Our West Indian Cricket Shame Only Deepens

DAVID A. COMISSIONG, President, Clement Payne Movement, Citizen of the Caribbean, and Lover of West Indies Cricket

How  shameful  it was to witness the gleeful rejoicing of the members of the West Indies cricket team in the wake of their fortuitous and totally undeserved victory over Scotland — a non- test status, associate member team of the International Cricket Council (ICC).

These men — supposed heirs to the  great West Indian cricketing tradition of such immortals as George Headley, Sir Frank Worrell, Sir Garfield Sobers, Clive Lloyd, and Sir Vivian Richards — seemingly had no qualms about celebrating the fact that it took  a manifestly erroneous umpiring decision, the intervention of a shower of rain, and the complicated calculations designed by Messers Duckworth and Lewis to “gift” them a 5 run victory over a Cricket team that is regarded as a minnow in international cricket!

But, as hurtful and shameful as this experience was, it should not have come as a surprise to any of us.

Let us recall that less than a year ago – on 20th June 2017 to be precise – Darren Sammy, our former West Indies cricket captain, prophetically warned us as follows:-

“I am very scared for the future of West Indies cricket …………I am scared that we might be relegated to the league of the Irelands and Scotlands, playing against these guys which is very, very sad — if something doesn’t change. And at the moment, the guy (Cricket West Indies president, Whycliffe “Dave” Cameron) has just been re-elected for another term. I can’t see it happening for us. It’s very sad for us.”

                                                                       (Published in the Nation Newspaper of Barbados on 21-06-17)

At the time, I came out publicly and stated that I totally agreed with Darren Sammy . West Indies cricket, I felt,  would go nowhere but DOWN under the immature, self-centered, and self-righteous leadership of current Cricket West Indies president Whycliffe “Dave” Cameron and the social class that he is a representative of.

I also took the opportunity to renew my call for the resignation of Mr Cameron – a call that I had first made when he presided over the backward decision to remove the Combined Campuses and Colleges (CCC) team from our regional one day cricket competition on the most ridiculous and frivolous of grounds, and I repeated the Call when his irresponsible and self-centred actions led to the abandonment of the West Indies cricket tour of India.

As far as I was concerned, the honourable and responsible thing for Mr. Cameron to do – in his capacity as President and leader of the WICB – was to publicly accept a considerable measure of responsibility for the Indian fiasco that had taken place; to publicly apologize to the Indian Cricket Board; and to resign from office.

Needless-to-say no such resignation was forthcoming then, and none ever will! And the reason it will not happen is not because of any special peculiarity of Mr. Cameron’s character or personality! Rather, it will not happen because the members of the Caribbean social class that Mr. Cameron belongs to simply do not behave in that manner!

The sad reality throughout our Caribbean is that a new bourgeois class has taken over the key leadership positions in Government, in the professions, and in important areas of national and regional life such as Cricket Administration. And it is such a self-absorbed class that its members find it extremely difficult to accept personal responsibility for anything, or to recognize that there are causes or institutions whose interests take precedence over their own personal individual interests.

These social elements have capitalized on the relative apathy and marginalization of the working class, and have constituted themselves into an entrenched elite or in-group, equipped with their own narrow group interests, and with a narrow, self-serving value system. Furthermore, many, if not most, members of this “class” have convinced themselves that they are entitled as of right to positions of privilege, wealth and comfort in our societies. This, in turn, is manifested in their unceasing jockeying for and pursuit of positions of status – privileged “jobs” – in national and regional political and Administrative structures, not least of which is the leadership and administrative structure of the WICB.

Many, if not most, of them are contemptuous of the working class base from which they have sprung. As a result, they possess no substantial roots in our region’s history of race and class struggle, and are therefore incapable of truly appreciating the value of the fruits of such struggles – whether such “fruits” are the sacred cultural institution of West Indies Cricket or — in the case of my island home of Barbados — the famous Barbadian system of free secondary and tertiary education!

