Travel from Barbados to Select West African Countries and Back

Submitted by Roslyn Shepherd

Demand for travel determines the servicing of routes by airlines.

The pandemic has triggered economic hardship worldwide, failures and or downsizing of some airlines, and in the absence of a definitive end to the effects of the pandemic, an on-going contraction in the demand for travel. This is bad news for Barbados whose economy is tourist dependent.

Whilst the country is in a wait and see position, it might well be beneficial if it looks at establishing a connection with Western Africa via air travel. As the most easterly Caribbean country, Barbados is nearest to West Africa, 6,406 km from Ghana and 7,431 km from Nigeria. There are seventeen (17) West African countries of which Nigeria and Ghana have a population of 100 million and 30 million respectively. Ghana is defined as a third world country but with the world fastest growing economy in 2019 and Nigeria, a rich 4th world country. Both Ghana and Nigeria have controlled the spread of Covid-19 and could be the main routes.

Demand for travel between Barbados and Ghana and Nigeria would have to be assessed by the Government of Barbados. In the absence of information, Barbados could benefit from promoting its educational institutions from primary to tertiary level. Parents who can afford tuition plus boarding and all the incidental costs might for a variety of reasons, prefer their children being schooled outside of the country. It might also be possible for Chefette to expand into West Africa. How Barbados can benefit from other aspects of oil rich Nigeria and agricultural based Ghana will also require research.

This suggestion is not new; both Jamaica and Guyana tooted flights to Africa but they failed to materialize. However, the present economic climate might just be right to follow through with these West African airline routes. Though flying to Barbados, most of Virgin Atlantic airplanes have been grounded by the pandemic. Dire warnings about the continued spread of Covid-19 in the USA, UK and even Europe do not indicate this airline will return to full flight in the short term. With assets grounded and the airline bleeding money, Sir Branson might well be receptive to a route from Barbados to West African countries. His planes would be back in the air earning money. There’s no direct competition. Ticket prices can be relatively cheap because the airline would be flying to an oil rich country, Nigeria. However, the viability of each route is incumbent on Barbados justifying demand.

Wouldn’t it be ironic if the former slaves in the Caribbean reverse the slave triangle to carve out trade between West Africa and the Caribbean and even North and South America.

This challenge is not outside the Prime Minister of Barbados’ orbit. The PM has resource people who can pull together a comprehensive Business Proposal. Her several interviews at the international level has raised her profile which should lead to contact and persuasion of the key international asset providers, Sir Branson or the alternative British Airways and though not discussed herein, the governments of Ghana and Nigeria.

This is not a start-up business where projected minimum start-up capital would be around $22 million in the first year as per a Business Plan done for a proposed new airline in 2010. The airport hubs, planes, personnel, etc., already exists. It would be interesting to know the flaw(s) in my idea.

354 comments

  • The truth about security firms is not being told. Once more, we are suffering form self induced amnesia. There were a number of small security firms being formed as early as the mid-80s. The most successful one was actually managed, at some point in time by a former high ranking member of the police force. There were largely owned by black barbadians.
    As the country “developed” and the need for more high end equipment and so on became more neccessary, many of these firms operated at the bare bones level. Once the industry began to move from “watchman” to “security firm” the little black firms went under. Once more an area of economic opportunity for the local Black entrepreneur was hijacked by outsiders because they simply could not get the finance to go on.
    This is the pattern and has been the pattern for the last 50 years. The same thing happpen with the mini moke(car rental) business in the tourist industry. Everybody knows , but the deniers will never admit it-convenient amnesia again-that the small black car rental busineses were literally driven out by high insurance costs and the failure to be given finance by the banks; racism in the industry and a black political class that looked the other way. And while we are at it, we need to go and find out , why the private transportation sector, started by black business people is now controlled by a minority group; check the car parts business and on and on, a picture of sabotage , racism, banks refusing to support black businesses and a corrupt, duplicit, black and basically useless political class emerges.
    It is almost impossible that we either don’t see these obvious inequalities or we are living in some dreamland of butterflies and daffodils and refuse to wake up to the reality that the country is prospering for a few while the majority sink into a poverty that is in real terms worst than it was sixty years ago.
    The struggle is far from over.
    Peace

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  • The only colour in business is green C.R.E.A.M. cash rules everything around me hundred dollar bill y’all

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  • @William

    A clarification: in the car rental business what we saw were businesses operating or investing in businesses to feed from the core business. For example hotels, apartments, insurance companies created car rental companies because of the opportunity.

