The Adrian Loveridge Column – Tourism is Our Only Hope

As we edge apparently aimlessly towards an inevitable general election there appears, at least through my eyes, little or no compulsion to place my X on the ballot paper of any wannabe politician in my constituency. We have only seen our current representative twice in over ten years, a onetime visit to our property and the second at a popular Bridgetown café.

We still await a VAT refund amounting to tens of thousands of dollars due since February 2013 despite having a single year’s Municipal Solid Waste Tax demand with added interest and penalties, even though we have absolutely no state garbage collection. Of course we would be happy to offset this (excluding interest) against any outstanding government dues including land taxes, although not yet payable, but just try and get a response from the Barbados Revenue Authority or its principals.

They seem to think they have absolutely no accountability or obligation to reply to the people paying their salaries.

And in the tourism sector there are still so many unresolved issues including the hundreds and more likely thousands of unregistered and unlicensed accommodation operators trading outside of the required criteria that the others are forced to comply with.

Will any new administration push this pressing matter onto the back burner and ignore the previous work done if elected, or will the long overdue process be forced to start over again with another potential delay of ten years or more? Are ‘we’ really waiting for some yet unknown public relations nightmare to happen that could potentially indelibly help destroy our hard earned reputation as a destination?

What, if any, progress on the promised reduction of VAT and tax concessions on inputs to our standalone restaurants, when the chosen few have been given these trading advantages several years ago and in some individual cases unparallel 40 year, total or partial exemptions.

Our car rental sub-sector has also been forced to absorb massive increases in unbudgeted expenditure, including randomly imposed higher vehicle taxes and duties, the dreaded National Social Responsibility Levy and its 400 per cent increase, higher insurance premiums and let us not for a second, forget the additional damage and maintenance costs caused by the appalling state of our neglected road network.

What is indisputable is that the tourism industry provides the highest number of eligible voters together with their dependents of any sector.

Why do these aspiring politicians not seem to either understand, or wish to address these issues, at least in the hope of securing their votes?

While my little vote is a mere straw in the wind, just maybe there are enough other disillusioned persons out there to demand that at least one politician or party who can fully embrace the dynamics of tourism and its critical role in any possible recovery of our dire economy, hopefully over the next two or three generations.

What part of the phrase ‘tourism is an export’ do they not comprehend and which other major sector offers us any realistic hope of fiscal recuperation?

78 comments

  • Mia’s statement to Sinckler. What does it have to do with tourism you ask? You shouldn’t have to!

