Adrian Loveridge Column – One of the Wonders of Barbados, Food and Rum Festival

Adrian Loveridge

Adrian Loveridge – Hotelier

Later this week Barbados will celebrate the tenth annual Food and Rum Festival with five days of special events and highlights to expose an incredible diverse choice of eating places and further compound the wide spread perception of being the Caribbean culinary capital.

Note, that I have not specifically mentioned restaurants, as increasingly both locals and visitors are ‘discovering’ edible alternatives.

For the first time this year, the ‘Food Truck MashUp’ will be featured and held at the Pelican Village between 2pm and midnight on Saturday 26th October, giving our enterprising smaller tourism entrepreneurs an incredible opportunity to showcase their creative offerings.

I really hope that our local manufacturers and distributors of rum and other beverages will fully support this particular day, with sampling tents and special offers, unique to the event.

It presents a great and low-cost way for Barbados based companies to influence brand choice, so when our visitors return home, they can make better informed choices, when confronted with multiple competing rum alternatives.

On the national tourism website (www.visitbarbados.org) there is even a full page dedicated to Food Trucks, stating that ‘Locals often refer to them as ‘food-vans’ and can be found today on every corner of the island’.

Clearly, there is a lot more both our policymakers and individual private operators can do, to better inform the public and get their product across.

For our food truck operators, existing or aspiring, you really don’t have to go too far to gain inspiration for a higher level.  Websites like http://www.foodtruckempire.com and http://www.roaminghunger.com, present dozens of ideas.

Mention should also be made of the son of one of our leading business visionaries Edwin Thirlwell, whose offspring (Angus) created the Hotel Chocolat empire and recently launched the ‘Chocmobile’.

Despite its recent unfortunate incident, within a few days of being put on-the-road originally, it was selling up to 800 cups (and many other products) of hot chocolate a day.

Mr. Thirlwell senior, is probably among the very first global ‘van’ food pioneers, having founded the British based Mr. Whippy ice cream, back in the nineteen fifties.

Looking at liquid options, Prosecco and Gin have taken on an almost insurmountable ascension in popularity within the United Kingdom. Custom-built attractive three wheeled sales vehicles are now exported all over the world.

Could a similar concept be adapted to market our unique rums products at special events, weddings, functions etc.?

With a lot of vision, determination and support, the possibilities would appear almost endless, while helping us maintain our hard won reputation as a leading gastronomic destination. And at the same time fostering new businesses and generating further employment.

As I understand, in the United States, these ‘rolling restaurants’ are the ‘fastest growing segment of the dining industry’, already employing over 14,000 people, with a forecast combined turnover of US$2 billion per year in earnings. As previously unknown destinations continue to vie for ‘our’ market, it’s critical that we further encourage and develop all aspects of our tourism offerings to the highest possible standard.

52 comments

  • An interesting post. There is however one aspect that needs to be examined carefully with the food vans/trucks. The food safety aspect has to be strictly enforced. Having trained some of the public health officers, it is essential that temperature abuse of food be rigidly stamped out. An out break of food poisoning among locals and tourists is the last thing that is needed. It is also required that the offender be named and shamed. This is done in other jurisdictions and serves to inform the public of where to avoid eating. Under current laws, the offenders cannot be named. Naming them can result in one being sued for slander/libel. This practice is counter productive; it encourages sloppiness and sub-standard efforts become the norm. Additionally, the hazard analysis critical control point (HACCP)with its prerequisite programs of standard sanitary operating procedures and current good manufacturing programs(SSOP’s and cGMP) have to be strictly enforced. Also the health certificate as currently issued needs some more in-depth testing ,for example to identify carriers of pathogenic microbes who do not show symptoms but who work with food.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Relevant article. Referring to the U quite relevant also as home delivery is overtaking on site fast or ‘quick’ food.

    Interestingly, how many are aware that generic kitchens are providing home delivery services for major brands. So when you order it is a contracted kitchen that provides the order, not the brand name. Obviously, made and provided according to contract, but a generic kitchen, which may also provide a number of other brands for delivery.

    I only found that out recently, but this practice is on the rise and likely to expand further.

