differences with their main trading partner China, overlooking treatment of Uyghur Muslims?

    But as with Cuba, there appears to be a big lobby of wealthy Venezuelans in Florida. Venezuela’s oil wealth that is.

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  • @David et al,

    A post-Covid economy (and for DR.GP TMEE’s pleasure, that is post quarantine, post heavy hospitalisations of Covid patients, fully and free resumed travel, even if the virus remains as is probable, when operations resume without hindrance from the virus), must shift and pivot now, to what the island wants in the long term.

    Remember my question on ‘where do we want to be in five years’? It hinges on that.

    no total reliance on any one financial institution
    a better lifestyle for the many (my prior note on working hours, efficiency and work life balance). Working smart and as John says, ‘get off our xxxes’ and having more evening leisure time. This working until six o clock each night is a North American thing that is needless. Smart, not more. This will reduce NCD’s and improve the heath and well being of all Barbadians.
    significantly reduced import bill, particularly food, furniture and clothing. All of these need to be ramped up locally, in a business-sustainable manner. Not constant grants, but fit for purpose, profit making small businesses.
    a better focus on practical use university industry development programs. This to be explored further, but the uni must contribute to the socioeconomic development in a meaningful way, particularly industry. Professor Medford and Mclean were prior examples of this and that is the direction to follow. Visionary academics who contribute to industrial potential.
    A properly planned transport system. The current subsidised system, where the taxpayers pay for losing routes an profiteers do all others, is financial nonsense. No one ever mentions this, when criticising subsidies.
    Improve the working of government. Update the Senate to include truly independent people. A Senate of ten. Two business people, two union, one church leader, University Chancellor, Chair of Head teachers, Head of the Bar, Head of BAMP, Head of International Business Association. Not rubber stampers. Or just get rid of it. A waste of money in its current form.
    Strong focus on land use policy and agricultural development. As I said prior, manageable farm sizes, but enough to make the economy of scale useful. Improved options for processing, both for local consumption and export, of produce.
    A focus on training and building an industry in software writing and coding, this is where the big opportunity is and will remain.
    A fulfilling of the plans for Bridgetown, to create a truly beautiful entertainment town, clubs, restaurants and yes, condos for the visitors. That is where the condos and villas should be.

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  • Although the PCR test was negative, Covid is the cause of death…let that sink in..

    “A nine-year-old is among three people who passed away as a result of coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the number of deaths to 28, the Ministry of Health and Wellness said a short while ago.

    There were 126 new positive COVID-19 cases on Monday, February 15”

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  • “In these reports, they never discuss the reason that the majority still vote for the ruling government. The country was for the wealthy few, with severe poverty, despite all of the oil wealth.”

    from the advent of capitalist greed..that is what has BROUGHT EVERY COUNTRY TO ITS KNEES….anyone can write the final chapter…it happens like clockwork with no deviations…chattel slavery ended didn’t it and that was the most evil and devious one…it must all come to an end..that’s why i ignore the political side of it…..the people continue to be reeled into and stifled by politics to their own detrimetnt…i view the whole thing exactly for what it is…..greed and covetousness.

    Like

  • @ Crusoe

    You are on the right track, but you need to drill down some of your suggestions.

    Like

  • @ JohnFebruary 17, 2021 1:47 AM
    “MTA
    Here is the record of a burial of George W. Prescod from Sweetfield in St. Peter in February 1854.
    100 years old!!”
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Listen matey, why don’t you research also the register of births for the same G.W.P in the year of 1753 to verify the authenticity of the outlier you have used to argue that a long lifespan of black slaves, many reaching the ripe old age of 100, to put many of the white populations in Europe and America to shame?

    Where does it show the race or even the ‘profession’ of those dead people? How do you know there were slaves?

    Did your self-inflicted myopia caused you to overlook the ages of the other ‘death’ entries?

    Why don’t you make a detailed examination of the ‘average’ ages of the other entries recorded in the death registers for the same period; or better yet, during officially sanctioned decades of slavery, where the burial of the average slave was not even reported to the official Registrar far less accorded a “Christian” burial in any Parish Church yard?

    Next minute you would be bringing evidence to show that those same black slave centenarians and old crippled nonagenarians were rather active in their contributions to the slave-breeding mill on the sugarcane plantations to even surpass those two freaks of nature as told in the Jewish book of tall tales of Abraham (100 years) and Sara (90 years).

    Now here is what real science has to say about the sordid life of the same black slaves you want to paint as living the life of Riley during your ‘imagined’ Age of halcyon days to make slavery in Barbadoes look like a flight of fancy on the Falconhurst plantation in Alabama.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Extract from a ‘scientific’ paper: “Osteology of a slave burial population from Barbados, West Indies”:⁓ R S Corruccini, J S Handler, R J Mutaw, F W Lange,

    “A unique seventeenth-nineteenth century slave cemetery population from Newton plantation, Barbados, allows examination of craniodental characters in relation to ethnohistorical data.

    Age-at-death estimates suggest life expectancy at birth of 29 years and low infant mortality; historical demography, however, suggests life expectancy of 20 years and very high infant mortality. Tooth decay, bilateral tooth loss, periodontal disease, root hypercementosis, and severe enamel hypoplasia are high in frequency. The teeth yield evidence of such cultural practices as pipe-smoking and incisor mutilation. Several skeletal features reflect periodic near-starvation…”

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  • They are just making stuff up and throwing it on BU wall.

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  • @Miller
    👍🏿👍🏿
    Excellent post.

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  • They are just making stuff up and throwing it on BU wall….(Quote)

    Plse explain.

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  • Gave Miller a compliment twice.
    Great post.

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  • Mr Passive- Aggressive says accept or ignore. Move on.

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  • @ Williams

    Thank you. It is nice to know that for the past year you have not made a single original contribution to the discussion on CoVid, apart from trying to rubbish people, who may sometimes be wrong, but who sincerely try to contribute..

