Last Mile Fibre is the Future

The passage of three Category 5 hurricanes in the Caribbean region and the devastation caused to the telecommunications infrastructure in a few islands has raised concern by many, why must landlines fail when there is no power.  It is an old argument that questions the transition from copper to fibre. Fortunately or unfortunately there is the global reality the trend is to fibre to the home- or what the techies refer to as “last mile” connection.   From all the reports fibre adds more capability to the distribution chain and is less expensive to deploy than copper. There is therefore no turning back!

The point the market – telcos, regulators and vested actors – should address is the need to educate the consuming public. The current state is that if customer telephones, Internet and video that is delivered via Internet cannot receive power from the fibre cable this translates to no service in a power outage. There is a popular position that the telephony provider should provide some sort of Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) device to each customer for this reason. And in some other markets USPs are sold as part of the product.

BU is expected to be highlight any issue, however, this is a specialise area and we abstain from advocating a nailed down position. BU consulted with a member of the BU family member who is knowledgeable in the telecommunications field and this is the feedback on whether telecommunications providers should include a UPS in the package to consumers:-

  1. The world-wide trend is towards “cord cutting” i.e. wireless telephony and Internet.  Read: cellphones.
  2. It would increase the cost to the provider to provide such equipment, which would of course have to be passed onto the consumer.
  3. The UPSs provisioned by those service providers overseas who do so only provide about six hours of backup.
  4. In the case of a serious hurricane which caused wide-spread power outages, the damage would probably also bring down the cables (both fibre and copper) which provides the last-mile connectivity.  Not much use having the CPE (Customer Premise Equipment) powered if the cable back to the provider is broken.
  5. The same situation exists for copper provisioned POTS (Plain Old Telephone Service); if the cable is down so is the service.
  6. Further to point 4, in the case of wide-spread damage a cell tower is going to be easier and quicker to repair than all the poles and the mounted cables needed to restore power and telephony to an area.
  7. Also, if a cell tower is damaged, a cell phone is likely going to be able to reach another operational tower further away.
  8. In the case of the complete destruction of all cellular infrastructure, emergency temporary access points can quickly be deployed.  Also, in the near future (a few years) cellular and WiFi provisioning will be commercially available using balloons (e.g. Google’s “Project Loon”), drones (e.g. Facebook’s “Aquila”) and LEO satellites (e.g Iridium (available now, but expensive), et al).

The feedback from the BU subject matter expert is what people should be more concerned about being able to recharge their mobile devices in an emergency.  For example, a small UPS (e.g. an APC 600VA UPS estimated at $200 BDS kept charged but turn off except when charging would work for a while.  There are USB charging dongles which plug into a car’s cigarette lighter for about $10 BDS.  And there are battery and solar USB charging devices available.

Barbadians have to get use to last mile fibre and take relevant decisions to mitigate in the event of a protracted power outage cause by disaster or some other catastrophic event.

63 comments

  • Solar power with storage batteries at each house with all taxes waived on items required.

    Like

  • Well Well & Consequences Observing Blogger.

    The APC works well, think it’s 164 minutes of charge time.

    Like

  • Home owners should buy HAND CRANK flashlights and radios.

    I have a hand crank flash light.

    http://www.homedepot.com/b/Tools-Safety-Security-Flashlights-Accessories-Flashlights/Hand-Crank/N-5yc1vZc23tZ1z0wzdx

    Like

  • Hopefully the Police and the BDF have generators and sat phones etc.

    You also have these guys to connect to the outside world.

    http://www.qsl.net/8p6aw/

    Like

  • @Hants

    It was a surprise to read that a Satphone was donated to Skerritt in Dominica to facilitate communication with the outside world. One would have thought that all the islands as part of contingency planning would have a satellite phone that is tested from time time in drills .

    Like

  • @ David,

    Hopefully the leaders in the Caribbean will learn from this year’s catastrophes.

    We BU bloggers should put our ideas on the blog and hope the politicians use them for political purposes. lol

    I really want people to take their self preservation more seriously.

    Like

  • My company has a satellite phone that clients can call and to provide connection throughout the various countries we operate.

    Like

  • Why does Dominica not have annually tested contingency plans?

    Why are Antigua and Dominica without Reserve Funds for re-building after hurricanes?

    Answer: Because West Indians seem to have problems planning ahead and saving. They spend every cent they can and borrow and beg even in the good times. In the bad times they have to be even more shameless and aggressive about begging.