    Zip it Minister Sinckler!
    Stop fooling Bajans
    When discussing the state of Barbados’s international reserves earlier this week, Minister Sinckler urged people not to panic. We would concur that panic is seldom a productive reaction. However, the Minister fails to understand that the Government’s practice of infrequent release of information itself breeds distrust and fear. This Government seems surprised that, even at a time of national crisis, the people of Barbados would want even monthly updates.
    Minister Sinckler, if there is no need for noted regional economists, such as Ms. Dukharan, to be concerned, then why has the Government refused to release the 2017 Article IV report approved by the Executive Board of the IMF in January? The publication of Article IV reports is widely considered around the world to be sound practice in terms supporting transparency in economic policy-making and strong investor relations. It is only troubled governments, fearful of the political fallout of IMF criticism, that shun publication. While we have been the first to question prescriptions of austerity, we believe that transparency and openness to debate are essential in our democracy (and we note that the IMF Article IV reports from the BLP years are available online for all to scrutinise). What is in the document that Minister Sinckler does not want people to find out as elections loom?
    Minister Sinckler, if there is no need for ordinary Barbadians not privy to ‘the facts’ to worry, then why are there rumours circulating that the Central Bank is desperately knocking on doors, pleading with financial institutions to pledge their foreign assets and those of their clients in order to allow the Central Bank to then use these assets to raise emergency external on a secured basis? When the Central Bank reports on the first quarter results later this month, will it confirm these last-ditch schemes, which skirt the Parliamentary approval process, or deny them?
    Minister Sinckler, reserves are now at a crisis level of 6 weeks’ worth of imports – half the CBB’s target: if the people are not panic, they will need to have not just the facts, but also the details of how the Government plans to save our dollar. This plan must be a credible one that goes to the heart of our economic malaise, and not one that pathetically relies on uncertain, one-off fire-sales of Barbados’s national assets for a temporary recovery in reserve levels.
    The Minister is totally out of his depth. He is swimming in waters too deep.
    I am Not having a debate with Chris Sinckler on the economy. He is looking for a political landing platform.
    The Governor of the Central Bank needs to take notice – he must decide which God is he serving, Barbados or the Minister of Finance. The Governor of the Central Bank is a servant of the people – not a creature of the Minister of Finance.
    To tell us that the country is good because the reserves are at $420m – only $10 million more than December 31 – . is to distract when he knows that the trajectory is going downward; when he and everyone else in the financial sector locally knows that the Central Bank has been desperately seeking to get a loan of US$100 million and asking people to bring back home their second tier reserves.
    Chris you are swimming in waters too deep for you – you need to stop it and zip it up and stop fooling people.
    The Minister needs to speak plainly to the country but, maybe, that is what he is afraid of.
    Barbadians need to be told:-
    1. How many times you have been written by the same Governor of the Central Bank with respect to the state of affairs. And when? Has he not told you that there is an urgent need to seek foreign financing to support the reserves given the delays in your planned divestments and the high levels of foreign debt financing the country must face.
    2. Why you as Minister of Finance will not release the IMF Article IV Report for last year.
    3. That there were no foreign debt payments in March unlike February; and that when combined with the inflows from CDB/IDB meant that there was no decline in what would otherwise be higher receipts in March. Bajans need to know that there will be more than $330 million in foreign debt payments in the next 12 months – provided that there are no further downgrades – BUT THE official projected foreign exchange inflows are less than $100 million
    4. That even with that, the increase in March 2018 is less than half of what the incerease was in March 2017.
    5. What will be our fate in June? How much foreign debt must be paid in the month of June? Is it not more than 3 times what we had to pay in foreign debt payments in February. Do we not have to pay $120m in foreign debt payments, immediately after the date by which the election must be held?
    6. Is there a Central Bank projection that places the worst case scenario of our Reserves as low as $100 million in December 2018.
    The Governor of the Central Bank must speak plainly to Barbadians and not allow a Minister with an electoral interest to serve to paint a picture with his blue-Coloured lenses.
    The Minister is consumed with telling us that his policies are working. That is his only interest. The Minister is taking figures out of context deliberately. It reminds me of the story once told in Parliament of the man who jumped out the skyscraper from 120th floor and when he passed the 30th floor he said “So far so good”.
    This notion that better cannot be done is a nonsense. And too much mock sport is now being made of Bajans and the state of our country.
    Our Debt was unsustainable for years now. And we have said it – Clyde, Ryan, Marsha, myself – the former PM, Minister Estwick and independent economists.
    There is a way out of this, of our economic malaise.l We have said over and over we will do whatever makes sense to the local, regional and international community and economists. But we need to see the data – unvarnished. We need ALL of the facts – all of the arrears.
    If things are getting better why has the PM abruptly ended negotiations with unions.
    Why is it that your boast of VAT Returns causes us to ponder? Some people may have had VAT returns paid but at what costs? Some say 20% 30% – I don’t know. What I do know is that Not Everyone is getting their returns.
    Look Barbadians need independent data so that they may understand how serious the country is.
    What are our true vital statistics? The blood pressure improving early in the morning and then dropping dangerously low again by the next day or next week cannot be used as a measurement that the patient is out of the woods and is recovering. The truth is the underlying bleeding will resume with a vengeance in June and December. And we have not prepared for those moments.
    The Minister needs to release the 2017 IMF Article IV REPORT TO THE PUBLIC.
    Equally the Governor must ensure that he is not put in an awkward or invidious position. The Minister is trying to write the Governor’s Quarterly Report for April for him. He is putting the pressure on the Governor causing people to believe the Nation’s back page story of the IDB Report that places our Central Bank at the bottom of the pack when it comes to independence and transparency of Central Banks – a horrendous 84th place out of 89. Now you know why I have pledged for the last 4 years to deal with the independence of the Bank. The Governor needs to tell the country what he has written under sections 25 and 48 to say.
    Whether there can only be recovery of reserves if the sale of assets
    Whether the Bank is warning that there will have to be more printing of money or building up of arrears or both to meet both the domestic deficit and foreign debt payments.
    Independent economists, who the minister is intent on attacking, must not take fear. They must continue to speak truth to power about the state of our economy.
    This Minister is out of his depth and really needs to zip it. It is no longer cute to be trifling with our economic well being – we cannot be the props to his re-election campaign.
    Barbadians need the facts as they get ready to make decisions about their future in the upcoming elections.
    We need to get on with our lives and let us all get on with the business of fixing this country.

    4th April 2018

    Like

  • 280.000
    Yet you cannot feed yourselves.
    Where are the market subsidy for agriculture and fishing industries.?
    All local produce should be subsidised as an incentive towards self sufficiency.
    It does not take trillions or
    rocket science to feed house and clothe yourselves.
    If dem politicians did not thief so much Barbados 🇧🇧 would be paradise !

    You need a dictator to change banana mindset….waiting for mana from heaven is not an option.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Whenever one mentions the word ‘subsidy’ the discussion will slide to a private sector bashing.

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  • @kamtanblog
    … waiting for mana from heaven…
    +++++++

    Subsidies are often just one more form of mana from heaven. We need instead to reduce our reliance on corrupt government structures and learn to change our own behaviour. Boycott Massy and go down to Cheapside Market to do your grocery shopping.

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  • Subsidising is just a temporary fix …it’s not forever or eternal.
    It can be reduced in time as productivity increases…eventually removed completely.
    Subsidies encourages innovation increased productivity…it’s not all about “profit” or “commercialism”

    Try it and then say it is/will not work.
    Just an idea !

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  • @Adrian
    Tourism is our Only Hope
    +++++++

    The article is OK, but the title is ridiculous… it sounds exactly like saying “sugar is our only hope” in 1966. The only thing that is completely predictable in economics is that economies change. Yes, in the short term we should pay attention to running our tourism industry sensibly and adapting it to a changing environment that includes AirBnB and climate change, but we also desperately need to diversify our economy.

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  • Boycott Massy and go down to Cheapside Market to do your grocery shopping.

