Where Is The Hardwood Housing Forensic Report?

The Hon. Prime Minister Freundel Jerome Stuart, Q.C., M.P

BU admits to being sympathetic to the platform message of the late Prime Minister David Thompson that on winning the government, he would usher in a new kind of governance in Barbados. The new dispensation would be driven by transparency legislation, a combination of Freedom of Information (FOI) and Integrity Legislation. The Democratic Labour Party (DLP) is approaching the end of its 5-year term and it is fair to say that nothing has changed. It is business as usual in Dodge.

Barbadians who walked the campaign trail last election should recall that one of the hot button issues was Hardwood Housing.  The late Prime Minister shouted to Barbadians who stood in the ‘dew’ that “someone will have to pay for Hardwood”. Many political pundits opine that the Hardwood Housing issue was the weight that tipped the scale for many voters and in the process destroyed Clyde Mascoll’s political aspirations.

It is strange that the Harwood Housing matter has not been pursued with the same vigour by the media as CLICO. It is a governance issue and the principle is the same. Is it fair that the DLP would promise to do a forensic audit on Harwood Housing and four years later courtesy is not extended to Barbadians by way of a status update? The question remains, was a forensic report performed on Hardwood Housing? If a report was done is it reasonable to expect that unlike the CLICO forensic report, it would have been sighted by members of the government after 4-years in the making? What is the true story to be told about Hardwood Housing? Was it a non issue which was turned into a political football because of the Mascoll factor?

Who remembers on the floor of the House when Prime Minister Thompson thundered  “Some measure of responsibility must be found. Anyone found guilty of any infelicities will be brought to justice”, He added “the fullest extent of the law will be brought to bear” whether the perpetrators were in “high office, low office or no office “What is left suggests that the taxpayers of this country will have to foot a huge bill”.

These were very serious and strong statements made by the late  Thompson and should not be left hanging. The government needs to put this matter to bed. After years of haranguing the Arthur administration about the St. Joseph Hospital Report which cost taxpayers millions was that report made public also? Why do we allow elected politicians to treat us for fools?

Prime Minister Fruendel Stuart who has had the office of Prime Minister foisted on him has promised to enact the Anti corruption Bill before the general election bell is rung. Nothing has been mentioned about FOI. What is scary is that the government in waiting [Barbados Labour Party] has not been strident in its call to enact transparency legislation. Prime Minister Stuart has the opportunity to do what is politically and morally right by being the Prime Minister to enact transparency legislation. He has the opportunity to deliver on what late Prime Minister promised, to delivery a forensic on Hardwoods Housing.

BU will evaluate the performance of this government on issues which are life changing for the citizenry. Promises are comfort for fools.

  • @enuff

    Not sure what his terms and conditions of employment of were at the time.

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  • Whatever there were Hammie couldn’t fire him lmao

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  • Caswell Franklyn

    Enuff

    Ministers do not have the power to hire or fire public officers or other public servants that are employed at statutory boards. However, even though they don’t have the power they exercise considerable influence in the case with statutory boards. They can and do give the boards instructions which the board members feel obligated to carry out. That is why so many boards face lawsuits for wrongful dismissal and have to pay out so much money, but what the hell it is not their money, so they don’t mind issuing unlawful instructions.

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  • @ Caswell
    Thank you. David there is your answer.

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  • millertheanunnaki

    @ Sargeant | April 1, 2012 at 2:33 PM |
    ” Thompson’s hit wasn’t illegal but Mascoll’s credibility was tottering and Thompson used the equivalent of the rabbit punch that Foreman delivered to Frazier as he was on his way down in the title bout in Jamaica.”

    Sarge, man, you got a real good memory. I will never forget that fight. Devastating it was! Foreman literarily lifted Frazier in mid-air with those punches. Those were not rabbit punches (just the one to the back of the head on his way down) but gorilla punches.
    That fight will always stick in my memory. First time the miller was getting free food after waiting in the queue for over 3 years. Had to make a choice. Watch the fight or eat the food. Guess what the hungry miller did?

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  • “A left and a right to Frazier … a left and a right to Frazier … and Frazier’s down”!!!

    It was that fast, that brutal and don’t remember anything unfair … just two completely mismatched opponents ….. heavyweight and a feather weight!

    Frazier was the rabbit so I guess it might be right to say he got a rabbit punch.

    Who you reckon out of Mia and Owen would be the rabbit in a straight head to head boxing match?

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  • Sad the toll boxing takes on our bodies.

    At the time those three guys, Foreman, Frazier and Ali were almost gods.

    One guy claimed to be the greatest … and I guess he was … for a time.

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  • “Who remembers on the floor of the House when Prime Minister Thompson thundered “Some measure of responsibility must be found. Anyone found guilty of any infelicities will be brought to justice”, He added “the fullest extent of the law will be brought to bear” whether the perpetrators were in “high office, low office or no office “What is left suggests that the taxpayers of this country will have to foot a huge bill”.