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  • @John you refer me to ancestry. Com?
    LOL. Are you serious?

    There was no longevity among the enslaved population of Barbados and one lived to 126. That’s nonsense.

    The life expectancy of slaves in Trinidad could have been as low as 15-20 years for males and 13-21 yrs for females.
    Barbados couldn’t havs been better.

    See for example,
    John AM (1988) Plantation slave mortality in Trinidad. Popul Stud (Camb) 42:161-182

    John AM (1988) The Plantation Slaves of Trinidad, 1783-1816: A Mathematical and Demographic Enquiry (Cambridge Univ Press, New York

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  • *and no one lived to 126

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  • Re A post-Covid economy (and for DR.GP TMEE’s pleasure, that is post quarantine, post heavy hospitalisations of Covid patients, fully and free resumed travel, even if the virus remains as is probable, when operations resume without hindrance from the virus), must shift and pivot now, to what the island wants in the long term.

    AND IT CAME TO PASS THAT THEY WERE DREAMERS IN THE LAND IN ABUNDANCE. NOT ONLY WERE THEY OVERCOME BY FEAR,AND PANIC, BUT THEY WERE AFFLICTED WITH DELUSIONS OF GRANDEUR.
    THEY WERE GOOD AT NAME CALLING
    THEY KNEW EVERYTHING, BUT SIMULTANEOUSLY KNEW NOTHING
    THEY WERE A GREAT SOURCE OF MIRTH, AS THEY FAILED TO RECOGNISE THAT THE WRITING IS REALLY AND TRULY ON THE WALL.

    Like

  • Dullard,

    Trinidad was captured by the English c.1797.

    In 1813, the oldest slaves were born in 1713 and 1718, one centenarian and one 95.

    Trinidad was Spanish and French, until c.1797 when the British took over.

    They had 10 years before the slave trade was abolished (1807) so I think you will find that they turned to India, which they controlled to get the labour.

    That’s why most Trinidadians you will meet clearly have East Indian ancestry.

    If you have not been able to figure out how to get to the source data using the ancestry.com website, I am quite prepared to show you how.

    Just put in the birth year you want in the box and click search.

    The source data is indexed so all you have to do is choose “view image” and you will see the original handwritten return from the person who owned the particular slave.

    For example, if you wanted to know how many slaves were over 100 as of the first slave returns in Barbados in 1817 all you would do is punch in 1717 in the birth year, click exact, then put in 1817 Barbados in the Keyword box and click exact.

    You would then click SEARCH.

    Next you would put in 1716 and repeat until you get to 1703 which is when Moll was born.

    The Ancestry site allows you to go beyond the two references you quote and actually look at the raw data on which those references are based.

    DO NOT DEPEND ON THE PROPAGANDA OF HISTORIANS.

    DO YOUR OWN DUE DILIGENCE.

    THE BEAUTY OF THE SITE IS THAT IT PUTS AT ANYONE’S DISPOSAL THE INDEX WHICH LEADS TO EVERY INDIVIDUAL SLAVE IN THE RETURNS, SOMETHING NEITHER AUTHOR WOULD HAVE HAD AT THEIR DISPOSAL WHEN THEY WROTE THEIR LEARNED PAPERS!!

    JOHN AM WENT THROUGH THE SOURCE DATA AND SUMMARISED AS BEST HE COULD THE MANY ENTRIES HE FOUND.

    I AM GIVING YOU A WAY TO CHECK HOW WELL HE DID HIS WORK< USING THE COMPUTER AND INTERNET WITH AN INDEXED SEARCH OF THE SAME SOURCE DATA HE WOULD HAVE USED.

    YOU WILL FIND THE HISTORIANS ARE BLOWN OUT OF THE WATER BY SIMPLE TECHNOLOGY.

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  • “The teeth yield evidence of such cultural practices as pipe-smoking and incisor mutilation. Several skeletal features reflect periodic near-starvation…”

    the lady from Domiinica who people met, and someone showed me a photo, that lifespan happened post slavery and post emancipation, she would’ve passed away in the 1970s..there was a modicum of healthcare around that time for descendants, they ate much better and there was no processed food.

    One lady in Oklahoma who still remembers the last pandemic AND the bombing to destroy Black Wall Street is about 116 years old..so that longevity started happening after the slave and emancipation period….the genes from Africa resurfaced and there was better healthcare.

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  • What John should be telling us is how long racist minorities are going to survive on the island when they no longer have black lives to feed off….according to what one posted in another forum, they are worried.

    Also noticed that the fraudulent social parasites have renamed themselves to WATCHDOGS….they can only be watchingdogging the government to see when the time is ripe to resume TIEFING FROM BLACK PEOPLE with their traitors in tow.

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  • Another example of how the post Covid landscape will change.

    Govt reviewing airport PPP – Cummins – Govt reviewing airport PPP – Cummins: https://barbadostoday.bb/2021/02/17/govt-reviewing-airport-ppp-cummins/

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  • The reason why it was unnecessary for Britain to tap the East Indian or Chinese population to provide labour for Barbados was because there was an over supply of labour.

    In 1680 there were ~40K slaves and Barbados produced 10K tons of sugar.

    In 1817 there were ~ 80K slaves and Barbados produced the exact same tonnage of sugar, 10K!!

    The reason was simple.

    Wind Energy capped the milling capacity and the milling capacity capped the output of sugar.

    A conclusion to be drawn from this is that conditions favoured population growth.

    So, what economic activity subsidised the growing slave population and sugar?

    If there were twice as many slaves alive in 1817 as 1680 and they produced the same sugar output, what did they do?

    Go figure!!

    It is simple really, maybe too simple for A Dullard!!