    With respect to security forms G4S, Amalgamated, Guardsman and a few other operate in Barbados. Some of the high end security offer specialized services behind the scene not just security guard service. In fact some international operations prefer to contract with overseas based firms to satisfy a confidence.

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  • I meant starting small, not ending small.

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  • @ William

    I agree with you in all you say, the only problem is that it is OUR fault. Take G4S; they came in because they were either invited or they saw an opportunity. Which firms employ them?
    If our trade unions were any good, and had a real interest in their members opportunities, they would have gone to those banks and big organisations and told them if they employed G4S they will call out their members; consumers would tell the big supermarkets that if they employed G4S they will withdraw their custom; Grantley Adams Airport and Virgin would be told if they employed G4S staff they will be a strike. That is our industrial muscle.
    We must either put getting food on the table today, or look beyond today to tomorrow. About the expensive motor insurance, I know about that.
    I have mentioned a meeting I attended with the ZR van owners on a number of occasions on BU. Sometime ago I accompanied the ZR owners to a meeting in the port with a government department.
    At the meeting high insurance costs were raised.I then suggested that they self-insure for fire, theft and vehicle repairs, and re-insure for third parties. For repairs they could either contract with a garage or open their own garage.
    The alternative I suggested was that all members of the association took out their insurance in bulk, negotiating with companies for the best deals.
    This older guy at the meeting, a returnee from the UK, almost screamed. He said “You can’t do that”. The meeting moved on. What happened next surprised me.
    Even though I was there as an invitee of the ZR owners, not a single person approached me after to get me to explain what I was talking about. It was outside their scope and so it was not real.
    I have raised the same question about legal insurance; our lawyers have no commercial sense. Then there is income protection; medical insurance – in short, Barbados is hugely under-insured and it remains so for a number of reasons. Motor insurance is an easy way to make loads of money because, by law, every vehicle on the roads should be insured.
    Why can’t government make it compulsory for all mortgage borrowers to also take out mortgage protection? Easy. If the borrowers default the lenders could seize their homes. There is method in the madness.
    Life insurance is also a money tree. Very few people who take out life insurance carry it through to death or the full term and few cash in on their policies. So, in reality, it is giving cash to insurance companies.
    Then we get the Mutual debacle, which instead of carrying out its de-mutualisation based on financial grounds, was turned in to political nonsense about black directors.
    The end result is that its legacy investment has still not been publicly accounted for. @William, we pay a high price for our ignorance and stubbornness.

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  • To further clarify Securicor formerly Brinks is the largest security firm in Barbados. Massy owns 49%. It is a hard segment to break into because of the high running cost and capital investment.There is a reason the significant players are regional or international players to benefit from economies of scale.

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  • December 8, 2020 7:08 AM

    @William
    @David
    “A clarification: in the car rental business what we saw were businesses operating or investing in businesses to feed from the core business. For example hotels, apartments, insurance companies created car rental companies because of the opportunity.(QUOTE)

    You have to move from what was done to whom it was done to. I know fully what you have stated. The question is : If we are talking pretty words about economic enfranchisement , we have to protect and literally guarantee economic activity and opportunity for those , mainly black locals, who will obviously be at a disadvantage. In other words use the law to ensure that the big tourism industry is not only for those who already have substantial wealth.
    You ought to know that the reason they wanted to chase the black beach vendors off the beach, was to ensure that the hotel stores could sell the jewelry to the tourists before they went out on the beach.
    We need to move the debate along rather than become shackled to backward thinking that we can’t drive economic activity by using our political power. We already know we have no real inherited wealth . Black businesses must be given the opportunity to compete. They cannot do it by high sounding technical argument that mean nothing. You simply don’t carry that to the bank.
    The struggle continues.
    Peace

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  • @Wiliam

    The blogmaster does not have the answers to how certain businesses can be protected in a free market. Will live it to the more intelligent on the blog to hash out.

    Peace

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  • @ Hal
    You must bear in mind that many of those persons who own mini vans are not that knowledgeable about commerce. This is OUR fault. An alert political class would have been using parliament to fight for them and they should be attending some form of business class at least one or two hours a week and be exposed to the real world of business and not left to “ hustle a dollar” and “ getting buy”. Many of them spend more time paying fines and in the law court than anything else.
    What really is the role of those political vagrants we feed every damn Tuesday all dressed down in jacket and tie? What really is their damn purpose if they cant implement straightforward policies to lift their people from the half a loaf or imaginary loaf system?
    Time to get serious. You have warned about changing demographics.
    The struggle continues

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  • @ David
    The same way we are now telling COW that a certain percentage of road works must go to small entrepreneurs. The same way that Arthur had small people building NHC houses. Do your homework, Sir. !
    Peace

