Rise of the Uneducated Class

Many issues of the day continue to question our ability to govern. One of them is the health of the National Insurance Fund (NIF). If you listen to the politician while in Opposition, it is a fund under stress. If you listen to the same politician on attaining the office of government, the NIF is described in more positive terms.

For the sober in the crowd there are the actuarial reviews to consider. Successive governments have been unresponsiveness to public inquiry about  releasing the reviews for public consumption in a timely manner. Of equal concern has been the inability of successive governments to ensure the timely release of audited financials to parliament.

Generations of Barbadians have contributed to the NIF to give currency to the tagline – it is our lifeline.  Auditor General report after report detail bad investment decisions taken by successive governments of  National Insurance Scheme (NIS) motivated by pampering and pandering the old boy network. The “investment” of USD60 millions in Clearwater Bay referred to loosely by Barbadians as Four Seasons is one example.

The NIS is one of a handful of state owned entities that should be ring-fenced to protect against the incompetence of the political class.  Judging from all reputable sources of economic data, the inability to adequately govern a 166 square mile, less than three hundred thousand people located in an idyllic geography should be evidence enough.

Prime Minister Mia Mottley and the Minister of Education Santia Bradshaw have signaled in recent weeks that major reform is coming for the education  system. The issue of revamping the  system has been discussed for decades by the more progressive minds. The inability of our leading lights to manage the NIS and the other entities that combine to ensure well functioning organs in the society is an indictment on the current system of edcuation.

Successive NIS Boards, NIS Investment Committees and the ancillary services have been managed by “educated” Barbadians.  The performance of the NIS like the judiciary, like the BWA, like the transportation system, like the waste management system, like the PSV sector etc etc all point to the inability to convert significant investment in education in the post Independence period.

The Barbados Labour Party (BLP) since wining office in May 2018 has aggressively pursued economic strategies to address an economy in free fall.  Interestingly, we have not observed the same urgency to address challenges with the NIS. In fact Prime Minister Mia Mottley hinted that the hesitation to address the NIS problem is rooted in the enormity of the solution required given the future obligations of the fund.

This week it was reported that millions of  Brazilians protested against President Jair Bolsonaro’s plan to privatize the pension plan. The story attracted the attention of this blogmaster because one senses that Barbados will have to implement draconian measures to protect the NIS for the many sooner rather than later. Already President hBolsonaro as suspended several benefits to Brazil’s low income, disabled and senior citizens. Only a few years ago Brazil was considered the emerging economy from the Latam region.

Related links:

Brazil: Bolsonaro to Suspend Senior, Disabled Benefits Programs

Brazil: Millions Protest Bolsonaro’s Neoliberal Pension Reform

The message to Barbadians is that we cannot continue to do the same thing all the time and expect a different result.

BB = P+G (E*SOEs +NG-S)

 

 

232 comments

  • I’m going to start again and make an ultraliberal statement:

    We have to privatize the NIS to take it out of the thieving hands of DLP politicians. The best would be to settle the NIS in Bermuda or the Bahamas. Far, far, away, from everything that looks blue, doesn’t walk upright and can’t eat with knife and fork.

    We also have to privatize education because it is too expensive. We have produced too many lazy and useless academics at the expense of the state, who do nothing and are superfluous.

    Hence my proposal to charge school fees for secondary education and to privatise tertiary education entirely.

    We need a second wave of emancipation and we need to free the Barbadians from the hole in the mud called the welfare state.

    Everything that comes from Barrow is bad and must be destroyed. We must erase every memory of Barrow and his party.

    Another 10 days.

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  • We are in much more danger from the hordes of the miseducated classes than the uneducated

    At least the uneducated can rely on their innate sensibilities

    Those sensibilities are trained out of the miseducated.

    These instincts gravitate the uneducated towards land ownership and real assets. Building things with their hands and minds. Employing the miseducated sub-humans.

    Whereas the miseducated continue to walk around thinking that all other things should be added them because their have a head full of brain space carrying somebody else’s thinking.

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  • Major reform of the Education system? Never mind the Crime statistics but schizophrenia seems to be on the rise, the previous Gov’t sent home Nigerian nurses, now this Gov’t bringing in Ghanaian nurses, it is party to 23 and me and we are kith and kin to Ghanaians. Wunnah can’t say that wunnah haven’t been warned but the Gov’t is sending signals that it’s time to eliminate the Nursing component at BCC since we have been advised that Bajan nurses are failing the exams at alarming rates.

    Looka I aint got nothing against our Ghanaian sisters some of them may discover that we made some subtle changes to kenkey and remade coucou. BTW Guyana embarked on a program of training nurses to serve NA and the wider Caribbean wuh happen to those nurses or is Caricom so much lip service?

    This stop Ghana, next stop The Philippines, did someone say India?

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  • @Sargeant

    You maybe aware the plan by government to man two polyclinics 24/7 has been derailed/delayed because one of the grouses from the BRNA is that there are not enough nurses to man the two clinics.

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  • @David

    Are the nurses’ concerns justified? If they are and part of the Gov’t’s proposal to bring in nurses is to staff the 24-hour polyclinics then it shows the Gov’t hasn’t thought the plan through otherwise it ought to have known that there were not enough (almost wrote enuff) bodies to cover the shifts. I am also reading that it plans to bring in up to 400 nurses, if the shortage of nurses is so acute that those numbers are required, we are in a whole heap of trouble.

    BTW 400 nurses? That is a part of the budgetary plan, right?

    Liked by 1 person

  • “We have to privatize the NIS to take it out of the thieving hands of DLP politicians. The best would be to settle the NIS in Bermuda or the Bahamas. Far, far, away, from everything that looks blue, doesn’t walk upright and can’t eat with knife and fork.”

    So yall BLP CROOKS planning to TIEF…..the whole NIS pension fund and domicile it offshore…BUT EACH AND EVERY ONE OF YOU REPULSIVE THIEVES SHOULD GO TO PRISON.

    anything to rob ya own black peopke, every stinking trick, mischief and lie ya can devise to rob ya own people…

    Was that CLICO CROOK…Haynes’ idea.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Ah Pacha…it cannot be said ENUFF….

    #LOUDER…

    “We are in much more danger from the hordes of the miseducated classes than the uneducated

    At least the uneducated can rely on their innate sensibilities

    Those sensibilities are trained out of the miseducated.

    These instincts gravitate the uneducated towards land ownership and real assets. Building things with their hands and minds. Employing the miseducated sub-humans.

    Whereas the miseducated continue to walk around thinking that all other things should be added them because their have a head full of brain space carrying somebody else’s thinking.”

    Liked by 1 person

  • What SCAM IS THIS BLP CROOKS..

