Another Perspective on Barbados Becoming a Republic

Submitted by Amused

QueenElizabethIn circa AD100, the Roman poet Juvenal in his Satires bemoaned the descent into dictatorship of Rome and explained how the dictators operated to gain political power with the phrase, “Give them bread and circuses.” And we know what happened to the Roman Empire as a result. Yet, a little less than two millennia later, Bajans are falling for the same thing. It is not that we haven’t seen the tactic before, it IS that, apparently, we as a nation choose to don blinkers and ignore it – after all, “That couldn’t happen in Barbados, we are too bright – the best in the world.”

Why should we not celebrate our independence? After all, the Americans do. The French have Bastille Day to celebrate theirs etc.

The Americans fought a war of independence and the French had their revolution. Barbados got its independence simply because it (and other colonies) instead of enriching the motherland, had become a drain on its resources and the motherland was ecstatic to let us go. Our only struggle lay in the terms on which independence would be agreed and in this we had the advantage of a team of intelligent, experienced and INTERNATIONAL Bajan minds, under the leadership and direction of the Rt Excellent Errol Barrow, negotiating. It is THEY we should be celebrating – all of them of whatever colour or creed or sexual preference. We should not, at this time, be fooled into celebrating how far we have come/descended as a country. Rather, we should be ashamed of ourselves over the brass bowls we have elected to rule us once they ad gone. And using this time to promote giving these idiots even more power is suicidal. So, what we got was not a celebration, but the precursor to a wake.

Realising that an independent Barbados, absent the reassurance of British support would not be viable in an international sense, Mr Barrow implemented a number of measures, the most visible of which was recourse at the highest appeal level to Her Majesty in council (the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council).

So Britain got its wish to cut back on its outgoings and Barbados got its wish to be autonomous, but under leaders of truly global stature. Unfortunately, these leaders were, over time, replaced by yard fowls aka Brass Bowls, whose means of survival was and continues to be reducing everything to the level of their own incompetence and in doing so, reducing Bajans to a state where they can only exist in Barbados, unless they get the hell out and embrace internationalism. But of course once they do that, most do not return and those that do find that a prophet is of no merit in his own country.

Take education as an example. Back in the day, pre and immediately post independence, all exams and exam papers for schools were directed from the UK. This meant that Bajans had the same qualifications as anyone in the UK and these qualifications were accepted almost worldwide. Now, in most professions, if a Bajan leaves Barbados, they have to re-sit exams before they can practice in their chosen profession.

We have eschewed the Privy Council as our final court of appeal, in favour of the CCJ which, with an alarming record of questionable judgements, is becoming the laughing stock of the international judicial world, resulting in the disappearance of our foreign investments, a situation enabled by the idiot we have as chief justice and a Bar Association that is a standing joke, except to Bajans who file complaints about specific attorneys and have to wait for 10 years and more and attend hearings of the “disciplinary” committee that are adjourned because of a lack of a quorum, which is not a joke. On that alone, one incident springs to mind.

During the tenure of David Simmons, the disciplinary committee found against a now-deceased attorney and referred the matter to the Court of Appeal where Simmons advised the complainant and the lawyer to SETTLE. This was not a litigation, but a disciplinary matter seeking the disbarment of the attorney for the embezzlement of client funds. Counsel for the Complainant, two eminent queens counsel, had taken the case pro bono and were disgusted when the chief justice offered to pay their costs out of legal aid, in other words, out of the public purse and they are on record as having indignantly refused. They did not expect to and were not paid ANYTHING AT ALL!! They saw (and wee) it as their duty as members of the Inner Bar. And to this day, 6 years later, the matter remains unresolved and likely unresolvable as the attorney is now deceased and likely his estate settled and disbursed. But why did Chief Justice Simmons do as he did? I do not accuse, but merely reflect that the attorney in question was one of his most ardent supporters and campaigners when he (Simmons) ran for office in St Thomas. In other words, a friend – a close friend. Which, in a PROPER and FUNCTIONAL justice system, would have been grounds for the CJ to recuse himself. It ought to have also elicited a payment of some sort to the complainant from the BA’s Compensation Fund that has never made any payments to any aggrieved party, despite the millions of dollars in the fund. One has to wonder of the Fund will be tapped to pay the likely awards and costs to Mr Vernon Smith QC and Mr Michael Springer QC in their actions against the BA. We shall see – and we shall also see what Government does should such a misappropriation of statutory funds occur.