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  • @ William

    You are right again. It is one of the things that get me really angry. I sum it up as poverty of ideas, as incompetence, even as the Barbados Condition, t hat predictable behaviour. I am sure you do not miss parliament, but parliament should have good people like yourself.
    Most small businesses are started by people using their life savings, borrowed money, redundancies, or lump sums obtained in lottery wins etc.
    Most start businesses to be self-employed, to be their own boss, not to have to bow and smile to some horrible boss. Some may have skills, such as motor mechanics, bakers, etc, but no business acumen. That is not their fault.
    Good government is about taking the unnecessary load off those people’s shoulders and allow them to get on with what they know and do best. They are not tax experts, etc.
    A good small business sector would do just that, providing the back office expertise, offering sound advice, while these people get on with their business.
    No wonder 70 per cent of small businesses fail. What does the government’s small business sector do, apart from walking around with bits of paper in their hands?
    Government could run start-up classes, the community college could run accounting for small businesses courses, including VAT, national insurance, pension provisions, etc.
    Or, even simpler, an enterprising young book keeper or accountant could offer those services to small business people. It is not rocket science. These are the services we get every day in the UK.
    If I want to start a business, my local authority will offer me free classes, the banks will add their bit, all the colleges will offer their bit, I can buy accounting software, the tax man will give advice. Every institution offers to help.
    If they can do it in the UK, why not Barbados? We do not have to re-invent the wheel. The same for the security business. Most security is about being watchpersons.
    But there is another argument which is important and that is the privatisation of the police or police work. Watch the inverse development, as private police numbers grow, the legal police numbers either stay the same or fall.
    There is a political argument about the growth of the private police, how businesses use the criminal justice system as part of their own security and the betrayal of the community by police.
    I will end on this brief note on the economics of crime. The business model of supermarkets is that they display their products on shelves allowing shoppers to walk along the aisles and select what they want.
    For the poor and easily tempted, this encourages shoplifting. It is a commercial principle of these firms to prosecute shoplifters. So we get someone shoplifting a loaf of bread, s/he is held by the store’s private police, the legal police are called, the person is prosecuted and fined or jailed.
    What is the cost of a loaf of bread? What is the cost of having a security person holding that person, calling out police, reserving court time, employing a magistrate and court staff, to punish someone who cannot afford a loaf of bread – all so that supermarkets can behave badly.
    There is a way round this. That the crown prosecution will not prosecute anyone accused of shoplifting goods worth less than Bds$1000, anything less make a civil offence.
    I will bet most supermarkets will not prosecute shoplifters for stealing single loaves of bread. They will suddenly become cost conscious. What they will do is ban the person from the store. We have to think strategically.

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  • All those international contracts that the fools in parliament entered into to enslave their people can be rescinded at the end of the contracts’ life or even before, start from SCRATCH….nothing is written in stone…but they have to go, they are slave masters and not real businesses to benefit the island and people…

    some will have to start small, depending on their knowledge base re business, but there are many Black business people on the island, who only lack opportunity, they have experience, know how and all the required tools already,….but can’t get it because some nuisance ass human parasite from the minority community who has the ears of idiots in the parliament, always jumps in front, even if they are broke, are welcomed by sellouts, given taxpayers or pensioners money by the millions to establish themselves and feed off the peoople which they never pay back but always get more, and the opportunity robbed black people are left completely out, so yes, it’s the fault of the clowns in suits in the parliament….they deprive the black population of their own investment money….and that’s the bottomline, been happening from the 1960s….ask Ram and all the other vicous racists and exploiters.

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  • @ David BU

    What you forgot to mention was, during 2004 Securicor merged with G4 Flack to form G4 Securicor, which subsequently became known worldwide as G4S in 2006. Hence, G4S Secure Solutions (Barbados) Ltd. and G4S Barbados.

    A guy who lived in my neighbourhood worked at Brinks for several years, moving through the ranks from a security guard to a ‘Cash & Carry’ (the armed guards division) supervisor at Securcor and G4S, until he retired. Unfortunately, depression led him to commit suicide.

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  • @William

    Is it so simple?

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  • @Artax

    Thanks.

    We have a couple of small players Patriot for example but given the outlay for armoury trucks, vaults, guns, training, licensing, compliance with global standards etc, it is a tough business for mom and pop type operations to penetrate. Some here focus on the guard service, is that all?

