From the Office of the Ambassador to Caricom – CARICOM’s “Year of Destiny” has arrived!

I cannot speak for the rest of the Caribbean Community, but I can confidently assert that the people of Barbados – after some 52 years of national Independence – are coming (or have come) to the firm collective realization that their best hope for a secure, prosperous, and opportunity-filled future lies within a successful Caribbean integration Movement rooted in the Caribbean Community (CARICOM).

You see, as the Barbadian people – under new political leadership – buckled down in the year 2018 to the urgent task of rebuilding the country’s economic fortunes, certain  realities became unmistakably clear to those charged with the responsibilities of piloting the ship of state.

I am referring to such realities as the fact that whilst Barbados’ economy, as measured by its annual Gross Domestic Product, is approximately US$4.53 Billion, the combined Gross Domestic Product of the 15 member states of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) is some US$74.8 Billion – 16½ times the size of the Barbados economy.

Similarly, while the land mass of Barbados is 430 square kilometres, the collective land mass of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) is 463,300 square kilometres – some 1,076 times the size of Barbados!  And while the   population (and potential market) of Barbados is 280,000 persons, the combined population (and potential market) of CARICOM is 18,335,544 persons – 64 times the size of Barbados’ population and potential market.

What holds true for Barbados also holds true for every other member nation of CARICOM.  For example, Trinidad & Tobago may boast of the largest economy in the Caribbean Community with a GDP of US$21.89 Billion, but the combined CARICOM economy is still nearly 3½ times the size of Trinidad & Tobago’s.  And while Guyana may boast of the largest land area at a massive 215,000 square kilometres, the territory of the combined Caribbean Community is still well more than twice the size of Guyana!

We therefore cannot help but recognize the tremendous potential opportunities and benefits that are there for all Caribbean people and CARICOM nations to capitalize on – if only we can complete the urgent work of establishing a seamlessly inter-connected “Single Market and Single Economy” in our vast and extensive 463,000 square kilometre Caribbean Community space.

Surely, part of our ambition for ourselves and our children and grandchildren must be to have at our disposal both a physical and an economic space in which we and they can freely roam in search of career and life opportunities.  And in a contemporary world in which powerful nations are either building border walls to keep out people who look like us or are enacting a host of anti-immigrant laws and regulations, we must consider ourselves fortunate to actually have in place a CARICOM Skilled Nationals Programme that permits skilled CARICOM citizens to move freely across our community in search of gainful employment and business opportunities.

More and more – in Barbados – the idea is taking root that we have absolutely nothing to fear from our CARICOM brothers and sisters who are coming to our island nation and bringing valuable skills and entrepreneurial energy with them.  Rather than being a detriment to our nation, these skilled intra-Caribbean migrants actually add value to the society and generate additional economic activity that everyone benefits from.

Similarly with our private sector businesspersons and professionals.  Just imagine how much good will redound to our economies if we are able to put the entire legal and regulatory structure in place to permit business enterprises and capital to move speedily and efficiently across the economic and physical space of our extensive multi-territory Community in search of markets and new arenas in which to build enterprises!

Imagine also the benefits to be derived from a state of affairs in which we are able to permit the many categories of trained and certified Caribbean “professionals” to register in one CARICOM member state and to have that registration automatically accepted in all 15 member states, thereby enabling the “professional” to move freely and effortlessly in the practise of his or her profession!

And surely, it is not beyond us to contemplate a scenario in which CARICOM governments, CARICOM businesses and the Caribbean labour movement combine together to create regional initiatives and structures of production to establish a system of inter-territory sea transportation; a food production programme to tackle our collective US$4 Billion annual food import bill; an import substituting manufacturing programme to tackle our collective annual US$6 Billion trade deficit; an initiative to unlock and deploy the potential investment capital to be found in the US$47 Billion in savings that our Caribbean people have deposited in banks at ridiculously low interest rates; a system for identifying and collating the high level technical and managerial expertise that is to be found in our regional public and private sectors and making it available to CARICOM nations in need of such expertise; and the list of possible projects goes on and on!

It should therefore not be too difficult for us – the people of the Caribbean Community – to visualize a beckoning future that is hopeful, positive, and full of possibilities.

It is against this background that I describe this new year of 2019 as a “Year of Destiny” for our Caribbean Community (CARICOM).  This is the year in which our CARICOM Secretariat, our Heads of Government, and all of the Councils, organs and bodies of CARICOM must take the Caribbean people on an unprecedented inter-active journey to accomplish the several critical projects that have been placed on  CARICOM’s 2019 agenda.

And if my fellow Caribbean citizens are not aware, let me inform them now that these projects include the commencement of initiatives to establish a regional fast ferry maritime transportation system, a Pan-Caribbean news and information network, a joint Public/Private agricultural and food production project, and an innovative economic engineering project to develop new financial instruments which will convert a significant portion of Caribbean bank deposits into investment capital.

They also include the fostering of regional economic growth and development by permitting Caribbean companies to bid for large government contracts right across the community, and the facilitation of an “ease of doing business” regime with the enactment of a regional Investment Policy and Code, a CARICOM Incentives Regime, a regional Financial Services Agreement, a single region-wide mechanism for the registration of companies, and the full implementation of the CARICOM Skilled Nationals Programme.

