The Grenville Phillips Column – Cry For Haiti Again

After the 2010 Haiti earthquake, I volunteered for over 12 deployments where I interacted with persons at almost all levels of responsibility.  Therefore, any opinion I have on Haiti is an informed one.

When our Prime Minister announced that Barbados would remove our visa requirement for Haitians, I was surprised at the daring offer.  But I had assumed that our Prime Minister’s advisors were far more informed than I, so I kept silent.  Now that Barbados has restored the visa requirement, it is important that this type of error never happen again.

Haiti is a politically unstable country of over 11 million people.  Many of them live in poverty, fear of violence, and hopelessness.  Visa requirements prevent most Haitians from travelling by air.  Therefore, many risk illegal travel by sea, an have drowned in their desperate search for a better life.

Almost 20% of Haitians live in: the United States, Dominican Republic, Cuba, Canada, Brazil, Chile, Bahamas, France, and Jamaica.  Many in Haiti depend on funds sent to them from their family and friends who successfully made it out.

Barbados gave Haiti the most generous visa requirement of all countries on this planet.  The next generous visa requirements were offered by: Israel, Rwanda, Benin, Gambia, and South Korea.  These countries are all outside of the Caribbean region, and outside of the Western Hemisphere.  Therefore, Barbados’ offer was the most attractive, safest, and the most realistic legal hope for desperate Haitians.

I was in Haiti after the Prime Minister’s announcement, and can confirm that Barbados’ invitation to Haitians, who were desperate for any glimmer of hope, was excitedly known.  We have now crushed that hope with the sorry excuse that too many Haitians were coming.  What else did we expect a desperate people to do?  Who advised our Prime Minister to remove the visa requirement in the first place?

Why would Barbados, with a land area that is 1.5% of Haiti’s, and a population that is 2.5% of Haiti’s, and an economy that is smaller than Haiti’s, and a debt-to-GDP profile that is worse than Haiti’s, invite Haitians to Barbados without a visa restriction?

Why would Barbados, that: has defaulted on its foreign debt, has a major unemployment problem, has long wait-times for limited public services, and is in a severe IMF austerity program, invite Haiti’s desperate millions to unnecessarily expense themselves with their precious limited funds, to travel to Barbados in search of work that even Barbadians cannot find?  It seems a most cruel joke of false hope, to play on a people who least deserve it.  So why did we do it?

We are accustomed to our politicians making impossible promises to get elected.  We are accustomed to our Members of Parliament practising their ‘Public Relations Economics’ of giving and taking away.  If they promise to reduce taxes in one part of our lives, then they will certainly increase taxes in another part, so that we always pay more.  But Haitians were not accustomed to this type of broken promise from us.

When the Government of Barbados attends regional or international meetings, our politicians do not represent their political parties or their base supporters – they represent all of us.  Therefore, any promises made at these meetings should not be like their campaign promises that they dismissively break at will.  Instead, these promises should be properly thought out.

It is almost impossible to develop well thought out policies if dissenting opinions are not considered.  For this reason, Solutions Barbados’ policy was that each Minister must have an advisory committee, not of loyal party supporters, but of experts in their fields.  This committee would carefully consider public opinions.  Had our Prime Minister been advised by such a committee, then it is unlikely that she would have made such a reckless promise to our Haitian brothers and sisters.

Grenville Phillips II is a Chartered Structural Engineer and President of Solutions Barbados.  He can be reached at NextParty246@gmail.com

65 comments

  • Commissiong finger prints were all over this reckless decisions

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  • “Why would Barbados, with a land area that is 1.5% of Haiti’s, and a population that is 2.5% of Haiti’s, and an economy that is smaller than Haiti’s, and a debt-to-GDP profile that is worse than Haiti’s, invite Haitians to Barbados without a visa restriction?”

    Solutions Barbados

    Firstly, ignore the silly comment about “Commissiong finger prints were all over this reckless decisions.” This pure political “poppycock.”

    This was NOT a Commisiong or Mottley decision…………it’s a CARICOM decision.

    According to the Treaty of Chaguaramas of the Caribbean Community, “membership of the Caribbean Community shall be open to any other State or Territory of the Caribbean Region that is, in the opinion of The Conference, able and willing to exercise the rights and assume the obligations of membership.”

    “The CARICOM Free Movement is an agreement amongst the Caribbean Community and Common Market (CARICOM) member countries. They created a Caribbean Single Market and Economy (CSME) allowing the free movement of people, goods and services in the region. This agreement makes it easier for citizens of one member state to locate jobs in the Caribbean in another member’s state.”

    In July 2018, at the 39th Meeting of the Conference, which was held in Montego Bay, Jamaica, the Heads of Government reviewed the operation of the CSME, they decided to accelerate its implementation of the Protocol on Contingent Rights.

    The Protocol covers the rights of persons moving to another country under the free movement of skills regime, as well as the spouses and dependents of those who move to another country.

    I understand where Grenville Philipps II is “coming from,”…………. and similar could be said of Jamaicans and Guyanese, many of whom are illegally residing and working in Barbados. When this fact is mentioned and references are made to them exploiting our laws, engaging in squatting and illegal vending…….. there are shouts of xenophobia.

    But, Jamaica and Guyana are member states………… so too is Haiti……….