    “I see NCB Capital Markets (Barbados) Limited to buy out the more than half-billion dollars debt owed by businesses to Government. It is ready to bank $170 million on Government debt. It is a Jamaican-owned investment firm which is specifically interested in purchasing from creditors the four-year Series F bonds created by the Mia Mottley Administration to reduce arrears due to suppliers of products and services up to the end of September last year.

    (Barbados) Limited. This entity says Barbados but it is Jamaican-owned. I see trouble. And businesses supposedly owe more than half-billion dollars but this company is only looking to offer les to help, about $170 million. Hmmm. Trouble I say.
    Chat Conversation End
    Type a message…”

    Liked by 1 person

  • Wuh looka look..president Mia and her shitehound consultants..

    “Despite its tough response, the investors’ committee said it wanted to continue to have “good faith discussions” in hopes of reaching an agreement that would benefit all parties involved.

    But it issued a warning that if Barbados tried to impose a “unilateral offer” based on either of the now-rejected “scenarios” this would “likely place economic reform efforts at risk, to the detriment of the country’s financial stability and well-being.”

    The committee is advised by Newstate Partners LLP and Arnold & Porter.”

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Sargeant

    A good critique. It definitely is an indictment on the BCC nursing program. Hopefully Minister Bostic will fill in the blanks soon.

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  • No Jeff Cumberbatch column today.

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  • Outside of their being INFORMED in THIS ERA of their very RICH AFRICAN HISTORY which is CRITICAL TO HEALING THE DAMAGED AFRICAN MIND…the centuries of ACCURATE black history maliciously kept from the black population and more recently kept from them by their nasty black leaders….BLACK BAJANS only need to have THEIR LAND and INFORMATION on their best interests and ACCESS TO THEIR OWN TAX MONEY AND PENSION MONEY….to be able to move forward and progress to generate WEALTH FOR THEMSELVES AND THEIR FUTURE GENERATIONS.

    ….nasty black corrupt leaders be DAMNED….and be gone.

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  • David

    We get up every Sunday mornings to read what Cumberbatch has to say.

    Maybe our disappointment could be assuaged by re-runs.

    Liked by 1 person

  • This is the WHOLE article…please inform those Bajans who are clueless to what is REALLY happening because they are being fed wholesale lies by a corrupt government…they will need the information to make INFORMED DECISIONS regarding their own well being and that of their future generations….going forward..that is why the majority blacks are ALWAYS LEFT BEHIND..they DO NOT HAVE ACCESS to accurate information…

    https://www.broadstjournal.com/post/foreign-lenders-accuse-barbados-negotiators-of-not-acting-in-good-faith?fbclid=IwAR0LeSM9HrMSJo8D23XJcXq1w2Rg6DnYqpb5ltAZ5uCq8oKHgwbJ849_wYU

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  • Happy Father’s Day to all and also to the many mothers who take on the roles of FATHERS.

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  • @ Sargeant,

    On this day in particular – Father’s day. You have hit a raw nerve.

    It is highly irresponsible of this government to be looking at recruiting 400 nurses from one country in a single swoop. It would be more prudent to commence with one-tenth of that number to see how they bed in. Is there a universal professional entry level for nurses to work internationally?

    Only today on Aljazeera news there was a report of a doctor from Pakistan who infected over 100 children with aids by the use of contaminated needles!

    Recently, I had the misfortune to witness first hand the nurses at the QEH on a certain ward. I can tell you that fifty percent of those nurses had no right to have been in possession of their uniform. Their rightful place should have been confined to working in concentration camps. Such was my disgust at what I saw on that ward.

    If a nurse is unprepared to be empathetic, civil and helpful then they have no right to be in the profession.

    As for your comments regarding CARICOM and Guyana, I would say don’t go down that route. Caribbean citizens are pretty much the same in their mindset.

    I would say to Mia that it is good idea to recruit nurses from other black countries to whom we may share a common heritage. However she should avoid recruiting nursing professionals from the Philippians or India as these nationalities will not be able to integrate into the local culture.

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  • William Skinner

    @ Pacha
    Who therefore are the educated.?Those who have certificates and degrees? Are they educated or “certificated “? We need to define educated in broader terms.
    For example : Is a mechanic who sits and explains the workings of an engine to a group of experts any less educated than a PhD student who sits and explains his thesis to his “peers”?
    Is a historian who presents his thesis to his “peers” for their review anymore educated than one who does not? Elitism and eleven plus thinking pervades everything and classism while attacked still seems to be the path. This is our greatest challenge.
    Whereas I agree with your submission it still reveals we are a long way from accepting the simple fact that schooling and holding diplomas are essentially qualifications and that person is only “educated” in the very narrow sense.
    Quite frankly to your way of thinking, it is more than obvious that the most independent and to some degree successful blacks in this country , were those who were deemed uneducated. Hence your point about the uneducated developing themselves financially and otherwise is taken.
    While I welcome the promise to abolish the eleven plus , I hope that an integral part of the reform will be to radically redefine what we consider to be education.

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  • =====Not a B thinmg or a D thing, but a we thing================
    Why do I find this title to be repulsive.
    I am here struggling to figure out why I find it in some sense to be Orwellian.
    How many classes do we have in Barbados\
    educated/mis-educated
    uneducated
    .
    .
    .
    and somewhere down the pecking order is the yardfowl.

    If you read BU carefully, there is always some dividing line being drawn somewhere.
    We don’t just have secondary schools, we have secondary schools and seven newer secondary schools.
    We have those who get bail and those who end up being lost in jail.
    A few articles in the past, some label themselves as the political class. leaving the majority of us as ordinary yardfowls

    We had over 50 years of the BLP and DLP classes and all we got for it is
    a ruined economy,
    enrichment of a selected minority,
    thieving that is out of control,
    abuse of the poor and weak in our system of injustice,
    land theft,
    scams masquerading as government projects,
    old talk representing itself as leadership,
    and the list goes on

    We must beat this bell incessantly. Our leadership seem to lack the will and inability to learn or to change course.

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  • A good point William. It reminds that Google, Microsoft and other top performing companies look pass paper qualifications.

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  • I was expecting to see an article outlining the expectations, life and death of Bitt-coin.
    Where did it go wrong?
    What became of the sand box?
    Is is now a litter box?
    But it seems as if omniscience died as well.