If, therefore, a year from now – on the 31st December 2019 – we are able to reflect back on this extensive work programme and to utter a collective “mission accomplished” we would have effectively launched our very own Caribbean economic, cultural and political “megaship”, and taken a giant and decisive step forward in securing our future .

170 comments

  • Barbados Underground Whistleblower

    This is a BUNCH OF DRIVEL.

    MOST PEOPLE LIVING IN THE WIDER CARIBBEAN ARE POOR AND BARELY STRUGGLING TO SURVIVE.

    WHAT YOU WILL FIND MANY WILL TRAVEL TO BARBADOS AS ECONOMIC IMMIGRANTS LOOKING TO TAKE MORE THAN WHAT BENEFITS THEY BRING INCLUDING ACCEPTANCE OF LOWER WAGES AND UNDER THE TABLE CASH PAYMENTS.

    MOST WILL NOT CONTRIBUTE BY PAYING NIS OR PAYE.

    I HAVE TRAVELED TO AT LEAST 16 CARIBBEAN ISLANDS AND SEE HOW MOST PEOPLE LIVE FIRST HAND.

    Liked by 3 people

  • It is drivel because you disagree?

    Do you understand the point Comissiong is trying to make even if you disagree?

    Do you understand the opportunity combined markets represent in a world of tariffs?

    To distill what Comissiong is saying only in movement of people is myopic.

    Like

  • Barbados Underground Whistleblower

    It is Drivel because it is not the REALITY.

    List 12 products that are currently made in Barbados that can be profitably sold in other Caribbean islands on a VERY large scale that can compete with similar products produced in Trinidad and Guyana where both labour and operational costs are at least 60% of the cost to produce locally.

    Even goods produced in most of the other islands are produced cheaper because of the high costs of doing business in Barbados.

    Maybe if the Barbados $ was devalued at least 50% the island would have a fighting chance to compete REGIONALLY.

    Unless this happens it is Drivel.

    Liked by 4 people

  • Are you aware that of the services Barbados currently sell to the region, solar, entertainment, legal, etc? Do you appreciate that if the common space can be efficiently leveraged it represents opportunity?

    Again you are being myopic. It is about preparing the playing field.

    Like

  • Sit on an early LIAT or Caribbean Airlines flight to the islands to appreciate the point.

    Like

  • Barbados Underground Whistleblower

    You may choose to call my observations myopic.

    It would surprise you that not only have I traveled first hand to many Caribbean islands I have also personally engaged in business REGIONALLY.

    How much solar, entertainment and legal services can be sold to turn the island around?

    Barbados is not ONLY competing against itself.

    I have sat on many full Liat and Caribbean Airways flights along with Air Jamaica before its demise and nothing I observed changes my feedback.

    Most solar materials for example are manufactured in China including the photovoltaic panels being assembled locally.

    Liked by 3 people

  • We do nothing.

    Some of you are mired in the negative. In fact you know everything. Nothing good can come out of Barbados.

    You may have the last word.

    Like

  • Barbados Underground Whistleblower

    The fact is I live and operate in the real world; it is not about being negative it is about being realistic.

    I also only comment about things I know about first hand so I don’t know everything as you have alleged in your response.

    I am not a yes man, Judas and an ass kisser unlike the Author of this Drivel who has to SING FOR HIS CARIBBEAN AMBASSADOR SUPPER.

    Devalue the Barbados $ 50% and the Island will have a more competitive chance REGIONALLY TO SUCCEED AND EARN SIGNIFICANTLY.

    .

    Liked by 3 people

  • Barbados Underground Whistleblower

    Unfortunately as it is the island of Barbados will continue to be a dumping ground for not the best out of Jamaica, Guyana and now Haiti.

    You can thank the Author of this Drivel for the beginning of the current fiasco with the Haitians locally which is just the tip of the iceberg.

    Liked by 3 people

  • @David

    Take the statistical points made in the article, but, how do the social, political and cultural impacts interplay with the economic potential?

    Does any political will exist to wrestle those demons to the ground?

    It seems locally and regional thinking is focused virtually entirely on economic arguments and numerical growth/development at the expense of or in ignorance of the socio-cultural space.

    This exact type of talk, movement and policy focus took place circa 1997-2007. Wonderful economic years but where did we end up on other fronts?

    Just oberving

    Liked by 1 person

  • This is a bunch of lying drivel from a parasitic snake-oil salesman.
    Barbados Underground Whistleblower has said it all, no matter how much he gets up the blogmaster’s nose with his dose of reality. It never ceases to amaze me that apparently sensible people give Commisiong the time of day.
    We may not know everything as you claim David, but we certainly know more than this self-serving creature, and if anyone doubts that, I eagerly await the list of benefits brought to Barbados by him,

    WELL SAID BUW.

    Like

  • @Observing

    Appreciate the point. The blogmaster has always admired the OECS, how as a subgroup it marshals resources. As you know, we live in a world where scale is everything. You listed challenges that will have to be overcome but what is life without such?

    History is littered with examples of man overcoming challenges when the need to do so was paramount. You may be right but here is what we know- we have to maximize our human and economic potential. We have to try.