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  • https://barbadostoday.bb/2021/02/17/investor-pouring-millions-into-expanding-fruit-and-vegetable-varieties-here/

    both STUPID governments have had access too BILLIONS OF TAX PAYERS DOLLARS over the years to do what this dude is doing now, they both SQUANDERED it with backward policies and listening to crooked minorities…this UNDERSCORES just how useless to the Black population both have always been and are very likely to continue being..

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  • FOOD PUSH
    INVESTOR POURING MILLIONS INTO EXPANDING FRUIT AND VEGETABLE VARIETIES HERE
    by Marlon Madden
    Concerned about the island’s high food import bill and a lack of variety in fresh fruits and vegetables all year round, one businessman is pumping millions of dollars into the local agriculture sector to effect change.
    Canadian Charles Gagnon, who has called Barbados home for the past decade, told Barbados TODAY he was simply eager to see the island growing more of the fruits and vegetables it consumes, adding that there was too much focus on sugarcane production over the years with very little on food production.
    “A lot of the tropical fruits and vegetables should grow well here so we should really look at replacing these imports. You kind of don’t know where they come from or how they are grown,” he said, pointing out that his farm would be using “as little” chemicals as possible.
    “If there is any disruption in maritime transportation or airfreight then if you don’t have at least some food autonomy then people could literally starve here. I don’t think we can go fully autonomous but to have some level of food security is important,” he explained.
    Last year, Gagnon completed the purchase of the Haymans and Warleigh plantations with over 400 acres of property stretching from Bakers to parts of Black Bess, Haymans, Farm Road and The Whim, all in the parish of St Peter.
    Gagnon was guarded about the total investment to be pumped into the operation to get it fully operational. However, Barbados TODAY understands that, including the purchase of the expansive property, the total investment would surpass the $10 million mark.
    “We purchase the land and then we have invested in machinery for the farm. I don’t have exact figures but we have already invested a few million dollars in getting the farm going, purchasing equipment, and fixing the buildings,” said Gagnon.
    Over the past several months, workers have been transforming the land, which was previously used for the growing of sugarcane under the management of the Barbados Agriculture Management Company (BAMC), but was overgrown with shrubs and at various points became an illegal dumping ground.
    Gagnon told Barbados TODAY the plan was to populate the area with a variety of fruits and vegetables, explaining that while there would be some production of the more commonly grown food crops, he would be introducing others that were being imported once they were able to grow here, as well as some spices.
    He said he believed if people were exposed to a wider variety of fresh fruits and vegetables at a reasonable cost, a lot of the non-communicable diseases now facing the population would be a thing of the past.
    “If people were to eat healthier then the health problems here would be reduced significantly,” he said.
    Acknowledging that farming was “a difficult business”, the trained lawyer and financial expert said he was not going into the new business venture with huge expectations of profitability.
    “Margins are not very high, but if at least we can sell enough to pay for the investment and the equipment and the labour costs but we are not looking to make millions out of farming. It is very challenging here,” he said.
    The new crop production enterprise, known as Haymans Farm, currently employs 15 people, and that number could double when the farm is at full capacity.
    Asked why this kind of investment at this time, the founder of the 14-year-old Amphora Financial Group told Barbados TODAY he simply believed now was the time.
    “I find at the moment things are not going very well in Barbados. I hope it will turn around. The property market has been depressed for years and farming is not doing that well either. I just believe that this place, if properly managed, could do better over time.
    “It has big challenges, but I think it has a lot of potential. I just need to focus and get certain things done right. I hope it will turn out to be a good investment in the long run,” he explained.
    Stating that he was confident in the Mia Mottley administration’s push towards achieving food security, Gagnon said “If I can contribute by making a better offering of fruits and vegetables, so be it. It is going to be good for my own family because we live here, and it is going to be good for everybody who gets our produce.”
    Five acres of the farm, which uses its own water source, have been earmarked for the immediate production of vegetables within a shade house for local consumption.
    The bulk of the farm, however, will be for the production of hay, which will be sold both locally and regionally.
    “We may have some solar generation also on some parts of the property that we are looking at. That is really it. Eventually, once we have bigger volumes of fruits and vegetables we will offer them to the public so that people can come here and buy directly from the farm,” said the investor.
    Gagnon, who is a large shareholder in a cannabis production company in Canada, admitted that he did examine the possibility of putting some of the land into cannabis production, but said he was still uneasy about doing so because of the high fees associated with licensing.
    However, he said he was willing to try at a one-acre production, but insisted it was not a part of the short-term plans.
    (marlonmadden@barbadostoday.bb)

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  • @Hants
    A lot of the tropical fruits and vegetables should grow well here so we should really look at replacing these imports. You kind of don’t know where they come from or how they are grown,” he said, pointing out that his farm would be using “as little” chemicals as possible.

    “If there is any disruption in maritime transportation or airfreight then if you don’t have at least some food autonomy then people could literally starve here. I don’t think we can go fully autonomous but to have some level of food security is important,” he explained.

    A few days ago we had a Barbadian braniac warning us against “food security”. Now we have this “Canadian idiot” wanting us to grow more food. Not only that… ‘He is putting his money where his mouth is.’.

    Give me the ‘idiot’. We have to ask more of our braniacs.

    Like

  • Of course when you read the full story, don’t be surprised if ten years from now, if there is just one crop and it is not a fruit.

    😃 All his plans went up in smoke😃
    A backdoor move.

    Liked by 1 person

  • William…the government will more than likely try to convince us that they couldn’t do this without Canadians french or otherwise, that Black people are not capable of doing this with THEIR OWN TAX DOLLARS…wonder how much concessions they’re giving him on demand to do what the people can do themselves with their money…..and they expect sensibe people to take them seriously or accept this STRAIGHT UP BULLSHIT…..in their lives..

    those a just a few of the plantations they sold to foreign whites/minority others, some are in St. Thomas, St. George and St. Philip.