    Same situation in Africa. Every country south of the Sahara has routine electricity cuts because the blockheads cannot save and plan for future electricity demand.

    And we ask why there is racial discrimination in the world? Why not?

    Like

  • @chad99999

    How much is estimated to rebuild? What is the purpose of property insurance?

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  • David

    Please. Government doesn’t insure the big infrastructure projects it completes.

    Even private property, some of which may be insured for hurricane ( but not flood) damage, is usually not covered at replacement value.

    Like

  • Can you say whether property insurance is available to Dominica to cover hurricane peril? If it is given the Dominica experience with hurricanes the deductible is probably pegged high for citizens. Can we say this is a solution for the average Joe?

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  • Chad,
    You are right and wrong. Governments do not take out insurance for large infrastructure projects because they self-insure. They factor in the cost of repairs and replacement and decide it would be cheaper to cover that themselves, saving taxpayers millions.

    Like

  • Note BU’s focus is on the ‘retail’ customer

    Like

  • @ David,

    You could do a Hurricane preparedness audit of your own house.

    Whatever you can do to avoid going to a hurricane shelter is worth the investment.

    Like

  • Dominica was as well prepared as reasonably possible for this unprecedented Cat 5 direct hit: That is why both Canefield and Douglas Charles airports are now open, that is why air traffic control is being run out of the govt emergency ops centre, that is why the roads to Portsmouth and the Airport are now open, that is why the Roseau Hospital is now functioning, that is how the electric utility managed to feed all 200 employees and family for over a week on their stored hurricane preparation rations, that is why satellite phones were in place at key locations (however – they don’t work well in stormy conditions), that is why key parts of the cell network are now up and running, that is why they switched off the public water system before the storm – they now have lots of potable water to use as soon as the pipes are repaired – if they hadn’t it would all be gone.
    Is it reasonable to build everything to Cat 5 standard (economically unjustifiable I would say), is it reasonable to figure out prepare what to do after? yes.
    Have we something to learn from Dominica? absolutely – and in particular the things they did right.

    Like

  • davymac September 25, 2017 at 7:51 PM
    there is much merit in what you are saying
    from the u tube videos I have seen the wall houses generally stood up well
    the wooden houses were flattened

    Like

  • @Chad99999 September 25, 2017 at 10:24 AM “Why does Dominica not have annually tested contingency plans?”
    http://www.cdema.org/
    So what do you think CDEMA does?

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  • @Chad99999 September 25, 2017 at 10:24 AM “Why are Antigua and Dominica without Reserve Funds for re-building after hurricanes?”

    http://www.ccrif.org/
    Caribbean Catastrophe Risk Insurance Facility
    So what do you think is the purpose of Caribbean Catastrophe Risk Insurance Facility

    Like

  • @Chad99999 September 25, 2017 at 10:24 AM “Why are Antigua and Dominica without Reserve Funds for re-building after hurricanes?”

    https://www.economist.com/news/americas/21729003-too-little-not-too-late-caribbeans-pioneering-form-disaster-insurance

    ON SEPTEMBER 12th, before it could reckon how much damage Hurricane Irma had caused, Turks and Caicos got some heartening news. Within a fortnight the tiny Caribbean territory would get $13.6m to pay for disaster relief. Days earlier, Antigua and Barbuda, St Kitts and Nevis and Anguilla were pledged $15.6m. The sum, a substantial 1% of their combined GDP, won’t come from foreign do-gooders. It is a reward for home-grown prudence.
    Like 13 other members of the Caribbean Community (Caricom) and Nicaragua, the four had been paying into the Caribbean Catastrophe Risk Insurance Facility (CCRIF). Created in 2007, it has so far doled out $69m to places battered by storms, floods and earthquakes. Unused funds are retained as reserves. Besides its own resources, CCRIF can draw on around $140m underwritten annually by reinsurers.

    Spreading risk across Caricom and beyond—CCRIF is open to associate members such as Anguilla and, since 2015, to Central American countries—has kept premiums affordable. “Parametric” triggers release money automatically depending on how severe a calamity is (as measured by wind speed, rainfall or magnitude of tremors) rather than after a tedious damage assessment. That makes cash available in the critical early days.