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  • A hearty good morning to all of Barbados
    Hope you have a better day than what I will have —- Going to pick-up MIL at noon.
    Have a great day Barbados

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  • @ David June 16, 2019 6:05 AM

    “definitely is an indictment on the BCC nursing program”

    From time to time I teach at BCC. I wouldn’t say its an indictment. I don’t deal with the nursing section but I deal with a different part of the health section. My last stint there, I found that the class was up to scratch and keen. Prior to that stint, I found that the students required lots of remedial teaching ( spelling, English. subject and verb agreement: I would correct using a red-ink pen giving examples of the correct way: Reminded me of when I was at elementary school Obviously something went wrong at elementary school for them. If you do not understand English ,how are you going to understand science?). You have to understand that there maybe persons working in government, who are sent on courses at BCC ( who ,one wonders how they ever got into the government service in the first place). One has to work with them and bring them up to scratch. Some of them really do excel and some do not. I hope you get my drift. In the food industry the mantra is bad raw materials in result in a mediocre end product coming off the production line

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  • @Dr. Lucas

    Notwithstanding what you have stated the proof of the pudding is in the eating. We have been unable to supply an adequate number nurses.

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  • It is a B thing, It is a D thing, It;s we thing

    One can understand the need for governments/companies to have secrets. After all, in a competitive market, having inside knowledge would give an ‘opponent’ an advantage.

    But unnecessary secrecy seem to be embedded within all of our organizations, both government and private. Little is explained to us and to add insult to injury, we are told we are just ignorant. As an example, no-one/no-company understands or is capable of doing restructuring. We are told that A and B are qualified, but when you look at their resume or work history it appears to be weak; their history appears to have gaps; and the prosperity/activity of their company can be questioned. Our heroes/saviors often appears to be inferior to some of those they rescue. This is the propagation of the “inferior superior” (to misquote a fellow blogger).

    How is it that no matter how diverse the activity/topic we see the same lame explanations emerging? The advent of the internet and the power of Google’s search engine have changed anything, but yet we get the old cloak of secrecy and the same explanation “You all are too ignorant to understand”. Over fifty years of free education, hundreds of citizens serving in positions of power throughout the world but always “You all are too ignorant to understand”. Is our education worth anything?

    Instead of trying to correct the situations when a serious challenge emerges, they wrapped themselves in the flag and patriotism, they try to intimidate by using the word treason; and at times they want to choke internet access. And, of course, we have the foolish few, who act as if we are still following the politics of the past as they chant the silly mantra “Four legs good, two legs Bad”.

    It is almost as if it is our leaders very nature is to be dishonest. Give them a clean page to write their names on (with expectation great) and they resort to the old playbook of trickery and skulduggery. The old dog cannot learn new tricks.

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  • de pedantic Dribbler

    Mr Blogmaster you are doing a NationNews!

    Years ago when that publication was birthed I recall they often used “scandalously” styled headlines to titilate…and continued in that vein over the years … and here you are mining that same vein 🤣…uneducated class, really!

    That grabs eyeballs much more than the more accurate Uninformed Class fah sure!

    But to the substance….your long standing thesis that failures at our key agencies like NIS “is an indictment on the current system of edcuation” is just not based in FACT or reality: a failure of execution cannot be blamed on the education system. Nor can a need for upgrade and improvements mean that what existed prior simply FAILED!

    That’s just NOT logical… if that is held as valid then the market crash of 2008 would be an indictment of the US finance education system failure or the abject laxity of US Intel not to identify and thwart the election inteference of their nation would be indicative of a failed training/education program!

    Is the woeful Brexit negotiations calamity a failure of British education !

    The “educated class” as you like to call them also include folks like you bro and your resident progressives like Skinner or the Goddess and Walter and the Bushman and the myriad others who show great nous here…in sum, our education system HAS INDEED WORKED …. sometimes too damn well, as our administrators have artfully been able to beguile and betray our sensibilities over these many years, not so !

    The fact that they also effed-up is a function…methinks, that our moral code FAILED….but then again that can’t carry a continuous salacious headline, grabbing handle can it.

    Thus I suspect you will persist with the absolutely misguided, illogical assertion that the education investment has absolutely failed. Alas!

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  • “@ Pacha
    Who therefore are the educated.?Those who have certificates and degrees? Are they educated or “certificated “? We need to define educated in broader terms”

    Those are the HIGHLY MISEDUCATED…so dumbed down and uppity…that they know not that they know not. Plus…they CANNOT STOP TIEFING FROM THEIR OWN PEOPLE…NOT EVEN TO SAVE THEIR OWN MISERABLR LIVES AND UGLY WORLDWIDE REPUTATIONS. They are MARKED and you should ask them why.

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  • “You maybe aware the plan by government to man two polyclinics 24/7 has been derailed/delayed because one of the grouses from the BRNA is that there are not enough nurses to man the two clinics.”

    One must question how thorough is the planning?
    Are plans developed in silos without input from all the required parties?
    Is it trial and error, with the plan of getting it right, eventually?
    Problems created, problems solved?

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  • It appears that Barbados would be a good place for Ghanian nurses to emigrate to.

    The current salary scale is stated below:

    Certificate nurses – They earn GHS 700 monthly.
    Diploma nurses – GHS 900 and above monthly.
    Degree holders – GHS 1600/2000 per month.
    In conclusion, it easy to note that nurses in Ghana are not well paid and clearly need a raise. To be a nurse in Ghana it is basically more of passion than for the pay.

    1 GHS = 19 CENTS USA

    2000 GHS = 370.53 USD

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  • @ David

    The high failure rate is due to the quality of the inputs. Check out the failure rate: it has a direct bearing on the number of persons graduating. and the number of available nurses.

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  • @Dee Word

    Have a reread of your missive.

    We have a situation where systemic risk is in play across sectors including government. This has to be called out for what it is. An abdication of the educated class to diagnose, analyse/evaluate and implement. What is at the core to manage these components you ask? You guessed it!

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  • @Dr. Lucas

    To be clear you link the quality of the inputs to what?

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  • @Dee Word

    We have to bring the pragmatic definition of education into to play here.

    Liked by 1 person

  • The blatant rape of the NIS fund had nothing to do with education but everything to do with a minister who intended to get to elections at all cost without rocking the boat by doing his dam job

    The fact that the governor of the central stood by and watched it happen had nothing to do with him being uneducated, but everything to do with him hanging on for his own self serving purpose. He could of said no count me out then resigned and gone to the press.

    The massive cost overruns on government projects had nothing to do with those involved being unable to add, but everything to do with a lack of oversight.

    99% of our problems that have us at the door of the IMF have nothing to do with our education system, but everything to do with many pursuing their personal agenda at all cost, with no regard for their consequences.

    If we looking for something to blame for where we are today we need to find another scapegoat and not blame the educational system.

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  • It this where our Education system have Barbados

    Barbados External Creditor Committee, a investors’ group which holds about 55% of Barbados’ US$1.5 Billion in foreign debt, and includes regional and international financial institutions, pension funds and central banks, as well as individual bondholders has accused Barbados of ignoring its so-called good faith proposals re-negotiating its foreign debt.