    On site fast food outlets will be reduced in size, due to this new delivery model.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Dentistry Whisperer (M. Pharm. D) LinkedIN

    Wrong! It’s Sand and Sun. I refer you to Sandals ads. No caves, no Universities, not even Liberty Silks.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Dr. Lucas

    Street food is part of our culture in the Caribbean.

    Like

  • @ Dr. Lucas
    There was a incident maybe about 6 years ago where a food van that serviced many business in Bridgetown left a trail of workers violently ill, one young lady had to be hospitalised. The authorities did their investigations, identified the perpetrator, it was the ham, and to my knowledge he/she faced no consequences.
    The businesses also figured out who the perpetrator was and the only action some took was to prevent him/her from coming on the compound in the future. The perpetrator simply parked outside on the public road. The businesses were hamstrung because of poor enforcement of regulations
    Some will say if people choose to continue buying from an unsafe source that is their business, unfortunately when they become sick the state has to pay.
    My uncle once got food poisoning from the food on a flight from UK to Barbados. He wrote the airline a letter and in response, he got a written apology, they covered his medical bills, and reimbursed the cost of his ticket . They also assured him an investigation would be carried out.
    I warn any friends visiting the island not to buy food from food vans and definitely do not buy food in the Gap.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ David

    You are correct ; street food has always been a part of our culture throughout the region. Once more we are being lectured about something that has been around from generation to generation. Indeed mobile canteens were once very popular. I know there have been food trucks catering to locals and tourists, for decades at some beaches.
    We always wait to get validation from those who know very little about our culture.
    Then we are made to look like imbeciles and copy cats.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Eating food from food trucks and street vendors is a risk and it is up to you whether you take that risk.

    It is the responsibility of government to create standards to mitigate risk by creating food safety standards and enforcing them.

    Liked by 1 person

  • re he health certificate as currently issued needs some more in-depth testing ,for example to identify carriers of pathogenic microbes who do not show symptoms but who work with food.

    AGAIN DR LUCAS IS 100% CORRECT! BUT I EXPECT THE BU ILLITERATES WHO KNOW ALL BUT YET KNOW NOTHING WILL SEEK TO CRITICIZE

    I HAVE ISSUED SEVERAL HEALTH CERTIFICATES IN MY TIME-ESPECIALLY AT CROP OVER TIME, AND DID SO EMPIRICALLY RATHER THAN USING ANY STANDARDS SUCH AS SEEKING TO ASCERTAIN IF THE FOOD HANDLER WAS CARRYING PATHOGENIC MICROBES

    RE Eating food from food trucks and street vendors is a risk and it is up to you whether you take that risk.

    It is the responsibility of government to create standards to mitigate risk by creating food safety standards and enforcing them.

    MR CUT AND PASTE AND PROVIDER OF LINKS IS ALSO 100% CORRECT!

    street food has always been a part of our culture throughout the region–AS IT IS ALL OVER THE WORLD, AND WE HAVE HEARD ABOUT DELHI BELLY.

    BECAUSE SOMETHING IS CULTURAL DOES NOT MAKE IT RIGHT OR SAFE ESPECIALLY IN AN ERA WHEN MANY ARE PRONE TO SUE OR WHEN ONE CAN READILY AND SPEEDILY REPORT A BREAK OUT OF ILLNESS ON THE INTERNET
    I WILL GRANT THE FACT THAT MOST FOOD PROVIDERS TEND TO BE CLEAN, BUT SOME EDUCATION BY FOLK LIKE DR LUCAS SHOULD BE MANDATORY AS WELL

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ David October 21, 2019 9:25 AM

    “@Dr. Lucas
    Street food is part of our culture in the Caribbean”

    I am fully aware of the above. Having lived for ten years in Trinidad I have sampled lots of roti from street vendors. I had enough common sense to never sample the oysters, which came with three different strengths of pepper sauce. Fortunately for me I never came down with illness although some of the students did. My microbiology professor attributed my escape to the fact that I at that time of my life I could hold a lot of waters to use the vernacular. The above example shows that one should be very careful when consuming foods. Recently, at the Mall in Christ Church, there was an infestation of Germanic cock-roaches which resulted in the public health official shutting down the place. There was a news black-out; the populace was left wondering why the place was closed and what the causative agent was, that resulted in closure. I got the low-down from one of my former students who said one of my more recent students had closed down the place. The Mall showed scant respect for one of the prerequisite programs for HACCP; namely good manufacturing procedures which addresses the cleanness of the food preparation environment. I seemed to had an effect on the students, other students taught by me have closed the Bridgetown fish market as well as BICO for sub-standard food preparation practices. I have warned them not to accept gifts from businesses that they inspect for obvious reasons.