    Disaster-based financial instruments have been around since the 1990s. In 2006 Mexico issued the world’s first sovereign catastrophe bond to finance its Natural Disaster Fund (FONDEN); investors lose their principal if calamity occurs, as it did on September 7th when a powerful earthquake killed at least 96 people. This helps Mexico deal with the aftermath.

    THE CARIBBEAN PIONEERED SOVEREIGN PARAMETRIC INSURANCE TAKEN OUT BY GOVERNMENTS, NOT COMPANIES OR HOUSEHOLDS. Other parts of the world have followed. The African Union and the Pacific Islands Forum have launched CCRIF-like initiatives. In August the cyclone-prone Philippines set up something akin to FONDEN.

    Such schemes have problems. The promise of payouts may encourage recklessness, such as building on vulnerable land. The money, which often flows directly into treasuries with a patchy governance record, could be misspent (or stolen). At first countries worried that unscrupulous brokers were overcharging for the reinsurance.

    Still, CCRIF and the like are worthwhile, says Stefan Dercon, a disaster-finance expert at Oxford University. Insurance has not replaced broader preparations for disaster. On the contrary, Mr Dercon observes, “paying for insurance forces you to think what to insure” and how to protect those assets. Some schemes dictate how payouts must be spent. Premiums for reinsurance have fallen, suggesting brokers are keen to build markets, not bilk customers.
    A bigger problem, says Simon Young, who until 2013 headed the company that supervises CCRIF, is that countries still scrimp on coverage. The Bahamas let its policy lapse and missed out on a $32m payout after Hurricane Matthew socked it in 2016. In some territories Irma has wiped out assets worth more than annual GDP. CCRIF will cover a fraction of that. As similar tragedies grow more common with climate change, governments may increasingly view premiums not as a cost, but as an investment.

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  • @Chad99999 September 25, 2017 at 10:24 AM ” West Indians seem to have problems planning ahead and saving. They spend every cent they can and borrow and beg even in the good times. In the bad times they have to be even more shameless and aggressive about begging.
    And we ask why there is racial discrimination in the world? Why not?

    If you don’t know what is going outside of the little bubble which you live in why don’t you STFU, instead of making yourself look both stupid and racist.

    Like

  • @Chad99999 September 25, 2017 at 10:24 AM

    And decent people, companies and NGO’s are making contributions out of their own pockets, although you have said that you will not.

    Why the phuck don’t you stay out of our business.

    Nobody int call you.

    Wait till your trough put before you bubble in it.

    Like

  • @Chad99999 September 25, 2017 at 10:24 AM

    Nasty, mean spirited person.

    Take you money with you when you die, and the sooner you do that the better.

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  • @Chad99999 September 25, 2017 at 10:24 AM ” West Indians seem to have problems planning ahead and saving. >

    Different to anyone else? In US credit card debt is very high, some people work more than one job to maintain even survival. In Canada, there is now an issue with credit card debt, it has risen substantially in the last three years.

    I guess one cannot be too harsh, as the cost of living and purchase of homes has risen beyond the rise in wages. But people need to live. So they find the money somehow and that somehow is debt financing.

    What it boils down to, is a market collapse, at some point. Debt financing is unsustainable.

    The last time it was ‘sub prime mortgages’. This time it will just be all mortgages and debt generally.

    Probably why ‘those that control things’ are trying to take the world into war, to eliminate half the population.

    Cynical? Yes, I am.

    For the record, has there been any report yet, on what happened to the massive Iraq and Libyan reserves post war? Which companies have profited post war-new administration?

    Such a report is overdue.

    Like

  • @Simple Simon

    Thanks for the research!

    Like

  • @David September 26, 2017 at 12:59 AM “@Simple Simon. Thanks for the research!”

    NP David. I spent my whole life doing de ting for money.

    Now I can do it for love.

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  • Simple Simon

    Why don’t you grow a brain, and until then STFU?

    You are crowing like a billy goat about insurance proceeds of $10 or $15 million. That will rebuild about 150 homes. The damage to Dominica is in the high hundreds of millions. Barbuda is a much smaller place but the damage there amounts to dozens of millions of dollars. US dollars.

    Neither the Dominicans nor the Antiguans prepared for this and that is why their prime ministers are disgracing the black race at the UN with pathetic appeals for money.They did not prepare for this because they are as stupid as you are.

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  • @chad99999 September 26, 2017 at 10:30 AM “You are crowing like a billy goat…”

    You do know don’t you that roosters crow, and goats bleat.