The same social element that is incapable of perceiving that the interests of the people’s institution of West Indies Cricket dwarfs their own personal interests, is the same social element that – in national governments throughout our region – is incapable of recognizing and defending the precious social-democratic gains that generations of Caribbean sufferers struggled so hard to achieve.

We, the masses of Caribbean people—the so-called ordinary citizens of the Caribbean– therefore cannot simply sit back and expect these supposed leaders to act responsibility and selflessly, not even where our beloved game of West Indies Cricket is concerned. Left to Cameron and his ilk, they will complacently look on while the once mighty West Indies Cricket team is reduced to a genuine and certified “minnow” in contemporary international Cricket, as long as they –the so-called Administrators– can continue to enjoy an elevated social status and the financial rewards that go with that status.

Some form of determined mass activism has to emerge from the base of our societies if our Caribbean Community is to get back on track with its historic liberatory struggle!

If we truly want to preserve the WICB, West Indies Cricket, “free” education, public health care, welfare provisions, worker rights, national sovereignty, and the list goes on – the people at the base of our societies and such working class-based institutions as the trade unions and the grass-roots cricket organizations (like the “Barbados Cricket League“) will have to bestir themselves and unite around a concrete people’s agenda.

151 comments

  • The bigger the GDP the more companies and individuals available for sponsorship.

    Instead of having one “Shell Shield” there are perhaps 100’s at all levels and ad age groups.

    The talent pool is thus expanded and there is a constant supply of players at the highest levels.

    China has an immense population … like India …. but no talent pool.

    The talent pool is not a function of population (it is important) but of a desire to play cricket.

    The more sponsors and money in cricket the greater the desire to play.

    … now if Chinese businesses sponsored Cricket in China we would have an immense talent pool.

    … and imagine if America ever adopted the game!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • … and if desire is the principal motivator then money is not necessarily a driving force, satisfaction will do.

    That’s why WI cricket is unique.

    The Peter Shorts of the past received peanuts if they ever received a salary.

    I’ll bet Cameron and other administrators are handsomely paid …. but their output as measured by performance of WI cricket is zero!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • The Peter Shorts of the past are the ones who built West Indies cricket and kept it unique.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Your perception of sponsorship is rather myopic.

    Firstly, sponsorship is a MARKETING strategy used to ADVERTISE a business’ products and services. However, businessmen are known to sponsor their “hobbies,” which in many cases are sports.

    You mentioned India. A “cricket culture” has developed in India since the game was introduced there by the British in the early 1700s with the first cricket match being played in 1721. Cricket is described as the “unofficial” national game of India. According to the February 4, 2014 edition of “The Economist,”: “To outsiders, the magnitude of Indians’ love for cricket is as incomprehensible as its feverish intensity.”

    Unlike west Indians, Indians have a great desire to play cricket. Check the amount of fans that follow the cricket team around the world and the stands are always filled during the IPL.

    Therefore, while it is obvious some Indian businesses will sponsor cricket as a marketing strategy…….several wealthy Indian businessmen sponsor cricket because they LOVE the game. They are willing to PAY the best players substantial amounts of money to entertain them and their friends.

    It is a completely different situation in the Caribbean. Cricket is not as well loved in this region as it is in India.

    Businesses in this region, several of which are foreign owned, do not sponsor cricket teams because they LOVE for the sport……they capitalize on the opportunity sponsorship provides to advertise their goods and services in the several Caribbean islands where cricket is played. Unfortunately, when teams perform poorly, these sponsors usually “disappear,” because “partnership” is no longer financially viable.

    C&W and Digicel are two telecommunications companies competing for dominance of the regional telecommunications market. After C&W gave up sponsorship of WI cricket, Digicel as a NEW company perhaps saw this as an opportunity to sponsor CWI as a means to advertise their products and services in the region.

    If you ever attended cricket matches in Guyana or islands such as SGV, SLU, T&T, Dominica, Montserrat, Antigua, St. Kitts, Jamaica, you would have noticed Digicel booths; “T” shirts and all types “paraphernalia” bearing the Digicel logo.