    TO BE FAIR……….if Haiti is a recognised member of CARICOM and the Treaty of Chaguaramas speaks to NON-DISCRIMINATION and EQUAL TREATMENT to citizens of ALL member states, why should visa requirements REMAIN imposed on Haitians?

    Why should Haiti be subjected to discrimination?

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  • The treaty had stipulations which gave govts opitions
    However this flip flopping govt decided to gallop out of the barn with a narrow political view instead of weighing the differences in lieu of Haiti plight against barbados economic problems
    Needless to say govt once again on this issue govt comes out looking like headless chickens stumbling in the dark

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  • Artax:

    It was a Barbados decision made at a CARICOM meeting. The other CARICOM heads did not follow Barbados’ lead.

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  • “It was a Barbados decision made at a CARICOM meeting. The other CARICOM heads did not follow Barbados’ lead.”

    Nextparty246

    I’m trying to be FAIR and IMPARTIAL.

    You’re missing the point. Even if it was a decision Barbados made at a CARICOM meeting, is Haiti a member of CARICOM and entitled to the benefits to be derived therefrom?

    If your answer is yes, then why do you believe the visa requirement should remain in effect and Haiti discriminated against, while other CARICOM member states can travel to Barbados and mandatory six month extended to them?

    What are your thoughts on Guyanese and Jamaicans who have been coming to Barbados in droves?

    Why should Haiti be different?

    What are your thoughts on squatting by illegal non-nationals?
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    “The treaty had stipulations which gave govts options…”

    Mariposa

    According to the Treaty of Chaguaramas of the Caribbean Community, “membership of the Caribbean Community shall be open to any other State or Territory of the Caribbean Region that is, in the opinion of The Conference, able and willing to exercise the rights and assume the obligations of membership.”

    Could you please present to BU, a list of those “stipulations which gave govts options?”

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  • fortyacresandamule

    Although Haiti is part of Caricom, I don’t think they are part of the single market arrangement with respect to free movement of people. And for good reason… they would have flooded the wealthier islands with there poor and weary mass. Even The Bahamas opted out of the Caricom single market.

    The recent squatting problem in BIM along illegal vending is definately a Jamaica phenomena. According to a survey, 25- 30% of the household in Jamaica lived in informal settlements. And all the major towns alongside the capital, Kingston, are swamped by illegal vendors.

    Miss Motley is projecting Barbados image and soft power in the region and abroad …because we so-called punch above our weight. This pronouncement of visa waiver for Haitians is a terrible idea.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Hi Artax:

    In your attempt to be fair and impartial, please note the following in the Caribbean Community Act.

    Article 45: “Member States commit themselves to the goal of free movement of their nationals within the Community.”

    Article 46 notes that member states agreed to a “first step” of allowing specific categories of persons “the right to seek employment in their jurisdictions”.

    Article 47 partially notes: “Where the exercise or rights granted under this Chapter creates serious difficulties in any sector of the economy of a Member State or occasions economic hardships in a region of the community, a Member State adversely affected thereby may, subject to the provisions of this Article, apply such restrictions on the exercise of the rights as it considers appropriate in order to resolve the difficulties or alleviate the hardships.”

    Therefore, giving and taking away rights is permitted, if after giving, hardship is experienced. However, the taking away must be in accordance with Article 47.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Grenville

    All agree it worked out to be a decision that backfired. One got the impression when Mia won office she was about making decisions to lift her profile in the region. Should she be recognized for reversing the decision?

    Liked by 1 person

  • On a related matter the blogmaster was made to understand that Minister of Home Affairs Edmund Hinkson would have released numbers to show the movement of people in categories of workers into Barbados. We are willing to apologize if the release was missed.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Not understanding you…

    “Should she be recognized for reversing the decision?”
    Recognize as “brilliant or mistake prone”/

    “We are willing to apologize if the release was missed.”
    We being who? Are you part of some PR team? A party official? or that BU should have provided the numbers if they were released.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Nextparty246

    How is the Caribbean Community Act RELEVANT to the questions I asked you TWICE previously?

    Since you’re more comfortable responding on BEHALFof Mariposa…….. and SEEM to be EXPERIENCING DIFFICULTIES ANSWERING MY QUESTIONS, I’ll revise their format.

    (1). Why do you believe the visa requirement should REMAIN in effect for Haitians and Haiti discriminated against in this regard, while the citizens of other CARICOM member states can travel to Barbados and the mandatory six months extended to them?

    (2). Do you believe because Barbados abolished the visa requirement for Haiti, it would have been a “free for all” for “Haiti’s desperate millions?”

    (3). You wrote: “Why would Barbados, that: has defaulted on its foreign debt, has a major unemployment problem, has long wait-times for limited public services, and is in a severe IMF austerity program, invite Haiti’s desperate millions to unnecessarily expense themselves with their precious limited funds, to travel to Barbados in search of work that even Barbadians cannot find?”

    I’ll REMIND you that, under the SAME economic circumstances you outlined above for Haitians……. Jamaicans and Guyanese are coming to Barbados in “droves” “in search of work that even Barbadians cannot find.”

    (4). Do you believe the current levels of illegal immigrants are unacceptably high, are increasingly difficult to control and posed potentially negative socio-economic challenges for Barbados?

    If so, why have you never written an article on what effect illegal immigrants from Guyana and Jamaica have on Barbados…. or do you prefer to focus on Haiti?