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  • @ Hal
    Many moons ago, a friend of mine was operating a business in the motor industry. I had a friend, now deceased, who had returned from England and was a lecturer at BIMAP. I asked my friend if he would like to do a basic business course at BIMAP. He told me he wanted to but “ could not get in”. I spoke to my buddy at BIMAP. He got my friend in. He did basic book keeping; business letter writing etc. I don’t want today much but my friend is now and has been one of the most successful black businesses persons in the motor industry. To this day, when we chat, he always says that course at BIMAP, so many decades ago change his business life.
    Like I have say these days on BU, I know about doing.
    The struggle continues
    @ David
    The same blasted way we gave Sandals concessions; wrote off a billion dollars in taxes and can now find $300 million, to bail out corporate miscreants . That’s the same damn way you can help poor struggle black business people to the next level.
    We use parliament for everything else. We found hundreds of millions to pay consultants did we not? Do your homework, Sir !
    Peace

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  • @Hal
    Should have been: “I don’t want to say “much, not “ today much”. My apologies.

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  • @William

    You are aware millions of dollars are made available to small businesses which they do not take up? You prefer handouts? Why are we spending billions in education again? You are looking at bandaids, we have to tackle financial literacy (illiteracy) at the root.

    Concessions, writeoffs is an option in the political toolbox to satisfy the political class not to be confused with what has to be done.

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  • @William Skinner,

    As a nation we are too easily riled by our government and the large foreign influence on the island.

    We remain an island whose people are predominantly of African descent. Explain to me why we as a people are so timid that we have allowed the country to develop as it has?

    I cannot answer this question as I was not born on the island and therefore have a completely different mindset to the average domestic Bajan.

    I believe Artax and a number of others are domestic Bajans. I would love to know why a large number of them have become such a complacent people.

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  • (Quote):
    Or, even simpler, an enterprising young book keeper or accountant could offer those services to small business people. It is not rocket science. These are the services we get every day in the UK.
    If I want to start a business, my local authority will offer me free classes, the banks will add their bit, all the colleges will offer their bit, I can buy accounting software, the tax man will give advice. Every institution offers to help.
    (Unquote).
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Isn’t that the kind of suite of services already offered in Bim by a number of government-funded entities, the Small Business Association, BIMAP and ‘small/ independent service providers’ like our own “Artax” (your friend in perennial verbal combat)?

    The ‘challenge’ in Bim is not one of availability of ‘advisory-type’ resources but of making good use of those resources in a business environment where potential business people see the driving around in a luxury vehicle is the shining badge of success.

    One cannot ‘teach’ people to be entrepreneurs. You can only ‘help’ them along the way to be successful business people.

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  • Governments are responsible for public sector and should adopt hands off and regulatory roles for private sector.
    The deeper questions of life is not about money but enriching yourself in life spiritually mentally physically morally and socially without money. Government should provide universal basic income to ensure food clothing and housing needs are met for all.
    Like daily exercise and mediation a little goes a long way.
    Let the west eat each other up in a dog eat dog capitalistic world (which is failing due to 0.1% holding 13%, 1% holding 50%, top 10% hold 85%, while 90% hold the remaining 15% and and the poorest half holding less than 5%.). Idiots are now talking black black black exploitation tropes memes ignoring the exploitation of all others in the dog race rat race between the human race. Political dogs will embrace racism populism in Barbados same way as USA and UK for platforms that offer nowt if you don’t get conscious.
    Economic Crisis cost of living rises

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  • I wonder if Mia is now fully aware of the desperate situation of her country men and women. She needs to explore the terrain of the country to see how desperate the masses are.

    In her press conference yesterday she appeared to be in shock.

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  • @ William

    The whole question of the private police is under-informed. A former associate of mine, Nigel South, did his PhD on the private police and very interesting conversations came out of it.
    A former Labour MP, Bruce George spent a large part of his parliamentary career also dealing with this matter. It seems to me as if we are going over old matter. Read back issues of the UK Hansard.
    Again, you are right. There is absolutely nothing, I mean nothing, that G4S does in Barbados that cannot be done by Barbadians. This is the language of colonialism. Do you remember when the Advocate was run by white people? And when CBC was first launched it was managed by Brits?
    How we got to where we are now is not of interest. Companies merge and acquire rivals all the time; that is the engine oil of capitalism.
    The underlying issue is that local businesspeople, black and white, have failed the nation. The reason we have not grown is nothing to do with the abilities of Barbadians, it is our stubbornness and arrogance.
    I will give an example which has a slight relevance. A few years ago a young woman who came to London to do a Masters degree was offered a job in Barbados almost immediately on her return. She had no direct post-qualification work experience in the discipline.
    For all kinds of reasons, it did not work out and she was let go. However, she was replaced by another young woman studying in the US, who had not even graduated yet when she was offered the unadvertised job. No post-graduation experience, no on the job training, she walked straight in to a top job.
    That is how we think. Qualifications equal competence.
    The same with security. There is NO security job in Barbados that is beyond our police or ex-police, that is why we send our police officers all over the world on training courses.
    If G4S wanted to operate in Barbados, then they should be compelled to employ Barbadians at every level, or train Barbadians to operate at every level. If we have small security firms, then it is the job of government to help them to grow. They can start that by offering them some government contracts.
    The other big joke about G4S is guards having small side arms. Why? Only the police and BDF should be armed in Barbados, and only specialist police squads. Take the guns off G4S.
    G4S is a British company and in the UK they cannot even carry staves. If they do it will be treated as offensive weapons and they will be arrested.
    Why didn’t the police oppose G4S getting gun permits?

