127 comments

  • BAJAN’sS NEED TO BE AWARE THOSE THAT PROMISE FREENESS HAVE TO FIRST TAKE FROM THE WHOLE POPULATION WHAT THEY HAVE EARNED AND THEIR ASSETS WHILE RETAINING FOR THEMSELVES AND THEIR FELLOW CRONIES AND THEN TRICKLING DOWN WHAT IS LEFT. IN SUCH A SITUATION, WE END UP WORKING FOR THE STATE THROUGH EXORBITANTLY HIGH TAXATION. WE THEREFORE BECOME INDENTURED TO THE STATE WITHOUT A RELEASE DATE. THAT MEANS YOUR WHOLE LIFE YOU SPEND WORKING FOR THE STATE RATHER THAN IMPROVING YOUR OWN LOT.

    LONG LIVE FREEDOM AND PROSPERITY!

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  • @ Mr. Skinner

    As I have mentioned in previous contributions, I’m not a fan of Barrow, or of any other politician for that matter. I’m of the firm belief they were/are PAID by the taxpayers to carry out the duties they were ELECTED to perform.

    Yet, a political party that continually boasts about being the “party for the poor” did not see it fit to take from Barrow’s examples.

    I recall when head of Barbados Vagrants and Homeless Society (BVHS), Kemar Saffrey’s cries for help from the previous DLP administration, “fell on deaf ears.”

    But, what is amazing and comical at the same time is, rather than addressing the issue, former Minister of Social Care, Steve Blackett, during a sitting in the House of Assembly on Tuesday, June 13, 2017, said his administration “inherited vagrancy from the BLP” and accused that political party of heralding “the advent of vagrancy in Barbados.”

    Mr. Skinner, I’ll bet you the last $25 on my credit union account if Saffrey comes out to similarly criticize this current BLP administration on the issue, its members would pass the blame to the DEMS, while saying they didn’t do anything about vagrancy during their tenure.

    this is an example of why I don’t take politicians seriously.

    These are the same politicians that, on “Errol Barrow Day,” would praise him, talk about his social policies, the NIS and NHC, how he loved to help poor people….. and constantly refer to his “mirror image” and other speeches as though, according to a contributor, “he was the fount of all wisdom.”

    Additionally, the BVHS compiled a report, which was presented to former administration, highlighting the plight of the homeless, its causes and possible solutions that Government can implement to tackle the issue.

    Unfortunately, those recommendations also “fell on deaf ears.”

    Liked by 1 person

  • Happy palindrome day.

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  • @ Artax
    It’s the same old crap. We don’t change governments , we change political parties .
    We can like it or lump it but the Duopoly Rules.

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  • @ John February 2, 2020 12:28 PM

    One thing that has been known as a fact of history and which can’t be denied or refuted by you still in your first year Sunday school class is that Quakers were some of the biggest slave owners in Barbados.

    Just check the ‘inherited’ names of their black properties they eventually disposed of.

    The hypocrisy of the Quakers owning black slaves while preaching against slavery is analogous to a Bajan rum shop owner telling his male customers to stop drinking.

    But we know you would argue that the Quakers were doing the wretched blacks a favour by saving them from tribal genocide back in violent Africa; just as the rum shop owner would argue he is selling his customers rum instead of them wasting it on buying sex from prostitutes.

    What a crowning example of perfect hypocrisy in the all-seeing eye of Yahweh!

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  • Miller
    February 2, 2020 3:14 PM

    @ John February 2, 2020 12:28 PM
    One thing that has been known as a fact of history and which can’t be denied or refuted by you still in your first year Sunday school class is that Quakers were some of the biggest slave owners in Barbados.

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Quakers owned slaves and in so doing came to the realization they needed to end it.

    Quakers ended slavery.

    That is fact of history.

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  • @John February 2, 2020 7:40 PM

    You still peddling that BS?