And how does all this tie into the author’s views, with which I completely agree? If we become a republic, apart from the extraordinary expense already highlighted by the author, the already parlous state of our country will diminish even further into dictatorship. We will become a pariah state like Venezuela or even like North Korea with its “beloved leader” or Feuhrer (ring any bells?). We are already in crisis state, but what the hell – let us embrace the idiocy of people like @ac, as long as the dictators give us bread and circuses whenever they are touting for votes and support. And I also agree that one party is as bad as the other.

88 comments

  • Well Well & Consequences2

    With the mentalities of the present lot of do very little politicians on the island who refuses, despite many pleadings, to engage the taxpayers on who pay their salaries, dialogue with, let them know and assure them of how their money is being spent, who the investors they are allowing into the island are , are they requesting these investors be vetted by international policing agencies and if not, why not…..I too would be concerned with the island sinking into a form of dictatorship since the leaders continually act as though the taxpayers exist for and have only one role, which is either to vote for them or exist as yardfowls , it is indeed disturbing and warrants close watching…it is wrong that taxpayers have to pay the salaries of politicians monthly and are not seen as important enough to know why they are not seeing enough benefits for their money, why they are being ignored, why they are being made to feel they have no rights.

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  • Caswell Franklyn

    Amused

    They are not giving us bread but rather rocks and circus. Too many of our people can’t find food to feed their families, and now not even water, but the Government finds time and money to engage in frivolity (circus) using the pretext of the 50th anniversary of independence. The people love a fete and turned out in their numbers, maybe we like it so.

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  • As usual the govt found another way to spend money unnecessarily.They should have saved it for Independence day.How many people are interested in the nov. 30th parade anyhow?It would have been a nice break from the norm and a good marketing tool for the 2016-17 tourist season.With lots of Barbadiana on display and could even incorporate a one time ceremonial platoon of police in old time harbour uniform with the flotilla.

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  • One could be pro Republic or anti Republic but this particular post seems to be a reflection of the authors dislikes and a case of the old boys network or friendship overriding the fundamental principles of justice.

    Let’s start with Education in which the author mourns the loss of external examinations in his words “all exams and exam papers for schools were directed from the UK” and “if a Bajan leaves Barbados, they have to re-sit exams before they can practice in their chosen profession”. First he is conflating two different situations, high school students leaving Barbados with academic qualifications gained in exams established and adjudicated in the Caribbean are accepted at Universities all over the world. The other point about individuals having to “re-sit” is that some professional bodies in other countries are more often than not interested in protecting their turf and will coopt Government authorities in restricting access to certain professions. It is both good and bad as it helps weed out those people graduating in other countries where the standards are lower but I haven’t heard it happening to people who graduate from UWI. In Canada if you are a lawyer in one province you can’t practice in another unless you get admitted to the Bar in that province and its all in the same country, and if one qualifies in law in Canada they still have to complete the certificate course in Trinidad or Jamaica to be allowed to practice in the Caribbean.

    Seriously “Amused” wants to go back to a system where the set English Lit book for GCE is “Memoirs of a Fox Hunting Man” or the “Trumpet Major”, where Toussaint L’Ouverture is an oversight or a student is asked to write an essay about a train ride in the country.

    “Amused’ also wants to go back to the Privy Council or perhaps the “House of Lords” to determine cases arising in the Caribbean, which means he doesn’t think we are competent in managing our own affairs. The concept of the CCJ is an excellent one but that doesn’t mean the execution is perfect and just because one doesn’t agree with the judgements is no excuse to throw out the baby with the bathwater. It is still storming days and it will get to the stage where it is norming and then performing.

    Lastly was the former CCJ was doing his friend a favour? This will happen whether Bim is a Republic or not it is a small island and everyone is one degree of separation from the next individual and it will remain that way even if we return to Whitehall and ask Britain to send back Sir John Stow to be the Queen or King’s representative on the island.

    Jeff C described the last contribution as “mawkish” since I am not a learned Professor of anything more like “Professor La Ha” I would describe this contribution as strident.

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  • Interesting to read both Sargeant and Amused.
    Sargeant did a great job of rounding out some of Amused statements. However, he fell down in the last statement where he made the common BU argument that it will happen elsewhere so it will happen here. We need to adopt best practices instead of excusing wrongdoings of others.

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  • This republic thing is frightening.
    I cannot accept the fact, as trumpeted by some, that things will essentially remain the same if we make this change. Then there are those who can only see the gloom and doom ahead that is brought on by such a change.