    Finally! Somebody speaking truth. Your power is in your hands, your money.

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  • @katmanblog
    Try it and then say it is/will not work.
    +++++++

    Agricultural subsidies are in widespread use around the world… in the Canadian dairy industry, in many sectors of US agriculture, throughout the EU… Their main effect has been to concentrate agribusiness ownership into giant conglomerates who then have the clout to bribe politicians into increasing their subsidies. The practice has never been shown to reduce prices to the consumer.

    In Barbados I predict that 95% of subsidies will end up in the pockets of those large farms that are well capitalized with investments in greenhouses and other technologies. We all know who those are… the descendants of hereditary plantation owners mixed in with a few expatriates. Subsidies will make the rich richer with very little benefit to average Bajans.

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  • Bernard Codrington

    @ PLT

    Subsidies in Barbados and in the more developed countries are paid for by the taxes on the captive taxpayers. The benefits are transferred to big businesses. The poor do not benefit in lower prices. Check the history of the local sugar industry. Check the history of hotel industry. Subsidies are part of the myth by which we live.

    @ Adrian Loveridge

    You have made out an excellent case for going out and voting for the lesser of the two evils. Forget the nuisances.
    Please take your family and friends with you to the voting booths. That is unless you want more of the same.
    What do you want to see the candidates for? Are you selling your vote? Do you want to be distracted by their hard luck stories ? Just vote for their programs and their characters.

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  • Bernard Codrington

    The Electorate at this stage of the game need no external reports to tell them the state of their society and economy. They are living it in real time every day. They need to exercise the power of their vote and attempt to arrest and change those ills. They have less than 59 days to change things.

    Go out and vote.

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  • NorthernObserver

    “voting for the lesser of the two evils”…..while sad this seems to be the political choice everywhere.
    Tragic is that ‘other candidates/parties’ are reduced to “nuisances”.
    A handful of decent people, of good character would be a significant improvement without a single policy. Just clean up and restore.

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  • @Peter

    The title falls to the blogmaster in this case. The point Adrian continues to make is that tourism is our lifeline now and in the immediate future to pay the bills and this should be reflected in our decision making.

    Like

  • Piece Uh De Rock Yeah Right

    @ The Honourable Blogmaster

    The name of the Article needs to be changed because it inadvertently ascribes to Loveridge a singularity of interst of which he may be undeserving?

    Wunna dun know that de ole man doan really comment in Adrian Loveridge columns

    THat is for one reason only – for which I am unapologetic.

    Because I realise that, irrespective of the importance of any topic here on BU, and there are many, he remains among those whom the ole man calls the “gold belt” plantocracy.

    This can be explained simply as “the selfish tourism oriented one economy parasites” who while involved in what you refer to as “our lifeline” for our mono-economy NEVER EVER MAKES ANY OTHER CONTRIBUTION TO ANY OTHER TOPIC HERE ON BU.

    Now for me there is something wrong with that modus operandum.

    Imagine me claiming that I am a de facto native who has transplanted my life and livelyhood to these shores but all I do is drop an article pun BU for the “natives to waddle about in, while I WITH DEMIGOD STATUS” leave the building.

    Frankly I see no difference between Loveridge and Fumbles with their deign to condescend to engage with the average man cause ” only we knows how to run tourism on our sacred GOLDEN BELT cause wunna really ent got de brain matter to run hotels and tourism…”

    But you know what Honourable Blogmaster, the sad thing is that GIVEN THE PERFORMANCE OF THE DLP, de man so right…”

    Looka leh de ole mand go and see which udder article uh my lost peoples I can go and stir up some commess in”

    Or better still, as a fellah tell de ole man, “why you doan stick to Stoopid Cartoons and left big peeples to discuss big peeple business?”

    TO use your words “the point I am making about Adrian is that he has to show by some tangible eans that he has real skin in the game as opposed to this justified momo-topic ranting…”

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  • @ David who wrote ” tourism is our lifeline now and in the immediate future “.

    That is why Bajans could support tourism while building a more diverse economy.

    Tourism as well as Financial services should be number 5 and 6 industries in Barbados.

    Agriculture ( FOOD ) should be feeding Barbados and used as “import substitution” and food security.

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  • @Hants

    Have you been following how the agriculture sector is managed in Barbados. Have you read the budget allocation to agriculture by government?

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  • No have not read…
    Would love to …please post if possible.

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  • @ David,

    Nothing in Barbados is a problem until it becomes a crisis.

    Bajans will not grow corn until there is no money to buy corn flakes.

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  • Piece Uh De Rock Yeah Right

    @ the Honourable Blogmaster, another of my comments is in suspense. The VPN is working but it unfortunately has this downside.

    With all the IT expertise that the DLP has engaged for this Election de ole man fraid dat dem locate me poor self and …..heheheheheh

    Like

  • barbados the new vanuatu, while you are waiting for john frum to save ya , you should have more concerned with john not coming.

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  • I am not sure if anyone really knows all the answers as to why the FX reserves are dropping. The new way of doing business where payments are processed off shore has a lot to do with the lack of funds arriving at the central bank. Add to that the constant demand for US dollars to make payments for things such as gasoline, cars and cellphones, all which leave the central bank fx reserves, and you can see there is a collision course ahead. As an example if there are 125000 smart phones purchased at a cost of $300 each US that will take $37,500,000 to pay for them. Where does that money come from? In most normal situations currency trades freely. US$ will be purchased on the open market to accomplish it. Our problem is that we don’t have that ability and it is obvious from the FX declines that we don’t have a current viable way of solving this dilemma. Hard times ahead.