    (5). What are your thoughts on illegal non-nationals, especially Guyanese and Jamaicans, squatting and engaging in illegal vending? I invite you to tour the environs of the old Fairchild Street market and report to BU on what you saw.

    (6). Under these circumstances, do you believe Jamaicans and Guyanese should be SUBJECTED to visa requirements as well?

    (7). What is your real FEAR of Haitians and why should they be treated differently?

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  • Grenville has raised an issue that is very important, apart from allowing Haitian free movement, which I shall deal with first. As fellow CARICOM citizens, Haitians should not have to get visas to visit Barbados; if they meet all the other existing conditions, they should also be allowed free movement to settle, but that should be conditional on not being a burden on Barbadian taxpayers and having obtained a job within three months. Failure means having to return home.
    But the bigger issue is the President’s casual approach to policy details; President Mottley has bought in to her own publicity, that she is a great orator, that she is highly knowledgeable, etc. She is wrong. Speaking for two hours without notes does not make one a great orator; what it means is repetition, contradictions, confusion.
    We have had a number of examples of her lack of details recently: increases in bus fares, then to change them; land tax increases, then to alter them; now this.
    In itself there is nothing wrong with this, it takes all kinds of leaders. But she must accept her weak point and make amends for them; I have previously suggested she needs a policy delivery unit reporting direct to her and with a mandate across all of government. She should think about it.
    But, whether it is Hyatt, or her hotel corridor, the prime minster/president needs to discuss all aspect s of policy with her colleagues and advisers before making one of her off the cuff speeches. So far, she has not been a good prime minister.

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  • @ Hal Austin

    I will go as far as to say that, her speeches are mostly bereft of solid substance. She sounds like a preacher but when one analyzes what has been said, it is all sound and fury, signifying nothing for the most part. She gets on a roll and her voice rises to a crescendo ( sounds nice to the ears) and then it dips to a syncline and becomes slightly hoarse bordering almost on a” hoarsy” whisper. I can see how the majority of folks are carried away with the oratory.

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  • Georgie Porgie

    DR LUCAS
    WHAT YOU ARE SAYING IS THAT MOTTLEYS ORATORY AND ACTIONS ARE LIKE THAT DESCRIBED FOR FALSE TEACHERS IN ROMANS 16:17-18 THUS

    17 Now I beseech you, brethren, mark them which cause divisions and offences contrary to the doctrine which ye have learned; and avoid them.

    18 For they that are such serve not our Lord Jesus Christ, but their own belly; and by good words and fair speeches deceive the hearts of the simple.

    SUCH EVIL FOLK ARE ALSO DESCRIBED IN PHILLIPIANS 3:7-19 THUS

    17 Brethren, be followers together of me, and mark them which walk so as ye have us for an ensample.

    18 (For many walk, of whom I have told you often, and now tell you even weeping, that they are the enemies of the cross of Christ:

    19 Whose end is destruction, whose God is their belly, and whose glory is in their shame, who mind earthly things.)I

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  • William Skinner

    I continuously wrote on BU prior to the last elections that we had a PM who was “indolent “ and a PM in waiting who was “ vacuous”
    No surprises here!

    Duopoly Rules

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  • I laughed out loud when Mottley political utterances are described as oratory makes me wonder where does Mia fit in with giants like Martin Luther King JFK and other notables who were pleasing in vocabulary style to the ear and their words meant something of value

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  • Robert Lucas

    Some of what you say is true of all politicians.

    When compared to the last elected dictator and regime Mugabe represents an improvement.

    At least she seeks to engage the public on some critical issues. Whereas, the last fellow didn’t even think he had to talk to us at all.

    Maybe, like most, you overestimate the power of any PM of Barbados

    And underestimate the power of the external forces impacting thereon.

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  • A+ article for Grenville, not one mention of IOS.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Dam typing machine with auto correct, ISO no IOS.

    Liked by 1 person

  • William Skinner

    @ Pacha

    You need to really explain your posits on others underestimating these outside forces. I don’t think that anybody on BU is ignorant of the fact that there are geopolitical forces that mitigate against countries such as ours. Why are you constantly promoting what is nothing more than “ technocratic insulation”. We are here saying that a decision to reverse the progressive policy of giving our Haitian brothers and sisters a life line, has been reversed.
    Others are questioning the PM’s depth on issues; whether her thoughts are well presented. We have all accepted that she is a far better communicator than Stuart.
    Now pray tell what does this have to do with peoples’, in your estimation, ignorance or lack of understanding in external circumstances.
    What do you really want to say?

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  • William Skinner

    Should read : a decision to give our Haitian brothers and sisters has been reversed. I consider it a reversal of a progressive policy.

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  • @William

    Many hold sympathy for your perspective. The problem some of us have is that there is no credible alternative raising their hands? We criticize the B then the D and so it goes.

    The blogmaster anticipates the narrative on the talk shows, traditional and social media will be the upgrade by Moody’s. The script is old.

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  • This errant school boy Grenville Phillips knows too little about too much.

    He is a devout neo-liberalist of the Richie Haynes typology whose desire for the material leaves no consideration for anything else, any other value metric. He is a reductionist!

    Had not for the Haitian people, slavery as a global construct, would have lasted well into the 20th century.

    It was Haiti which took on the full force of a globalized racist system based on the exploitation of African labour and pointed us to a ‘better’ way.