    However, there are many “big businesses” in the Caribbean such as SOL, Simpson Motors, C.O Williams, Williams Industries, Sandals, Shillingford in Dominica, J.Q Charles and Hess in St. Lucia, Ansa McAl in T&T, Grace in Jamaica or the Eastern Group of Companies in SVG, that, when combined could provide adequate sponsorship for regional and WI cricket………….but that depends on if they want to. And the present situation with WI cricket is not enough to motivate the business sector to sponsor the game. There may also be businessmen that love the game but are unwilling to provide sponsorship.

    Interestingly, Barbadian, Kyffin Simpson bought SHELL and rebranded it as SOL. So far, he has not expressed a desire to redevelop a “SOL Shield Cricket” to replace “SHELL Shield Cricket.”

    Instead, SOL (and companies such as C.O Williams, Williams Industries and R.L Seale Co. Ltd.), prefer to sponsor sports (hobbies) such as car racing/rally, surfing, polo and horse racing. The owners of these businesses and their relatives either actively participate in these sports or are administrators.

    Like

  • “I’ll bet Cameron and other administrators are handsomely paid…..”

    No they are NOT.

    On several occasions Conde Riley and other CWI board members have dismissed the myth that they are paid “handsomely.” Those positions are more or less……voluntary.

    Liked by 1 person

  • “The Peter Shorts of the past are the ones who built West Indies cricket and kept it unique.”

    The above comment did not surprise me.

    I have read some of your comments on various issues in this forum in which you would discuss a point before subtly raising some underlying racial overtones (i.e. your constant references to the white Quakers helping slaves, when in actuality they owned slaves).

    You keep mentioning the white WICBC president Peter Short. Are you suggesting he was responsible for the halcyon days of the 1970s and 1980s when WI cricket was at its highest level……or do you attribute the success to the talented players of that era?

    If you attribute success to the players, then it would be unreasonable for you to lay blame at the feet of Dave Cameron and hold him responsible for WI cricket reaching its nadir…….because this current group of cricketers are simply “no good.”

    Liked by 1 person

  • John March 26, 2018 at 11:47 PM #

    China has an immense population … like India …. but no talent pool.(Quote) ..The population is THE talent pool – able, disable, tall, short, , female, male, all of them are the pool from which the cricketing taalent will come.

    .

    Liked by 1 person

  • Shaking My Head In Amazement

    ..The population is THE talent pool – able, disable, tall, short, , female, male, all of them are the pool from which the cricketing taalent will come.

    Shaking My Head In Amazement at this man. He should use a pseudonym.

    Liked by 1 person

  • millertheanunnaki

    @ Shaking My Head In Amazement March 27, 2018 at 10:29 AM

    LOL!!!!

    SMHIA, you are rather “slow” in arriving at that ‘simple’ conclusion.

    You should have gone to St. Giles in August to be with a classmate in Shallow Hal. LOL!!!

    The idiot savant of journalism probably doesn’t know that game of cricket (unlike ping pong) is a cultural relic of British colonialism and nothing to do with population size.

    Maybe he was thinking about Hong Kong.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Instead, SOL (and companies such as C.O Williams, Williams Industries and R.L Seale Co. Ltd.), prefer to sponsor sports (hobbies) such as car racing/rally, surfing, polo and horse racing. The owners of these businesses and their relatives either actively participate in these sports or are administrators.

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Faulty logic!!!

    Go to the Garrison on Gold Cup day and see the crowds!!

    …. and if you really want to see crowds … go up at Bushy Park at a race meet!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • … then see if you can find a cricket match a saturday … count the peoples on your fingers!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • John March 26, 2018 at 11:47 PM #

    The talent pool is not a function of population (it is important) but of a desire to play cricket.(Quote)