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  • April 9, 2018 3:07 PM

    Plse explain foreign currency reserves to me, apart from paying for gasoline, car s and cell phones.

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  • My friend direct that question
    to head of your central bank.
    Today most tourists pay with plastic cards … or bajan $

    Suggestion
    Adopt £ € $ as your local currency …Equador did so a few years ago !
    No one uses the Pesos today as legal tender.
    Simple Simon says
    Invite heads of the three central banks and ECB (Equador central banks)
    for talks/negotiations.

    Like

  • Suggestion
    Google Equador currency …,

    Since 2000 the USD has been used as its currency.
    Go figure ….

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  • Bernard Codrington

    @ Kamtan at 4:31 PM

    Barbadians still have to earn the US $. Do you think the Federal Reserve will print money for Barbadians to spend ?
    You are not dealing with the fundamental issues. As Hal would say”Foreign Reserves is not the problem.”

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  • @Bernard

    The way how business is done in the economy has changed affecting forex flow as well.

    No longer does the forex flow to Barbados but some is intercepted based on the operating model and of course there is the leaking.

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  • When I book an all inclusive Barbados vacation and pay for it online by credit card in US dollars how much money ends up

    in Barbados so corn flakes, English apples and BMWs can be imported ?

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  • Jesus Christ, we have been hearing all our raaaasoul lives that god is our only hope, that tourism is our only hope. Both have been fictions.

    Now, anybody who is so infantile as to see reality in such terms, or maybe an idiot.

    We say fuck it,

    Now we are really a colony of a colony. For Britain is a colony of the USA. Where is the ‘hope’ there

    And we are to believe that an industry which has never been able to make net gains for Barbados is some ‘only’ White hope – fuck off!

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  • So Pacha what is your solution what else do you have to sell, as kevin costner said in water world your dying you just dont know it yet.Unless there is a market for sewage,sugar or sargassum tourism is your best bet.but like a trireme with all the oarsmen rowing to a different cadence they are just going to go around in circles if move at all.

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  • Well, well, well!

    I could not believe my ears tonight hearing Bobby Morris addressing Lowe’s DLP branch last night.

    The taxpayers have been paying Bobby Morris a huge salary with perks as Caricom Ambassador. He promised the fisher folk to get a fishing agreement with Trinidad so that our fishermen would not get arrested and have their boats seized. He failed badly as ambassador and with no achievements up to recently when he gave up the job……….

    There was he on DLPTV telling the fishermen that he did not need to get any fishing agreement with Trinidad. He said that the fishermen should organise themselves and form a co-op or a company and register in Trinidad and then no one can touch them.

    Imagine that!…………no wonder Barbados is in serious trouble with jokers like Bobby Morris.

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  • Dear Media Professionals,

    We are writing to request your attendance at a Press Briefing to be held on Wednesday April 11th, 2018 at 10:00am.

    The briefing will be held at the B&B Bar (Red Banks Shop) which is located at the corner of Rhianna Drive and Westbury Road, St. Michael.

    This will be an opportunity to introduce the St. Michael West Candidate for the Barbados Integrity Movement and Political Leader Mr. Neil Holder.

    There will be a guest speaker from the constituency to speak about the current state of affairs from the perspective of a constituent.

    We look forward to your participation as such.

    Warm regards.

    Neil a. Holder

    POLITICAL LEADER



    Picture

    BARBADOS INTEGRITY MOVEMENT (BIM)

    Suite 1, Fenshaw,

    Pine Plantation Road

    St. Michael

    BARBADOS W.I.

    Tel: (246) 822-2475

    Email: barbadosintegritymovement@gmail.com

    Instagram: barbados_integrity_movement

    Twitter: BIM_Official

    Like

  • While my little vote is a mere straw in the wind, just maybe there are enough other disillusioned persons out there to demand that at least one politician or party who can fully embrace the dynamics of tourism and its critical role in any possible recovery of our dire economy, hopefully over the next two or three generations.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Bajans themselves do not embrace the dynamics of tourism and its critical role in any possible recovery of our dire economy.

    Why would politicians do so either?

    Bajans have a lot of growing up to do.

    The recent “dah beach is mine” episode at the Crane shows just how childishly insecure may Bajans are and incapable of understanding even the simplest facts.

    From PhD’s to calypsonians, many just don’t get the simple fact that over the period of a year, the Barbadian Population is a quarter of the tourist population.

    There are probably upwards of a million guests we entertain each year either as long stay or cruise ship arrivals.

    For a brief moment during the day, at the crack of dawn, you will find mostly Bajans on the beach … and mostly old fogeys approaching the departure lounge of life.

    For the rest of the day, if you were to go look at the popular beaches you would probably find 10 of our guests for each one of us and in some months the ratio goes higher.

    The funniest thing about Bajans is that their imagined ire is not directed at our guests, it is directed at anyone who appears to be successful and “has a lot of money”!!

    It is an anti success mentality.

    Many spend more time envying the success of others instead of getting on with the business of being a part of the success and being successful too.