    When dealing with food, the food safety specialist err on the side of caution.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Robert

    That is your legacy. Well done. Although not as great as you, I am told by some of my former reports they have a test when faced with difficult decisions: What would Hal do?
    I am more than happy with that. It is professional integrity. Congratulations.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Redguard October 21, 2019 9:58 AM

    Silence is the norm in such cases . Take for example the case of the roach infestation at the Mall. The public health officer took photographs of the infested area. The pictures were shared with others, some of whom uploaded them to social media. The officer has now found himself in hot water as the business responsible for the infestation wants to sue him and he also has violated government rules, since the public is now aware of the identity of the perpetrator (which is against the laws of the land).

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Hal October 21, 2019 12:53 PM

    Thanks. I very serious about my professionalism. I try not to let down my profession and my personal idea of what is right and what is wrong.

    Liked by 1 person

  • DR LUCAS

    I AM HAPPY THAT YOU WERE INVOLVED IN THE TEACHING OF OUR PUBLIC HEALTH OFFICERS AND THAT THEY HAVE NOT ONLY LEARNED BY ROTE, BUT THEY HEEDED WHAT THEY WERE TAUGHT AND WERE ABLE TO APPLY IT IN THE PRACTICE OF THEIR VOCATION

    THIS REMINDS ME OF A PART OF THE COLLECT FOR THE SECOND SUNDAY IN ADVENT THAT I WAS TAUGHT BY ROTE AS A SUNDAY SCHOOL BOY

    BLESSED Lord, who hast caused all holy Scriptures to be written for our learning: Grant that we may in such wise hear them, read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest them, that by patience and comfort of thy holy Word, we may embrace and ever hold fast the blessed hope of everlasting life, which thou hast given us in our Saviour Jesus Christ. Amen.

    IF WE hear, read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest and ever hold fast the THINGS WE LEARN BY ROTE AND PRACTICE THEM FAITHFULLY FERVENTLY AND FEARLESSLY, THE COUNTRY WOULD BE WELL SERVED, AND OUR EDUCATION WORTHWHILE IN SOME MEASURE.

    Liked by 1 person

  • DR LUCAS
    HAL
    N.B 2 TIMOTHY 2:2
    And the things you have heard me say in the presence of many witnesses entrust to reliable people who will also be qualified to teach others.
    WHEN YOU TEACH WELL YOU WILL BE BLESSED WHEN YOUR STUDENTS FOLLOW YOUR INSTRUCTION AND THEN ARE EQUIPPED TO TEACH OTHERS ALSO

    1 SOME ONE TAUGHT US
    2 WE LEARNED WELL AND
    3 WERE ABLE TO TEACH OTHERS
    4 THE GREATEST JOY IS WHEN THOSE WHOM WE TAUGHT ARE ABLE TO TEACH OTHERS ALSO, BECAUSE WE THEN KNOW FOR SURE THAT WE HAVE REALLY TAUGHT WELL

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ GP October 21, 2019 1:04 PM

    I am schedule to teach food chemistry and organic chemistry at BCC in January 2020. PAHO wants to elevate the program from a diploma to a degree level program. The class of 2017 was schedule to graduate from the degree program in Jan 2018 on completion of food chemistry and organic chemistry. That never happened because for some reason, the PS in health took it upon himself to follow the Jamaica public health course which does not include chemistry at all. He claimed it wasn’t necessary to include chemistry. PAHO was paying the bill and became irate that Barbados did not follow the plans agreed to. PAHO insisted that its plan be executed.