    The first part of your statement is correct, but the second part does not follow on. The second part is a function of managing behaviour. The ‘pool’ is the catchment population, it has nothing to do with who excels at the game.
    Twenty five years ago Afghanistan was not a cricket-playing country, they adopted cricket as a result of being exposed to it by the British, but more importantly, Pakistan. They were nudged.
    If you have a population of 1.3billion and, more importantly a youth population of over 800m, the it is fair to say a huge number of those may become attracted to the game, even if they had not considered it before.
    We have all kinds of cricket: blind cricket, women’s cricket, youth cricket, etc. I gave the example of the young lad of Barbadian heritage who went to his specialist school playing cricket, and ended up being a rugby union player.
    He was not in a rugby playing pool until his school sports master took him under his control .and trained him up. He was part of the talent pool (ie the pool of potential player).
    Think about it like homeownership: the pool of potential homeowners are not just those who are saving for a down payment; but the entire population.
    For example, those already looking for homes are already in the ‘pool’, but if lending is made more attractive (ie 100 per cent mortgages), then others not considering home ownership may become interested; and so would some people who are already homeowners, who may then think of building a portfolio of homes for rental. It is managing behaviour/attitudes.
    In business potential customers are the pool, that is why businesspeople market their goods and services. They do not sit back and wait until people come to them.
    So it is with any game in a new environment.

    .
    .

    Liked by 1 person

  • Shaking My Head In Amazement

    My friend, you are being extremely ridiculous….…“faulty logic,” WHAT!!!!

    Initially, the “conversation” was about SPONSORSHIP……NOT crowd attendance. But since you mentioned the subject……… “Go to the Garrison on any normal Saturday race day and see the crowds,”……..

    ………..you can also “count the peoples on your fingers!!”

    Liked by 1 person

  • “Faulty logic!!! Go to the Garrison on Gold Cup day and see the crowds!! …. and if you really want to see crowds … go up at Bushy Park at a race meet!!!”
    +++++++++++++++++++++

    The only time there is a crowd at horse racing is on Gold Cup Day. Racing on any other Saturday has as many people as a Division 1 cricket final or a premier league football match.

    Gold Cup is sponsored by the owners of Sandy Lane, who are ACTIVELY involved in horse racing and the OWNERS of race horses. This race attracts entrants from the region, USA and Canada. I also mentioned R.L Seale Co. Ltd. Its owner, David Seale, is also ACTIVELY INVOLVED in horse racing as well. He is currently the President of the Barbados Turf Club and the owner of race horses.

    As I previously mentioned, “According to the February 4, 2014 edition of The Economist,”: “To outsiders, the magnitude of Indians’ love for cricket is as incomprehensible as its feverish intensity.” Similar cannot be said about West Indians.

    You are correct re: “…….if you can find a cricket match a Saturday … count the peoples on your fingers.” Although Bajans, for example, love cricket, many fans do not attend games as was the case in the halcyon days when Barbados’ and West Indies’ cricket was “strong.” Interest in the sport has been dwindling over the years as is evidenced by the attendance at Tests and ODIs, which has also extended to the other Caribbean territories.

    When I was growing up, cricket was played in the “gap,” on the “school pasture,” vacant lots and on the beach. This is not the case today. Younger Barbadians and West Indies are now more interested in English, European and South American football, US basket-ball, baseball and the super bowl. Youngsters can tell you the names of players, their salaries, statistics, previous teams, etc. “Go to any sports bars around the island to see the crowds.”

    Liked by 1 person

  • Initially, the “conversation” was about SPONSORSHIP……NOT crowd attendance.

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Sponsorship and crowds go hand in hand!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • The above comment did not surprise me.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Peter Short, King Dyal, Clyde Walcott John Goddard, Garry Sobers etc etc all built WI Cricket.

    George Challenor, Learie Constantine etc etc likewise.

    Sometimes I like to see who is insecure and who isn’t …. just for a laugh!!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • “Sometimes I like to see who is insecure and who isn’t …. just for a laugh!!!”

    The above comment is a “cop out.” You are a very dishonest individual.

    Liked by 1 person

  • For the sake of curiosity, would you please explain how “Sponsorship and crowds go hand in hand?”

    ++++++++++++++++++++++

    “The Peter Shorts of the past are the ones who built West Indies cricket and kept it unique.”

    Then: “Peter Short, King Dyal, Clyde Walcott John Goddard, Garry Sobers etc etc all built WI Cricket.”