    Like

  • Any progressive Caribbean person would support the idea of regional unity – including also the non-English speaking islands and nations.
    But a top down plea for regional unity, or singing the praises of CARICOM as is, is not the answer. The fundamental flaw in CARICOM as presently constructed is one of a democratic deficit, which must be addressed.
    At present we have constituency councils (non elected), parliament (elected every four or five years), which is where our democracy ends. All the institutions of CARICOM are unelected. Nor is there is any programme of public education, by member-states or by the CARICOM Secretariat. These are not oversights, but major flaws which MUST be sorted out before we drill down the regional body any further.
    As far as this contribution is concerned, it is simply propaganda. It raises an economic argument which exposes the author’s ignorance of economic policy and which, in any case, is outside his remit.

    Liked by 3 people

  • We have some here that sit in their chilly apartments taking potshots at Barbados for sport. As an island we have work to do but we love our country and we die trying to make it better.

    #continuetoplaytheman

    Like

  • The patriotism of a fool.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Barbados Underground Whistleblower @ People on this blog still sleeping and covering for ongoing crime in and out of office upon the People, Fake news and reporting half ass id dumbing down the people, when they wake up it shall be war, Keep talking most know what you are saying is true, But DeepState and the Kabal is all around you, Keep fighting help is on its way!

    Like

  • @ David – who are these snipers in their chilly apartments? Don’t be shy.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @45govt

    See this piece by Comissiong for what it is, promoting awareness/education in the regional space the importance of functional cooperation between the grouping.

    Like

  • I see Comissiong for what he is, a self promoting parasitic windbag who has inexplicably escaped the obscurity he deserves. More fool us for supporting and enabling the clown.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Focus on the message.

    Should we be having a serious discussion about how we view regional integration in whatever form?

    Like

  • David

    I often wonder if Americans held the same view as some Barbadians do about Jamaicans, Guyanese and Haitians, where would I be and those of the islands of the Caribbean who live in America?

    We too often forget that when Barbados was not doing well economically, many Barbadians migrated to Guyana in search of a better life …

    Like

  • @David BU,

    Define ‘serious’. An institution that has a serious democratic deficit must address that flaw if it is to progress. Is that ‘serious’ enough?

    Like

  • David

    We call ourselves West Indians, but the truth of the matter is we know very little about each other … how would I have known that people from neighboring islands of my generation attended school without shoes in the 1980s, had I not had that conversation?

    Like

  • Regional integration is a wet dream of politicians. The Federation failed, and the EU or what may more accurately be called the EUSSR, will fail soon too, thank goodness. More monuments to the never ending attempts by our political minnows to ignore their constituents’ interests in favour of their own by constantly seeking to enlarge their ponds. They must be resisted.

    Liked by 1 person

  • David,

    Turn cornmeal is cou cou in Jamaica and
    Fungee is cou cou in Antigua, but how many Bajans know this, but yet we call ourselves West Indians…?

    Like

  • I like the concept but the economic realities run counter productive for a barbados economy
    An economy after fifty years of independence is ill equipped to produce products to sell in an open market
    This idea of allowing across the board immigrants to enter our shores as a mainstay of building our economy is a pipe dream which will devastate our social basket and enviroment
    (Unlike america ) Barbados is a small island with nothing to offer vast immigrants who can travel from state to state looking and finding jobs
    Barbados has 11 parishes many which are poor and unproductive

    Liked by 4 people

  • CARICOM is total folly in the twenty first century.
    Indeed it always was a waste of time and resources ….

    The Caricom Ambassidor should hopefully be among BERT’s phase two victims….

    Then perhaps David C. can get back to doing something useful to address the legal wickedness that has taken root in Barbados, and which is the KEY problem that we need to address in 2019….
    …rather than trying to put meat of rotted skeletons.

    Liked by 3 people

  • @45govt

    As far as you are concerned we should give up. Carry on with your doom and gloom stuff.

    Like

  • @Lexicon

    We share a history and logic and commonsense suggest this should be a springboard to build a shared future in whatever form. We like to be bogged down and turned off by process. It is about maximizing the resources- how little- of the region for the benefit of the people. Have we fully exploited fisheries? Have we fully exploited the genius of our people by leveraging skills across national boundaries or have insularity and myopia hindered? Have we…?

    Like

  • @Bush Tea

    Your contribution is for Barbados to exist in a fish bowl?

    Like

  • The time to create a West Indies Union was right after initial independence when we were all starting out together.
    Waiting until each country forged its own destiny, history, culture and fortune to seek a marraige has been an exercise in IDIOCY. ESPECIALLY for Barbados who has been the main suitor – spending lots of money on dates, gifts, on adjusting its laws etc…. while the other horn us openly …and laugh.

    There is something SPECIAL about a people who are able to disrespect themselves to such an extent…. (Special – retarded)
    …such are people who see NOTHING wrong with selling their CRITICAL assets to complete foreigners – and becoming renters in their OWN land… then complaining about unfair treatment…

    SUCH ARE BRASS BOWLS IDIOTS….
    We do that role SOOOOO well.