    I was simply providing links to some disaster preparedness institutions that you were clearly unaware of.

    No need to get hot under the collar. All of us are ignorant about something or another.

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  • @chad99999 September 26, 2017 at 10:30 AM “disgracing the black race”

    Believe me self hating chadx5 is the only one who feels disgraced.

    How can more that 1 billion black people feel disgraced because of severe damage caused by hurricanes.

    ga long do.

    Like

  • MORE DISGRACEFUL BEGGING FROM AN INDEPENDENT NATION THAT SHOULD HAVE REMAINED A BRITISH COLONY

    From the JAMAICA OBSERVER

    Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit said Tuesday he is negotiating with the World Bank for US$100 million in loans and grants to help the island undertake recovery work following the passage of Hurricane Maria last week. Speaking at the daily news briefing, Skerrit said that the Washington-based financial institution has already agreed to US$64 million in loans and grants “and I am negotiating for them to take it to US$100 million.

    “They have asked me to come to Washington to further negotiate this package. I told them I would come if they will take it to 100 million, so we are trying to push them to take it to US$100 million in a combination of grants and loans,” Skerrit told reporters.
    He said that the island had received US$19 million from the Catastrophic Risk Insurance Policy and deposited at the Eastern Caribbean Central Bank (ECCB) and that a number of governments and agencies have been making commitments since the hurricane struck the island last Monday.

    He sought to reassure citizens that food supplies were being received and would be distributed throughout the island as he urged people with transportation to assist in getting the supplies to needy communities.

    Skerrit said he was sending a letter to the University of the West Indies urging that it does not take any action that would hamper the Dominican students there from continuing to pursue their education.

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  • Another Caribbean nation that will have to suffer suffocating sovereign debt for generations to come.

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  • Dominica needs slab concrete roofs, telephone and transmission poles of concrete or steel, sunken power and cable lines, etc.

    Can BU present a complete set of ideas for rebuilding these islands in the Windwards and Leewards? Their own people are incapable of re-imagining their construction methods. Dominica is led by an idiot (“Make it $100 million”).

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  • Dominica needs slab concrete roofs, telephone and transmission poles of concrete or steel, sunken power and cable lines, etc.

    Can BU present a complete set of ideas for rebuilding these islands in the Windwards and Leewards? Their own people are incapable of re-imagining their construction methods. Dominica is led by an idiot (“Make it $100 million”).

    Like

  • @Chad
    Puerto Rico is not yet benefiting from being a colony (protectorate) of the US.
    Surprised that you think remaining a British colony is the solution.

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  • The Gazer

    As usual you are WRONG.

    President Trump has declared Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands major disaster areas and the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the State of New York have started moving supplies into the islands. FEMA has a $15 billion appropriation.

    The White House is preparing a special aid proposal for Puerto Rico that will be presented to the US Congress next month for legislative approval.

    Get it? Trump is president of all the people.

    Like

  • I am not an engineer, but when Hurricane Lenny hit the west coast of Dominica I saw Jersey Barriers 10′ Long x 2′ Wide (at base) x 2′-8″ High, Weighing: Approx. 4,760 lbs each tossed around by the sea like matchsticks.

    And of course a problem with concrete is steel. Because of the salt sea air, steel does not perform in quite the same way in does in places which are 1,000 miles from the sea

    Like

  • @ David, Page 1 of BarbadosToday. Mia and Portia……What lovely smiles.

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  • Dominica will be getting a robust distributed generation system that no longer needs transmission lines. (98% of housing was affected by the hurricane, but 98% of this housing is still standing, with only roof and window damage). Dominica switched to concrete buildings after hurricane David, that is why so many buildings are still standing.
    Solar + Storage + Distributed Generation = A new resilient power system for Dominica – designed and installed by DOMLEC and Emera ,t o reduce fuel prices for our customers.

    Liked by 1 person

  • chad99999 September 26, 2017 at 10:30 AM #

    Neglecting that Houston and Florida also are in dire need of aid and are only receiving it more easily because they are part and parcel of the mainland USA?

    And their governors have also pleaded for aid.

    What is wrong for asking for help when you are in trouble.

    Strange is your mindset.

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  • davymac

    Is minimising the problems in Dominica. The roof on a house should not peel away in a hurricane. If the roof goes you lose most of your possessions, which are either blown away or soaked by rain.