    Like

  • willfully, maliciously and arrogantly pushing the Black population right back on to slave plantations…that was the intent from the very beginning as we warned..

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  • GPFebruary 17, 2021 9:21 AM Re A post-Covid economy (and for DR.GP TMEE’s pleasure, that is post quarantine, post heavy hospitalisations of Covid patients, fully and free resumed travel, even if the virus remains as is probable, when operations resume without hindrance from the virus), must shift and pivot now, to what the island wants in the long term.

    AND IT CAME TO PASS THAT THEY WERE DREAMERS IN THE LAND IN ABUNDANCE. NOT ONLY WERE THEY OVERCOME BY FEAR,AND PANIC, BUT THEY WERE AFFLICTED WITH DELUSIONS OF GRANDEUR.
    THEY WERE GOOD AT NAME CALLING
    THEY KNEW EVERYTHING, BUT SIMULTANEOUSLY KNEW NOTHING
    THEY WERE A GREAT SOURCE OF MIRTH, AS THEY FAILED TO RECOGNISE THAT THE WRITING IS REALLY AND TRULY ON THE WALL.

    What are you on about now? Yes, you are good at name calling, remember when you called the VP a ‘hoe’?

    And your last sentence, you are on again about the end of the world and rapture. Stupse. Such rubbish and then talking about people panicking.

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  • @ WURA
    Like I said to you less than forty eight hours ago: Ignore the ostriches wherever they are. Country being sold out , right under our noses.
    That’s why I sent the article. More to come. Yuh can hide and buy land but you can hide and work um.

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  • @ TheOGazerts,

    ” The bulk of the farm, however, will be for the production of hay, which will be sold both locally and regionally.”

    ” bulk ” ” hay “

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  • Launder – laundry – cleaning. The art of turning something that is unpalatable into something that is considered clean and healthy.. Governments and civilians over the years have carried out despicable activities for numerous reasons.

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  • The fellow owns a medical marijuana company in Canada? Hmm

    I commend his efforts to grow food in Barbados, at least on the face of it. As Theo and Hants state, what follows will tell the full story.

    This is why such farms should have governing legislation as to productive usage by acreage.

    Other than that, good luck to him.

    I still would like to see farms split by acreage to allow small farmers to lease various sizes, from one to three acres and then larger parcels, for productive use, with absolutely no right to develop for other commercial or residential use.

    Liked by 1 person

  • What are you on about now? Yes, you are good at name calling, remember when you called the VP a ‘hoe’?

    THERE IS NAME CALLING AND THEN THERE IS TRUTH TELLING.
    JUST AS IT IS NOT ERRONEOUS TO CALL A SPADE …..A SPADE, IT IS QUITE CORRECT TO CALL A HOE ….A HOE, FOR A HOE IS INDEED A HOE..

    And your last sentence, you are on again about the end of the world and rapture. Stupse.Such rubbish and then talking about people panicking.
    THE CONCEPT OF THE ESCHATON IS DEFINITELY NOT RUBBISH
    THERE IS NO NEED TO PANIC ABOUT THE ESCHATON, BECAUSE ONE CAN EASILY PREPARE THEREFOR.

    I SAY AGAIN VERY ACCURATELY AND IN PROPER PROSE……THAT CAN NOT BE REFUTED…………….

    AND IT CAME TO PASS THAT THEY WERE DREAMERS IN THE LAND IN ABUNDANCE. NOT ONLY WERE THEY OVERCOME BY FEAR,AND PANIC, BUT THEY WERE AFFLICTED WITH DELUSIONS OF GRANDEUR.
    THEY WERE GOOD AT NAME CALLING
    THEY KNEW EVERYTHING, BUT SIMULTANEOUSLY KNEW NOTHING
    THEY WERE A GREAT SOURCE OF MIRTH, AS THEY FAILED TO RECOGNISE THAT THE WRITING IS REALLY AND TRULY ON THE WALL.

    MY UNDERSTANDING IS THAT COVID-19 IS AN EXAMPLE OF A PLAGUE, AND THAT IT HAS AND CONTINUES TO AFFECT COMMERCE UNIVERSALLY

    MY UNDERSTANDING IS THAT BOTH PLAGUES AND TERMINATION OF COMMERCE UNIVERSALLY HAS BEEN PREDICTED, SO HOW CAN IT BE POSSIBLE THAT THE CURRENT REALITY IS RUBBISH, WHEN IT IS CAUSING SO MUCH CHAOS, CONFUSION AND CEASELESS CHATTER?

    SEEMS TO ME THAT THE WRITING IS REALLY AND TRULY ON THE WALL.

    I AM CALMLY ENJOYING THE.CHAOS, CONFUSION AND CEASELESS CHATTER, AS I CONTEMPLATE “RUBBISH” HAPENING.

    THERE WILL BE LOTS OF RUBBISH AROUND THEN FOR SURE BUT LESS CEASELESS CHATTER.

    Like

  • @ Williams

    Thank you. It is nice to know that for the past year you have not made a single original contribution to the discussion on CoVid, apart from trying to rubbish people, who may sometimes be wrong, but who sincerely try to contribute..”

    Funny thing, I have seen some of the original contributions that were made.. if only they were based on fact/truth. I leave you to judge if my post are original or not. My one desire, is that they are truthful.

    If I think something is wrong or misleading, then I will comment. What I will not do is to join your fight circuit.

    You initiate fights with A, then with B then with C…. A few weeks/days later you start with A again and work through your list. You will have to get your kicks/thrills elsewhere. Move on.

    Over and out. You may have the last word.