    I have leeway to change up the syllabus how I want it to be. The chemistry program at present does not include physical chemistry. I am going to include pH measurements and so on. One can’t really do chemistry without having an idea of pH, acidity and bases. So I plan to lop off some time from the organic and food chemistry. Organic chemistry is straight forward once sp,sp2 and sp3 spatial distribution is understood. I intend to ensure that after leaving BCC’s public health program, the students can handle themselves any where in the world.

    Liked by 1 person

  • robert lucas
    October 21, 2019 1:40 PM

    “I am schedule to teach food chemistry and organic chemistry at BCC in January 2020……..

    I have leeway to change up the syllabus how I want it to be……. .

    I intend to ensure that after leaving BCC’s public health program, the students can handle themselves any where in the world.”

    robert lucas,
    You go, boy! Excellent thinking!

    It makes me feel extremely proud to know that there are still some Barbadians left who are not envious, malicious, spiteful, and hateful towards other Barbadians. I sense that you will do a magnificent job. Stay blessed.

    Liked by 1 person

  • poorpeacefulandpolite

    I never eat anything that hasn’t been cooked (ie heated). Uncooked greens or food/soft drink on ice are major sources of gastrointestinal infection. I personally also recommend a little accompanying alcohol-based chaser. Not much, not strong – enough to stimulate gastric acid.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Robert Lucas

    The students are fortunate to have you . Keep up the good work.

    Like

  • ROBERT

    ORGANIC CHEMISTRY AS YOU KNOW IS SO VERY IMPORTANT (IN MY VIEW) TO UNDERSTAND PHARMACEUTICALS, AND EVEN PHYTODRUGS

    E.G TUMERIC IS USEFUL FOR TREATMENT OF PAIN BECAUSE IT CONTAINS THE BENZENE RING WHICH IS PRESENT IN ALL PAIN KILLERS FROM ASPIRIN AND BEYOND

    I THINK YOU SHOULD SHOULD STRESS THE FIVE MAIN MECHANISMS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY AS A TOOL FOR USE IN THEIR DEVELOPMENT AND THEN STRESS THE ORGANIC CHEMISTRY NOT AS WE MIGHT HAVE LEARNED IT YEARS AGO, BUT AS WE NOW CAN APPRECIATE IT FROM OUR EXPERIENCES

    THE ROLE OF PHENOLS ENOLS ALCOHOLS ETC IN PLANTS AND THE BODY

    I AGREE WITH YOUR VIEW ON pH, acidity and bases.

    I HAD A NURSE IN ONE OF MY BIOCHEM MED SCHOOL CLASSES IN 2011 WHO SAID SHE HAD AN ALCOHOLIC PATIENT THAT COLLAPSED AFTER THEY TOOK HIM ABRUPTLY OFF HIS LIKERS.

    I HAD NEVER MET SUCH A SCENARIO, HAD NEVER BEEN TAUGHT SUCH OR SEEN THE INFO IN ANY OF THE 7 MOST POPULAR BIOCHEM TEXTS, SO I COULD NOT ANSWER HER QUESTION

    ON RESEARCH I FOUND THAT ALCOHOL IS METABOLIZED TO ACETYL COA, AND AS SUCH THIS IS HOW ALCOHOLICS DERIVE THEIR ENERGY VIA THE KREBS CYCLE.

    SO WHEN THEY TOOK AWAY THE MAN’S ALCOHOL THEY TOOK AWAY HIS SOURCE OF ACETYLCOA AND HIS MEANS OF GENERATING ATP.

    I WONT TOUCH THE FOOD CHEMISTRY MUCH THOUGH IF I WERE YOU, CAUSE I THINK WE NEED MORE OF THAT THAN LESS.
    I WOULD RATHER STRESS THE ROLE OF CERTAIN FUNCTIONAL GROUPS IN PLANT AND ANIMAL LIFE RATHER THAN JUST THE PLAIN RUN OF THE MILL ORGANIC CHEM REACTIONS

    GOOD LUCK SIR

    Liked by 1 person

  • RE The class of 2017 was schedule to graduate from the degree program in Jan 2018 on completion of food chemistry and organic chemistry. That never happened because for some reason, the PS in health took it upon himself to follow the Jamaica public health course which does not include chemistry at all. He claimed it wasn’t necessary to include chemistry.