    So why weren’t the roofs made of concrete? Why not install high-impact windows that do not disintegrate? Why are these lessons learned so slowly, and at such great cost?

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  • Crusoe

    Strange mindset?

    Are you capable of understanding the DIFFERENCE between intergovernmental appeals for assistance within the United States (as when a city mayor or a state governor) asks the federal government in Washington for money, and begging for money at the United Nations and at the World Bank?

    Let me break it down for you. Americans in Houston and Florida pay MOST of their taxes to the feferal government in Washington. So they are really asking Trump to give them their money back.

    Dominica doesn’t pay taxes to the UN or the World Bank. They are BEGGING other people for money. And beggars are treated as inferior people. Get it?

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  • Chad,

    Maybe I am nowhere on the intelligence scale as a guru like you. I am just a humble servant.

    However, two points, straight from using your own thinking (of those having a vested interest being able to seek assistance from their associated organization).

    As a member nation of the World Bank and the UN, Dominica has a vested interest and is a partner in those two organisations.

    From the World Bank website ”The organizations that make up the World Bank Group are owned by the governments of member nations, which have the ultimate decision-making power within the organizations on all matters, including policy, financial or membership issues.”

    ‘Owned by the governments of the member nations’.

    Therefore, Dominica, as much as anyone, has a right to ask for loans and grants from that bank.

    Are you capable of comprehending that, with your great intellect and all? Get it??

    Secondly, while some of us actually do understand finance and money as much as or more than you do, we do not choose to base all life decisions purely on money terms.

    There is such a thing as a humanitarian ethos. Well rounded and actually, normal people making decisions for a group, make those decisions based on holistic factors, including but not limited to financial aspect, humanitarian need etc.

    That is the crux of the second point. While you can rant that they have no right to ask for the money, it merely depicts a sociopathic approach.

    It does NOT reflect a balanced approach and what a normal human being would arrive at.

    Do you comprehend that? Get it? Or do you have great intellectual capacity (if you do, that is not a given, as you obviously could not see the first point\, which makes a mockery of your base reasoning), without a shred of moral or ethical fibre?

    Enjoy your day. Maybe have a read of some Ghandi or such to soften your nasty outlook…if that is possible.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Crusoe

    Let’s try one more time.

    The payments Dominica and Antigua make to the the World Bank and the United Nations are glorified membership fees that admit them to a club where they can ask other club members for money.

    Although all countries joining the World Bank are required to have equity participation, and are therefore co-owners, Dominica’s ownership stake in the WB is so tiny (since its contribution is based on its GDP relative to those of all other member countries) that the situation is rather like that of a street guy who owns one share of Apple or Google stock. He can call himself a capitalist or a businessman, but that makes him a joke.

    Moreover, Dominica is not just asking for loans at concessional interest rates. They are asking for grants. Free money from other countries. Aid. They are begging, and begging reinforces the inferiority of the black man in the eyes of people of other races.

    Like

  • @ Crusoe 5.02 am
    Elegant drive through midon …off the back foot ..and with a lot of wrist in the shot.

    @ Chad
    Take it easy with that ‘wild-swinging’ collins of yours nuh. Your enthusiastic insistence on demonstrating that black people are brass bowls …needs to take into consideration the fact that DESPITE this being the case, the ‘other’ peoples are MUCH MUCH worse…. perhaps even beyond redemption.

    How is it less desirable for a man who suffers a major natural catastrophe to be begging alms; than for a fellow, ALREADY overladen with wealth, to be spending the bulk of that wealth in building weapons of mass destruction…. while systematically using those weapons (and threats of the use thereof) to rob already poor brass bowls of the little that they retain in their countries…?

    Are you saying that a Prime Minister – seeing his people suffer, is a scamp for asking for help from those holding massive material wealth -mostly acquired ‘vi et armis’ from weaker peoples …. and is in a worse place than a president that flattened a country like Iraq on the accusation that they ‘may have possession of WOMDs’ (but who we ALL knew had designs on their oil reserves)?

    Take a step back Chad…and try a new line of attack…
    …besides, Crusoe is a fella that has scant respect for such shiite bowling as you have been putting forth in this last over…

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  • @ Chad99999 September 28, 2017 at 6:45 AM
    “Moreover, Dominica is not just asking for loans at concessional interest rates. They are asking for grants. Free money from other countries. Aid. They are begging, and begging reinforces the inferiority of the black man in the eyes of people of other races.”