    Like

  • The vaccine rollout in Italy has been slow, but with millions waiting for their injection some key groups are refusing the Oxford/AstraZeneca jab when it is offered to them.
    For every 100 people, the UK has vaccinated 23.3, whereas in EU the figure is just 4.88.
    In Italy the number is 4.96, and case numbers in the country have been staying at high levels in recent days.
    In many EU countries they consider this Covid jab second best to either the Pfizer/BioNTech or Moderna vaccines.
    It comes after some European politicians were talking down the Oxford/AstraZeneca jab to cover the EU being slow to complete contracts and beset by delays from suppliers, all of which has backfired and reduced the take-up of the vaccine
    In Italy, teachers and police officers under the age of 50 have been moved up the priority list, but only if they accept the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine.
    Representatives of the police are demanding they are given the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine instead, saying they want the one with the greatest efficacy.
    Dr Paolo Mezzana has said the doctors in Italy are asking for a different vaccine because the AstraZeneca one takes a while for immunisation to come into effect and they need protection now.
    He said this viewpoint is being interpreted incorrectly by some believing if doctors do not want it then why should they have it.
    Dr Mezzana said: “We are saying that it’s a good vaccine, very good.”
    He added it’s good because of how easy it is to administer and store.
    Some EU countries have said they will not be giving the AstraZeneca vaccine to its elderly over fears it is not as effective for old people.
    AstraZeneca, Oxford University and the UK government have denied this and World Health Organization and EU guidelines say the vaccine works for everyone.
    Only a very small amount of studies have been done on the efficacy of the AstraZeneca vaccine in elderly people, but the company says there’s no reason to suspect age will make their jab less effective….(Quote)

    Like

  • A trip to the beach may be one of the safest post-lockdown activities Britons will be able to take part in, a Sage scientist has suggested, after evidence shows the risk of outdoor transmission of Covid-19 is low.
    “There’s been very, very little evidence that any transmission outdoors is happening in the UK,” Mark Woolhouse, professor of infectious disease epidemiology at the University of Edinburgh, told the Science and Technology Committee today.
    While trips abroad may have to wait due to the risk of importing dangerous new variants, beach visits could be given the green light, Prof Woolhouse, whose research feeds in to the Government’s Sage sub-group Spi-M, said.
    “There were no outbreaks linked to crowded beaches,” he said. “There’s never been a Covid-19 outbreak linked to a beach ever anywhere in the world to the best of my knowledge.”
    He said that other mass gatherings – such as a horse racing event – are an exception because they do not involve social distancing and there are “pinch points” like travel and refreshment facilities.
    “I think we do have to understand where the risks are so that we can do as much as possible safely,” he added….(Quote)

    Like

  • @David February 17, 2021 3:04 PM
    you know the interconnections?
    Invest Caribbean-ICN is Persaud. And Corbin is a Director of ICN, plus seemingly the one at Ritzury. All else is largely Jamaican connections. See a lot of show, but less sizzle.

    Like

  • I actually know someone who patented their medical marijuana product and they were so right, these sellout nigas will always be a curse and blight in Black lives.

    Like

  • @ David February 17, 2021 3:04 PM
    (Quote)
    Is pursuing cannabis market one way to go? (Unquote).

    (Quote):
    Medical marijuana is the future. It offers a chance for the country to create new jobs and lower its debt burden. As a result, increasing its tax revenues. It is time Barbados and the wider Caribbean, take their share of this huge pie. (Unquote).
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Blogmaster, is this the same plant which only a few years ago was look upon as the female equivalent to Satan?

    Are the political powers-that-be going to offer a national pardon to those who were the early entrepreneurs in this newly embraced venture as was done for those who lost their innocent lives or were incarcerated at Glendairy for long periods of time for simply participating in the 1937 riots (and earlier rebellions) for merely ‘fighting’ for fair play and a level playing field in the social and economic race?

    Oh, how the lowly ‘street’ girl called Mary Jane has risen, all of a sudden, to the top of the foreign investment heap to be the only attraction in Bridgetown!

    Now here is a ‘green’ opportunity for your local investment magnate man Mal(m)oney to shift gears in his duty-free’ automatic Mercedes Benz machine by putting some of that US $175 mill sitting idle in some ‘foreign’ bank account to good ROI use not only to save the Bajan economy from pending implosion but also to turn Barbados into a ‘high-living’ hotspot sans the Hyatt-made concrete lighthouse of a scammer’s imagination.

    Like

  • “Blogmaster, is this the same plant which only a few years ago was look upon as the female equivalent to Satan?”

    hypocrites, frauds and sellouts…who will still lockup Black people only for the plant.

    Like

  • @Miller

    There is the tipping point for all things. You are aware of the Elliot Ness era?

    Like

  • @Miller, Are the political powers-that-be going to offer a national pardon to those who were the early entrepreneurs in this newly embraced venture as was done for those who lost their innocent lives or were incarcerated at Glendairy for long periods of time for simply participating in the 1937 riots (and earlier rebellions) for merely ‘fighting’ for fair play and a level playing field in the social and economic race?

    Miller, there is a distinction between the two. The 1937 riots were a rebellion against unjust laws and inequitable application between people, all being citizens. This was a fundamental wrong and thus, action to correct should be pardoned.

    In contrast, the breaking of a law that applies to everyone without fear nor favour, is still, the breaking of a law. Thus, past transgressions cannot be given a pass. That was the law, at the time.

    However, from the moment that we have a concerted agreement to legalise marijuana, from that point forward, in my opinion the status of those incarcerated changes, if not absolutely, to some measure.

    Yes, trafficking for the purpose of sale for pleasure is still a crime, however, when you are allowing a large section of people to make money from the production and manufacture of the same product, yet incarcerate another group, there appears to be some inequity.

    One may argue that it is illegal to traffic a quantity of cocaine or other harder drug, but it is still legal to produce and use in medicine, that point may be taken. So, how do we reconcile the two?

    To get it out of the way quickly, I will first address the possession for personal use. I believe that it should be made legal to hold some reasonable quantity of marijuana for personal use. While it begs the question of where you get it from, such an approach will reduce the waste of resources chasing every user or everyone in possession, whether they traffic or not.