    Hmmmmmm……..you keep “moving the goal post” in an effort to prove yourself correct.

    You are a very dishonest, disingenuous individual…….no wonder WW&C refers to you as “Johnliesalot.”

    Liked by 1 person

  • Sponsors want to reach the market they serve … made up of people … kind of like crowds .. they are made up of people too!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • Artax March 27, 2018 at 8:11 PM #
    “Sometimes I like to see who is insecure and who isn’t …. just for a laugh!!!”
    The above comment is a “cop out.” You are a very dishonest individual.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Peter Short is long dead.

    Yet his name seems to cause you great insecurity.

    … clearly Quakers do too!!!

    Facts are facts …. only insecure people can’t deal with them.

    Liked by 1 person

  • … and it is also a fact that all of the names I mentioned built WI cricket!!

    Undisputable!!

    I could also add my name too because like thousands of others I was once heavily emotionally invested in WI Cricket ….

    … all those thousands also built it too!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • I have said her e before and say again: have we in Barbados ever produced a better batsman than Seymour Nurse. Why don’t we celebrate him the way we celebrate others? Doubt me, go back to hat historic game in the Park, Spartan versus Empire, with Wes Hall at his best. Nurse put so many lashes in him tears still come to my eyes when I think about it. That game represented the real spirit of cricket.
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Look at these sentiments about Cricket.

    Do you realise that which team won or lost was irrelevant?

    Was the match drawn?

    Cricket was never about the mundane … win, lose or draw … it was about the spectacular.

    That is the change.

    I can remember Kallicharran vs Dennis Lillee in the World Cup ….. I am sure WI won but that for me is secondary.

    What colour was Kallicharran???????????????

    Liked by 1 person

  • No big set of protective gear …. no helmet …. and no jumbo bat!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • More!!!

    … and who can forget “Caught Sobers bowled Gibbs”!!

    This was Sobers’ last series, 1973 … he was “old”!!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • “Sponsors want to reach the market they serve … made up of people … kind of like crowds .. they are made up of people too!!”

    Rubbish…….a whole heap of shiite!!!!!

    You have conveniently “twisted” the meaning of your original comment in an attempt to prove yourself correct…….dishonesty!!!!

    ++++++++++++++++++++

    “Facts are facts …. only insecure people can’t deal with them.”

    If making an observation that many of your comments have racist undertones, especially in the year 2018, makes me insecure…….then I plead “guilty.”

    However, if you are black……. and you believe white people are responsible for the “civilization” of blacks……….. then you are more insecure than you may care to admit.

    People such as you sicken me……..facts are facts.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Which one of our current players can produce anything like this?

    Liked by 1 person

  • NorthernO

    We hope yuh see that Australia is a real country.

    We no doubt are referring to the recent incident of ‘cheating’

    In which the ICC imposed minimal fines, suspensions

    Only for the government of Australia to get involved and bring a level of seriousness to the issue.

    As a result the captain, Smith, maybe not to play again

    And the vice-captain has been severely sanctioned

    So the political elites brought a level of sanity to the matter

    As compared to how the ICC is attempting to treat the regional political leaders who are seeking to meet with them, the ICC

    The ICC is telling regional governments that the President of the WICB (C) must be at such a meeting.

    The ICC, like the FIFA, obviously feel that their governance of world sport is outside the remit of the political elites. This has always been so,

    Liked by 1 person

  • Pacha ya got ma bawlinn on de call-in.

    What lil babee Jeebus gobshite what?!!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • Know what I like about the Bush, Bushie, and indeed the whole internet? No eminents. Me, Harold Hoyte, Patrick Maxwell, Bobby Pitcher, Jeff Broomes, a judge, and you, and Welly. Also, goats.