    It’s really a pity that poor exploited god-forsaken Dominica could not have been in possession of a mock nuclear weapon to use as a major gambling chip in the casino of geopolitics to extract easy money from the house of the grand rich US of A.
    How do you think North Korea survives economically? Because those Kim guys are some of the biggest ‘blackmailers’ on Earth (or should that be yellow-mailers, to be politically correct?) to make Russian extortionists and hackers look like Nigerians attending Sunday school.

    For they know that behind the veil of the Trumpeter’s brassy but empty threats of retaliation and total annihilation the blowhard is a coward of a business dealer who would be prepared to give billions of taxpayers’ money to silence rocket-man yellow Kim for a few more years just to make that ‘orange’ bully look like an accomplished CEO like a ‘real-real’ commander-in-chief of an army of mock orangutans.
    Now which vulnerable country would be in his crosshairs of deflection while that ‘keep-your-yellow-mouth-shut’ deal (hush money) in the guise of much needed aid to the suffering people of North Korea is going on behind the diplomatic scenes? Would it be an invasion of Venezuela instead of Iran?

    BTW, Chad, what’s become of the wall of Jericho to be built to keep out those swarthy aliens landing South of the Rio Grande? Awaiting the arrival of a category 10 hurricane name ‘Pancho Gringo’?

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  • @Chad They are begging, and begging reinforces the inferiority of the black man in the eyes of people of other races.>

    Good gosh. Where did race come into it. I see a government asking for assistance. You see black people begging.

    How strange. But then, res ipsa loquitor, obviously you see race as top of mind.

    So, you are not only a sociopath, but a racist one at that.

    No thanks, I will not be joining you on the parade ground to do Nazi salutes and goosesteps.

    You can be a one-man show.

    Like

  • millertheanunnaki September 28, 2017 at 8:42 AM #

    Of course, what an exposition it is, that with all the eagerness to enter into Iraq and Libya, one for WOMDs and the second to ‘liberate the people’, where the evidence to support the existence of the WOMBs was dubious at best, now that there is a country that the evidence is clear WOMDs exist and the leader is boasting of it, there is no rush to intervene, merely bluster. If there were to be any intervention, it would have happened already.

    But then, NK has neither the hard and massive foreign reserves nor the stated desire, to change from US dollars to another currency as their main reserve currency.

    Which is the real reason for the Iraq and Libya interventions, oil being another reason, although secondary.

    Like

  • The idea that North Korea is extracting money from the United States is a bad joke.

    There are international trade and banking sanctions imposed by the UN that are costing NK a fortune. Any food aid they have received is partial compensation for the special burdens imposed on them.

    If you blockheads are unaware of the racial aspects of foreign aid you are bigger fools than I imagined.

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  • @ Chad99999 September 28, 2017 at 9:07 AM

    So why doesn’t your brawling trumpeter do like GWB and invade NK as was done in Iraq under the known smokescreen that NK is in possession of weapons of mass destruction?

    Now that should put a feather in his cap to look like a real Yankee Doodle Dandy!

    Because there is no black gold in NK? Or is it because NK’s Big Brother with very strong economic arms made of large military muscle lives next door?

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  • @ Crusoe September 28, 2017 at 8:54 AM

    Crusoe, they say that great minds think alike.

    Not to pat each other on the back but I responded to Chaddie ( Trump’s self-proclaimed Press Secretary) before reading your bang-on rebuttal and disposal of his propagandistic bull crap.

    Like

  • DUH??

    FROM THE JAMAICA OBSERVER

    The Government of the British Virgin Islands (BVI) says plans are being made to review and upgrade the territory’s building codes following the devastating impact of Hurricane Irma. “This hurricane that hit us is the scale we have never seen before, it was a Category 5, and it was really devastating,” said BVI Premier and Minister of Finance Dr Orlando Smith, during a Town Hall meeting earlier this week.
    “We have to take lessons from what has happened, certainly with Irma and review our building codes,” he added. “We have lost and received damage to about 70 per cent of our buildings, and that now gives us an opportunity to build smarter and stronger.”
    The premier said just a few months ago, he had received a copy of the first draft of the new building code, because he had some concerns about the way buildings were being constructed. “But now, we have to review that again; and, when we do that, we will want to involve the community and get your contributions, so that in the end, we will be able to build stronger and better,” he said.