    Let us now look at the other equation, being:

    Cocaine for medical use, legal VS cocaine for pleasure, unlicensed sale, illegal

    Marijuana for medical use, legal VC marijuana for pleasure, unlicensed sale, illegal

    The two equations are identical in principle.

    So, what is our real issue? I submit that the issue is that, as you say, those early producers are marginalised by not having the resources and legal know how, to combat the new entrants.

    While the sale for pleasure will still be illegal, the sale for medicinal use will be legal and the market should be opened up for all producers, who can maintain medical grade quality.

    This is where these growers need legal and business assistance, to ensure that their product can be processed to medical grade and sold as branded product.

    That is where one focus point needs to be.

    The solution is possibly:

    legislate that all personal use up to a specific level is legal for possession
    institute an assistance program to convert current illegal producers to legitimate production of medical marijuana
    legislate to reduce the sentences of all those currently incarcerated for the production and or sale of marijuana, to time served and immediately release them. While this does not absolve them from breaking the law, in existence at the time of the crime, it ensures that they are not unfairly treated in the transfer of illegal to legal production and sale.
    implement a new punitive framework for those who choose to continue to work illegally, outside of the legal production of the drug.

    This will be the most suitable and just approach to addressing current inequity in the system.

    On the assistance program for current illegal producers, it will require substantial work, including assistance in processing and standards education, to ensure that these producers can cope with a new playing field of operation.

    Like

  • …..who patented their medical marijuana product…so impressed and pleased to post that the BLACK person delivered a world class product…

    .destroying black people to elevate trash will be the end of sellouts.

    Like

  • WURA-War-on-UFebruary 17, 2021 4:36 PM “Blogmaster, is this the same plant which only a few years ago was look upon as the female equivalent to Satan?” hypocrites, frauds and sellouts…who will still lockup Black people only for the plant.

    While I agree that the playing field needs to be level, the problem is ensuring that the legal framework is consistent with internaitonal principles.

    As such, the issue is really to bring the status quo up to speed by

    releasing those currently incarcerated for the sale of the drug, as of the point of legalisation their status effectively changes. At the time of incarceration, they committed a crime, but as of the day the drug is legalised, it would not be a crime, so natural justice would indicate they be released as of that date.
    ensuring that producers have the resources to convert their process to that for medical grade marijuana products.

    That is really the crux of it.

    Often what we may see as about intent, is actually about a lack of understanding of principles and imagination as to how to apply these principles to practical scenarios.

    Like

  • According to the Pentagon, up to a third of US service people refuse to be vaccinated.

    Like

  • My head is beginning to spin as I try to connect the dots and link all the stories together.

    First we had drug smuggling men on a yacht named ‘Ecstacy’. Strange name for a boat.

    Even stranger was use of the boat for drug smuggling. Was the name a bold signal for the movement/availability of drugs?

    Anyhow, one of the men on the yacht subsequently appeared in a ‘marIjuana video rant’ with a big mouth Canadian.
    Truth is stranger than fiction.

    Then we had a son of the soil a braniac preaching against food security.

    A few days later we have a Canadian supporting food security with an acre for marijuana security.

    Prophesy
    Ten years down the road, the food security Canadian cites the braniac and says ‘i dun wid dat. I gun plant marijuana’

    Braniac says ‘yuh see. I wuz right:

    Waru saying ‘i saw it coming. I knew it was marijuana from Day 1’

    Theo and other bajans saying ‘dem trick we’

    Hants asking “way de hay’

    Liked by 1 person

  • GPFebruary 17, 2021 12:45 PM

    Good grief. I see you on a soapbox ranting about end times. Did you and John both smoke some stuff at the same time that was off in some way?

    Two erstwhile brainiacs gone nutty.

    The world will go on, milleniums after both of us. Mankind, centuries after.

    But, enjoy YOUR world. That is what it is about anyway.

    Like

  • TheOGazertsFebruary 17, 2021 5:11 PM

    Have no fear. These new farms will give the term ‘cane fire’ a wild new meaning. It will raise Bajans and visitors to higher heights.

    Like

  • @ Crusoe February 17, 2021 4:59 PM
    “Miller, there is a distinction between the two. The 1937 riots were a rebellion against unjust laws and inequitable application between people, all being citizens. This was a fundamental wrong and thus, action to correct should be pardoned.
    In contrast, the breaking of a law that applies to everyone without fear nor favour, is still, the breaking of a law. Thus, past transgressions cannot be given a pass. That was the law, at the time.”
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    You would make a (very) good defence lawyer (for the Crown).

    On behalf of the ‘victims’ of the marijuana holocaust, all that can be submitted to the judge and jury is a plea for mitigation by arguing that the keeping of slaves and its attendant institutions- including the ‘holy’ Church which was deeply complicit- were also seen in the eyes of the then Law as ‘kosher’.

    But weren’t the same slave owners including the same Church handsomely compensated for the loss of their profitable property?

    And what did the ex-slaves and their descendants receive as compensation for their exploitation and dehumanisation other than a white Jesus to brainwash the mind of the likes of both GPs?

    Wasn’t it lawful under the Nazi Third Reich to send non-Aryans to concentration camps as part of the ‘final solution’ to the Jewish problem?

    Should we, therefore, allow history to repeat itself to the moral disadvantage of the more enlightened’ descendants of the1937 riots?

    Like

  • Cruseo…reality, logic, commonsense and dumb politicians giddy on small power dont mix.

    Like

  • MillerFebruary 17, 2021 5:47 PM Wasn’t it lawful under the Nazi Third Reich to send non-Aryans to concentration camps as part of the ‘final solution’ to the Jewish problem? // Should we, therefore, allow history to repeat itself to the moral disadvantage of the more enlightened’ descendants of the1937 riots?