    HOW CAN A MORONIC PS IN HEALTH VETO SOMETHING IN A PROGRAM THE GUVMENT NOT PAYING FOR
    WHAT DOES HE KNOW ABOUT ANYTHING OR ABOUT THE NEED OR IMPORTANCE OF CHEMISTRY?
    WERE YOU NOT TRAINED TO KNOW, AND APPLY WHAT YOU KNOW?
    I TELL MY STUDENTS FEARLESSLY
    BIOCHEMISTRY IS LIFE AND LIFE IS BIOCHEMISTRY! LOL

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ GP October 21, 2019 2:36 PM
    That is what happened, The 2017 class was due back in January 2918 to make the whole thing a continuum to get the degree. It was an accelerated course of study, starting in January and ending in the following January, no breaks. He vetoed the whole thing talking about there was no need for such a level of expertise. Fortunately, PAHO kicked up a fuss about how its funds were to be used and insisted that the course be taught as agreed upon. It passed through my mind that maybe, he didn’t want to see others make any progress. In the interim, when I see the members of the class ,I tell them not to give up hope. As I explained to them, they don’t have to remain in Barbados after getting the degree that they can go any where and work.

    I taught the organic Chemistry and food chemistry 2006-2007. Parts of the organic chemistry syllabus over lap with the food chemistry(eg. proteins, carbohydrates, lipids)so it is better either to teach under the heading of organic chemistry fully or under food chemistry fully., leaving room for pH and so on.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Correction: the 2017 class was due back in January 2018, not 2918.

    Liked by 1 person

  • ROBERT
    RE He vetoed the whole thing talking about there was no need for such a level of expertise.

    DOES NOT MAKE SENSE. WE NEED EXPERTISE EVERYWHERE ALL THE TIME

    RE It passed through my mind that maybe, he didn’t want to see others make any progress.

    UNDOUBTEDLY…AS THIS IS THE NORM. BUT HOW WILL WE PROGRESS IF THE EXPERIENCE AND EXPERTISE OF FOLK LIKE YOU IS DISREGARDED, OR NOT EMPLOYED TO THE MAXIMUM

    RE I taught the organic Chemistry and food chemistry 2006-2007. Parts of the organic chemistry syllabus over lap with the food chemistry(eg. proteins, carbohydrates, lipids)so it is better either to teach under the heading of organic chemistry fully or under food chemistry fully., leaving room for pH and so on.

    AGREED MAKES SENSE
    GOOD LUCK

    Liked by 1 person

  • @poorpeacefulandpolite October 21, 2019 2:09 PM

    “I never eat anything that hasn’t been cooked (ie heated). Uncooked greens ”

    I don’t blame you at all. If good agriculture practices(GAP) are not executed, one is liable to come down with protozoan food borne illnesses as well as E.coli and Listeria monocytogenes food borne infections. The quality of irrigation water as well as water used to cool down fruits and vegetables must be at the potable level. Also all manure used must be cured to allow ultra violet rays to destroy pathogenic microbes, before being applied to crops.

    Liked by 1 person

  • What are we saying, should Street good selling be banned or more heavily regulated.

    Like

  • @ GP October 21, 2019 3:25 PM

    Thanks.

    Like

  • ROBERT

    RE I intend to ensure that after leaving BCC’s public health program, the students can handle themselves any where in the world.

    I TELL MY STUDENTS THIS
    I AM TEACHING YOU TO ENABLE YOU
    1- TO PASS THE EXAM AT THE END OF THIS COURSE
    2- TO PASS THE QUALIFYING EXAM
    BUT MOST OF ALL I AM TEACHING YOU TO ENABLE YOU
    3 – TO PASS THE EXAMS YOU MUST PASS EVERYDAY WHEN YOU GO TO WORK

    Liked by 1 person

  • Q What are we saying, should Street good selling be banned or more heavily regulated.

    A NOT NECESSARILY banned or more heavily regulated. BUT MORE SO THE GIVING OF EDUCATION TO VENDORS TO GIVE THEM A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF WHAT SHOULD BE DONE……..HOW……AND WHY.