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  • A Conversation in Consciousness Part 1

    A Conversation in Consciousness Part 2

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  • Your head is hard.

    The issue is not whether security can be supplied locally.

    Then again you are an expert about everything.

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  • @ TLSN December 8, 2020 9:49 AM
    “I believe Artax and a number of others are domestic Bajans. I would love to know why a large number of them have become such a complacent people.”
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    A very good point you have raised.

    It’s truly amazing why the vast majority of shops importing and selling so-called beauty products -including mock hair and skin bleaching creams- to black people are owned by non-blacks (mainly people of East Indian and Middle Eastern extract) who themselves do not use any of those chemicals-based products on their own ‘persons’.

    What’s wrong with the educated black women carrying on these kinds of businesses which do not require any significant specialized skills or intensive capital outlays?

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  • Let us give the PM time to find a solution.

    It seems she is the only competent person in government to deal with issues like this.

    What role is the minister of labour playing in the dispute ?

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  • @ David BU

    There are several local security firms in Barbados. Even some policemen operate their own private security firms ‘on the side.’ They usually employ former and ‘off duty’ police officers, soldiers and prison officers, who provide security for the larger supermarkets, membership shopping stores, convenience stores, gas station mini-marts, stores in Bridgetown, fetes, cruises, etc. Those guys are well paid. However, the employees of the established firms usually have to work 12 hour shifts to earn a decent wage.

    I’m also concerned about the ‘real starvation wages’ janitorial firms pay their employees and the terms and conditions of their employment. Cleaners may have to report for work at 8am, but end up being paid for 4 hours for that day. They are only paid for the time spent on each job……. and not for the time traveling thereto.

    Let’s assume, for example, janitorial firm “LMN Janitorial Services, located in Collymore Rock, assigns a cleaning team to 4 cleaning jobs a particular day – two in Christ Church, one in St. Philip and one in St. John. They report for work at 8am, spend an hour preparing and loading the van with cleaning chemicals. They leave headquarters at 9am and arrived at job #1 at 10am, which they completed by 11:30am (1½ hrs); they arrive at job #2 at 12:00 noon and complete it by 1:00pm (1hr). The team spends 2 hrs on job #3 after arriving there at 1:30pm and ½ an hour on job#4, which they began at 3:50pm. They return to headquarters at about 5:15pm. So far, after being ‘on the job’ for 9 hours and 15 minutes, the team only worked 5 hours on that day.

    I was unable to get an answer when I asked what happens in the unfortunate event of an employee being injured as a result of an accident while traveling between jobs.

    Supposed the firm has a contract to clean ABC Co. Ltd. from Monday to Friday. If ABC wants a general cleaning a Saturday or Sunday, the cleaners are not pay ‘time and a half’ or ‘double time,’ reason being it is a contract job. They are only paid x1½ or x2 if a company that does not have a contract, requires cleaning services on those days.

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  • The issue is not whether security can be supplied locally….(Quote)

    Apologies. What is the issue? Explain in simple terms, plse.

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  • @Artax

    The focus of the blogmaster’s argument is the other services. Have no problem with the security guards fighting for fair pay. The practice of hiring old people to do security work to benefit from less NIS payments.

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  • What are the other services? Can ordinary working Barbadian men and women be trained to do security work? Or, why is this so-called security work beyond ordinary Barbadians?
    Why should old men be employed to do security work, apart from savings on national insurance contributions? Can it be because of the low pay? Pensioner poverty is the most awful poverty in any society. Exploiting the elderly is abuse.
    The problem is that in the rush to Barbadianise the public sector we left the private sector entirely to its own devices. We are now paying a price.