    Liked by 1 person

  • John March 28, 2018 at 6:51 AM #

    I do not like discussions about cricket (or any other sport, for that matter) in the wrong company because it brings out the emotion in people. You are right: the art of cricket is not about winning or losing, but the beauty of a fine batsman, a top class spinner, an artistic fast bowler and a classy wicket keeper (Ossie Gill, Andy White); it is how th game is played. That was the tradition.
    And you are right, I cannot remember the outcome of the Spartan v Empire game. I do remember Peter Lashley and Cammie Smith opening for Spartan with Chaarlie Griffiths coming from the hospital end.
    In those days cricket was more than a game, it was theatre. The introduction of one-day cricket, limited over and so-called T-20 cricket have combined to turn it in to a get rich quick activity.
    ,

    Liked by 1 person

  • NorthernObserver

    @Pacha
    it was Cricket Australia (formerly the Australian Cricket Board) which levied the 2 one year bans on the capt and vice-capt, and 9 months on the offending player.
    Not the government of Australia.
    They should have banned them for 5 years. (ultimately career ending bans)

    Liked by 1 person

  • NorthernO

    Yes. The PM of Australia made a public statement raising the level the seriousness of the offence.

    Liked by 1 person

  • NorthernObserver

    Yes PM Turnbull called it a ‘national disgrace’. He also called for an end to “sledging”.

    The ICC, and other bodies of its ilk, are a colossal waste of time. This is no secret.

    Liked by 1 person

  • The Prime Minister of Australia was bound to step in because the sport has “used” the country.

    However, when things were good, the country relished the connection so the country is complicit.

    Ideally, country should not be involved, the sport should be played for the pure enjoyment and upliftment of people.

    This is what WI cricket used to be all about.

    Win, lose or draw, it used to be about pure enjoyment.

    So, there will be a team called West Indies at the World Cup but barring an act of God or some divine revelation to an individual on the team, we won’t be seeing any WI Cricket being played by that team.

    Sobers went tot Rhodesia and created a furore because of insecure Black leaders who never understood what Cricket was really about and tried to create a new interpretation.

    Because it was Sobers it was a storm in a teacup and blew over!!

    However, careers of several remarkable talents were ruined years later because none of those men who went to South Africa was a Sobers.

    A real pity!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • NorthernObserver

    @John
    “I could also add my name too because like thousands of others I was once heavily emotionally invested in WI Cricket ….”

    John, emotional involvement doesn’t produce top players?

    “Ideally, country should not be involved, the sport should be played for the pure enjoyment and upliftment of people.
    This is what WI cricket used to be all about.
    Win, lose or draw, it used to be about pure enjoyment.”

    Maybe that is how YOU saw it, but what about the PLAYERS?

    There was likely no other time in history, except the 74-84 decade, that WI could have fielded 3 internationally competitive teams. And the majority of those players were in the English County cricket league, a professional league.

    What happened of significance in the 81-82 period???? What was its effect on cricket, particularly in the Caribbean??

    Liked by 1 person

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    Entering this debate seems almost like taking part in one of those timeless tests…soon come ideally that a team need to catch the ship bound for home so stumps will get pulled…soon 😁

    @Hal, re “…I cannot remember the outcome of the Spartan v Empire game. I do remember Peter Lashley and Cammie Smith opening for Spartan with Chaarlie Griffiths coming from the hospital end…In those days cricket was more than a game, it was theatre. The introduction of one-day cricket, limited over and so-called T-20 cricket have combined to turn it in to a get rich quick activity.”

    What a strange perspective! Cricket is still more than a game and wonderful theatre and earnestly played matches always will be such.

    To suggest that skilled players who now have a chance to earn an excellent wage from the various limited over competitions are simple money grabbing schemers is terribly discriminatory (NOT racially); professional sportspeople in all disciplines take EVERY opportunity in their field of endeavour to make as much money as is possible while their skills and health are intact, so why should cricketers be any different.

    And do you think that those Zimbabwe players were not emotionally torn asunder to not make the world cup !

    Cricket has totally moved on from those glory days when Spartan and Empire were filled with stars BECAUSE for one reason early on, they could not play anywhere else. Your nostalgia also omits some very salient facts re the combined BCL to the BCA competition et al… Anyhow, enough of that.

    @Northern, as I asked another blogger why “… should [they] have banned them for 5 years. (ultimately career ending bans)”?