    The first one aligns with my explanation of the pardoning of those who fought in the 1937 rebellion. The Nazi action was a fundamental wrong, just as the laws existing prior to 1937.

    On the second point, I have outlined a remedy that addresses the balancing of the playing field. If you think that more needs to be given in the remedy, then so be it. But the framework has been outlined.

    Like

  • @ Crusoe February 17, 2021 6:00 PM
    “On the second point, I have outlined a remedy that addresses the balancing of the playing field. If you think that more needs to be given in the remedy, then so be it. But the framework has been outlined.”
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Now here is a proposal in regard to the levelling of the playing field which you might find not up your socially and financially ‘well-paved’ street.

    How about making the ‘God-given’ naturally-growing cannabis plant freely available for cultivation on a home or cottage-industry basis just like any other ‘agricultural’ product e.g. thyme, parsley neem, moringa, aloe vera.

    If it is to be produced on a larger scale to generate big profits for investors like rum from sugarcane or cigarettes from tobacco, then it should be subject to a licensing regime and the ‘final output’ taxed at the point of production.

    Then we should have no small fry players going to jail for hustling spliffs while the big players ‘buy-out’ their way like C H walking free for any ‘assumed’ role in the Redlands cum Ecstasy affair.

    Liked by 1 person

  • RE GPFebruary 17, 2021 12:45 PM
    Good grief. I see you on a soapbox ranting about end times. Did you and John both smoke some stuff at the same time that was off in some way? Two erstwhile brainiacs gone nutty.
    The world will go on, milleniums after both of us. Mankind, centuries after.But, enjoy YOUR world. That is what it is about anyway.
    MANY MANY YEARS AGO,A MAN WAS BUILDING A LARGE BOAT WAY IN LAND. HE CLAIMED THAT THERE WOULD BE A FLOOD. HIS PEERS MOCKED HIM FOR ABOUT 300 YEARS UNTIL…….AS RECORDED IN THE SAYINGS OF THE SAME JESUS THAT SAID LOVE YOUR NEIGHBOUR AS YOURSELF IN Matthew 24:37-39 KJV THUS►
    37 But as the days of Noah were, so shall also the coming of the Son of man be.
    38 For as in the days that were before the flood they were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, until the day that Noe entered into the ark,
    39 And knew not until the flood came, and took them all away; so shall also the coming of the Son of man be.
    IN ANOTHER SECTION OF THE WORD OF TRUTH WE READ IN 2 PETER THUS
    3 Knowing this first, that there shall come in the last days scoffers, walking after their own lusts,
    4 And saying, Where is the promise of his coming? for since the fathers fell asleep, all things continue as they were from the beginning of the creation.
    5 For this they willingly are ignorant of, that by the word of God the heavens were of old, and the earth standing out of the water and in the water:
    6 Whereby the world that then was, being overflowed with water, perished:
    7 But the heavens and the earth, which are now, by the same word are kept in store, reserved unto fire against the day of judgment and perdition of ungodly men.
    8 But, beloved, be not ignorant of this one thing, that one day is with the Lord as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day.
    9 The Lord is not slack concerning his promise, as some men count slackness; but is longsuffering to us-ward, not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance.
    10 But the day of the Lord will come as a thief in the night; in the which the heavens shall pass away with a great noise, and the elements shall melt with fervent heat, the earth also and the works that are therein shall be burned up.
    11 Seeing then that all these things shall be dissolved, what manner of persons ought ye to be in all holy conversation and godliness,
    12 Looking for and hasting unto the coming of the day of God, wherein the heavens being on fire shall be dissolved, and the elements shall melt with fervent heat?
    JUST AS SOME FOLK WILL REFUSE TO TAKE THE VACCINE, SOME WILL REJECT PETER’S MESSAGE ABOVE ON THE ESCHATON.
    A FEW WILL ACCEPT BOTH.

    Like

  • Canadians love the Caribbean.

    In 20015
    ” Ernie Eves, former Ontario premier, joins board of Jamaican medical marijuana business Timeless Herbal Care “

    Like

  • Maybe not in Barbados and the Caribbean but…

    Like

  • MillerFebruary 17, 2021 6:44 PM

    Miller, I have no issue with that. That takes my reference to remove any penalties for personal use and expands to the cottage industry.

    No problem at all.

    Back to the currently incarcerated offenders. Just an analogy, but I think a fair one.

    Today, the speed limit on a road is 20mph. Ten people get caught and jailed for two months, five for driving at 30mph and five for driving at 40mph.

    End of the month, a new speed limit is legislated at 35mph.

    Is it fair to keep the prior convicted in prison, when every other person is driving at 35mph now?

    I would say, because it was a crime at the time, there is no need to revisit the conviction. However, in the interest of natural justice, it is right, to immediately release them, such that going forward, they are on even field with their peers. That is only fair.

    Is there a difference between the 35mph and 40mph rule breakers? I think not. The essential parameters of the situation have changed. That the 40mph rule breakers still surpassed the ‘new limit’ is irrelevant.

    In the same way, there is no need to revisit prior sentencing for marijuana convictions, however, from the day of legalisation, the parameters have changed and they should be freed forthwith.

    Breaking of laws henceforth, based on the new existing laws, determine their future, as with everyone else.

    Thoughts?

    Like

  • TheOGazertsFebruary 17, 2021 5:11 PM

    We are on the same page with much of that. Curiouser and curiouser. Makes on wonder what is real and what is not.

    Also gives some further credence to Miller view re legalisation of cottage industry, because a level playing field must be done and be seen to be done. Let us get real and be honest about things.

    How many of these people locked up for a spliff brought in a container of grass through the port?

    If we are not honest about a level playing field, we are wasting time.

    N’est pas?