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  • “The same blasted way we gave Sandals concessions; wrote off a billion dollars in taxes and can now find $300 million, to bail out corporate miscreants . That’s the same damn way you can help poor struggle black business people to the next level.”

    and we have to keep REMINDING THEM DAILY THAT IT’S ALL BLACK PEOPLE’S MONEY…

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  • William…don’t mind all the other fluff talk in the article, this has been happening before 2014 and neither DBLP said a word to defend or protect the workers, but now shit has hit fan they are running out trying to stick their fingers into every leaking dyke….problem is, they ain’t got enuff fingers……lol

    “Security officers at G4S are being paid $7.24 cents an hour while security guards earn $8.79. Both posts perform the same work, but G4S created the former category in 2014 without any consultation on the exciting collective bargaining agreement. Since that time, the company has not hired anyone under the title of security guard, no security officer was promoted to security guard and only the administrative staff received salary increases.”

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  • Let’s assume, for example, janitorial firm “LMN Janitorial Services, located in Collymore Rock, assigns a cleaning team to 4 cleaning jobs a particular day – two in Christ Church, one in St. Philip and one in St. John. They report for work at 8am, spend an hour preparing and loading the van with cleaning chemicals. They leave headquarters at 9am and arrived at job #1 at 10am, which they completed by 11:30am (1½ hrs); they arrive at job #2 at 12:00 noon and complete it by 1:00pm (1hr). The team spends 2 hrs on job #3 after arriving there at 1:30pm and ½ an hour on job#4, which they began at 3:50pm. They return to headquarters at about 5:15pm. So far, after being ‘on the job’ for 9 hours and 15 minutes, the team only worked 5 hours on that day.

    Xxxxxxxxxxx

    THIS IS A SERIOUS FAILURE ON THE LABOUR DEPARTMENT AND SHOULD BE A CRIMINAL ACT.

    SOME GET MAD BECAUSE I CALL BARBADOS A 2 X 3 BACKWARD ISLAND.

    THIS COULD NOT HAPPEN IN ANY DEVELOPED COUNTRY.

    BLACKS EXPLOITING OTHER BLACKS AS MOST CLEANING COMPANIES ON THE ISLAND ARE OWNED BY BLACK BAJANS.

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  • “Security officers at G4S are being paid $7.24 cents an hour while security guards earn $8.79. Both posts perform the same work, but G4S created the former category in 2014 without any consultation on the exciting collective bargaining agreement. Since that time, the company has not hired anyone under the title of security guard, no security officer was promoted to security guard and only the administrative staff received salary increases.”

    Brilliant. You save $12.00 (1.50×8) for each day worked. Which is more than $3,000 per year for each worker. With 300 workers that close to a $1M per year.
    Absolutely brilliant.

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  • Theo…it gets exhausting how evil the white and other pretend business people in Barbados are, it get’s even more repulsive when blacks are put in any kind of positions of power over other black people, starting in that blighted parliament and trickling down to every section of the community, then they all want to know why the youths are so angry, violent and murderous all the time, it’s because of them, no one else to blame, their parents and grandparents were treated the same way, this is just an escalation due to the actions of vile actions by black leaders and the thieves in the minority community…..every prospect for advancement for Black people on the island has been sabotaged by these animals with tiny island power over the population…

    don’t let any one of those FRAUDS tell you any different, just look at the situation with this Big Mike, dude sells soil nutrients, what the hell is he doing setting up marijuana slave plantations in Barbados, when people on the island have been growing weed for over 40 years, he only started his gig in the 90s, just the other day, he’s basically a soil technician, what the hell does he really know about marijuana, particularly what obtains in the Caribbean, soon ya will hear he wants 40-50 million dollars a year in concessions, paid for by taxpayers, for reviving plantation slavery….they are not even interested in their own strains because they can’t TIEF IT FROM THE BLACK PEOPLE ON THE ISLAND WHO HAS THE KNOWLEDGE…. i heard they tried and were told to fcuk off..by the black people who knew they were going to be robbed if they allowed them access to any information about marijuana…..knowledge can be transported anywhere.

    told them they can only attract crooks and scam artists just like themselves.

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  • Even worse, they are missing out on so much social and financial support available for the Black population, all because of the false leader’s slave society stance, no one wants to get involved until it has all been removed…

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  • I do remember the small security firms. Does not surprise me what happened to them. I still believe that we capitulate too easily.

    My best friend has been present at many of the transport meetings of which Hal spoke, her family having been in the business for many, many years. Many proposals have been made to governments of both parties. There is always resistance.