    THIS WOULD/SHOULD REASSURE CUSTOMERS AND GIVE CONFIDENCE TO BOTH VENDORS AND VENDEES

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ GP
    @ Robert Lucas

    Thanks for maintaining the high standards of professionalism in your fields. Thanks also for passing these standards onto your charges. It is becoming increasingly difficult to enforce excellence in all that we do.

    Like

  • @ robert lucas October 21, 2019 12:59 PM
    “Silence is the norm in such cases . Take for example the case of the roach infestation at the Mall. The public health officer took photographs of the infested area. The pictures were shared with others, some of whom uploaded them to social media. The officer has now found himself in hot water as the business responsible for the infestation wants to sue him and he also has violated government rules, since the public is now aware of the identity of the perpetrator (which is against the laws of the land).”
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    We can only wish and hope that similar gusto and fearless commitment to public health and safety standards can be demonstrated at the Oistins Bay Garden food outlets.

    How can the authorities allow a place of such popularity and with such easily milked cash-cow benefits to run down to such a dingy and filthy state in such a short space of time?

    The limited toilet facilities are woefully inadequate given the large number of visitors who have to be catered for.

    Is the place not used by the ‘resident vagrants’ as an open-air diurnal latrine?

    Why are the tourism and health officials going to engage in not only good maintenance/upkeep practices but also ensure that washroom facilities are improved to meet internationally-acceptable health and safety standards in order to minimize the chances of some outbreak of some disease related to improper food handling.

    Is the old commonsense motto “an ounce of prevention is worth {more than} a pound of cure” no longer of relevance in Barbados?

    A million dollar lawsuit initiated by some ‘food-poisoned’ money-hungry white American might just be the much needed kick in the backside to force these lazy bastards for officials to do their job.

    PS:
    A massively intense sprucing up of the place is needed even in preparation, if not anticipation, of the “We gatherin’” home-coming of the overseas Bajan.

    A thing of beauty is a joy forever but a nasty dirty house is a massive turnoff to visitors and to those local residents of decency and class.

    Please don’t slaughter the Bajan cow which is providing the forex-giving milk.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ GP
    Not banned. More regulated. Inspection of homes if cooking and preparation are done there. Regular unannounced inspections Inspection of surroundings. Calibration of thermometers. Microbial testing. Regular refresher courses in food handling. Keeping of records by data logger which public health authority has access to by wireless means in real time. Fines for those who constantly break the food regulations.. Banning only force them under ground.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Miller October 21, 2019 4:36 PM
    I haven’t been up Oistins in years ;but one needs only to enter any bath room facility in town to find a similar thing. I think the authorities have just given up. Wanton defacing of the facilities is the norm. It seems to be a Barbadian problem. One means of handling the matter is the mandatory payment for the use of the facility which should be hooked up to a data logger that issues a ticket and records the time and name of the user (harsh measures have to be used). Should also be closed-circuit TV outside the entrance that records a digital photo and time. Perpetrators should be jailed and subjected to heavy fines. By so doing, all of the slack doings will come to an end.

    Like

  • JOLLY GOOD SHOW ROBERT IF YOU CAN HAVE THIS IMPLEMENTED AND SUSTAINED
    SEEMS LIKE YOU SHOULD BE A CONSULTANT TO THE PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Miller

    On a positive note you have noticed bush on the roadside to Paradise Beach property was cleared?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ GP.

    During a discussion session ,a member of the class of 2017,remarked to the rest of the students that the authorities would never allow me to hold an influential position.. I thought he was very prescient for one so young.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @David October 21, 2019 4:56 PM

    Noted!

    But only when the piles of detritus are removed from the site and the place given a little environmental facelift should we shout hosanna to the highest to the god of the Bajan environment.

    At least the BU role in this environmental rescue effort has not been in vain.

    There is still some sting in the tail of the BU motto.

    The spirits of the pre-Portuguese settlers who once lived on that land might be enjoying a bit of rest at last.

    Like

  • ROBERT
    that the authorities would never allow me to hold an influential position..