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  • @Chad99999 September 28, 2017 at 9:07 AM “If you blockheads are unaware of the racial aspects of foreign aid you are bigger fools than I imagined.”

    Get back to work you. So that money can go straight from your bank account, to the IRS, to my bank account, to the people of Dominica. I need to send my money–your money really– tomorrow.

    It was 9:07 AM when you wrote that and your head should have been down, and kept down until 5:00 PM

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  • @Chad99999 September 28, 2017 at 4:28 AM “Are you capable of understanding the DIFFERENCE between intergovernmental appeals for assistance within the United States (as when a city mayor or a state governor) asks the federal government in Washington for money, and begging for money at the United Nations and at the World Bank? Let me break it down for you. Americans in Houston and Florida pay MOST of their taxes to the feferal government in Washington. So they are really asking Trump to give them their money back.”

    And some of those “Americans” in Houston and Florida who pay most of their taxes to the U.S. government are also Dominicans, and Bajans and Antiguans and Jamaicans and Trinidadians. Just off the top of my head I can count several “American” relatives who pay taxes to the U.S. federal government. These are people whose bottoms I cleaned, whose food I cooked, whom I taught to cross the street, people whom I taught to read and write. So now it is payback time.

    Do you think that it cost nothing to produce a healthy university or graduate school ready young adult for the American market?

    Payback time.

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  • I trust that if chadx5 can’t/won’t contribute to hurrican relief in Dominica that he can contribute to this one since begging reinforces the inferiority of Roman Catholics in the eyes of people of other religions.

    André Finot, the cathedral’s spokesman, pointed out the decay. One patch of limestone crumbled at a finger’s touch…“Everywhere the stone is eroded, and the more the wind blows, the more all of these little pieces keep falling,”…To foot the bill — an estimated 150 million euros, or nearly $180 million — they are hoping to capitalize not only on the architectural patriotism of the French, but also on the francophilia of American donors.
    “There is a real need for urgent restoration work,” said Michel Picaud, who heads the newly created Friends of Notre-Dame de Paris foundation, which aims to raise money in the United States.”

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  • The Pentagon has appointed Lt. Gen. Jeffrey Buchanan to lead the U.S. federal government’s efforts to restore essential services to Puerto Ricans.

    Trump is The Man!

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  • MNK

    “BTW Chad, what’s become of the Wall of Jericho” …

    Sneer if you like, but we’re building the Wall. As we speak, contractors are competing against each other in San Diego, where a demonstration is underway of alternative designs for the Wall.

    Go Trump!

    Like

  • @ Chad
    Perhaps Trump needs to build walls around Trump Towers and the White House …to protect himself from the growing numbers of American who seem to hate his donkey …. according to polls

    LOL
    ha ha ha
    Murdah!!!

    Like

  • Trump has been busy sending out self- congratulatory messages reminiscent of GW “Brownie you’re doing a heck of a job” while on the ground people are starving and lacking basic necessities.

    Trump also said the wall will be “see through” , “because you have to see who is on the other side” (you can’t make this stuff up), in other news the WH fired its comedy writer, it’s the only job Trump can handle.

    Like

  • Chad ”where a demonstration is underway of alternative designs for the Wall.”

    How many Republicans does it take to build a wall???

    Hahahahaha.

    PS I thought that Republicans do not like demonstrations?

    Like

  • Chad99999 September 28, 2017 at 9:07 AM # ”of the racial aspects of foreign aid ”’

    Oh, well done old chap. He finally admits it, right there in black and white (no pun intended). Took long enough.

    Poor Chad, born too late. Would have been right at home on a plantation with a whip in his hand.

    Never fear Chad, take a trip to the boonies in hick country and you will find a good old Maw and Paw growing moonshine on a farm. They will think just like you. Ask them if you can stay and toast Trump each night with them.

    Don’t come back.

    Like

  • British Virgin Islands and Anguilla are receiving 25 million British pounds of aid, and the total aid package is expected to be 100 million.

    Had Antigua/Barbuda and Dominica remained British colonies, they would be getting the same kind of financial assistance.

    Like

  • And if your mother had balls she would be your father.

    Like

  • Simple Simon September 30, 2017 at 4:10 PM #
    And if your mother had balls she would be your father.

    SIMPLE THAT IS A NON SCQUITUR! LOL

    Like

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