    As in most matters, the truth is somewhere between the two extremes.

    But given the recent developments in the islands where the rewards of get rich schemes are equivalent to winning the most lucrative US lotto; where our social services appear to be imploding; the education of our children is under siege and facing daily water shortages, I am beginning to wonder, if our leaders think just calling ourselves by a different name will automatically fix our problems.

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  • Ammm,so what is this author really saying? Seems like they are upset Barbados broke away from the mother country.

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  • 50 years of Independence and possibly going republic, and we are shouting Gold! Gold! Gold!
    After 63 years of structured Technical Training in Barbados, starting out in 1952 with the Technical Branch of the Barbados Evening Institute, progressing to the Barbados Technical Institute,and finally the Samuel Jackman Polytechnic,, we have this.

    Past stalwarts, may they RIP, like Denton Sayers, William Byer and Errington Jackman, plus the countless others who were Foremen/ Supervisors/Managers of motor vehicle repair establishments in Barbados , must surely be spinning like a flywheel in their graves.
    Where are the Ministry of Education, The Ministry of Labour, the Workers Unions?

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  • Trust Sargeant to rush in to areas reserved for commissioned officers or bright NCOs…

    There are some things in this INTERNATIONAL VILLAGE called earth that are best judged by international standards…. especially when you are a nobody, from nowhere, with nothing. Academic achievement is such a thing.

    When we live in a country where the person we have as Minister of Education can SERIOUSLY continue in that role after Alexandra, The CXC exams shiite, and the many other cases of lack of leadership and intelligence, …how the hell do we REALLY know that our ‘bright’ students are truly ‘bright’ …and not just replicas of the jackasses running the system?

    We would …if they were judged by INTERNATIONAL standards.
    Then we may find that a completely DIFFERENT set of citizens may evolve as the truly ‘bright’ among us.

    Sargeant is only talking his usual shiite.
    It yet remains people like EWB. Tom, Bree and the old guard of Public servants who continue to be seen as the TRUE stalwarts of the progress made by Barbados….decades after introducing the CXC shiite.
    Under what system were THEY educated?

    …and how was Froon (and his band of hee-haws) educated and certified…?

    Come to think of it … what has been YOUR experience Sargeant…? 🙂

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  • Wish that this government would be as committed to enacting transparency legislation and educating and enforcing why looking after the environment is as important as going republic.

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  • Well Well & Consequences2

    Colonel…..unbelievable, a mechanic.

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  • are-we-there-yet

    Nothing new here but it is a viewpoint that should be considered as we prematurely celebrate our 50 years of independence

    http://www.caribbean360.com/opinion/1129414

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  • are-we-there-yet

    By the way.

    Yesterday morning I heard the tail end of a report by David Ellis that appeared to have been a new Moody’s rating of Barbados’ economy. I have not seen anything of that report since then on any news cast.

    Did anyone hear the full report and is there a new rating for Barbados?

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  • Well Well & Consequences2

    Caribbean politicians love to fill their citizen’s heads up with delusional lies, if they do as the author of this article suggests, which is the right action to take, they will have to roll back all those lies they neen telling the people and bring themselves down a couple notches to the level of humility, as they should, time is running out..

    “Will the English-speaking Caribbean nations continue year after year in insecurity, uncertainty and anxiety deceived by delusions of sovereignty and power that retard their real potential for betterment? The region’s New Year Resolution should be to make integration of the Caribbean a reality – to let the strength of solidarity of one people conquer the weakness of separateness. It can never be too late to do what is right.”

    Read more: http://www.caribbean360.com/opinion/1129414#ixzz3wmqyupr1

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  • On this island there are many billionaires and millionaires from abroad. Did government ever ask them for free guidance? I am sure they would. This island needs some new input, not new debts made by the Sinckler-man to pay iPhones and tickets to Disney-World for the so-called local elite.

    All we get are heavy invoices from local rainmakers, shamans, consultants, pastors etc pp without the slightest idea. Example: the disaster called CAHILL.

    Or simply some local citizen with common sense. That would work as well. Everybody looking at the Cahill webpage would have seen that it is simply a sham.

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  • @Bushie
    Sargeant is only talking his usual Shiite
    ++++++++++
    Thank you Bush for confirming that we are not on the same page, did you get the gist of what “Amused” is suggesting? Me thinks that you have rushed headlong like the proverbial bull in a China Shop as is usually the case without fully comprehending all that he wrote and as is your forte thrown enough red herrings to supply Bajan Cou Cou makers for the next generation.