    In a terse press release issued on Friday the Committee said Barbados had ignored a revised proposal that it had “in good faith” on 17 May 2019. The lobby group said that, instead, the Government of Barbados had released so-called “restructuring scenarios” that ignored its suggestions during negotiations over the past several months.

    As a result, the Committee said it could not “take seriously” Barbados’ commitment to negotiate “in a consensual manner” a new payment plan for its external commercial default, and would not support or recommend to its members either of the two options which Barbados had recently put forward informally. It said the government need to “reengage in good faith negotiations.”

    Under the first option or so-called “scenario, the government would give creditors new bonds worth two-thirds of their original principal, with interest payments made twice yearly, at 3.5 per cent in the first two years, and 7.5 per cent per annum until the 2033 maturity date.

    In the second “scenario, outlined in Friday’s Nation newspaper by Shawn Cumberbatch, the bondholders would receive the full face value of the restructured bonds but interest payments would be fixed at 3.5 per cent per annum until 2044.

    In its update to creditors, the government of Barbados defended the offers saying “Both scenarios are at the limits of what is compatible with the debt sustainability framework that underpins the EFF (Extended Fund Facility,” that is, the IMF loan.

    The investor group accused the government of misrepresenting it, stating that “Contrary to what has been stated by the Authorities in the ‘Creditor Update’ released on 11 June 2019, the Committee’s last financial proposal was designed to meet all of the Authorities’ objectives…”

    It said this included giving Barbados the ability to reach the 60% debt-to-GDP target by 2033 under the IMF loan – however, with a one-year margin of error – while providing greater cash flow relief for the creditors.

    The Committee also claimed that its proposal would have improved Barbados’ ability to re-access the international capital markets over time.

    The Committee added that Barbados’ statements regarding maintaining inter-creditor equity were irrelevant, saying in effect that comparing the domestic debt agreement finalized in late 2018 to the terms presented to external commercial creditors was essentially like trying to compare apples with oranges.

    The investor group said “Domestic investors were subject to a local law regime designed to force the implementation of that restructuring,” noting that this power did not apply to “the New York and UK law instruments represented by the Committee.”

    It also noted that over half of the domestic debt re-negotiated was held by state-owned entities of Barbados, and Barbados is able to offer “additional accommodations to private sector domestic investors that by nature are not available to international investors.”

    Despite its tough response, the investors’ committee said it wanted to continue to have “good faith discussions” in hopes of reaching an agreement that would benefit all parties involved.

    But it issued a warning that if Barbados tried to impose a “unilateral offer” based on either of the now-rejected “scenarios” this would “likely place economic reform efforts at risk, to the detriment of the country’s financial stability and well-being.”

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  • Before someone jumps to the conclusion that I am saying our education system is not in need of serious review that is not the case. I agree it needs an overhaul but it can not be blamed for many of our failings in terms of where we are today.

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  • @xDavid

    Output

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  • de pedantic Dribbler

    Let’s parse your well crafted sentence also…You said: *We have a situation where systemic risk is in play across sectors including government. This has to be called out for what it is. An abdication of the educated class to diagnose, analyse/evaluate and implement. *

    Is there uncontrolled risk management in the private sector or primarily and principally in the govt sector?…. I suggest the private sectors gurus manage their processes well (notwithstanding the TnT sell off; they make much wealth from us, don’t they)!…. Who provided the foundational educatation for them… same one that educated our govt sector folks, not so!

    We cannot honestly say that successive govt’s have NOT diagnosed and analysed/evaluated our problems… No way!

    I wholeheartedly agree they have NOT IMPLEMENTED properly….but that’s execution… That’s a function of indifference, spite or malfeasance and normally has not a jot to do with EDUCATION!

    The sewerage running in the streets: The diagnosis and evaluation was done years ago by competent Bajans and sewerage processing plants were constructed and sewer lines connected (remember Propa Pork originated from that severe dislocation in Black Rock; I too was decimated businesswise, so I recall that only too well).

    The more recent problems were NOT about diagnosis or analysis…but about continuous improperly implemented maintenance and a detailed investigation would likely show that funds were subverted … that’s corruption David NOT lack of education or understanding what needed to be done!

    I could go on endlessly…so let’s agree to disagree.

    Yes our education processes need to be updated but the previous education investment has bourne tremendous results … courupt public officials DO NOT negate that!

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  • @ David

    Input is linked to output.

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  • @ William,

    Experts predict d that by 2030 (11 years from now) 85 per cent of the jobs young people will be doing do not yet exist. That is the power of artificial intelligence and digital innovation.
    Sometime ago Dr Sucker Byer raised the issue of the future of work; it was also mentioned by Ronnie Yearwood; to this day our great media have not thought the subject fit for discussion. Is our educational system fit for purpose?
    President Mottley is a former education minister, but as I have said before, she has no stomach for details, for policy. She likes headline announcement s, punching above our weight. Policy takes up too much time and, for the disinterested, can be boring.
    Take the issue of importing 400 Ghanaian nurses to work in our health service. It is a lunatic idea. Just ask black nurses (and patients) who have worked in, or been in hospitals, with West African nurses. Talk to the returnees. As a |UK patient, I would rather have white nurses than West Africans – and I speak from experience.
    The other issues are: what proportion of the total health service pay roll will the 400 nurses be? Does that mean on some wards there will be a total or majority West African staff? Will this change the culture of the hospital and will that be a good thing? Of course we need good relations with our West African cousins, but this is not the way to go about it.
    The fundamental issue is the failure of our educational system. That is where the problem starts, not by lowering standards or importing stop-gap staff. But the problem goes far beyond nursing staff; it goes right to the heart of all our institutions, as @John A has been saying for a number of days.
    We must also see this importation of Ghanaian nurses as part of the narrative the President has been telling the nation about the size of the Barbados population, and the bogus argument she uses to justify it (about Singapore, Suriname, Guyana and elsewhere).
    Had she thought long and hard about this she would realise that radical demographic change will change the nature of Barbadian society forever – unless that is her intention.
    As usual, she does not put forward a comprehensive argument, but the only legitimate argument to justify this is the flawed economic one of increasing productivity. As I have already pointed out, increased productivity will come from technology and output per capita per hour, not bums on seats.
    After nearly 13 months, this government is yet to tell us what it is vision is of a future Barbados, apart from having a world-class women’s football team.

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  • Sir William Skinner
    WARU

    The ‘educated’ are yet to be defined in terms of a serious block for national development.