    Chattel Slavery was ended because of economic factors brought about by the full effects of the first phase of the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the encroaching influence of the second phase of the Industrial Revolution in North Atlantic economies.

    Why overwork a black hand so costly to maintain (from cane-field delivery to deadly collapse in the hot sun) when a similar job could be done by a mechanical nig**r or donkey much more cheaply in the long run similar to what is happening with AI replacing human labour in the modern age of the digital revolution?

    What transformative and guiding role did the Quakers play in the Haitian ‘black’ Revolution?

    If the Quakers ended slavery why didn’t they oppose the hefty compensation packages given to the slave owners (while the victims didn’t get two half-pennies to rub together) for the loss of property similar to an insured race horse like Shergar being stolen under circumstances smelling of an inside job?

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  • @robert lucas February 1, 2020 12:04 PM “You are correct. The man was an alleged navigator during the war.”

    An alleged navigator and a navigator are the same thing?

    Can both guide you out and bring you back safely?

    Asking for a friend.

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  • @Tron February 2, 2020 11:14 AM “Those who praise Barrow praise 10 years of economic rape, corruption, murders, state failure and bankruptcy.”

    Tron you amaze me, and I am not easily amazed. Barrow died on 1 June, 1987.

    How on earth can he be responsible for what happened between 2008 and 2018?

    So my grandfather committed murder in 1914 [yes he did and was not caught] are you going to hang me now?

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  • Miller
    February 2, 2020 8:23 PM

    If the Quakers ended slavery why didn’t they oppose the hefty compensation packages given to the slave owners

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Simple, it was the law of the land.

    Parliament, which contained one single Quaker at the time voted the sum.

    How else would the freed slaves have been taught to read and write?

    How would the schools and churches have been built?

    What is the education budget in Barbados today?

    Education is not cheap.

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  • John
    February 3, 2020 12:24 AM

    What transformative and guiding role did the Quakers play in the Haitian ‘black’ Revolution?

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Quakers came out of Britain and were almost solely to be found in British colonies.

    If you check your history you will find St. Domingue was a French colony and Britain and France were invariably at war.

    Don’t mind all this recent EU recent lovey dovey stuff.

    France and England used to fight one another regularly.

    You will actually find that in 1804 when Haiti came into existence, The Revolutionary War (1792-1802) had ended but the Napoleonic War (1803-1815) had just begun.

    Nelson was the person who played a transformative and guiding role in the Haitian “black” Revolution, not the Quakers.

    I don’t think he ever set foot in St. Domingue/Haiti.

    Like

  • Miller
    February 2, 2020 8:23 PM

    Chattel Slavery was ended because of economic factors brought about by the full effects of the first phase of the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the encroaching influence of the second phase of the Industrial Revolution in North Atlantic economies.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    When was the first steam plant installed in Barbados? – late 19th century

    When did the first tractors arrive in Barbados? – 20th century

    More Bajans worked in the cane fields in the sugar boom after World War II than worked in them in slavery.

    Sugar output at the end of slavery was about 10,000 tons.

    In 1957 it reached 200,000 tons.

    A factor of 20.

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  • The post WWII sugar boom is what fueled the Barbadian leap forward.

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  • … and yet, Barbados is tiny and its sugar output insignificant compared with bigger countries.

    But, it was ready to go and suffered no destruction of its plant during the war.

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  • “robert lucasJanuary 31, 2020 8:33 PM

    The question I want to pose is this: how relevant is Barrow to the young people of today? I pose this question because it is often touted that the ideas espoused by Barrow should be the road map for Barbados of today. Surely, the problems of today were never envisaged back in Barrow’s days and therefore one would expect a new way of thinking is needed to deal with the current problems, As for destroying Barrow’s legacy all I would say on that score is that I do not agree with having Errol Barrow’s day. I have always maintained that the day should be in honor of all of the prime ministers ( like what is done in the US : having a president day). I find that there seems to be an effort to deify the man. If you have ever tuned into the radio on the day, there is a constant snippet of his sayings as though he was the fount of all wisdom.. I expect this post will result in a hostile reception.”