    How prophetic! Only if he were alive to face this CLICO music . He would be found guilty of many infelicities and would have to be brought to justice.

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  • well leroy parris wasn’t he part of the many infelicities . How come no charges has been brought against him after 4 years with the only flimsy charge of selling insurance. you guys talk a good talk with no evidence. don;t hold you breathe for such charges would not happen even if DT was alive. just wishful thinking and a lot of bull;;;;;sh

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  • What is wrong with the citizens of Barbados (or in the CLICO case the policyholders) doing the calling to accound and enforcement of law through the courts of Barbados if their Government will not do it!!

    Why do we have to wait on a dead man?

    It just takes a few (one can do it) to figure out how to apply the law as it exists to the problem at hand.

    I think there is a “tide in the affairs of men (and women) of this country” which is rising and it is only a matter of time before someone with the brains and the courage takes the step and brings the whole thing crashing down …. using the law as it exists.

    Alot of people need to be called to account and I think one citizen or policyholder can do it, once he/she figures out what to do.

    Isn’t the CLICO matter simply a breach of Trust by the Company and the Governments of the regions and aren’t there precedents which show how to deal with breaches of Trust?

    Conmen have been around from the dawn of time and the law has caught up with a few in the past. It has to be all there.

    This is nothing new.

    Just need to look at the special case of conmen operating under the guise of MP’s and company directors and see how to deal with it in the courts.

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  • The PDC has been perusing an undated online paper by one G C Brathwaite – Changing state dynamics – erosion of democracy in Barbados.

    We stumbled across this paper, as we were going through some articles – on line – dealing with some of the political history of Barbados.

    That Brathwaite used to have his submissions published on the BU blog site, but for whatever reasons have not recently been having any published, is some thing we find a little mystifying.

    But, like academic diggers that have come across something by one of our political opponents that is pertinent of censure and worthy of absolute criticism, and like social critics that have come across something that meretricously shows off as intelligent writing but that is itself far less than that, we have decided to use this opportunity – upon brushing off the hard crusty layers of academic pollution – to expose some BU readers to some of the infertile nonsense that Brathwaite has contained in the paper, with a primary view of showing them why this country is hardly going anywhere ideologically intellectually politically, sometimes because of many of those who are so-called practising intellectuals in this country and who would have been the beneficiaries of “free” education, having chosen to remain tightly confusedly stuck in many old useless 20th century ideological political paradigms and cockfights.

    So, first of all, in this paper – Brathwaite portrays the false assumption that Barbados has been a democracy, albeit one that is eroding.

    What piffle!!

    Barbados has NEVER been a democracy. Barbados out of so many other appropriate definitions is an oligarchy – rule by a few.

    For Brathwaite to suggest therefore that Barbados has been a democracy – which is rule by the majority of people in a polity- is illusory of him.

    While he falsely contended that democracy is being eroded, we must state that this oligarchy is becoming more and more conditioned by many instances of corruption, lawlessness, anarchism and permissiveness on many social political cultural fronts. Of course these circumstances will have an adverse negative impact more on authority than liberty, more on cooperation than conflict in the country – in the long term with greater threats to traditional authority and conformity.

    While Brathwaite variously interchanges use of the term “erosion of democracy”, with use of the term “threat to erosion of democracy”, in some of earlier parts of the paper, thus creating confusion in the mind of the critical reader/thinker about what is really the theme of the paper, it is certainly not interesting that the powerlessness that he so ascribes to this Barbados “democracy” that is in flux, is markedly a consequence of local and international oligarchic conditions – and not democratic growth from oligary even.

    Another fundamental error that that he makes, and which obviously has come through pure instinctual belief – not research – is that, he wrote that Tourism is the leading contributor to GDP in 2004/5 (presumably this is the time when that part of/the whole paper was written – in the paper itself he makes reference to Barbados celebrating its 39th year of nationhood). Research of the relevant Central Bank data would however indicate that the tourism sector although the no 1 foreign exchange earning sector, at the time, was the third biggest contributor to GDP – and not the leading sector.

    NB. We fundamentally believe however that GDP must take into consideration only productive activity – and not services activity. We no longer lump together the value of physical output with the value of services.

    PDC

    Like

  • The PDC has been perusing an undated online paper by one George C. Brathwaite – Changing state dynamics – erosion of democracy in Barbados.

    We stumbled across this paper, as we were going through some articles – on line – dealing with some of the political history of Barbados.

    That Brathwaite used to have his submissions published on the BU blog site, but for whatever reasons have not recently been having any published, is some thing we find a little mystifying.