    This article was initially talking about the uneducated

    We introduced the miseducated as a more troubling social construction.

    Maybe we could properly locate them amongst the unschooled who have achieved personal independence as a perquisite for a broader interdependence and as rooted within an ancient Afrikan epistemological tradition.

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  • @Dr.Lucas

    Understand the point you are making.

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  • @Dee Ward

    Sorry to chatter your argument but we have no private sector that adds significantly to moving the GDP needle in a sustainable way. The private sector is a taker i.e. it depends on government NOT an enabling environment/framework, it does not create. Look at the pie chart, the largest chuck is distributive/retail trade. What does it tell you about the ability to create/manufacture?

    #education

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Hal

    well said. i cant speak to your experiences with West African nurses but this idea about growing the Bim population by external inputs ought to scare every bajan. that is why i mentioned it in my bullet points as to what i would do about the murders.

    nothing scares bajans like talk about replacing them but it has always been a BLP plank. in the 70s Tom said he would like to see Bridgetown become a cosmopolitan place.

    yeah MAM jumps from political topics without fully fleshing out the technical points to fulfill the policies. she sounds good but it is all superficial

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Hal

    I would go further on the NIS issue and say that the “educated” people who are in charge of the fund will not in anyway try to touch it in a serious restructuring, but will instead look to put a patch on a rotten main.

    If that fund is ever valued by an independent entity that takes into account the worthless paper it holds, buildings it has that were built at cost that are way in excess of today s market value and other issues the fund has, the on book adjustment that will be made will be massive.

    Also remember the fund has a serious cash flow shortfall from this year, resulting in it’s billion dollars in paper being cut from a yield of roughly 7% to 1%. That is a yearly loss of $60 million dollars there alone. How will it be addressed?

    We will probably not get pension to 70 and don’t be surprised if the total monthly contribution between worker and employer doesn’t reach 30% of insured earnings as well.

    Like

  • @ Greene

    That is true I still waiting for an explanation in English as to what “Establishing a sandbox for digital currency to play in” means. I asked for an outline of the governance protocol and the cap level for its influx into the system in relation to current local currncy supply and ain’t hear a man squeak on it yet!

    Wait I lie one blogger tell me I don’t like Abed. Lol

    Liked by 1 person

  • SO MANY ISSUES YET WE ALWAYS SEEM TO MISS THE ROOT CAUSE!

    ROUND AND ROUND THE BU MULBERRY BUSH WHERE IT STOPS DOES ANYBODY KNOW?

    Tron seems have an Idea…

    Tron June 15, 2019 6:53 PM “We need a second wave of emancipation and we need to free the Barbadians from the hole in the mud called the welfare state.”

    FREEDOM CONCURS 100% YET NOBODY WANTS TO CALL A SPADE A SPADE!

    Personal actions, needs, responsibilities, and beliefs are the attributes of the Individual. You cannot be socially liberated, while being economically enslaved. You cannot own yourself if your personal responsibilities are collectively bound together through political power and the Government. —we do not have collective minds or a collective conscience….

    Unless you are willing to shoulder your own burdens and buy your own services–you are NOT willing to be free. If you wish to use political power to commit so-called “charitable” donations to others for what you determine as “rights” to receive monies for Individual needs and responsibilities—you ONLY implant a NARCOTIC for corruption, degradation, dependence, public ownership of human beings, and servitude….

    You cannot separate government from your body and your conscience if you at first do not separate it from your personal consequences and responsibilities…

    SOCIALISM IS SOLD TO THE IGNORANT BY DANGLING THE CARROT ON THE STICK, BUT SELDOM DO THOSE STARING AT THE CARROT SEE THE GREED FOR POWER SHINING IN THE EYES OF THOSE WHO HOLD THE STICK!

    Socialism is ALL about the 5% controlling the remaining 95% and throughout history, it has ALWAYS resulted in tyranny, suppression, misery, and eventually death to those whose desire for the carrot left them blind to where the carrot will lead them…

    Make no mistake, a prison can be in a prison without needing the bars. When you hand all the power to a small group, they will continue to control more and more aspects of your life.

    IT’S ALL ABOUT CONTROL…

    With Socialism the 5% will control every aspect of your life..

    OF COURSE, EVERYTHING WILL BE FREE… AND, ALL YOU HAVE TO DO IS SURRENDER YOUR FREEDOM…

    Like

  • William Skinner

    @ Hal
    Almost forty years ago, we were training nurses , from Namibia. They were staying at the YMCA. Today we are importing nurses from Ghana.
    One of the first people to call for a larger population was Dr. Clyde Mascoll. Later on Ronald Jones joined the chorus. Today the PM is embracing Jones position.
    Once more the confusion of policy is clearly evident within the duopoly.
    There is an all out mission to turn the country into a replica of Singapore.
    Both major parties are obviously delusional.

    Liked by 1 person

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    David, you do not shatter my argument in the least…you are however, opening a fresh line of enquiry about the GDP mix.

    Suffice to say you are being ruthlessly harsh (and very simplistic) to condemn that “we have no private sector that adds significantly to moving the GDP needle in a sustainable way.”

    Our tourism plant is I believe 90% private sector controlled. But let’s not meander into number crunching for its sake…

    The simple fact is that our nation has lost much of its manufacturing due to our high cost of living…. I mentioned Intel last evening and although that was way back over 30 years since they left we have seen the same reasoning for other departures of operations into TnT, other islands or Central America in more recent times.

    Thus most of our manufacturing is for local consumption and with the size of our market those businesses are quite relatively small and reflect comparatively lowly on a GDP table…. HOWEVER, you cannot dismiss Windmill or WIBISCO or any other manufacturer as a non-creator because on a small revenue stream!

    Thus what I grasp from our ability to create/manufacture is that we are too small a market to thrive particularly in this day and age of low trade barriers… so why then are there not more Bajan originated regionally spread manufacturing firms, you may undoubtedly retort… I have no idea, other than we have not been able to create better mouse-traps than those of our regional cousins!

    I don’t blame that on education.

    As I said, let’s agree to disagree.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Dee Word

    Raising the tourism flag is the best you can do in the context of an education discussion and the inability of an educated country to create and manufacture read produce to add diversity to the economy? Our ability to create cannot be limited to a Barbados space. Think big man!

    Wheel and come again please.

    Like

  • @ William

    I can see the appeal of Singapore. It makes for easy thinking, Bajan politicians do not like too much thinking. And, most important, Singapore gave up democracy for economic development. Is that a price Barbados is willing to pay? I can see the attraction to President Mottley.