    Up to this day the White international system has never forgiven Haiti.

    Had not for Haiti there was not be a Bussa Rebellion of 1816, in Barbados.

    Yet in 2019 we are made to read, from a man whose ancestors were themselves slaves, that we too should, like the White people of the world, continue to punish Haitians for all the good they did for us.

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  • @ Mariposa July 3, 2019 6:13 AM
    I was searching for an appropriate word and at the time oratory came to mind.

    @ Pachamama July 3, 2019 6:17 AM

    Point noted. Previous person was a non-communicator. I have always felt that he got a post he never expected and was flabbergasted by the burden on his shoulders (he is no Atlas carrying the world on his shoulders). Like what was explained in the book “The Peter Principle ” when one is promoted to a post above one’s technical ability.

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  • William Skinner

    The alarming thing here is not Grenville. As far as I know Grenville has never been included or sought to be included in any progressive movement.
    We have progressives, who witnessed the reversal of this progressive policy and they are sitting inside and outside of parliament in absolute silence.
    While we attempt to further marginalise Haiti, we are extending an open door policy to several others from outside of the region.
    The most stunning development is that the government of Haiti is being blamed for this decision. Prior to the elections we were told all must be done to make the Haitians welcome.
    Strange that Pacha will want to put Grenville on the cross for this reactionary development.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Dr. Lucas

    Even if the Peter Principle affected Stuart what does mit say about the parliamentary group that surrounded him? Have a look at the BLP in government. There are some areas which have improved but the modus operandi is the same.

    Liked by 1 person

  • William Skinner

    A more progressive policy would have been to offer at least 500 Haitians immediate citizenship and assist them in settling and then bringing in family members as their social and economic situations improved.
    We are being bamboozled by a lot of government by PR.
    Once more the the duopoly is succeeding in making apologists of those who apparently do not know the difference in a change of government and a change of party.
    These days are funny nights.

    The Duopoly Rules

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  • Sir Willian Skinner

    Unlike you we have no particular confidence in the leadership ethos propagated by many.

    What your reliance of such does is to distract from systems analysis and focus too much on personalities.

    We cannot be convinced that the single personality is the most significant variable.

    We gave the same ”technocratic insulation” to the previous office holder.

    ””””””””””I don’t think that anybody on BU is ignorant of the fact that there are geopolitical forces that mitigate against countries such as ours.”””””””””’

    If this statement is true, why is so much discussion, ‘analysis’, devoid of such factoring? Why do you persist with your righteous indignation about Brexit, the rise of Trumpism etc?

    ””””””””’Others are questioning the PM’s depth on issues; whether her thoughts are well presented. We have all accepted that she is a far better communicator than Stuart.”””””””’

    Skinner, this is purely political. No PM can be expected, or should be expected. to be an expert on everything. Even for you, no such expectation is set.

    In the best of worlds, a maybe preferred for a PM to have nothing to do but think.

    We have never recognized a deficit in saying what we want to.

    Trust we’ve touched on all points!

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  • Sir William Skinner

    We are not to be closeted into your ‘progressive’ political formations.

    We have said previously, and will say again, that we are NOT ‘progressives’.

    We are against all of your favoured political labels, But if you insist, then we would want to be considered as unrepentant anarchists.

    Our determination is that your ‘progressive’ ways of thinking, of being, are dead.

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  • Let us look at where we stand today in reality and see if we could even afford to open our doors to a flock of geese far less thousands of Haitians.

    We are currently in one of the worst financial situations since independence, with most of those Barbadians laid off not being able to find jobs. Where therefore is the opportunity to employ others coming from?

    Our transport board has a fleet of roughly 50 working buses as compared to 200 in the good old days. This has resulted in those Barbadians who live in the country having difficulty getting to and from work. How can we therefore accommodate more people in the rural area and transport them as well?

    We tried recently to open 2 polyclinics on a 24 hour basis and could only manage to open 1. Where is the increased medical care for a few thousand Haitians going to come from?

    We have a major problem with the delivery of water supply and garbage collection now in rural areas to Our own people. Many parts of St Thomas, St Joseph and other high elevation areas some days have no water supply as a result. So based on this how will we supply a few thousand more who settle in these areas?

    Garbage is still piled up in the rural areas due to a shortage of trucks. If we can’t even collect the refuse from our own people how are we going to do so when we add a few thousand more?

    What we are talking about doing is equivalent to inviting 10 people for lunch when you have a 8 seater dining table and only enough food to feed 6 to begin with.

    Make life comfortable for your own people first before you poster for political gain in caricom, that would be what many Bajans would tell you.

    The idea of opening our doors to thousands of Haitians at this stage is therefore ludicrous in terms of a real life situation. All who want to cuss me feel free now!

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  • @ David July 3, 2019 7:05 AM

    It doesn’t say much for the bunch that surrounded him and also doesn’t say much for the populace that voted them in. What it does say/show is the paucity of choices available to the electorate : It also is an indictment on the population

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  • William Skinner

    @ Pacha

    Points well taken

    However you stated: “If this statement is true, why is so much discussion, ‘analysis’, devoid of such factoring? Why do you persist with your righteous indignation about Brexit, the rise of Trumpism etc?

    I have basicaly never been involved about Trump or Brexit on BU. You have the wrong man on that !

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  • Sir William Skinner

    Untrue!