    To an extent the mindset is promoted by our dear politicians who of themselves cannot generate the business success themselves and choose to go the route of feeding off the success of others.

    That creates the downward spiral we see yet seem unable to pull ourselves away from.

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  • The article is OK, but the title is ridiculous… it sounds exactly like saying “sugar is our only hope” in 1966.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    The difference between the Barbados economy in 1966 and today is that it was growing!!!

    There was optimism, hope and expectation which seems today to have vanished.

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  • Kamtanblog April 9, 2018 4:31 PM

    Since 2000 the USD has been used as its currency.(Quote)

    There are over US$70bn circulating outside the US, most of it in countries where the Greenback is valid currency – including in Barbados. The problem in Barbados is that there is no control of this foreign currency and most businesses prefer to be paid in US dollars.
    It is the outcome of bad regulation. The answer is simple: make it illegal to pay or receive US dollars in payment for any good or service. All foreign currencies should be changed in banks, cambios or bureaux de change.

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  • Bernard Codrington

    @ John at 7: 54 AM

    Most of the opinions you have expressed in this intervention I share.
    However,Barbadians do have the information . It is the interpretation of the information that is inadequate and the logic that is seriously flawed.
    In the case still at issue is the missing comprehension that without the existing guests at the Crane Hotel there would be no market for beach chairs. So we must be careful what signals we are sending to the tourist market and foreign investors.

    Are we saying come spend your money but we will not share our beaches?

    We want to attract foreign direct investment but we have some schizophrenic residuals of class and race conflicts.

    We need to have an open debate on these issues and have them resolved.

    These are areas where the authorities need lots of cooperation and buy-in from the opinion framers. Not sensational news makers.

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  • @ David,

    “As part of its efforts to encourage Barbadians to grow and eat what is produced on their own land,

    the Rural Development Commission (RDC) will be conducting its first ever

    Grow What You Eat Seminar on Wednesday, April 18.”

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  • “As part of its efforts to encourage Barbadians to grow and eat what is produced on their own land, the Rural Development Commission (RDC) will be conducting its first ever Grow What You Eat Seminar on Wednesday, April 18.”

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    In other words, Bajans are being urged to return to their past practices and when I suggested the same thing I am called all kind of names!!

    I am enjoying watching this mess created by Bajans unfold!!

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  • We want to attract foreign direct investment but we have some schizophrenic residuals of class and race conflicts.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Local investment built the Deep Water Harbour which makes the 500K plus guests who pass through Barbados and all of the associated businesses possible.

    The investment came from the Sugar Industry, its reserve fund … likewise the QEH..

    The Airport is another investment of local capital …. out of the sugar industry … and this makes the other half of the Tourist Industry possible.

    The investments occurred long before Independence.

    Manufacturing was an example of investment/industrialization by invitation.

    … an abject failure!!

    We no longer hear of the BIDC in the news and the BDB turned out to be no more than a scam for on lending money to associated political cronies.

    The only foreign capital Barbados can attract is funny money … and it is not for investment … unless you consider laundries an investment!!

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  • John April 10, 2018 5:55 PM

    Local investment built the Deep Water Harbour which makes the 500K plus guests who pass through Barbados and all of the associated businesses possible.(Quote)

    Thanks for this. Ignorance of our economic history is as much a punishment as imprisonment of the mind. We have some economic illiterates on this blog who are always bleating on about foreign reserves. They believe that because they shout loudest, they are right.
    Our economic growth can be funded mainly endogenously through good management of the economy. Until the profligate spending, this is how we funded our economic progress.
    The real problem is that those at the commanding heights of our politics and economy want to grow on the cheap – or what they think I the cheap: borrowing from international and regional bodies; punitive taxation; leveraging the future and ringfencing debate.
    The only alternatives on the table are the so-called creative economy of the UPP, a proposals that looks as if it was designed by a sixth former, and the fantasy of Solutions Barbados, which its leader tells us very proudly was given a pass mark by a chartered accountant. It is like asking the local mason to build a skyscraper without the support of structural and civil engineers.

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  • Bernard Codrington

    @ John at 5:55PM

    I will leave Well Well to fix you up
    . It is stretching the truth to attribute these Public Sector investments to the Sugar Industry. You also ignored the fact that Barbados had internal self government when these projects were conceived and executed.

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  • Bernard Codrington

    @ John at 5:55 PM no 2

    My apologies . I see a partial correction to what appeared earlier.

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  • Bernard Codrington April 10, 2018 6:38 PM

    When Costain moved in to Pelican island in the mid-1950s, that debt was under-written by the sugar industry, which carried the burden of taxation. I cannot see where the fact of internal self-government made a difference.
    The substantive point is you do not run an economy to get foreign reserves, you run and grow an economy to improve the standard of living for citizens through improvements in productivity, who makes the island attractive to foreign tourists and investors.

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  • Why was the Deep Water Harbour built?

    Best to look at Sugar output to understand.

    It reached 200,000 tons in 1957 I believe.

    The reason for the Deep Water Harbour was the handling of the “massive” amounts of sugar the Island produced and for which there was a demand.

    Lighters rowed by men transported the sugar out into Carlisle Bay.

    The lighters were loaded at the wharf.

    I am sure you have seen pictures of old Bridgetown.