    Liked by 1 person

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @Tron at 6:5 p.. of June 1, 2019

    Looking for another way to transfer the black working people’s money into the pockets of you and your useless greedy friends are you?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Pachamama June 15, 2019 9:21 PM
    “We are in much more danger from the hordes of the miseducated classes than the uneducated
    At least the uneducated can rely on their innate sensibilities
    Those sensibilities are trained out of the miseducated.
    These instincts gravitate the uneducated towards land ownership and real assets. Building things with their hands and minds. Employing the miseducated sub-humans.
    Whereas the miseducated continue to walk around thinking that all other things should be added them because their have a head full of brain space carrying somebody else’s thinking.”
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Pacha Sage, the Ascended Master, you have just untied the Gordian knot to the Bajan psyche as to why there has been a dramatic fall from grace from being the ‘best-managed black country’ to one bordering on the brink of abject incompetence which your English bête noir Hal constantly refers to as a “failed state”.

    The Bajan “mis-educated” class ‘have’ indeed lost that natural talent called ‘COMMONSENSE’.

    How else can you explain the inability of modern-day university-attended bureaucrats to resolve problems which their ‘Seventh-Standard’ trained predecessors were able to treat as routine matters like public transportation, sanitation and tax collection?

    How come the so-called uneducated workers were able to remove the detritus and garbage from the streets and vacant lots within 48 hours using only hoes, brooms, shovels and donkey carts whereas the modern-day lazy laggards in cahoots with their office-bound university-trained supervisors equipped with their sophisticated equipment cannot arrange for the same simple jobs to be done in a timely and efficient manner?

    Commonsense, Dear Pacha, has exited the Bajan backdoor of integrity and basic competence while the regurgitation of bullshit has entered through the front door fabricated by the Guild of the UWI.

    The shit of ‘mis-education ‘has certainly floated to the top in the sea of Bajan governance.

    The only raft or lifeboat left to Salvation is to bring Bajan to their knees by injecting the serum of Devaluation and hard(er) times into their socio-economic bloodstream.

    Like

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @David at 11:09 of June 15, 2019

    Maybe if there are not enough nurses to “man” the polyclinics, we can train some real-real MEN to man them?

    Imagine if those 27 dead men so far for the year and their 27 or more almost certainly young male killers, imagine if instead of learning how to use a gun, imagine if they had learned to be nurses, and could deliver babies, give immunizations, take blood pressures, counsel diabetics, dress “lame foots” etc.

    There is plenty of good work to be done in Barbados, and evidently the money to pay for it, because we will have to house and pay the Ghanian nurses won’t we?

    Why not train the guys of the “ghettoes” to be public health nurses. Turn a 20 year old potential criminal into an excellent public health nurse by 25.

    I would love to have some of those young men looking after me as I grow older.

    I would rather be nursed be a handsome young man, than by a sour old woman.

    Liked by 1 person

  • UPPITY NEGROS…can’t stop tiefing from their own black people…we have less than 4 YEARS to WATCH them ATTEMPT ways to ROB THE PEOPLE AND ISLAND…and between them, their crime syndicate from bar association and their criminal Cartel in the minority community…they will be burning the midnight oil..for all 4 years….cause they got the whole Caribbean to play in…until they are STOPPED.

    let’s watch…it’s movie time, let’s just make sure it ends with ALL THE UPPITY NEGROS IN HANDCUFFS….since they CAN’T STOP tiefing…FROM THEIR PEOPLE..

    Like

  • The biggest concern I as a Barbadian have is what is going on, or better yet, not going on in the foreign debt settlement at the hands of White Oak.

    We are getting dangerously close to being black listed by foreign finance institutions as was done to Argentina post 2004. The fact that White Oak refuses to accept the foreign creditors offer which meets the IMF target but just 12 months later should raise questions. Is it that meeting an agreement would mean an end to the $85000 USD a month gravy train?

    If you look at the way Argentina dealt with their foreign creditors back then and how White Oak is dealing with ours they are some glaring similarities.

    I urge the PM to step in and tell White Oak to accept their offer before we end up on a black list like Argentina. If this God forbid was to happen, what we as a country stand to lose, would be ten fold plus greater than closing a deal based on just 12 months difference in the meeting of a goal.

    We basically quarelling over cents when being black listed by international dollars would cost us millions, not to mention hamper our growth for years going forward.

    Like

  • @John A

    So we settle the external creditors and our uneducated people continue business as usual what next?

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David BU

    Time for a realty check.

    What is an educated society?
    What social function does education serve?
    What do we mean by education?
    You may not have noticed ,but this blog is all over the place like Punka.

    How come you did not inform the Blog about the foreign debt holders brouhaha?

    Are we going to have a discussion on the foreign debt restructuring? That would be educative.

    Like

  • @Vincent

    Someone sent the Nasdaq link a couple days ago. We can discuss tomorrow on another blog. We have discussed the matter a week or so ago?

    Like

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @TheOGazerts at 7:57 a.m.

    But the MIL is the same wonderful person who gave you that lovely, long lasting heavy sweet.

    Enjoy your day do!

    Like

  • @ David.

    No not at all, but it must be now our priority because if we don’t settle it the opportunity for our people both educated and not, will be severely hampered in terms of opportunity in the short to medium term.

    What we need most is growth in the economy so our people can have opportunities for betterment. When we educate them they need to have a road to growth. If this isn’t done we will have people with Bsc’s packing shelves at Massy.

    There can be no growth without foreign money. The government can run in the short term to the IMF, but the rest of the island needs to be in a position to be seen favourably by the said foreign creditors that White Oak is offending.

    It is therefore time for the PM to step in and instruct white oak to settle on this final offer.

    Like

  • @John A

    Yes we need t close it.

    Like

  • @ Simple Simon,

    By a sour old Ghanaian woman. Hope you do not end up in any major London hospital. They are rude, obnoxious, aggressive and unhelpful. They also often fiddle records.
    I know a Barbadian man (n his early 60s) who died minutes after he was visited by his children; as they left North Middlesex hospital, they saw a mature African nurse approach his bed. He was dead minutes later. May be coincidence. I do not think so.
    What these nurses, like all people, bring with them is their culture. When they see a black person they relax and think they are dealing with someone from ‘home’ and old forms of behaviour come to the fore. This will end in tears..

    Like

  • I am not saying your point on education is important, I am just saying when we educate people what do we do with them in the absence of opportunity?

    This foreign debt settlement should be the biggest concern of every Barbadian and our government!

    Like

  • Sorry I meant is not important

    Like

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @John A at 9:12 a.m.

    Agreed.

    I can’t anything.

    Like

  • “If you look at the way Argentina dealt with their foreign creditors back then and how White Oak is dealing with ours they are some glaring similarities.”