    And yet her family business just keeps on trucking, mini bussing, zr-ing, taxiing and tour bussing even after the death of the father. I have worked there during down time and I know why. I would have done it for free, it was so much fun.

    The employees are well treated and seldom leave, there is good service and all the family work in the business.

    The same father was also a successful farmer before he got into transport.

    He was not a corrupt or political man. Why did he thrive? Why is his business still thriving after his death?

    He was a positive man, never saw him flustered, nor angry, nor anything other than smiling. He was a problem solver.

    Daffodils and butterflies?

    No. The odds are stacked against us. Some of us find ways to beat the odds.

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  • They have no clue what colossal failures, shame and disgrace they are being perceived as worldwide, but that’s what they are and will always be operating in a system designed to enslave our ancestors….they can never, ever get anything right, especially not with their toxic mentalities..

    Like

  • Missing out on an array and myriad opportunites, but am not the one to tell them what, they’re too crooked and that must never be introduced to the positive and progressive, too damn busy these days anyway to get my energy sucked on my negative public nuisances.

    ah see hoteliers are still begging…the original welfare recipients.

    Like

  • Talk about having no damn shame, that harlot brigade.

    “Prime Minister Mia Mottley has warned corporate Barbados, especially tourism industry players, to pay their workers’ severance once they can afford to do so.

    Speaking shortly after the end of a meeting with several ministers as well as staff and union representatives of the security firm G4S over the ongoing pay row, the Prime Minister declared: “If you are the beneficiary of profits and dividends over the years, you have a responsibility to be there when profits and dividends have gone, to see the other side of the pendulum when workers are facing difficult times.

    “You must bear in mind that it is the blood, sweat, tears and efforts of the workers that have made the profits possible. So with that in mind, you have to carry the workers along.”

    While Mottley reiterated that her Government was on the workers’ side and would see to it that they got their severance payments, she urged employers not to leave their staff by the wayside when their actions showed that they could indeed compensate them.”

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  • @ WURA-War-on-UDecember 9, 2020 9:14 AM
    “While Mottley reiterated that her Government was on the workers’ side and would see to it that they got their severance payments, she urged employers not to leave their staff by the wayside when their actions showed that they could indeed compensate them.””
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    So who is going to pay severance to the Bajan ex-employees of LIAT (1974) Ltd (including the pilots)?

    Like

  • @Miller

    Is LIAT 1974 a company incorporated in Barbados?

    Like

  • @ David December 9, 2020 9:46 AM

    NO!
    But its major shareholder is the GoB and a major player in Caricom.

    Doesn’t that count for something in the grand scheme of Equity?

    Now who is going to pay those severed LIAT (1974) Ltd workers? LIAT (1974) Ltd (Under Administration) as part of the liquidation process?

    Like

  • Barbados is a shareholder in a company incorporated in another country. You should be able to answer your question.

    Like

  • @ David December 9, 2020 10:12 AM

    So what standing does the NUPW have in the matter?
    ‘Amicus curiae’?

    The same standing the GoB had in the recently resolved but very controversial and violence-affected Guyana elections, thanks to the timely intervention of the Trump administration?

    Like

  • Oh well, Mia let the big cat out of the little bag…..definitely the much better move…🤣🤣😂😂…so where are the fowls to give us all the sordid, gory details….snitch on G4S….Theo, ah can’t wait…robbing workers over 6 million dollars in the last 6 years to buy land in Barbados….woozer…..lol

    “You cannot tell me you cannot afford to pay workers when you can afford to buy government property and we are very clear that you have to put workers in front and centre of what you prepare to do in this season.

    “And the acquisition of property while leaving workers at the side of the road for the Government to deal with will not be tolerated, especially from those from among us who know our norms and our laws.”

    Like

  • @Miller

    Good question. Former LIAT Barbados based pilots are free to join a union of their choice but how/who can NUPW poll to ensure demands are taken seriously?

    No one.

    Like

  • “So who is going to pay severance to the Bajan ex-employees of LIAT (1974) Ltd (including the pilots)?”

    Miller…one cockup at a time, am about to retire, i swear, it’s coming at us too fast and furiouis, they should make crooked ass maloney and all who sat on the liat board for decades fattening their gluttonous guts….pay for their own actions right along with the crooked ass governments who put them all there…..am too exhaunted to even think further than that….lol

    as revealed in another forum, more than Enuff G4S workers got sick and died because of the social stress, mistreatment etc….someone had to be exposed eventually.