    Liked by 1 person

  • “……….we have absolutely nothing to fear from our CARICOM brothers and sisters who are coming to our island nation and bringing valuable skills and entrepreneurial energy with them.

    Mr. Commisiong

    Visit any club in Nelson Street or adult entertainment establishments……… or take a walk along Jemmotts Lane and Bay Street any time during the night, for a first hand observation of the “valuable skills and entrepreneurial energy our CARICOM sisters brought with them.”

    Liked by 2 people

  • @ David
    What fishbowl what??!!
    What an outdated analogy.

    The whole damn world is a village….
    It is actually EASIER to get to Europe than it is to get to Antigua and certainly to Haiti.
    It is AS easy and as inexpensive to communicate with Australia as with Guyana.

    What fishbowl what?
    In REALITY, in 2019, we can as easily form a relationship with Fiji as with Trinidad.

    Do you realize what century we are in….?

    This Caricom nonsense should have died with the damn Federation.
    THAT was the opportunity that we missed…
    …and as usual for brass bowls, we messed THAT up…

    Liked by 2 people

  • The SAD reality as Artax so clearly outlines, is that it is mainly the riff raff that have taken advantage of these ridiculous Caricom work arrangements since the stupid Trinidad Treaty.
    Prior to that, people from all over the Caribbean traveled and worked in all these various countries NORMALLY.

    This short-term travel / work arrangement mainly suits Lawyers, drug dealers and hookers.

    Who the hell leaves their home and family to come to a place where they will take up a menial job – living in a slum …. EXCEPT riff raff who can do no better? ….and of course lawyers who depend on such scum.
    People moved and worked in the old days because of LOVE relationships, genuine work opportunities with good pay and prospects, and for health, education and other reasons.

    …now is it just a quick way to earn some fast dollars to send back home …and where you can do things that you would NOT do at home – where you are known…

    Liked by 2 people

  • I agree with Bushy and commiesong we need more venezuelans . we can have mayors and pilots doing our laundry and gardening instead of riff raff.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Has it yet dawned on you David that you are the only one marching in time here? You single me out in your usual partisan manner for spreading gloom and doom whereas it is simply REALITY, something you have clearly lost sight of, but most people haven’t.
    THE PEOPLE ARE NOT INTERESTED IN YOUR EMPIRE BUILDING, AND ESPECIALLY NOT INTERESTED IN ANY BS THAT COMISSIONG PROMOTES.

    When in a hole stop digging.

    Liked by 1 person

  • “It is actually EASIER to get to Europe than it is to get to Antigua and certainly to Haiti.”

    Bushy

    I may have to travel to Antigua for 3 days later in this month. LIAT’s air fare is $1,150.16.

    Liked by 1 person

  • David

    I noticed as boy growing up in the town area of Barbados that St. Lucians in particular were able to forged a petty good standard of living by their entrepreneurship, and this envied those Barbadians in the area who ought to have been doing better because they were obviously born and bred there.

    Like

  • @ Artax
    Bushie did not say cheaper..

    …and even so, the benefits (to Bushie) of traveling to Europe makes the net arrangement cheaper since more blenzers can be extracted from the albino-centric up North than can be from Antigua’s many tight fisted scam artists….

    Going home…?
    LOL
    ha ha ha

    Like

  • David,

    I told you a while back that that ship sailed about fifty years ago. Bushie has now clarified why. There was a spirit of common destiny when we were all taking steps away from colonialism. We missed the boat. Sad but true.

    NEXT!

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Artax

    What about the others working in more traditional jobs?

    Like

  • Isn’t this a good example why we need to come together to rationalize common air space matters etc?

    Like

  • @Donna

    We missed the boat in your opinion. The problem with some of us is that we speak in absolutes about matters that are hardly clearcut. History has shown that in every situatIon what is required is a little leadership. The blogmaster recalls almost 12 years ago some on this blog were vocal that BU would have been eliminated from the blogosphere by the political class. A tiny example.

    Liked by 1 person

  • “Rather than being a detriment to our nation, these skilled intra-Caribbean migrants actually add value to the society and generate additional economic activity that everyone benefits from.”

    Mr. Commisiong

    As you may be aware, the old Fairchild Market has been demolished.

    The original food vendors from that market, were RELOCATED, for the past 10 years, to the “TEMPORARY” Golden Square Market on Probyn Street, which is on the site where the Plaza Cinema was located……. and in front of the Clement Payne Park. The Ministry of Agriculture constructed stalls on the opposite side by the Methodist Church’s car park to accommodate the other displaced vendors.

    These vendors never got the chance to move into them because they remained uncompleted until they were dismantled and lumber and galvanise sheets stolen by “paros” and the MoA eventually removing the remainder.

    They are Guyanese and Jamaicans, of “questionable immigration status,” who have illegally occupied the opened area of the RAT INFESTED, condemned old Fairchild Street Market compound, where they have illegally constructed bars to sell food and beverages…….

    ……WITHOUT health certificates, liquor licenses……and toilet facilities.

    Whereas vendors in the Golden Square Market are “FINANCIALLY DISADVANTAGED” by the fact the market has to CLOSE at 6:00pm on weekdays and 7:00pm on Friday & Saturday……..