    Like

  • Crusoe..this should not even be a discussion. Every country so far that has legalized marijuana have included policies that releases people who were convicted for the pland and wiped the convictions of many….even the ones who were serving life sentences. It’s the backward Barbados AG jumped out braying his jackassness that people who were convicted for marijuana can’t participate in the trade when forward thinking jurisdications are training these same people to create legal businesses in every area that could promote financial success, and prevent recidivism. Barbados’ leaders are backward and take pleasure in destroying any opportunity that would elevate black lives…..that’s why Karma is on their asses like a second skin and will go nowhere as long as they continue to be as*holes oppressing and criminalizing only Black people.

    Like

  • Barbados AG jumped out braying his jackassness that people who were convicted for marijuana can’t participate in the trade when forward thinking jurisdications are training these same people to create legal businesses in every area that could promote financial success, and prevent recidivism….that alerted us that the shitheads of parliament with their minority foreign and local slavemaster wannabes were going to use the marijuana to once against enslave Black people on those blighted and cursed slave plantations…while ripping off the treasury of concessions….all those leaders should be jailed for this clear crime they all plotted against the Black citizens.

    Like

  • Financial education key, says Haynes
    Financial education is vital during these troubling economic times, says Central Bank Governor Cleviston Haynes.
    During the Barbados Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors virtual monthly meeting on Friday, he said Barbados was undergoing financial system reform by going more digital and moving away from cash. He said it was important for financial advisers to help keep the public abreast of the changing dynamics of finance.
    “Education is very important as we adopt new [financial] instruments and it is important we improve our ability to educate the public. Not everyone is financially savvy, and often there is a fear of using new instruments, particularly for the older folk and I think as financial advisers, you are in a position to reach out to your clientèle, some young and some not so young, and you have an opportunity . . . to share information on these instruments,” he said..
    Choices critical
    Haynes said the Central Bank would soon be launching its own education programmes, adding it was critical for people to have a choice of alternative products to ensure Barbados’ economy remained competitive.
    “Developments in digital technology, computer networks, internet businesses and e-commerce platforms are influencing the nature and scope of finance. Digital payments represent the trend of the future . . . and in recent times both Government and the bank have recommended the reduced use of cash and the movement towards digital payments, accelerated by the pandemic,” he said.
    Moving away
    Haynes said more companies were moving away from distributing cheques and opting for direct payments, which in turn accelerated
    the acceptance of e-commerce and e-banking, adding Government was utilising direct payments through the automated clearing house (ACH) system. He saidhe thought a direct payment system could also be apotential solution to the current problems regarding pension cheques, where long lines of people were seen at post offices on Friday.
    The Governor also spoke about the upcoming National Payment System Bill, which he said was to “promote a safe, efficient, resilient and competitive payment system”, which will be under the supervision of the Central Bank. “This new legislation will create a framework for licensing payment services and will establish a payments council to advise the bank. The bank will, over time, give force to this legislation and will be prepared to take action against licensees who breach the law,” he said.
    Haynes said the Central Bank was also changing its internal governance, with the Governor and board serving six years instead of five following his tenure. In addition, he said the bank would be limiting how much money it lent Government.
    “In December a new Central Bank Act came into force, which makes a number of innovations. The act now clearly defines what the key objectives of the bank are – which is to protect the value of our currency and to maintain financial stability across the financial system.
    “One of the major changes is that there are limitations on how much financing the Central Bank can provide to Government at any point in time. The new act seeksto reduce the capacity of thebank to provide inordinate amounts of financing to Government. We will continue to provide some financing through the overdraft facility – bearing in mind Government, like any business, has cash flow needs – but we will not be active on the primary market in order to fund
    Government in the near term,” he said. (CA)

    Source: Nation

    Like

  • Governor warns of ‘blessing
    circles

    Central Bank Governor Cleviston Haynes advised anyone taking part in any financial schemes such as “blessing circles” to exercise caution and seek advice first.
    While he admitted he did not know all the details concerning blessing circles, he said “it seems to be speculative” and there was risk with any such mechanism.
    “There could be a relationship between adversity and the emergence of schemes which appear to be somewhat disingenuous. You probably stand a good chance of being a loser at the end of the day –which goes back to education and understanding.
    Significant investment
    “If you are being asked to make a significant investment of that type, perhaps it may be wise to have someone who you can sit with and who can give you [sound] advice,” he said.
    Haynes said traditional meeting turns carried risks as well and advised anyone considering entering any such scheme to seek out information, get sound financial advice and not invest what they were not prepared to lose.
    Haynes’ comments were made on Friday during his address at the Barbados Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors virtual monthly meeting. (CA)

    Source: Nation

    Like

  • Haynes’ comments were made on Friday during his address at the Barbados Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors virtual monthly meeting…..(Quote)

    Insurance agents work for insurance companies, financial advisers work for their clients. Is this an organisation of chalk and cheese?

    Like

  • ‘Blessing circle’? Sounds like a small version of Ponzi scheme. Is it like the old Meeting Turn?

    Problem is, in the old days, people had scruples. Not now.

    Like

  • The majority have to find a way to create their own investments and get away from the crooks in the private sector and in the parliament who will STEAL ALL THEIR MONEY and keep them in poverty….all the evidence is right there…don’t give them any time to regroup and restart robbing Black people, that’s the opportunities they are all now talking about….shut them down….let them find other fools to rob, hopefully this time they will be finished off.

    that’s what Haynes should be saying, but he’s a creature of the same massive rob the Black population thefts..

    Like

  • WURA
    YOU IS A BRIGHT WOMAN RIGHT ? AND A KNOWER OF MANY THINGS RIGHT?
    CAN YOU PLEASE KINDLY TELL ME WHAT IS THE DEFINITION OF A POST COVID WORLD?

    Like

  • GP……it’s a reboot….with the Black population once again at the bottom with all the scum, thieves and racists at the top, but only if Black people allow their lowclass no good covetous black face leaders to maneuver them into that position again..

    Like

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