    The sugar was then lifted aboard the ships by cranes on the ship which transported it to England and its refineries.

    The Deep Water Harbour was built around the Sugar Terminal and conveyor system which removed the necessity for the lighters and allowed output to be maximised.

    Instead of anchoring in Carlisle Bay, ships steamed into the Deep Water Harbour and a conveyor system moved the sugar from the Terminal to the ship with little human intervention.

    The only reason the Deep Water Harbour exists was SUGAR …. and that was not a product of any government initiative.

    Capitalism built it.

    The funds to build it came from the reserves Sugar had accumulated over years of skillful operations by people at all levels who actually knew what they were doing!!

    The next time Sugar output reached 200,000 tons was in 1967 …. and it wasn’t because of independence.

    What followed was systematic destruction by incompetents and changes in the market.

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  • The Crane called “The Crane”?

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  • Minister Sinckler, if there is no need for noted regional economists, such as Ms. Dukharan, to be concerned, then why has the Government refused to release the 2017 Article IV report approved by the Executive Board of the IMF in January? (Quote)

    Who are these regional economists? It is my understanding that Ms Dukharan is now undertaking a PhD in economics at a local institution, which means her thesis is being supervised by dons at the local institutions. More so, she is herself convinced she needs to learn a bit more about the dismal science.
    Are we now elevating her above her tutors? Above a reknown economist such as Dr DeLisle Williams? Above professors such as Frank Alleyne?
    Where is the evidence of her original thinking? It is true that Sinckler is out of hi depths and should not have remained in his job for nine years. But that is due to the incompetence of the prime minister..

    Like

  • John April 10, 2018 6:54 PMs

    The Deep Water Harbour was built because the world was on the threshold of containerisation. At the time it was one of the first container ports in the world. A real case of punching above our weight. It was not built because of sugar, it was built to enhance our shipping trade and sugar benefited form it enormously. Bagging sugar and towing it out in lighters out to ships anchored in Carlisle Bay was uneconomic and labour intensive. It also freed up all those building used as warehouses for better use.
    More seriously, we have never replaced the sugar industry: the Barbados and Central foundries, with all those skills (turning, pattern makers, fitters, etc). which have not been replaced.
    The central foundry is still dilapidated, while the Barbados Foundry site is now a white elephant of a court building.

    Like

  • Bernard Codrington

    John at 6 :54 Pm

    @ Hal at 6 :54 PM

    I think that we are engaging in semantics here.
    By whom was the Sugar Stabilization Fund set up. ?
    Who owned the Sugar Stabilization Fund ?
    Why was it set up?
    Who owns the Deep Water Harbour?
    Was the income of the Sugar Industry equitably divided between capitalists and labour in that era?

    I think we have a responsibility to read the economic / political history of Barbados very carefully.

    Like

  • Was the income of the Sugar Industry equitably divided between capitalists and labour in that era?

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Is it equitably divides between “pseudo Capitalists” of today and labour?

    Was the money ever replaced in the Reserve/Sugar Stabilisation Fund?

    If it wasn’t I would guess who ever owned the Sugar Stabilisation Fund owns the Deep Water Harbour!!

    Isn’t that how it works?

    Like

  • What was the major product handled at the Deep Water Harbour and did it ship in containers?

    By 1961, Barbados’ steam and diesel had long removed the need for Barbados to be a major shipping location as it was in the days of sail.

    Like

  • The Crane is called “The Crane” because it was a major shipping point for goods …. I would guess sugar … to Bridge town and the ships in Carlisle Bay.

    There were no container trucks in those days.

    I have heard there was actually a Crane that lowered and raised cargo from the cliff to the sea.

    Did you know that the Crane Beach was once known as “Skull Bay”?

    Check Professor Marshall’s book.

    Like

  • Professor. Marshall book…
    Title and publisher of possible please…Amazon !

    Hindsight teaches fools
    Fools forget
    Friends forgive

    Friend of bajans
    Guyanese

    Like

  • Of Halls Hills and Holes
    Place Names of Barbados

    Woodville Marshall

    ISBN 978-976-95396-4-8

    Like

  • For those who never knew about Lighters and that ships anchored in Carlisle Bay!!

    Like

  • Bernard Codrington

    John
    Production requires capital ,Land and Labour. How the benefits of production is distributed is a political decision. The sugar industry then was the major economic activity. A very large technological input came from the public sector at the botanical level, the factory level, at the marketing and transport level. Much the same as today.

    My major intention was to correct your assertion that the Sugar Industry built the QEH and The Deep Water Harbour.
    GOB had to fight the Sugar Barons to set up the Stabilization Fund for future development of the sector and Barbados as a whole. It took a visionary Political Class to effect these changes. Those were at the level of the Colonial Office, the Governor,and the local Parliament. The major financial adviser to the GOB was Sir Archibald Cuke ,a Barbadian, apart from the colonial Financial Secretary..

    Like

  • Wasn’t the GOB essentially comprised of the “Sugar Barons”?

    My Grandfather used to canvas for one!!

    Like

  • He received a CBE (Commander of the British Empire) in 1953 for Public Service to Barbados and in the 1940’s was speaker of the house.

    Like

  • In 1981 when the Euro devalued and sugar received about half of the revenue it had received the year before, Misappropriation of the funds in the Price Stabilisation fund by the GOB raised its head.