    But, like academic diggers that have come across something by one of our political opponents that is pertinent of censure and worthy of absolute criticism, and like social critics that have come across something that meretricously shows off as intelligent writing but that is itself far less than that, we have decided to use this opportunity – upon brushing off the hard crusty layers of academic pollution – to expose some BU readers to some of the infertile nonsense that Brathwaite has contained in the paper, with a primary view of showing them why this country is hardly going anywhere ideologically intellectually politically, sometimes because of many of those who are so-called practising intellectuals in this country and who would have been the beneficiaries of “free” education, having chosen to remain tightly confusedly stuck in many old useless 20th century ideological political paradigms and cockfights.

    So, first of all, in this paper – Brathwaite portrays the false assumption that Barbados has been a democracy, albeit one that is eroding.

    What piffle!!

    Barbados has NEVER been a democracy. Barbados out of so many other appropriate definitions is an oligarchy – rule by a few.

    For Brathwaite to suggest therefore that Barbados has been a democracy – which is rule by the majority of people in a polity- is illusory of him.

    While he falsely contended that democracy is being eroded, we must state that this oligarchy is becoming more and more conditioned by many instances of corruption, lawlessness, anarchism and permissiveness on many social political cultural fronts. Of course these circumstances will have an adverse negative impact more on authority than liberty, more on cooperation than conflict in the country – in the long term with greater threats to traditional authority and conformity.

    While Brathwaite variously interchanges use of the term “erosion of democracy”, with use of the term “threat to erosion of democracy”, in some of earlier parts of the paper, thus creating confusion in the mind of the critical reader/thinker about what is really the theme of the paper, it is certainly not interesting that the powerlessness that he so ascribes to this Barbados “democracy” that is in flux, is markedly a consequence of local and international oligarchic conditions – and not democratic growth from oligary even.

    Another fundamental error that that he makes, and which obviously has come through pure instinctual belief – not research – is that, he wrote that Tourism is the leading contributor to GDP in 2004/5 (presumably this is the time when that part of/the whole paper was written – in the paper itself he makes reference to Barbados celebrating its 39th year of nationhood). Research of the relevant Central Bank data would however indicate that the tourism sector although the no 1 foreign exchange earning sector, at the time, was the third biggest contributor to GDP – and not the leading sector.

    NB. We fundamentally believe however that GDP must take into consideration only productive activity – and not services activity. We no longer lump together the value of physical output with the value of services.

    PDC

    Like

  • PDC
    So, first of all, in this paper – Brathwaite portrays the false assumption that Barbados has been a democracy, albeit one that is eroding.

    What piffle!!

    Barbados has NEVER been a democracy. Barbados out of so many other appropriate definitions is an oligarchy – rule by a few.
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ut

    Barbados is a democracy but democracy needs testing now and again.

    What better way than for an individual citizen/policyholder (or a group) to seek to use the courts as is their democratic right to call to account what amounts to no more than a bunch of conmen .

    Why rely on Government when everyone alleges that the conmen are a part of Government.

    Under normal circumstances the Government should do it but obviously no one has any confidence in Government.

    It would be like a breath of fresh air.

    Such a movement could spawn the future leaders of Barbados.

    Like

  • George C. Brathwaite

    @PDC

    I am happy to note that you are following me and getting in some reading. Academics do not have a monopoly on ideas and knowledge, they actually try to stimulate discussion on ideas, disseminate information hopefully to add to knowledge, and in that way, generally contribute to human progress.
    By the way, is it possible for you to name one country, past or present, that would fit your bill as a democracy? Should I take it that there are no democrasies in the international system? I wish you well in your reading and analysis as you continue to enlighten.

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  • @ David

    Do you appreciate the fact that Chris Sinckler, leader of the Eager 11 was motivated into action as a result of the very CRUEL blow (delivered by the PM) of removing the responsibility for Nation Insurance Scheme from Ministry of Finance and Economic Affairs and that since then NIS has undertaken major investments such as the new CXC building and Four Season?

    Do you appreciate that this was clearly an attempt by the PM and or his kitchen Cabinet to limited the power, financial and otherwise of the Minister of Finance thereby ensuring that all construction projects were NOT awarded to the Bjerkham Group namely JADA, PRECONCO, SIGMA and CARIBBEAN HOMES?

    Do you appreciate why the action of the Eager 11 was promoted by BJERKHAM, TEMPRO and MALONEY And why the meeting was convened in an apartment at Sapphire Beach Apartments in Dover belonging to BJERKHAM and TEMPRO?

    Do you appreciate that the Prime Minister is aware of the very close relationship between BJERKHAM Group and Minister Sinckler?

    Do you appreciate the roll of Minister Sealy in ensuring that ALL contractors in Barbados, irrespective of perceived party affiliation, should be given a slice of the GOB’s capital works programme as a method of protecting business in a harsh economic climate which carries with it attendant benefits such as maintaining employment levels in Barbados.

    Why does the Minister of Finance believe that BJERKHAM is GOD and should be the recipient of ALL government contracts, is because he can multiply loaves and bread and feed many?

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  • Thanks for finally writing about >Where
    Is The Hardwood Housing Forensic Report? | Barbados Underground <Liked it!

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