    Like

  • One things for sure, if Mia is not onlyblowing bullshit hot air and actually have G4S SANCTIONED at the ILO level, she will be viewed in a limited but far different light…

    Like

  • If the greedy criminals for employers cannot afford to pay their employee’s severance, then what are they doing in Barbados…

    if they can afford to pay and are blatantly refusing because they have ALWAYS ROBBED BLACK WORKERS IN BARBADOS…then they need to be brought up on some kinda charges and have all their buildings, equipment, etc seized…

    Like

  • Theo… check this out, after they rob employees, then they sell out and run with their loot. UKs weak economy was bound to cause hostile and other takeovers, they are all thieves and slave masters, they should be nowhere near Black majority countries period.

    “G4S will fall into foreign hands after its board accepted a takeover offer from US rival Allied Universal.

    The British security firm agreed a £3.8billion deal worth 245p per share after a bitter bidding war with Canadian predator Garda World.

    It will create a global giant with 750,000 staff and annual revenues of £13.4billion.

    British security firm G4S agreed a £3.8billion deal worth 245p per share after a bitter bidding war with Canadian predator Garda World +1
    British security firm G4S agreed a £3.8billion deal worth 245p per share after a bitter bidding war with Canadian predator Garda World

    G4S chief executive Ashley Almanza, 56, and chairman John Connolly, 70, will scoop an estimated £7million if shareholders accept the bid.

    Almanza holds 2.1m shares, worth around £5.2million, while Connolly and his family hold 611,000 shares, worth £1.5million. G4S is just the latest British firm to fall into foreign hands. “

    Like

  • Beckles to European Parliament: “End colonialism in region and honour debt owed.”
    December 10, 2020
    UWI News

    The UWI’s Vice-Chancellor, Professor Sir Hilary Beckles, called upon the European Parliament to end colonization in the region and honour its debt to the people. Invited to speak to the parliament (at a virtual international panel on December 2, 2020) during a special discussion on the poverty legacies of colonization, he reminded the audience that Europe’s economic development was funded by a brutal and inhumane system of wealth extraction from the Caribbean, leaving the region impoverished and unable to meet its economic development targets.

    Sir Hilary reminded the parliament that the Caribbean remains one of the few colonized regions in the world, and that Europe’s legacy is one of continuing economic exploitation, and the politics and policies of white supremacy. The Caribbean, he said, since pushing for its independence, has taken full responsibility for its future, but he noted that the responsibility and accountability relationship is a two-way process. Europe, he stated, walked away from its obligations after committing heinous crimes against humanity in the region, stripping it of its natural resources, and enslaving its people.

    Left behind as the primary legacy is the horrendous social and economic mess that Europe has refused to clean up with a development plan, but the Caribbean has a right to economic fairness and justice.

    Europe’s insistence on giving aid instead of economic development funding is reflective of an obsolete mentality that has no honourable place in the 21st century. It drives, for example, the impulse to blacklist the region’s financial sector, and to be unsupportive of economic diversification strategies.

    “This is a top moral priority issue in the international order,” Professor Beckles said, noting that the world is aware of the extent to which Europe plundered the Caribbean to fund its growth and development, while the region is forced to fund its own economic development with debt. Europe, he insisted, owes the West Indies an enormous debt which can be addressed by a “Marshall Plan” similar to what it offered the East Indies with the “Colombo Plan” between 1950 and 2000.

    Reparatory justice, he told the gathering, is about economic development partnership and support. He congratulated the parliament for recognizing that ‘repairing this legacy’ is an idea whose time has come.

    More about the event
    The Inaugural Commemoration of the European Day for the Abolition of the Slave Trade, hosted by the European Parliament, took place on December 2, 2020. Among the activities on this landmark day was a virtual international panel consisting of experts in diverse areas such as history; human, social and political science; African studies; feminism; and human rights. The event was themed, the Histories and Legacies of the Transatlantic Trade and Enslavement of Africans and People of African Descent in Europe and the Caribbean with a screening of the documentary series, “Enslaved” (2020).

    Vice-Chancellor of The University of the West Indies and Chairman of the CARICOM Reparations Commission, Professor Sir Hilary Beckles was a featured panellist on the session titled: Repairing the Present, Building the Future. For the full event agenda visit https://www.ardi-ep.eu/inaugural-european-parliament-commemoration-of-the-european-day-for-the-abolition-of-the-slave-trade/

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  • Travelling with children is much like anything with children – not always easy! Children make activities that are usually exciting and fun rather difficult and they don’t mean to; it’s just that they need to be entertained, fed and paid attention from morning until night, and when you factor into travel time and moving from destination to destination, it’s a challenge.holiday apartments melbourne

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