    Sachin Tendulkur was caught ball tampering, so too other prominent players…they were sanctioned and moved on. What these men did was stupid and wrong and they will pay dearly but they can’t be punished way beyond the sentencing guidelines simply because they are stupid.

    If that was the case generally in life we wouldn’t have enough room for jails!

    And why is the “… ICC, and other bodies of its ilk, … a colossal waste of time.”?

    They are merely the governing body that sets the structure and guidelines for international play…whether good or ineffectual some group would have to play that role, seems to me.

    Liked by 1 person

  • There was likely no other time in history, except the 74-84 decade, that WI could have fielded 3 internationally competitive teams.

    What happened of significance in the 81-82 period????

    +++++++++++++++++++++++

    Today we can safely say that there is no other time in history that WI CANNOT field a single competitive team …. AT ALL, ….NOT A ONE ….. NADA …. PERIOD!!

    What caused this change?

    Why is it now that not a single WI team has been produced since the 90’s which is internationally competitive?

    Lara popped up in this period … how come no team?

    There was no sweat producing not only competitive but world beating teams in the 1950’s, or 60’s.

    What caused the demise?

    Define WI cricket prior to 74-84 period and it will be clear to you!!

    Could it be that there is simply no emotional investment by me and others that there is no such world beating teams?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Independence in 66 perhaps?

    Many bloggers accept Barbados has declined since 1966!!

    Could the same process be at work in Jamaica, Guyana etc?

    Liked by 1 person

  • NorthernObserver

    @DIW
    I am unaware of ‘sentencing guidelines’. It would appear from your comments, that prior sentences have not served to stop the actions?

    Not a big fan of “international governing bodies”. They have been repeatedly inconsistent, and in several cases simply corrupt. And in several cases one member(s) are so strong, the stick they wield makes it a joke. Ever seen Hockey Canada follow anything from the IIHF, unless its a tournament run by the IIHF.

    Liked by 1 person

  • NorthernObserver

    @John

    What happened in 81-82? English county cricket changed to allow ONE non-national per team. The vast majority of all those WI stars in the +/- 70’s on, played in this league. And they were several on certain teams.

    While the WI team had continued from the 50’s and 60’s, they relied more on development and skill honing via County Cricket. And to make a living playing cricket. They even trained Gordon Greenidge for us (he left Bim @ 11 I think). He was eligible to play for England.

    Any surprise a bunch of them subsequently accepted a year’s salary to play for a month in S.Africa?

    Liked by 1 person

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    Yes there are guidelines for ball tampering per ICC. In fact the sanction for this ‘cheating offence’ starts at rather innocuous (opposing team gets a 5-run credit) and ends apparently at a maximum one game suspension for offending player(s)… I say apparently because that was Smith’s sentence.

    Compare that to the proposed two game suspension which Rabada was to endure for ‘accidental’ contact of the same Smith during the bowler’s exuberant send off of the aussie captain during the preceeding test. That was overturned on appeal but the seeming discrepancy tells a clear story of the lack of gravity of ball tampering compared to the supposed ‘greivous bodily harm’ incidental touch!

    It’s worth noting that press reports highlighted that in the same match the South Africans were doing the other ‘ball tampering’ ploy of throwing the cherry into the ground on returns to the keeper. They wanted to achieve the same goal: speed up opportunity to get reverse swing.

    And that highlights the fact that ball tampering is done – so the players say in their tell all books and in the press- by all bowlers in some way…these guys simply got caught crossing that line.

    The bounced returns is sorta a nod and wink ploy if the umpires are not attentive…they were quite so however in this match and warned the SAs to stop that action on the ball and they did. Matter closed.

    The Aussies went way over the cliff with their tampering, however.

    Liked by 1 person

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    Sigh…continually flawed logic , with dishonesty and disingenuity as the blogger Artax noted.

    You said: “Why is it now that not a single WI team has been produced since the 90’s which is internationally competitive?”

    As far as I know these are viable and successful WI teams also,

    2004,Champions Trophy winners.
    2012,T20 winners
    2016, T20 Men Champs; U-19 Champs ; Women’s T20 Champs

    Additionally the WI were beaten finalists in the Champions Trophy in 2006 and in U19 and women’s ODI in the 2000s also, as I recall.