    That is why am always concerned about Argentina being in Barbados..,they should NOT be any any black majority country, especially one as vulnerable as Barbados with such weak, corrupt leaders.

    They always got some wishy washy excuse for being in Barbados despite it all sounding like outright lies…since they systematically killed off all their blacks with their ugly racist selves, why are they now sniffing around a black majority island with vulnerable people.

    Bajans need more information at this point…it needs to sink in deeply that this wicked government is no good for the people or island.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    John A

    No one who advised the MoF to restructure GoB debt understands economics or finance. It was a recommendation for disaster.

    Like

  • @ David

    I Don’t think many understand the seriousness of this matter and that is why it is brushed aside. Even the so called opposition has not bothered to explain to the people what getting black listed by international creditors could mean. Not one of them has taken the time to explain to the public the price Argentina paid for trying to play hard ball with them.

    The only person I heard who publically came out and stated his concern by linking it to Argentina’s failure was Jeremy Stephens. For that he was nearly crucified too.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ John A
    I used “restructuring ” ,their euphemism for walking away from a financial obligation.

    Like

  • @John A

    On a point of elucidation regarding the debt matter between Argentina and creditors took 14 years.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-argentina-debt/argentina-lead-creditors-settle-14-year-debt-battle-for-4-65-billion-idUSKCN0W2249

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ John A

    The onus is on GoB to explain to the Electorate what they did and why they did it.

    Like

  • @ Vincent

    I agree with you 104% ( the 4% is to cover inflation)

    The way everyone is just glossing over the issue is frightening. I mean I can understand why government frighten to talk about it, but what about the dam opposition that want us to take them seriously? The whole way this foreign debt restructuring had been handled is a pathetic failure and an embarrassment. From what we paid white oaks to what we have gotten from them is laughable.

    I like You wouldn’t even use the word restructuring at all, as that implies that a concrete settlement has been reached and Implemented.

    Then again Vincent if you paying 2 men $85000 a month to fix a problem what incentive dem got to rush and fix it?

    Like

  • White Hoax is anticipating another 12 months of bullshitting and stringing out international creditors at US85,000 a pop per month….per Mia’s instructions….no money laundering monitoring in place for the hoax company…..a nice and easy way to funnel and siphon off millions of tax dollars…,so who is going to know…and even if people know, what can they do….no recourse.

    Like

  • @ David

    Thanks for posting the Argentine story for all to read.

    Like

  • @ Sirsimple

    I would bet you if you went through the city and asked 20 people what they see the fallout being for not closing on the foreign creditors would be, no more than 2 may know what you are talking about.

    Not because they are “uneducated ” but because the government don’t want to discuss it, the opposition seem incapable of doing it and when people like Jeremy open their mouths to use Argentina as an example of what happens when you play the ass with people money, he gets cussed going and coming by party faithfuls.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ David

    If you thinking of posting the Nasdaq article next week there was also a good article written by Bloomberg Financial around the same time too. They looked at it from a slightly different slant as well.

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    David you often provide me a hearty 🤣… I can only gather from your wry remarks that you did NOT read the brief 200 words post but stopped after the first 40 words!

    Now, THAT my good sir I would signal as an indictment of our education system 🤣!

    Bro, how can you assert “Our ability to create cannot be limited to a Barbados space. Think big man!…Wheel and come again please” when I ANTICIPATED your line of delivery and bluntly and clearly noted:

    so why then are there not more Bajan originated regionally spread manufacturing firms, you may undoubtedly retort… I have no idea, other than we have not been able to create better mouse-traps than those of our regional cousins!…I don’t blame that on education.

    OK I will give in to your gen X styled desire 😂 to not read past 40 words (or is that characters) and dun here!

    I will indeed wheel and come again!

    Liked by 1 person

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @Hal at 9:29 a.m.

    To Hal who would prefer white nurses.

    I regret if my [literal] black sisters and sisters-in-law who have for decades worked in the U.K health system as midwives, with spinal injury patients, with severely burned patients, as public health nurses, and as emergency room, neuro-surgery nurses and geriatric nurses, did not treat you well. They are all black. They were all born black. They could no more change their blackness than you could change yours. They have all met patients like you who did not want to be nursed by a black nurses, even before any nursing took place, but as soon as they saw her black skin.

    Racism is racism, even, or especially when it is racist words spoken by a black person against other black people.

    Liked by 1 person

  • If uppity Mia thinks she can bullshit veteran creditors who have already BEEN THERE AND DONE THAT….and they are all linked together in the international market….welll go right ahead….we watching….in watch muh nuh style,…wuhloss.

    “Hedge fund Elliott Management, run by billionaire Paul Singer, brought numerous lawsuits against Argentina.

    The legal saga involved years of court battles, street protests in Buenos Aires, the seizure of an Argentine naval vessel, and increasingly distorted economic policies as the government tried to avoid settling with the holdout creditors who blocked them raising capital on the international markets.”

    Liked by 1 person

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    I’ve had a white nurse try to take a blood sample from me. By the time she was finished the bed was a bloody mess. I do not blame her whiteness for that. Maybe she was inexperienced, maybe she was just one incompetent white nurse out of millions of competent white nurses. And by the way it is very easy to take blood from me as I am a generous and long time voluntary donor.

    But I am certain her whiteness had nothing to do with the incident.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Wura

    True but what the article doesn’t tell you is that years after 2004 the foreign creditors still basically had Argentina black listed. Those that lent them did so under some of the harshest guidelines imaginable. Many in Argentina still say today they are paying the price for how badly that foreign debt issue was handled.

    I really hope that opens the eyes and minds of many Bajans.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Since Barbados has NOTHING TO SEIZE…except some criminal minorities and PLENTY tiefing ministers and lawyers…,we beg the international creditors..take the bitches and INTRODUCE THEM TO HARD LABOR….they do not know what that is and NEED AN INTRODUCTION…up close and personal.

    Cause we KNOW…THESE THIEVES PLAN TO RIP OFF…THOSE CREDITORS…that is all they know.

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    Vincent you got me kerfuffled here…

    Second item, first! Are you really, really, REALLY suggesting that any interested Bajan had to wait for David to link them to the Argentine debt issue! Fah trute, really?

    And the first item: No one who advised the MoF to restructure GoB debt understands economics or finance. It was a recommendation for disaster. Seriously!….. You can be as critical as you desire about the ploy to renege but unless you are privvy to all the complexities of thOfe funding obligations and hard push back negotiations it’s merely YOUR interpretation of how they should have proceeded.

    Whether you or John A like the strategy or not it is a LEGITIMATE one… the FUNDAMENTAL story of Argentina as I gleaned it years ago is that a major default MUST be handled well and to the Blogmaster’s point you CANNOT continue business as usual as a settlement is reached.