    THIS IS VERY OBVIOUS
    THERE IS NO ROOM FOR FOLK WHO STAND OUT AND HAVE GUTS AND GOOD IDEAS

    I thought he was very prescient for one so young.

    NOT REALLY. THE YOUTH TODAY SEE THINGS MUCH MORE CLEARLY THAN WE DO WHEN WE WERE THEIR AGE. IT IS ONE OF THE REASONS MANY OF THEM DONT BOTHER TO TRY.

    AT AN EARLY AGE MY FATHER TOLD US WE SHOULD SEEK TO EXCEL. ONE DAY WHILE HE WAS SAYING THIS THE GARBAGE TRUCK PASSED (THEY ACTUALLY CAME AROUND REGULARLY IN THE 60’S) AND HE SAID ” IF YOU ARE GOING TO COLLECT GARBAGE…BE THE BEST!”

    WHEN I WAS 14 YEARS OLD MY FATHER TOLD ME…
    DO RIGHT AND FEAR NO MAN
    DONT WRITE AND FEAR NO WOMAN.

    HE WAS SPOT ON ABOUT PART 2 BUT DOING RIGHT IS FRAUGHT WITH DANGER
    I ONCE HAD A SENIOR NURSE SAY TO ME “DR GP YOU MUST NOT ALWAYS BE RIGHT……PEOPLE DONT LIKE YOU WHEN YOU ARE ALWAYS RIGHT.

    I AM SURE YOU HAVE BY NOW LEARNED THESE TRUTHS

    Liked by 1 person

  • @GP.
    True.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Miller

    This blogmaster attended a function recently and almost strangled on a cocktail when the featured speaker mentioned Barbados Underground as a source of information along with Nation and BT not in this order. No mention of the Advocate.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David Bu

    No surprise to me. Now you know the power of perseverance against the odds. Do not squander the opportunity nor abuse it.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    That should be “Please do not squander etc”

    Like

  • @Vincent

    Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  • “Miller: October 21, 2019 4:36 PM: We can only wish and hope that similar gusto and fearless commitment to public health and safety standards can be demonstrated at the Oistins Bay Garden food outlets.”

    Miller

    Your comment comes back to the point I have been consistently making in this forum.

    The environs of the old Fairchild Street market is rat infested and there is a nauseating smell of urine and faeces because there aren’t any toilet facilities and people urinate and defacate anywhere.

    Yet, the market officials and public health inspectors stood idly by as people have been illegally building stalls around that UNHEALTHY environment, where they are ALLOWED to SELL food and beverages WITHOUT the REQUIRED liquor licenses and health certificates.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Dr Lucas

    As usual your contributions are heart warming and your commitment to the “grind” even in the face of the “idiot epidemic ” that beseiges our country, as Permanent Secretary and the political level, is superlative!

    God continue to bless you mightily and de ole man prays that you never compromise your values for man of woman born!

    De ole man always I’d first to admit dat having left school at 11, I is not de brightest tool in the shed.

    So when everybody heading for hotdogs de ole man does just be getting through de entrance door to the gala!

    You said and I quote..

    “…An interesting post. There is however one aspect that needs to be examined carefully with the food vans/trucks. The food safety aspect has to be strictly enforced. Having trained some of the public health officers, it is essential that temperature abuse of food be rigidly stamped out.

    An out break of food poisoning among locals and tourists is the last thing that is needed…”

    I concur with you that this is an interesting post and am 100% in agreement with all of the rest of the remarks following.

    But there is an aspect of Adrian Loveridge ‘s post that all of wunna fellers missed and which I will respectfully bring to wunna attention.

    It might even be that Adrian missed it himself when he said

    “…Mention should also be made of the son of one of our leading business visionaries Edwin Thirlwell, whose offspring (Angus) created the Hotel Chocolat empire and recently launched the ‘Chocmobile’…”

    And herein is where de ole man deviates from many in the pack.

    99% of bajans focus inwardly and seek and simultaneously defeat their dreams with concepts THAT CANT EXIST IN THE BARBADOS ECOSYSTEM because the supporting regulations DONT EXIST!!!