    You have many times opined as to why we here would talk about subjects, including the ones mentioned, which you perceive to have nothing to do with your One Caribbean Nation.

    Your words not ours.

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  • John A

    I understand and agree with you comments.

    However, Jamaicans and Guyanese are entering Barbados on a daily basis, under the same circumstances you outlined in you comments (e.g. public transportation and garbage situations, water woes, etc).

    If you want to restrict Haitians, don’t you believe we should also look at restricting the influx of Jamaicans and Guyanese as well?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Some need to stop burying head in the sand in regards to Haitians
    It is well known that Haitians are carries of communicable disease
    Trying to suggest that Haitians should be giving the same immigration status accorded to Guyanese and Jamaicans for free movement is looking at the issues through a political lense

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  • Moripokey

    What a bountiful cunt are you!

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  • I’m here trying to figure out how “Trying to suggest that Haitians should be giving the same immigration status accorded to Guyanese and Jamaicans for free movement is looking at the issues through a political lens?

    I couldn’t…… so, I guess thine ignorance knoweth no bounds.

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  • SETTING THE HISTORICAL RECORD STRAIGHT WHILE EXPOSING PMAMA’S BIASES’…

    Pmama Knows too Much about too Little! There is Always an Agenda with Pmama…Racism Comes First and Dictates all the Rest.

    It is True that there was a Save Rebellion in Haiti that resulted in their Freedom and it is a Desirable and a Good thing that a man be not a Slave and that he Desires Freedom. But people telling LIES about Slavery is no help and the Haitians, their Drums could not beat loud enough to be heard in Barbados nor could they phone or use the Internet to tell Bussa anything. Although Bussa was Right to try to gain his Freedom, Bussa had planned a Violent uprising, so we do not owe anybody in Haiti anything as Pmama would make us believe. Although Barbados had a high number of Slaves they were from many parts of Africa and they all spoke different languages. In present day Nigeria, they are 150 different languages spoken and in present day Africa they have Africans Holding Africans as Slaves. Although Pmama would have you believe that the Blacks won their Freedom in the West Indies, it was the same White Man he speaks so Disparagingly about that Granted all the Slaves their Freedom. When it was Proclaimed in England in 1834 with sometime of fazed in-period to be enacted by 1838, Barbados Instituted it immediately and it was welcomed in Barbados. Just for your information, BARBADOS HAD FREE BLACKS WHO OWNED SLAVES. So Pmama’s Lies and Rewriting of History Should Not be Tolerated.

    LEARN FROM HISTORY ON SLAVERY IN THE CARIBBEAN AND THE CONNECTION PMAMA IS REFERRING TO BETWEEN HAITI AND BARBADOS…

    We see from the following that Jean-Baptiste Belley, was a FREE” BLACK OR “COLOURED” SLAVEHOLDER in Saint-Domingue modern-day Haiti. It seems that Belley was born on the coast of West Africa in 1746 or 1747. Around the age of two, he sold into slavery in Saint-Domingue, modern-day Haiti. Little is known of his life as a slave, except that he was allowed to pursue a trade and earn enough money to eventually purchase his own freedom. He clearly received an education, either before or after his emancipation…

    The National Convention decrees the abolition of the Negroes’ slavery in all of the Colonies. Therefore, it orders that all men, without any distinction of color, domiciled in the Colonies, shall be free citizens and enjoy all the rights guaranteed by the Constitution…

    Commissioners of the Republic had already proclaimed the abolition of slavery in Haiti a year earlier, but now that measure was extended to all French territories. AS FOR BELLEY, HE CONTINUED FIGHTING IN PARIS THE INFLUENCE OF THE LOBBY OF PLANTATION OWNERS, WHO HAD REGAINED HOPE OF A REINSTATEMENT OF SLAVERY AFTER THE FALL OF ROBESPIERRE IN 1794 AND THE ENSUING REACTION.

    IT IS SAID THAT THERE WERE 5,349 SLAVEHOLDERS IN BARBADOS PRIOR TO EMANCIPATION OF WHICH 2,294 WERE LANDOWNERS FROM 399 PLANTATIONS. THE REMAINDER OF 3,055 WERE LANDLESS, AND OF THESE 2,000 WERE “FREE” BLACK OR “COLOURED” SLAVEHOLDERS.

    IF HAITI WAS THE FIRST TO BE FREED WHY ARE THEY AMONG THE POOREST NATIONS OF THE EARTH?

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  • The political lens is not observing the realities of the Haitians coming from an improverished country where the standard of living is well below what is in other Caricom nations and the health and well being of these Haitians must be place in full focus before being accorded free movement

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  • @Artax

    Yes of course we should look at restricting all those who come to take and not give. If you are coming as an investor that is a different issue, as you are adding to the table and creating jobs for our people. To talk though of free movement of people when your economy is in the toilet and your own people are struggling to make ends meet is ludicrous.

    It was different in the 2007 building boom where we had a shortage of Labour, but today with a massive glut of real estate unsold that is not the case.

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  • “The political lens is not observing the realities of the Haitians coming from an improverished country where the standard of living is well below what is in other Caricom nations and the health and well being of these Haitians must be place in full focus before being accorded free movement.”

    What a whole heap of discriminatory, alarmist, unsubstantiated speculative shiite!

    You’re never able to discuss an issue reasonably and rationally…… and without the “political overtones.”