    …..…..the Guyanese and Jamaicans enjoy the liberty of the opened area old Fairchild Street Market compound, where they can maximise sales and revenue, because closing time for them……. is “until they say when.”

    There is a Guyanese woman selling food on a bench in “open air,” dusty environment of the Clement Payne Park.

    Additionally, several Guyanese are selling produce on the exterior of the Cheapside Market, while Barbadian vendors have to RENT market space on the interior.

    Surely you must agree that these situations are not only a DETRIMENT to Barbadians………but UNFAIR as well.

    (1). How can this situation “add value to the society and generate additional economic activity that everyone benefits from,” when the only people really benefiting are the “intra-Caribbean migrants?”

    (2). How do YOU and this BLP administration plan to address these unfair trading practices and UNHEALTHY situation…….

    ……….. as well as the increasing number of Guyanese and Jamaicans, of questionable immigration status, who are ILLEGALLY SQUATTING and CONSTRUCTING HOMES on lands located in the Penny Hole/Rock Hall, St. Philip area……… and across Barbados?

    Liked by 2 people

  • David

    Then we need to abandon the overly used term West Indian because it has no intrinsic value whatsoever … because we obviously know very little about each other…

    Like

  • @Lexicon

    We cannot abandon who we are as a people. To allow only economic conditions shape our future is narrow.

    Like

  • What about the others working in more traditional jobs?
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Like who..?
    The former DPP? – who brought his foreign racist inclinations to the job here?
    Like Butch Stewart – the Paradise pisser? who uses Barbados like the Chinese use Africa?
    Like Dr Robinson – the mastermind behind our NIS operations? …and the great teaching Guru on the Hill..?

    Who are these great examples of CARICOM integration?

    Arthur pushed that retarded shiite logic about ‘bringing talent in’ … to make Barbados first class.
    BUT…
    WHICH COUNTRY (except Brassbowlland) encourages it OWN top talents to flee overseas – while hoping that OTHER countries will send it THEIR top talents….. You will ONLY get riff raff….. it stands to reason.

    We can excuse Arthur – HE was an ‘economist’ (whatever the Hell THAT is…) but shiite man … are we to continue with the folly…?

    The CHALLENGE is to develop our OWN DAMN PEOPLE to their best potential…..
    How hard is that to get..?

    Liked by 2 people

  • “There is something SPECIAL about a people who are able to disrespect themselves to such an extent…. (Special – retarded)”

    lol. lol…

    these days I laugh, there is not much else to do.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Bush Tea

    You are being extreme. We have hundreds if not thousands of people from the region working in Barbados, some have retired and still live in Barbados. Don’t we have Barbadians who visit other countries and have to be deported? We will have bad apples, to focus on them is myopic. Here is the challenge, if we cannot perfect how we function in our backyard who will take us on when we attempt to enter bilateral arrangements with foreign countries?

    Like

  • Artax, a perfect expose of the Comissiong brand of lying bulls**t.

    Like

  • On the other side of the equation i see a plan afoot by Commisiong to have all Carribbean nations coming together to build an economic firewall and an financial Empire which will prevent USA economic invasion
    The downside however will be govts acting as dictators and people fighting among themselves
    Reason being that since some countries productivity is slim to naught those who have the highest level to produce would be the ones to call the economic shots in pricing producing a trade war among the islands and the unproductive nations feeling the shitty end of the economic stick

    Like

  • David is busy playing “I Wish.” He wishes we had about ten Caribbean leaders who could do the impossible or would even want to do the impossible.” Ten of them simultaneously.

    He wants the equivalent of our cricket team of the Clive Lloyd and Viv Richards era when every man was a superstar but every man worked together for the common good.

    Good luck with that one!

    Liked by 2 people

  • We wish some of you accept that Caribbean people have been moving and living up and down the island chain for years.

    We wish some of you appreciate that Barbados is an ageing population with a rising social security cost. A solution must be found, and the options and opportunities are…?

    Like

  • To say, “we need to abandon the overly used term West Indian because it has no intrinsic value whatsoever … because we obviously know very little about each other,” is not entirely true.

    Knowing “fungee” is Antigua’s or St. Kitts’ version of our “cou cou,” does not mean anything. You can get that information on-line or from books.

    People choose not to learn about the other Caribbean territories because of some silly beliefs and preconceived ideas about these islands and their citizens. For example, I heard a man arguing with another man that there aren’t any Honda vehicles or “wall houses” in St. Vincent and everyone use “pit toilets.” I asked him if he had ever visited SVG…….obviously his response was “NO.”

    A retired teacher who lives in my district told me a few months ago he prefers travelling to the United States, Canada or Europe and the other “big countries”……but would never visit any Caribbean island because they do not have anything to offer him.

    Then we have people who refer to the other Caribbean territories as “the low islands,” while others believe being Barbadian makes them superior in comparison with their Caribbean neighbours.

    For anyone to know about any Caribbean island, one would have to those islands to interact with the people and experience their cultures.

    Like

  • Many have questioned why Barbados Underground feature items bout Trinidad, Guyana and other Caribbean countries. Many have queried why we don’t see heavy responses to these items except from an enlightened few.

    The reason is….

    Like

  • David,

    I bemoan the fact that we missed the boat but alas I don’t think it is coming back.