    That nation came out of its late 1990s early 2000s financial crisis slowly but was back on the international markets issuing debt (and people buying it) some few years ago and again now they are at the IMF’s door cup in hand…that nation is a freaking serial defaulter, like Greece and Spain and a number of others… they are still functioning sorta well!

    The question as I glean from you all is whether that is now Bim’s fate.. I get that and its not a pleasant scenario!

    These fiascos are games…. played for the ridiculous fees for the White Oaks, lawyers et al who are friends of power brokers…. we know that so lets get real and cut the clap trap about government needing to educate its citizens about the Argentina scenario vis Bim!

    As said above EDUCATION is about pragmatic, continuos learning…. if Bajans dont have the basic whererwithall to inform themselves then indeed we are a bunch of “uneducated’ nincompoops …and we ARE NOT that!

    Anyhow, I gone!

    Like

  • I don’t appreciate the generalization of “African” nurses as incompetent or untrained, it is the same characterization that has been levelled at Caribbean professionals of all stripes in some countries. If they are going to be brought in what we should be concerned about is, are there trained to our standards (assuming we have standards) and how quickly they become acclimatized to our norms particularly in the health care environment.

    Our actions in some areas remind me of the saying “if you don’t know where you are going any road will take you there”, in the not too distant past people who were trained in the medical field in Cuba had their credential questioned or rejected when they tried to utilize them in Barbados yet the Barbados Gov’t was assisting in sending patients to Cuba for various medical procedures, now there is a wholesale effort to import Ghanaian nurses.

    The eleven plus results will be announced shortly, watch the politicians take credit and watch the media laud those who did well, the current nurses dilemma is an indictment of our Education system because we are still mired in a system that has been abandoned by its initiators and we haven’t identified where our weaknesses are and how we can fix them.

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    Ooooops,, @Vincent the Argentina link item was not your post but @John A!

    Like

  • “I really hope that opens the eyes and minds of many Bajans.”

    a mature, intelligent government would have sat down with these creditors and reached an amicable…to both parties ///agreement…but not these greedy so and so…they want to drag it out for maximum effect…KNOWING that these same creditors…CAN SHUT THE ISLAND DOWN……

    but the plan is to drag the shit out and then blame the other corrupt government, when the creditors strike back in anger and frustration,,,…a plan i don’t know if the UPPITY CAN SEE…has already BACKFIRED…but let them carry on smartly…more ammunition for us to bury their corrupt backsides with.

    Like

  • Re: Ghanaian ancestry…most Caribbean people of AFRICAN DESCENT will find that they…like myself, have anywhere between 9% or more Ghanaian ancestry…it is not something ya can hide, if you do ancestry testing..

    do your ancestry testing before this government with their …CONTROL FREAK SELVES…try to railroad you into what THEY WANT..instead of what YOU as an AFRICAN DESCENDANT…is ENTITLED TO.

    Like

  • Argentina and Uruguay woke up in darkness Sunday after an unprecedented power failure cascaded across their shared electrical grid, affecting millions of people.

    https://www.npr.org/2019/06/16/733191328/millions-in-argentina-and-uruguay-without-electricity-after-power-failure

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Hants at 1 : 49 PM

    I am no engineer . But should these occurrences not be expected in a integrated distributive system.?

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington,

    It cannot be acceptable for 48 million people to lose their electrical power.

    I expect that their hospitals have backup power generators.

    Hopefully the engineers will be working on a solution.

    Like

  • This one occurred in 2003. Had to cook on a gas barbecue grill.

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/biggest-blackout-in-us-history/

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ dPD at 12 :44 PM

    DPD if you do not have anything intelligent to contribute to a discussion, please desist from proving yourself uneducated. Is defaulting from a debt legitimate? Since when? And in which civilized country? In any case is the question of legitimacy under discussion? The issue is that creditability vanishes when one does not pay one’s debt on time and according to contract. It is worse when you indicate you have no intention of paying back. In private individual arrangements one negotiates repayment but on manageable terms.
    The question of legitimacy is irrelevant. It is one of your usual ploys to jackass the moot. So haul.

    Like

  • @ Vincent

    I have just heard of the death of Barbadian Sylvia Denman, an outstanding legal scholar. I have not seen a report of her death in any of the local papers, but UK papers and the BBC have made announcements. She is someone who should have been celebrated in the country of her birth.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Hal Austin at3:54 PM

    Condolences to family and friends.
    I do not know the person. Denman is not a Bajan name. What was her maiden name? What area of law did she specialise in?

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @JohnA 11.57am
    For years, one SOE after another failed to provide an annual report. Do u think there is a shortage of accountants on the island?
    Nary a word. And from persons who know better. They simply don’t wish to be tarred and feathered by the political hacks. Now we want transparency, we want the GoB to tell us why?
    The horse dun bolt. We like it so?

    Like

  • @ Simple Simon,

    I am not sure why you misinterpret things, if it is your stupidity. It is not the first time. I have reached the conclusion you just cannot read. I never said anything about preferring white nurses, you clown. So much for your university education.
    Nor have I mentioned anything about nurses being black or lack of training (apart from good manners). Caribbean nurses are black too. I said African, and that they are rude, obnoxious, aggressive and unsympathetic. If you have not spent any time in a hospital with those pigs you cannot talk. Both black and white patients complain about them. May be it is cultural.
    By the way, I recently spent a month in hospital with Caribbean, African, Irish, English, Indian, Chinese and Asian doctors and nurses. By a mile the Africans were the worst. Nigerians and Ghanaians. They are despicable.
    The excuse often given is that since they came to the UK en masse in the 1980s and 90s, they missed the worst of English overt racism. I do not buy that. They treat white patients differently.

    Like

  • @ Northern

    Yes you are correct that’s why when I hear politicians say to us ” don’t worry the NIS is in sound financial standing ” I can’t help but laugh and asked ” oh based on what?”.

    Not only have then not produced audited financials for years, but I doubt they have ever even carried out a ROI on any of their investments individually. Let’s. Take one for example.

    The Grotto housing project.

    Finished cost. ?
    Annual running cost. ?
    Rent collected annually. ?

    Total return on investment yearly =

    I would bet the return got a minus in front it.

    Do the same for other buildings and see if the ROI meets any acceptable level of return. Yet those investments form part of our retirement safety net. That and the 1% on Sinkler worthless paper.

    Liked by 1 person

  • I shudder to think in real terms what the amount needed as a cash injection would be to put the NIS on a sound footing now. Remember too the government paper they hold is useless if they need cash now, as government is not in a position if called on by the NIS, to convert any of that paper to cash for them to meet their monthly commitments.

    Like

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