    Yes, I agree the decision to abolish the visa requirements for Haitians may not have been the best decision, at this time, but not for the reasons you’re advancing.

    But, unfortunately, our agenda here is to prove government’s decision was incorrect, by implying Haitians are poor, diseased carrying people who would cause a mass epidemic of infectious diseases if they are allowed to enter Barbados.

    It is politically expedient for you to do so. And you don’t have the statistics to substantiate your opinion and you haven’t presented any examples of countries where what you’re suggesting occurred.

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  • How reckless can this govt be unable to recognize the negative implications considering that the country of Haiti has a record of political upheaveal very low standard of living including health issues

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  • @ Mariposa

    Have a look at the history of the relations between Haiti and the Dominican Republic, especially since the 1930s. Whether right or wrong, for decades Haitians, and people of Haitian descent,, could not get citizenship in the DR, and they are neighbours.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Don’t know much about Haiti but I am reading that Guyana is expected to have the fastest growing economy in the world and the BBC is suggesting that Guyana may become the richest country in Latin America. Furthermore Suriname may also follow Guyana in terms of economic development. It seems obvious to me that Barbados should deepen its links with both CARICOM neighbours.

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  • Please note that I have nothing against Haitians as some are trying to suggest. When I visit Haiti, I do not charge a fee for my services. I genuinely care about them.

    The Government of Barbados can give and take away without breaking the Treaty. My principal points were that before giving, it was foreseen that we would have had to take away since we did not have the capacity to give, and that when making promises to another country, they must be well thought out.

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  • This govt was mostly interested in further embarrassing past govt rather than looking at the bigger picture of the country of Haiti socio-economic problems and its over all impact derive from other problems other than those directed to Haitian financial problems
    All it would take is for one Haitian to have a commuincable contagiuos disease which spread across barbados just because present govt wanted to play political one man gamemanship

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  • @Georgie Porgie July 3, 2019 6:01 AM

    I will pass on this one. ( Must admit you had me laughing).

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Ping Pong July 3, 2019 10:38 AM
    After the treatment meted out to the Guyanese by Barbadians, I find your comment reminiscent to the story of the dog and the bone.

    Like

  • fortyacresandamule

    I think the same scrutiny should be applied to non-skilled Jamaicans coming into Barbados. And I am saying this as a person with family members who are jamaicans.

    Guyana, with proven reserve of over 5billion barrels of oil and counting, and a population of 780000, in a few years time will be one of the richest country per capita in the world.

    Like

  • William Skinner

    @ Pacha
    I maintain that position. I note that those of you who will expend thousands of intellectual hours discussing the intricacies of Trumpism and Brexit have no such discipline or penchant for discussing the emerging One Caribbean Nation. I figure my response was nebulous. However you certainly are correct when you say I have no appetite to waste on Trump or May.
    You often delve into the fall of American imperialism and its dollar. You tend to believe that because others don’t put everything into your geo political box that they cannot understand the importance of thinking globally.
    My dear brother global thinkers see the continued emergence of the new Caribbean Nation as essential to our geopolitical importance. You are just missing the point .
    Here in the real progressive Caribbean world we seek a better life for our people. We will continue to defend this principled position unfazed by those who continue to seek massa’s blessings. You say that progressive thinking is “dead” . We are not with you on that one. We await your return to the mission of a new Caribbean Nation built on several of the principles to which you adhere.
    We therefore call on the government of Barbados to immediately give no less than 500 Haitians all the rights and privileges of citizenship. We also call on the government to extend all assistance so that as soon as they are settled they can obtain automatic citizenship for their families.
    We call on all progressive forces to support this demand.

    Like

  • @ William,

    May I be so rude as to suggest that unless your One Caribbean Nation comes in to effect there will be no independence Caribbean islands in 100 years time. We are in the last chance saloon.

    Liked by 1 person

  • William Skinner

    @ Hal
    You are correct. Our generation dropped the ball and became preoccupied with intellectual sophistry rather than critical progressive thinking .
    This fickleness has led some to see only the economic fall out from Brexit while ignoring the errosion of our cultural identity and the undercurrent geopolitical direction that sucks is into the same socio economic slavery from which we yearn to escape.
    Stand firm my Brother.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Sir William Skinner

    There are few subjects, only one that we can recall, where you and your soul-mate in the UK disagree.

    As shorthand we generally assume that anything he says, axiomatically you agree. Our reading of contributions are thusly so informed.

    ””””””””””’I maintain that position. I note that those of you who will expend thousands of intellectual hours discussing the intricacies of Trumpism and Brexit have no such discipline or penchant for discussing the emerging One Caribbean Nation”””””””””

    Which world are you living in. Emerging 70 years hence?
    And generally following the EU model which is undergoing immense pressures on all sides.
    Don’t you see the links between the case studies – CARICOM and the EU.

    ””””””””’ I figure my response was nebulous. However you certainly are correct when you say I have no appetite to waste on Trump or May.”””’

    This is consistent with our long time measure of you. So why deny it earlier this morning?
    You must tell us how it’s unworthy to consider the country which has a 70 year economic blockade on a significant Caribbean island within your Zone of Peace. Especially when another economic blockade is being erected on another country in the region.

    ””””””””””””’You often delve into the fall of American imperialism and its dollar. You tend to believe that because others don’t put everything into your geo political box that they cannot understand the importance of thinking globally.”””””””””””””””