    The reason is, in my case, that I don’t know enough about these situations. I read but do not comment.

    Like

  • Yes? What IS the reason?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @David

    Coyote sees that the BLOGMASTER has taken a step and gotten off the fence, however it appears most posters view he has selected the wrong side of the grass is greener fence. Blogmaster appears to be taking the HIGH PHILOSOPHICAL ROAD which most Barbados university Bajans subscribe too, then interpret comments as NEGATIVE when in fact the comments are REALITY.

    Time to SMELL THE ROSES and leave the South Coast PHILOSOPHICAL sewage to the un-educated corrupt politicians. The Communist Social System only works under dictatorial regimes, of which the author of the article is a fully pledged member.

    FAILED STATE IDEALS.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @45Govt,

    The reason is that David BU does not know what he is saying. I| have said this on numerous occasions. On the one hand he talks about Barbadian loyalty (ie nationalism), then he implies a Caribbean-wide unity (ie shared sovereignty), then he condemns institutions set up by the former colonial master which ended over 50 years ago (ie liberation), then he tolerates a view that Barbados is a democratic Republic with a foreign Monarch (ie a bogus political and legal argument).
    When future generations read this nonsense they are going to ask if we had any sense of reason.

    Liked by 2 people

  • There you have it David, succinct rejections of your denial of reality, and not from me, so will you dismiss the wise words of Wily Coyote and Hal Austin as doom-mongering also, or can you see you have got it wrong?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @45govt

    We all have opinions.

    Let all content.

    Like

  • As an unapologetic regionalist, I am in total agreement with the article.
    To quote Errol Barrow:
    “ We are a family of islands nestling closely under the shelter of the great Cooperative Republic of Guyana. And this fact of regional togetherness is lived everyday by ordinary West Indian men and women”
    ( 1986 CARICOM Heads of Government Conference)

    Like

  • Donks Gripe and Josh

    There are nuggets of merit in the bastard’s Caribbean togetherness framework. The real deal is no one who thinks for themselves trust such an individual and rightly so. The way that person selfishly fcuked up desperately needed economic opportunies was appallingly and downright wicked. Whatever is promoted from that source gives the sense of a hidden agenda.

    His lackey the glorified yard fowl is a monkey see monkey do type who disrespects opposing viewpoints. No wonder he, the author and watch muh are kindred spirits underneath it all they are dictators of the banana republic variety. The short man knew of what he spoke. While most support Caribbean unity we reject discredited saboteurs who play the unity card.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ William,

    We are all committed regionalists, but under what umbrella? As I have said, the idea of CARICOM is most outstanding, but what we have at present is anti-democratic and badly flawed. Let us get that right.

    Liked by 1 person

  • We are not impressed because this is titled ‘from the office of the ambassador’.
    Substantively, it is high time that people like Commissiong and William Skinner stop this feigned commitment to the Federation, to Caricomalong, for they are both dead.
    If the titans of a postmodern Caribbean, people like Williams, Adams, Manley, Barrow, our man Burnham, et al could not met it wuk, minions like Mottley don’t stand a chance.

    The likes of Comissiong and Skinner are deluding themselves and misleading the vulnerable with a pipedream, an idea well located in a bygone era.

    We fear that their argumentations are part of a propaganda campaign aimed at serving the interests of elite forces, like the officials in the Caricom organs, that they want to ensure that caricom politicians can get a chance to jerk off in public while pretending to be statesmen with relevance beyond their own island.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Hal
    The major problem is the lack of leadership. The current political leaders , have failed to inspire because they have been more interested in raw political skullduggery.
    The current umbrella is workable but it’s the political leadership that has failed.

    Like

  • “like the officials in the Caricom organs, that they want to ensure that caricom politicians can get a chance to jerk off in public while pretending to be statesmen with relevance beyond their own island.”

    they are all yet to LEARN how INSIGNIFICANT they ALL are.. in the grand scheme of things…

    Like

  • Today the Chinese landed a vehicle on the other side of the moon. The first time in history.

    People are talking about interplanetary industrialization.

    Here on Pachamama, there is a better than even chance that the EU and other blocks could be entering a death spiral.

    People in the USA looking to withdraw from the union to avoid the hundreds of trillions in debt, including unfunded liabilities, that must become a real problem soon.

    But we got titularly intelligent people talking about a 70 years old failed integration project.

    Be jesus christ!

    Liked by 2 people

  • @Pacha

    When you have finished indulging tell out how it relates to Caribbean countries with a shared history and geography working together to achieve best results for the people of the region. Does it mean other approaches should be ignored? Of course not!

    Like

  • Artax

    Yes I do agree that one can ascertain the different names attributed to cou cou throughout region online, but why did take a Barbadian, Antiguan, and Jamaican to come abroad to realized this fact?
    This goes to show how little we really know about each other, but yet we are proud to call ourselves West Indians…
    Artax, how many here know or care to know that Jamaicans have to pay to go to secondary school?
    A thing we too often take for granted in Barbados…

    Like

  • David

    Don’t be snide!

    For you cannot on the one hand argue that we live in a global village and at the same time maintain that a failed movement is still indispensable.