    No hostile reception from me because i find your your remarks with which i concur quite honest.

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  • “DavidJanuary 31, 2020 9:08 PM

    @Dr. Lucas

    The fact young people do not know Barrow is more a reflection on the adults and our inability to share our history”

    Why the reflection on the history of Barrow alone and not the others?

    Wasn’t there someone to whom the population once referred to as ‘ Moses’ on his return from England from talks with the British Government after the riots.

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  • “Hal AustinFebruary 1, 2020 6:37 AM

    Barrow is Father of Independence. Hail the father. Friends of all, satellites of none. He is a national hero. Hail Barrow, the great World War two pilot, the great LSE economist, the great politician, the great philosopher, the great leader.”

    All Caribbean countries had Fathers and no mothers of Independence. Britain was moving swiftly to divest itself of its Colonies which would have resulted in savings to their then tottering economy.

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  • “Education is not cheap.”

    should read…MISEDUCATION and MISINFORMATION…is not cheap.

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  • The most TRUTH i have heard in ages.:

    “When the people shield and protect corrupt politicians they, the people, are themselves complicit and contribute to the death of the nation.”

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  • @ Silly Woman February 2, 2020 11:14 PM

    Barrow was the deluded architect of the Barbadian welfare state that made people fat, sick and lazy. We now have 12 (!!!) years of no economic growth above the level of 2008.

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  • @Tron February 3, 2020 5:56 PM “We now have 12 (!!!) years of no economic growth above the level of 2008.”

    Tronnie my boy, I won’t be around 12 years from now. I will be in the place where streets are paved with gold. But I am sure that you will be able to handle things without me.

    Enjoy the final 2/3rds of the 21st century.

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  • John
    February 3, 2020 8:38 AM

    The post WWII sugar boom is what fueled the Barbadian leap forward.

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    … and yet EWB looked forward to the day when there would not be a single cane blade in Barbados!!

    Like

  • John
    February 3, 2020 12:41 AM

    John
    February 3, 2020 12:24 AM
    What transformative and guiding role did the Quakers play in the Haitian ‘black’ Revolution?
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Quakers came out of Britain and were almost solely to be found in British colonies.
    If you check your history you will find St. Domingue was a French colony and Britain and France were invariably at war.
    Don’t mind all this recent EU recent lovey dovey stuff.
    France and England used to fight one another regularly.
    You will actually find that in 1804 when Haiti came into existence, The Revolutionary War (1792-1802) had ended but the Napoleonic War (1803-1815) had just begun.
    Nelson was the person who played a transformative and guiding role in the Haitian “black” Revolution, not the Quakers.
    I don’t think he ever set foot in St. Domingue/Haiti.

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Here’s what the Quakers of Philadelphia did.

    They opened their doors to the French and their slaves fleeing the mayhem in St. Domingue and also let in the Yellow Fever which killed 1 in 10 in Philadelphia.

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  • Obviously he made some folks fat.

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  • @ Silly Woman February 3, 2020 6:08 PM

    I did not know that you move to Guyana in 2032, the new kingdom of richness and glory.

    All hail to Vishnu! A curse on Burnham, the butcher and Kāli´s deputy on earth.

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  • “William SkinnerFebruary 2, 2020 2:41 PM

    @ Artax
    It’s the same old crap. We don’t change governments , we change political parties .
    We can like it or ”

    Perhaps ARTA can help me with something which boggles my mind

    How are political parties not recognized in the Constitution able to wield unbridled power

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  • Interesting that Gordon predicted the destruction of the NIS and Treasury Buildings so many years ago. If Government does go ahead with its plan to make the Treasury Building into apartments, Ninja Man should get first pick – after all, he recognized the value of the place as a home for many years!

    Like

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