    We, unlike you, care not who agrees with us or not. This matter of reaching agreement is the province of progressives not anarchists.

    Same question again. If you understand the importance of what’s happening elsewhere why are your discourses not so informed by those experiences.

    ”””””””””””’My dear brother global thinkers see the continued emergence of the new Caribbean Nation as essential to our geopolitical importance. You are just missing the point .”””””””””’

    No. Tell us who these global leaders are, of recent vintage. You must.

    ””””””””Here in the real progressive Caribbean world we seek a better life for our people. We will continue to defend this principled position unfazed by those who continue to seek massa’s blessings.””””””’

    You appear to have descended to stricking blows beneath the belt. But the first sentence cannot be supported by history.

    ”””””””””You say that progressive thinking is “dead” . We are not with you on that one”””””””

    Our thinking is not predicated on who will or will not agree. But since you understand what’s happening globally now, and in the Caribbean, you should explain the political loses to your progressives in many countries, in recent years, the reasons for the rise of fascism which are primarily the failures of progressives, etc.

    ”””””””””””’We await your return to the mission of a new Caribbean Nation built on several of the principles to which you adhere.”””””””””””””’

    This is a pipedream. That boat has long come and gone.

    ”””””””””’We therefore call on the government of Barbados to immediately give no less than 500 Haitians all the rights and privileges of citizenship. We also call on the government to extend all assistance so that as soon as they are settled they can obtain automatic citizenship for their families.
    We call on all progressive forces to support this demand.”””””””””””””

    Why only 500? It maybe better for all Haitians if the GoB could help Haiti find the billions in PetroCaribe funds stolen by the present and former governments.

    It would be much better for all Haitians if the GoB could get the Clintons and their foundation to give Haiti the 12 billion in earthquake money they absconded with.

    You may have the last word.

    Like

  • Georgie Porgie

    re @Georgie Porgie July 3, 2019 6:01 AM
    I will pass on this one. ( Must admit you had me laughing).

    DR LUCAS,
    I am sure that you, because you laughed, and the Philologus, Vincent, both understand what I was saying very clearly; even though you do not confess to be also a Philologus.

    Paul advises us, as he did the early church at Rome to mark and avoid those who were cause divisions and offences contrary to the doctrine which they had learned; just as the PM is dividing the country by doing and saying things which are contrary to our mores, and customs.
    This is because she is not serving the Bajan populace, but her own belly;i.e she is serving her own lusts and pleasures in her actions, or in Bajan parlance “she doing wuh she like! …and not necessarily what she know is right or expected according to our mores, and customs.
    She is only good at using good words and fair speeches to deceive the hearts of the simple.

    She is not following proper example, because she is the enemy of the people. She is really a wolf in sheep’s clothing.But her end, and the nation is destruction, under her leadership. Both she, and the nation will suffer shame, because the emphasis is strictly on earthly things, while not realizing that there is a great imminent danger from those who are false teachers, and the followers of false teachers. Let’s face it, she just can’t seem to rest unless she is stirring up controversy. She is constantly calling people to be loyal to her and her way of thinking.
    Bajans need to Watch out & Wise up. Just as in Eden God did not prevent the serpent from tempting Eve,–“beguiling her in his craftiness”; so God does not forcibly prevent false teachers, division-makers, evil workers, stumbling producers, from coming among His people. But He warns us, and expects us to exercise both our discernment and our hatred of evil, and in turning away from such.

    The all-seeing God has adequately equipped us to effectively deal with the subtle wickedness of evil doers! We should not wait until everyone is scattered or deceived until we are concerned with dividers and deceivers.

    Like

  • @ Georgie Porgie July 3, 2019 2:39 PM

    I don’t expect much from her except talk..

    !. The libels laws have not been changed.
    2. Delinking the legal profession from its intrenched position in The laws of Barbados hasn’t even been talked about.
    3. Diversifying the economy has not seriously been attempted.
    4. No handle on crime : Not unexpected because elites are not jailed when breaches of the law have been done by them.
    5.No outside ideas are seriously adopted. A closed group of people have all the ideas, even though the same people in the past have been shown to have no ideas.
    6.Change is supposed to be engendered by those who aren’t inherently interested in changing things.
    7. no serious attempts have been made to curb corruption.
    8. A fixed time for elections has not been introduced.

    Like

  • Georgie Porgie

    DR LUCAS
    WE ARE SINGING IN THE SAME CHOIR SIR
    WHEN MIA DONE SQUEEZE THE BALLS OF THE POPULACE OF BARBADOS AND CAUSING POLITICAL TORSION THE MEN WILL ALL BE BACK TO SINGING TREBLE OR ALTO AS IN PRIMARY SCHOOL

    Liked by 1 person

  • GEORGIE PORGIE

    Somebody needs to recommend Mia to TAKL

    Like

  • What about the homeless in Barbados?

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2019/07/02/doors-closed/

    The comments that follow the story are interesting. Contributors seem divided on whether he should allow the boys to perform community services at his organization. Some who have the safety of their homes, the comfort of their living rooms and the protections of friends and family are quick to condemn Mr Saffrey and a few even quoted a few Bible passages to point out the error of Mr Saffrey’s action.