    Our judgement is that we should cooperate with all countries where we can

    But this fixation with a petite regionalism is at best quaint.

    Not dissimilar to our enduring allegiance, still, to a failed empire.

    Liked by 2 people

  • @ William,

    Failure of leadership is A problem, not THE problem.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Pachamama, It seems David hasn’t heeded Einstein who noted the definition of insanity was to keep doing the same thing expecting a different result.

    Liked by 1 person

  • He probably still watches “West Indies cricket” too.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Why can’t we grow functional cooperation in the region and operate in a global village at the same time? Explain to the BU dufus blogmaster please. We accept that Caricom is a failed experiment in your opinion.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Those who oppose regional integration as the path forward may want to tell us the path they prefer.

    @ Hal
    Once leadership is A problem, the path forward would be more difficult.

    Like

  • Caricom is a failed construct in reality, as is the Federation, soon to be followed by the EU. The PEOPLE as opposed to their self-serving political class (I won’t glorify them with the term leaders) are wedddd to nationhood, not globalism.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ William,

    I am not objecting o regional unity. I am in favour of a West Indies Federation, which includes all 7000 Caribbean islands. The problem with CARICOM is that it is flawed, badly flawed.

    Like

  • What a blinkered, lying mentality

    There is certainly a difference between opposition to integration and having the ball, the intestinal fortitude, to accept that it has failed.

    Those failures occurred within an epoch/s where the conditions were best for success.

    If we could not then succeed, how is it now possible to now?

    In these circumstances, it is for the defenders of a failed movement to justify their idiocy.

    Liked by 2 people

  • Hal, what on earth makes you think a second go at a WI Federation would work? No one wants it.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Common sense dictates that we should seek integration ….with like minds.
    History tells us that the Caribbean countries are NOT like-minded…
    Most recently…
    – NOT even with the shiite CCJ – and this after being insulted by the Privy Council.

    MEANWHILE, the world has moved on technologically..
    …where almost EVERY COUNTRY ON EARTH can now be considered to be a neighbor…

    YET we have this illogical fascination with this archaic idea of integration based on PHYSICAL LOCATION…..
    t..hat made sense in 1950.

    Bottom line…
    We continue to fail because decisions are being make about priorities by complete idiots.
    We have reached the sad state where obvious, FAILED, brass bowls put themselves up as ‘experts’…
    …where people who have FAILED in every previous area, gets the chance to manage national affairs.
    …and we actually expect good results…?

    @ Donna
    Let them keep watching ‘west indian’ cricket….. and looking for wins…

    Liked by 2 people

  • There are several relatively successful regional undertakings via CARICOM. It would be almost impossible for any reasonable person to conclude that the movement is a total and or irreversible failure.
    However it is also necessary for those who deem it a failure to inform how we should move forward.
    As a regionalist even with its flaws and failures, I believe like Hal that it is not beyond hope.

    Like

  • William Skinner is right about leadership being the problem.

    How do we choose leaders…?
    By popular acclaim…? ..brilliant.!!!
    THAT sounds wise…

    How about the old time wisdom of looking for persons who have been successful in $1,000 enterprises
    …and putting them in charge of $1,000,000 enterprises?
    How about judging leaders by the RESULTS that they are able to achieve…
    ..rather than the popularity that they are able to buy with bribes?

    GRASS is our future….

    Liked by 1 person

  • “More and more – in Barbados – the idea is taking root that we have absolutely nothing to fear from our CARICOM brothers and sisters who are coming to our island nation and bringing valuable skills and entrepreneurial energy with them.”

    Mr. Commisiong

    In December 2017, policemen were “deployed” to remove illegal vendors that “set up shop” in certain areas around Bridgetown, blocking alleys, sidewalks and around the entrance and immediate perimeter of the Fairchild Street Bus Terminal.

    One vendor plying her trade near the entrance of the bus terminal, told the press government should allow them to sell anywhere because in Guyana they call sell anything anywhere they choose to……..and was also adamant she would return to where she usually sells, as soon as the police leaves the area.

    On another occasion, police ordered the closure of bars in the old Fairchild Street market compound, whose owners were operating without necessary permits and licenses. They RE-OPENED shortly after the police left the area.

    Obviously, “our CARICOM brothers and sisters who are coming to our island nation” are also bring their “cultures” with them as well…….. while being DISRESPECTFUL in the process.

    And it seems as though these “CARICOM brothers and sisters” believe government should change our laws to accommodate their way of life.

    As Barbados’ Ambassador to CARICOM, what do you propose the authorities should do to address these issues?

    Do you believe Caribbean governments need better policies to manage migration?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ William
    As a regionalist even with its flaws and failures, I believe like Hal that it is not beyond hope.
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Don’t you believe that mankind has the potential to live in peace and harmony too…?
    Don’t you ALSO see the value in everyone loving their neighbors and being community – centric…?

    But if you are SMART – you will walk softly and carry a BIG stick.
    and you would NOT organise YOUR life as if everyone else was of your mind-set…?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Artar

    Look at the positive side of the issue for change … at least the illegal vendors aren’t victimizing you and the rest of the Barbadian public … I would never fault a man if he tries his best to make an honest living because had this not been the case he would probably be victimizing you and others…

    Like

  • Artax

    You are hitting some good points.