    It was estimated back then that the GOB owed the Sugar Industry upwards of $100 million.

    You can figure out what that is worth today and subtract any “subsidies” from it..

    The 1982 BNB Act enabled the BNB to “subsidise” the Sugar Industry.

    The problem in Barbados has always been not much cash available!!!!

    So the GOB will always be attracted to wherever it can get some.

    The NIS springs to mind … and of course the various laundries in legal offices and accounting firms!!

    Like

  • I was “surfing the net” and found the following advertisement and preamble (below) very interesting:

    “Can’t get enough of those beautiful Caribbean beaches but don’t want to drive your rental car there to enjoy it? Take a look at some of our favorite beachfront villa rentals below! Whether you want to swim, sunbathe, walk, jog or snorkel, just walk out the door of your PRIVATE BEACHFRONT VILLA.”

    “Don’t SACRIFICE PRIVACY and SOLITUDE by SETTLING on a beachfront hotel. By renting a PRIVATE BEACHFRONT VILLA YOU CAN HAVE YOUR BEACH AND ENJOY IT TOO!”

    https://www.wheretostay.com/barbados-villas-for-Beachfront

    When I ask questions in this forum, I am accused by the usual suspects as not having the ability to “think critically” or by not discussing Trump with my children makes me an incompetent parent.

    However, there has been continued “back and forth” about the Crane issue and if beaches are owned by hotels or the public…….or if they are owned by hotels, the public must have access.

    If you read the ad, it seems to be suggesting to potential visitors that there are private beaches in Barbados.

    Or are beachfront properties treated differently from hotels?

    Like

  • Demand greater than Supply …. increase in price …. increase in profits.

    Supply greater than Demand … decrease in price … decrease in profits

    Hence Price Stabilisation Fund.

    Nothing new, price of sugar rose X3 after the supply from Haiti was cut off over 150 years before this film.

    Like

  • If you read the ad, it seems to be suggesting to potential visitors that there are private beaches in Barbados.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    All beaches are not created equal.

    Foul Bay and Long Beach are “private” because not many people go there.

    Some small Beaches are private because there is no Public Access.

    Private can mean … secluded …… not necessarily segregated!!

    Like

  • Last time I walked down to Cluff’s Bay, Archers Bay and Maycock’s Bay there was not a soul present.

    Maycock’s Bay, unless it has been spoilt by construction is probably one of the nicest place to see and experience in Barbados.

    The old Fort there was once bought by a film star in the 50’s and construction of a Beach House commenced.

    Think it was Claudette Colbert.

    Queens Fort, further down the West Coast is probably hard to get to from the sea side and you probably would need to get there through the property.

    Look at google earth and you will see there are many secluded beaches in Barbados … waiting to be spoilt!!

    Like

  • Man…..wunnuh bright boys duz really like confuse every issue.

    Now you have introduced something completely different, which suggests a beach may be described as being “private” “because not many people go there” or “because there is no Public Access.”

    I believe you spend too much time “over thinking” to make simple issues complicated.

    Like

  • We need a new tourism model that first asks the big questions…Is tourism a benefit to the government of Barbados? if not why not? If so how so? Do we have a ROI policy in government for tourism?

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @Artax
    Barbadians have the issue with ‘beach’, not your average visitor who are here for a short period. John is correct, that in marketing verbiage, private can mean secluded and peaceful. And advertisers will use whatever they can to convey their message. And then some.
    Last Xmas, friends (first time visitors) rented a ‘private beach house’ (their words). When they sent info, I had to explain the said property was waterfront, but any beach was a few hundred feet left or right of the property. It had a few big rocks in front into which the ocean crashed. It was THEIR assumption it was a ‘beach house’, the verbiage never said so, it said “on the sparkling waters of the Caribbean”, and showed pictures of beaches which were nearby.
    The slam in your piece is really against hotels. You may have inferred whatever you want, but it never stated the beach was private. A marketing twist, to convey whatever the reader chooses.
    And those in the property business have several wonderful descriptors…cute/cozy=small, awaiting your touch=unfinished, lovingly enjoyed by the same family for 50 years or first time offered this century=in need of updating, endless possibilities=needs work etc etc

    Like

  • A private beach is like a private room at the hospital. The hospital/hotel owned will charge you a whole lot of money and give you a make believe story that they will keep the hoipolloi out. In fact the hoipolloi will be in and out all day looking after you.

    Who do you think it is that delivers the services you are paying so much money for? Do you ever see the share holders of the hotel or hospital? No. You see the people who cook your food, mop your floors, wash your linens, and in a hospital wipe your shitty behind–ordinary people. In and out all day.

    But we–the tourists too–or especially the tourists are such poor great poppets that we are willing to give already rich people more, and more of our money so that we can buy into an illusion.

    Like

  • @Artax April 11, 2018 10:48 AM “If you read the ad, it seems to be suggesting to potential visitors that there are private beaches in Barbados.”

    It seems to be suggesting that marketing executives too love hyperbole.

    Like

  • I believe you spend too much time “over thinking” to make simple issues complicated.

    +++++++++++++++++

    Not really .. I just think critically … cuts the thinking time to a minimum and …. reduces errors!!