    I agree with the decision Mr Kemar Saffrey made. One can imagine the fear and terror one of the victims of these young men would experience if he/she found himself/herself alone with these young men. Mr Saffrey placed the welfare of his “clients” well above the standard of just looking good and “being popular”. Mr Saffrey main obligation is to protect his ‘clients’ and to ensure their safety when in his charge.

    Stand strong Mr Saffrey. Continue to protect your clients. Let the young men find their redemption elsewhere.

    Like

  • https://barbadostoday.bb/2019/07/03/put-it-on-the-altar-a-solution-to-corruption/
    “The primary solution to corruption lies, not so much in the law courts, in Parliamentary enactments, in the efforts of the police and other law enforcement agencies, (important though they all may be), but in an appeal to the God of justice, who knows the hearts of all people.”

    We know the law courts are not working. The altar would be even less effective.

    Like

  • Piece the Legend

    @ Commander Theophillus Gazerts

    You quoted and I requote

    “”“We are willing to apologize if the release was missed.”

    We being who?

    Are you part of some PR team? A party official? or that BU should have provided the numbers if they were released?…””

    Theophillus you know very well that Barbados Underground has become the Ministry of Disinformation

    This notification by the BU BORG was already on our weekly brief a few times.

    And you dun know that the Honourable Blogmaster is not going to respond to you

    Heheheheh

    Like

  • fortyacresandamule

    Haiti’s independence history should make us all proud. And rightly so. As human beings, we all need a sense of accomplishment and validation especially among those who are powerless, hated and despised. However, constantly dwelling on past glory is not going to solve the many challenges Haiti is facing…a majority of which is self-inflicted in my opinion.

    Haiti has been independent for damn too long (over 200 years) -notwithstanding the setbacks caused by external actors- to be such a pitiful economic and political basket case in the americas. She needs to get her house in order and claim her rightful place among the great nations of the world.

    Liked by 1 person

  • WE MUST LOOK AT THE PASS TO ENSURE WE DO NOT REPEAT THE SAME MISTAKES IN THE FUTURE…MORE SELF INFLICTED WOUNDS BREWING IN HAITI… DETAILS OF THE BLOODY HISTORY OF THIS ONCE DEPOSED COMMUNIST DICTATOR.

    Haiti has a population slightly over 11 million of mostly impoverished and illiterate, while their past President Jean Bertrand Aristide has a Net Worth: of $800 million dollars, who was an Ex Priest and a Politician. The economy depends heavily on tourism, having no oil or precious metals and little industry.

    The Caribbean is also a valuable staging area for Communist-sponsored revolution throughout Latin America. The Soviets acquired their first base in the area when Cuba fell to Fidel Castro in 1959. Weapons, training, and other support have since moved through Cuba into the hands of revolutionaries in Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Colombia, Peru, Chile, Argentina, Grenada and Venezuela. The fall of Guyana to the Communists in the 1970s created another outpost at the other end of the Caribbean. Nicaragua then fell to the Sandinistas in 1979, who have joined the supply line of weapons to terrorists in El Salvador and elsewhere.

    Thus, it should come as no surprise that the Haitian Communists have long plotted their seizure of power. For nearly three decades, the United Party of Haitian Communists (PUCH) stood little chance of victory against the Duvalier family, which ruled the nation as strongmen. The PUCH was officially banned, forcing it to operate underground. But the patience of Communists is such that they gradually built the infrastructure of revolution, waiting for their opportunity.

    Not particularly inclined toward the democratic process, Aristide proclaimed the slogan, “revolution, not elections,” during his 1990 campaign for the Haitian presidency. This was, of course, coupled with fiery anti-American and pro-Communist rhetoric:

    Aristide’s admiration for other Communist revolutionaries and dictators showed in his autobiography, though couched in tender rhetoric: I prefer to welcome those ideas that rest on the values of beauty, dignity, respect, and love. Che Guevara… a doctor, an internationalist, certainly incorporated some of those values, as did Allende.

    Aristide’s collection of speeches, entitled Capitalism is a Mortal Sin, also speaks for itself.

    But after winning the presidency Aristide dropped all pretenses and immediately established official ties with the Communist Bloc. For example, Fidel Castro honored Aristide by sending a 23-man delegation to his inauguration ceremony. And Aristide could soon be heard shouting “Down with American imperialism!” while his mobs burned the US flag in front of the American embassy.

    Aristide was a Communist through and through and like all Communist they always get Gain while Claiming to Help the Poor… How is Hoping to Improve One’s Situation aiding by once again Welcoming back a Communist Dictator… Do you think Aristide by doing good works will open the way for his Rise to power once again? Even Poor people learn by their mistakes or do they? Is Culture so ingrained that it becomes a Continual Stumbling Block? What will happen when Aristide once again Rules Haiti?

    Like

  • @MARIPOSA @July 3, 2019 9:04 AM
    You have all rights to be stupid and ignorant but please bring data / relevant documents when making such statements about my people! Thanks in advance.

    Like

  • “8. A fixed time for elections has not been introduced”

    can’t happen when she already anointed herself president and hooked up with an enslaver/human trafficking country to keep slave society Barbados on stream, but she was not expecting the BACKLASH……

    These DAMN VOTE BEGGARS for ministers/politicians…..once given titles, access to the treasury, pension fund and diplomatic passports.. that is what they do…nothing to benefit the populi who elected them..

    ..but they will soon haffa BEG votes AGAIN…ticktock.

    Like

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