    I dont thinks that, while the idea is nice, we have the local uptake for these carts

    And I say so based on the death of the snow cone vendor.

    However what de ole man has been chanting for ages is our country’s implementation of a reverse colonization initiative which would see the country researching viable niches like the chocomobile offering and creating a mini manufacturing and franchising product.

    De ole man would think that the whole process of commercializing the chocomobile might certainly inform and might be transferable, in part or in whole to another sector.

    We need to understand that we dont want to focus on spending forex as much as generating Forex.

    Nuff forex generation is required it pay back the ImF loan as well as service our $15 billion deficit

    But remember dat de ole man ent too sharp like de rest of wunna so I apologize in advance

    Like

  • @ the Honourable Blogmaster your assistance please with an item here thank you kindly

    Like

  • @Piece the Legend October 23, 2019 7:00 PM

    I didn’t miss the particular point. I have had a run-in Edwin Thirlwell some time ago and preferred not to pass an opinion which subliminally might be prejudiced against the man.

    Like

  • Dr. Lucas presents with grace and humility. Not hard on the ears.

    Like

  • I have eaten from food vans over the years. i usually observe their equipment and practices before I do so. I have never found a fly in my food as I did at one fast food restaurant. And I have never had food poisoning although I do suspect that i have a cast iron stomach. Been to a wedding and a birthday party in one twenty-four hour period once. Ate everything in sight. Many others who attended both were sick. I wasn’t. Went to a Xmas luncheon once. Ate everything in sight. Many others were sick. I wasn’t.

    Maybe the experts could explain to me how that happened. Is a cast iron stomach a real thing?

    Always wondered about the issuing of health certificates. I applied for one once and I thought it was all too easy.

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  • @ Donna October 24, 2019 4:01 PM

    Easily explained. The microbes aren’t uniformly disperse throughout the food. Food consists of heterogeneous mixtures of materials. Even in the case of soup for example, there are insoluble particles present, which can be used as sites for microbial adsorption on the particle surface, which affect the numbers of microbes available for infection.. There is also the factor of microbial load (the amount of the microbe present). The microbial load will vary through out the food. Where conditions are conducive, there will be microbes present in the millions per gram of food. In the case of viral food infections, viruses are present at very low numbers The inoculum potential ( that is, the threshold required to cause infection, will vary from a few cells to millions). There is also the factor of the person’s genetic predisposition to succumb to infection by a particular microbe. This will vary from person to person. There is also the factor of the alcohol intake which can affect the what is known as the pH( acidity of the environment). Greater acidity will have a negative effect on the infectious capability of the microbe.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Dr. Lucas,

    When you say negative effect on the infectious capability does that mean that alcohol intake could have prevented infection from progressing?

    If so, since I did not drink any alcohol there was some other reason.

    Maybe my genetic predisposition in this case is another way of saying cast iron stomach.

    Don’t catch colds or flu or much else for that matter.

    Thanks for your response.

    Like

  • Dr. Lucas

    I know the man too and have found him to be as are all men, mercurial in his disposition when discussing things with ***s

    I can sometimes, overlook some of these things and eclectically graft those elements of a model which are fit for purpose.

    You dont have to like Owen Arthur or Colin Hudson, all you should do is graft the things that they do that work.

    If they cooperate with that concept of course!

    Like

  • @ Donna October 24, 2019 7:10 PM

    “When you say negative effect on the infectious capability does that mean that alcohol intake could have prevented infection from progressing?”

    The alcohol is converted into acid which results in a lowering of the pH( a measure of how acid the environment is):. the extent to which the pH is lowered is dependent on what is called the buffering capacity of the stomach’s content which varies from person to person. Buffering capacity refers to the amount of material needed change the pH by a known amount . Each microbe has a pH range that is optimum for its growth. Changes in the optimum pH( above or below the optimum value) have adverse effects on the microbes ability to cause harm. To answer your question, it depends on the person, the microbe and the pH level.

    @Piece the Legend October 24, 2019 8:27 PM

    My run in with the fellow came as the result of a letter published on line about poor food preparation. Was sent a letter by a lawyer (acting in his behalf) giving me two weeks tp retract, which I ignored.

    Like

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