    Like

  • When I ask questions in this forum, I am accused by the usual suspects as not having the ability to “think critically”

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    It isn’t a matter of ability, its just not taking everything you are told at face value.

    I became aware there was actually a technique with the name “critical thinking” in a value engineering course I took back in 1979.

    It is about stripping away the superfluous and picking out the essentials.

    Now I am pretty good at it.

    It is a natural kind of something, hard to describe but you can learn it and improve as you get on in life.

    If it is too good to be true it usually isn’t.

    Like

  • “It seems to be suggesting that marketing executives too love hyperbole.”

    Simple Simon

    You may be correct…….….

    But, my experience in the hotel sector taught me when potential visitors read these ads and pay US$3,000/n for a villa, they expect to find private beaches, where they can relax, undisturbed by locals.

    Although you may argue the ad never mentioned the beach is private (neither did I), the statement re: “Don’t SACRIFICE PRIVACY and SOLITUDE by SETTLING on a beachfront hotel. By renting a PRIVATE beachfront villa you can have YOUR beach and enjoy it too!”……….

    …………seemingly implies they should expect some level of privacy.

    Some ads, for example, may state Barbados is warm and sunny….but a tourist may visit here and experience 2 days of rain fall. Would you believe that tourist would angrily ask staff when the rain will end? And that is enough for him/her not to visit Barbados again.

    And while you’re on about private beaches………. what about Port St. Charles?

    Do any of you know that there are certain areas of the beach at Port St. Charles where locals cannot venture?

    Like

  • “It isn’t a matter of ability, its just not taking everything you are told at face value.”

    Hmmmmmm…..

    Ohhhhh………I understand now…………is it similar to how to never take anything you mention in this forum at face value, because, more often than not, you are incorrect?

    Thanks for the lesson.

    Like

  • Do any of you know that there are certain areas of the beach at Port St. Charles where locals cannot venture?

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    You are admitting that the beach at Port St. Charles is accessible by the public … period.

    You are also adding a second fact (it sounds like) some areas are inaccessible to the public!!!

    So what’s the problem if locals can go to the beach at Port St. Charles?

    There are other coves and bays that Bajans cannot access through a Public Beach Access.

    All beaches are not created equal …. that’s just how it is!!

    You should not let that make you feel insecure, life is to sweet and too short to let yourself bother about trivia!!

    So, don’t sweat the small stuff.

    Like

  • “So what’s the problem if locals can go to the beach at Port St. Charles?”

    “You should not let that make you feel insecure, life is to sweet and too short to let yourself bother about trivia!!”

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Huh???????

    Am……..I’ll allow those two comments to pass outside the off stump.

    Like

  • The article is OK, but the title is ridiculous… it sounds exactly like saying “sugar is our only hope” in 1966.
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    The difference between the Barbados economy in 1966 and today is that it was growing!!!
    There was optimism, hope and expectation which seems today to have vanished.

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Here are the numbers …. you can check them.

    Prior to WWII world sugar output was about 30 million tons.

    WWII destroyed the cane production capability of the Philipines and Java the beet production of Europe and the USSR.

    England had sugar from the Caribbean, Africa, Australia and India, the US from itself, Cuba, Puerto Rico and Hawaii.

    In 1945, world output had fallen to 15 million tons.

    The economies in Barbados and all other sugar producing countries grew as the world sought to replace output.

    Today, world output is more than 10 times what it was in 1945, and 5 times what it was when the war begun.

    Sugar output peaked in Barbados in 200,000 tons in 1957, limited by its tiny size.

    Until about 1968 Barbados was profiting from sugar.

    The Deep Water Harbour was built out of Sugar and for sugar.

    It would be difficult to think of a Civil works project in Barbados remotely similar in scope and impact on the economy.

    Then we got a genius for a leader who could not wait to see the last cane blade!!

    https://www.google.com/search?q=world+sugar+production&tbm=isch&tbs=rimg:CY6Du1GsnDX_1IjhaeknfgTfGZOWdVT3fYpENk2w6LHGg2NJMUQKavGoGRxvVlxE8v2dCRwFthLiJKc-5k7tMX1sbxCoSCVp6Sd-BN8ZkEf3hkjQr3xPxKhIJ5Z1VPd9ikQ0RooXhsTXT5k8qEgmTbDoscaDY0hFPXJxwcwXtFCoSCUxRApq8agZHEa2h1B1WeTxZKhIJG9WXETy_1Z0IRvqGY6kaGNz4qEglHAW2EuIkpzxFm6A2D2X2XGCoSCbmTu0xfWxvEEWJjzALkF4W-&tbo=u&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiR4dze3LTaAhXvYd8KHaJJB-EQ9C96BAgAEBg&biw=1366&bih=651&dpr=1#imgrc=joO7UaycNf-tsM:

    Like

  • https://www.worldatlas.com/articles/top-sugarcane-producing-countries.html

    Barbados don’t even get a mention!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Pin prick … and yet there is a lot of idle arable land in bush with which we should do something!!

    Every square inch is a World Heritage Site because of our Quaker past and the impact on the abolition of slavery!!!!

    Clean it, farm it, promote its history, create employment and the Tourist Industry will benefit.

    There is nowhere in the world with such a history!!

    Like

  • … even BT and his weed wacker could get something to do when the day come!!

    Like

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