    I am glad you put the last contributions as direct questions to Commissong.

    Let us see how he responds.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Bushie

    The ‘unsullied’ make blandishments about leadership and the lack thereof.

    All they are trying to do is to justify their own ineptitude. Their own fecklessness. Engage in escapism. Refusal to take ownership of failures for which they have been part thereof. Etc.

    This writer has studied, and conducted seminars in the theories of leadership to senior executives and middle managers of a number of large corporations and government entities.

    Your musing is therefore unacceptable to us as a final understanding.

    Like

  • Interesting theory that immigrants should be allowed to bring their scofflaw ways to their adopted country for fear of worse law-breaking if they are balked.
    That muddle-headed, not to say moronic thinking has gone down so well in Europe.

    Like

  • @ Come Sing a Song

    This is pure unmitigated shy$e

    CARICOM WILL NEVER WORK

    But let de ole man share your agenda and that of yoor boss Mugabe.

    EU Pan REGIONAL FUNDING to set up these WI FEDERATION IDEAS under the guise of CARICOM UNITY

    More many to be had at that EU Funding level than can be teifed at the national level.

    I HOPE CARICOM SEES WUNNA STINKING GAME

    Steupseee

    Like

  • “As a regionalist even with its flaws and failures, I believe like Hal that it is not beyond hope.”

    Mr. Skinner

    Even if you consider…….

    ………………the governments and people of the Caribbean cannot come together as it relates to simple issues such as LIAT, UWI, West Indies cricket, CCJ, immigration, investment……….. and Barbados and Trinidad being unable to broker a simple fishing deal?

    Like

  • sirfuzzy (i was a sheep some years ago; not a sheep anymore)

    In Rome you do what the Romans do(or expect). If Rome allowed any and everyone one to do as they like; maybe it would no longer be Rome. Likewise; if you come to Barbados do as Bajans do, Respect our laws etc. Cause it seems you wanted to come here for a reason in the first place; otherwise you would have stayed where you are at home and get on with your living there.

    You may be able to sell anything any where in Gtown Guyana; but last time i checked you are in Btown Barbados. Many of these Caribbean ppl will travel to London and New York etc but they will blend it and do what is expected of them.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @45Govt,

    One of the firs things an immigrant puts in his/her suitcase is her/his culture. Once you get the numbers the entire district can be changed. Have a look at large parts of London.

    Like

  • @ Pacha
    Boss … if you are in the mood to take some serious nylon on your donkey from the whacker,
    then feel free to repeat what you said at 1.06 pm ….but in English this time…

    Remember that the object of Bushies’ musings is not aimed at your final understanding…
    Also consider that while you were ‘conducting seminars’, Bushie was writing the books…
    LOL

    Liked by 1 person

  • Sirfuzzy

    Name any country in the world today where immigrants do not break the law? It happens in every country and among all groups of people, so find a best argument against legal immigration than the one you have presented here…

    Like

  • Again, it has been argues that certain elements of CARICOM, the regional integration movement have been ‘relatively successful’. Let them be named!

    The ‘unfinished product’ (EWB) making those claims should also answer all the other pertinent questions. These must include the metrics used in that determination, the number of relatively successful agencies/projects as compared to the whole number over time, etc

    In the absence of such imperial data, man-in-the-streets mouthings are worthless.

    Like

  • Mr. Lexicon

    Are you suggesting an illegal vendor can make an honest living by breaking the laws of the land? So, in your opinion, it’s okay for an illegal vendor not to adhere to the laws of the land…….as long as “he tries his best to make an honest living?”

    And I was here thinking the reason why the term “illegal” was attached to “vendor” was because he/she was breaking the law.

    Are you also suggesting the rest of the Barbadian public and I would be victimized if we do not allow illegal vending?

    This brings me back to Bush Tea’s point. What type of immigrants are we trying to attract, the “riff raffs” who are prepared to engage in employment that does not significantly benefit our economy, but to earn enough to money to “send back home?”

    Liked by 2 people

  • Bushie

    You mekking us shiiiite!

    In English – the failure of integration is not only that of CARICOM/Caribbean leaders, but it’s one generations of us all should take possession of, in equal measure.

    How else can we do the most import thing – facing the future with confidence!

    Like

  • To think that the unifying of CARICOM States is futile .. is linear thinking.

    AFRICA, in a couple decades will become UNIFIED into ONE CONTINENTAL STATE with ONE CURRENCY, ONE ECONOMY, supplying the world with quality food, mineral resources and new technologies. Today, they are working and moving towards these objectives.
    AMERICA was once a group of individual states, today they are UNIFIED.
    EUROPE, likewise has followed suit. Lessons can be learned and avoided.

    CARICOM AGENDA must be commended. It is visionary. It is meaningful. The Ideas are workable and sustainable.
    Probabilities are high… It is a model that Africa will follow, we cannot fail them.

    Critics must separate concepts from corruption, lay aside false, suggestive and misinterpreted realities from defined targeted actualities that can achieve much once the effort is supported and encouraged.
    None of you discourage your children to excel even to the point you strategize and plan.

    Like

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