    Liked by 1 person

  • As far as I know these are viable and successful WI teams also,
    2004,Champions Trophy winners.
    2012,T20 winners
    2016, T20 Men Champs; U-19 Champs ; Women’s T20 Champs
    Additionally the WI were beaten finalists in the Champions Trophy in 2006 and in U19 and women’s ODI in the 2000s also, as I recall.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    While in Test Cricket …. the way WI cricket was measured …..

    Point is so simple you missed it.

    So let’s get this right.

    WI got Test status in the 1920’s

    We get the individual brilliance during the 30’s.

    The war years of the 40’s not much cricket.

    From the beginning of the 50’s WI cricket shines … Ramadin and Valentine.

    Three W’s, Sobers.

    The 60’s Hall and Griffith … excellence in Tests cemented.

    Peaks in the 80’s then decline sets in.

    What is it that our ancestors did to build WI Cricket from the 20’s and before to the 80’s and what is it now that has created the decline?

    Remember, if you want to understand the decline look at the common factor … TEST CRICKET!!

    TEST …. that is the magic word!!!

    WI Cricket was built long before Peter Short came along!!

    Peter Short played for Lodge in the 1940’s.

    Who built it up and how?

    …. …. and now we have to address the question … who destroyed it?

    Liked by 1 person

  • NorthernObserver March 29, 2018 at 1:37 AM #
    @John
    What happened in 81-82? English county cricket changed to allow ONE non-national per team. The vast majority of all those WI stars in the +/- 70’s on, played in this league. And they were several on certain teams.
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Somehow West Indians before the onset of county cricket as an outlet for West Indian Players were able to produce Sobers, Hall, Griffith, Goddard, the three W’s etc.

    Richards and Roberts were created at the Alf Gover school in England in the 70’s.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alf_Gover

    Who is presiding over its demise?

    Liked by 1 person

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    The Blogmaster has noted repeatedly that the sport of cricket is our allegory of Bajan social decline so it’s reasonable to step away from those real life blogs to address your absolustely irrational and illogical remarks.

    WI cricket was founded on teTests because that was basically the ONLY form of international cricket played…it is utter nonsensical reasoning to say:”While in Test Cricket …. the way WI cricket was measured …..” as some meanigful point.

    For as long as I started following cricket the Brits and others pejoratively labelled us “calypso cricketers” because of our one-day style of play long before that form of the game became the coin of the realm, so to speak.

    The point being that since that ’75 final we basically stamped our authority as limited over maguffies…and then after that Australia debacle in 75-76 we slowly built prowess as a dominant Test nation.

    Consider further that when Kerry Packer started his rival cricket league he desperately wanted our WI one-day might as the star attraction.

    The simple point you so stumble past is that cricket is about executing the skills regardless of the type of game…we have always had the skills but have simply disbanded the collective spirit to harness everything into a winning formula!

    The Alf Grover School cut and formed lumps of mineral rock into superior diamonds …it did NOT create the diamonds.

    Liked by 1 person

  • I hope the rewards justify the risks.

    “KARACHI, Pakistan –

    Presidential-style security, including bulletproofed buses, will be afforded West Indies on

    their historic three-match Twenty20 series against Pakistan starting here Sunday.

    Liked by 1 person

  • You see why we can never formulate credible solutions to obvious problems
    We look for scapegoats to avoid casting blame where blame lies
    The destruction of West Indies cricket did not start with Cameron
    It started with Captain Peter Short and those at that time who did not see the need to be visionary in their outlook when they were in charge
    They were just content and basketball in the glory of the success on the backs of players who played the game with a philosophical purpose.
    And Cameron did not put himself there anyhow.

    Like

  • Those who talk about young, talented West Indians giving back to society should check the latest on Ottis Gibson in South Africa and the rejection of Desmond Haynes for the position of head coach of the West Indies cricket team, in preference for an Englishman not even now in his own back yard.

    Like

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