    Could you expand on what is wrong with the CXC? Please not your usual neologism about Brass Bowls but a substantive case of why it should be abandoned and replaced with whatever you think is better.

    The other issue is about standards where did I write anything that would negate the requirement for standards? “Amused” would have you believe that any qualification gained in Barbados is automatically subject to scrutiny in other countries since our apron strings have been partly severed from Merry Olde England. Barbados imposes standards on others too, and I wrote that lawyers in Canada can’t practice in Barbados without the legal certificate from Sir Hugh Wooding etc. I also wrote that some professional bodies in some countries “try to protect their turf” and impose restrictions on others who want to practice their occupations there -see also Barbados again where the BMA if that’s the acronym fought against allowing Cuban trained doctors from working in Barbados (the hypocrisy is evident since Bajans have been going to Cuba for medical treatment).

    So who is talking “shite” again?

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  • We will become a pariah state like Venezuela or even like North Korea with its “beloved leader” or Feuhrer (ring any bells?).

    +±++±±+++±±±++++±±±±+++++±±±±±
    Venezuela is a Republic.
    North Korea is a Republic.
    All Republics are like Venezuela and North Korea.
    No?

    The Chief Justice is an idiot.
    The Chief Justice is a Lawyer.
    All Lawyers are idiots.
    Yes?

    If FJS succeeds where OSA failed, he would deserve a knighthood 👑

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  • @Box Cart

    Good examples for fallacy in syllogism. They should have taught that at UWI to the leaders.

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  • Brilliant, Box Cart!

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  • @ Sargeant
    Somebody gotta bring you to attention….

    There are some things that should be reserved for patriotic focus….
    Things like OWNERSHIP of land and national assets;
    Things like cultural heritage…
    Things like citizenship, political and cultural leadership

    Then, for obvious reasons, there are some things that should NEVER be inward looking…
    ..Sport performance
    ..Academic/ Educational standards
    ..Health…

    CXC was conceived to give control of educational standards to a clique of small minded regional jokers who measure ‘success’ by the number of so-called ‘passes’ achieved.
    There are may ways to achieve high ‘passes’
    ….Excellent teaching methodologies with a high quality curricula
    ….Naturally talented students
    ….Committed parents / Government officials
    ….By setting easy-ass papers and including SBAs (worth almost half the pass mark) which can be done by parents /teachers / friends.
    ….Making exam papers available to selected candidates a few weeks prior to exam.

    You have been away for a while, so you may be surprised at how CXC seeks to “achieve success”….

    Additionally, you should explore the COST of running this regional money spender…. and compare it to paying an internationally known and globally accepted world-class university like Oxford or Cambridge a few dollars per subject per student.

    Instead of wasting valuable and scarce funds on creating CXC, Arthur could have invested in creating a Regional Civil Service Institute with responsibility for establishing and maintaining performance standards across the various Government Ministries of CARICOM.

    ….but this would have created some difficulties for politicians seeking to install their own poppets as ‘acting’ permanent secretaries and other officers to kowtow to their illegal demands….

    Given our political wont to consistently do shiite, what problem EXACTLY, do you have with Bushie’s brass bowl terminologies…? 🙂

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  • @Bush Tea January 10, 2016 at 7:42 AM #

    Chuckle…..I like to give Jack his Jacket……I agree with your above,just goes to show that when you are thinking you are on the ball…..up and on.

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  • Well Well & Consequences2

    I can nevrr get why students who obtain x amount of CXCs, if not successful in getting into the civil service, end up working in some store in Swan Street or Broadd St, because there are just not enough businesses who hire these students who do not have advanced education for onr reason or another. Unless you aspire to higher education, these kids with CXCs have limited options unless they leave the island. I remember 20 years ago, those who finished high school had to wait 5 years to find a job paying a livable wage, if they were lucky or connected. After decades the educators should and could refine that process.

    They do not have to copy exactly evertything in North America, but they gotta be a better way, they are always talking about progress, time to use their brains for real progress and betterment. Give the kids positive options, stagnating their progress is counterproductive.

    Recently some brilliant educators in the US came up with the idea of giving kids in K12 the option of finishing high school throw online courses, they were given the option of either online publicly paid courses (taxpaer funded) or private courses, they pay for private courses. Young people need to know they have updated options and not stress filled antiquated processes.

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  • Well Well & Consequences2

    And whither Mr Stuart’s republic plan?
    Added by Barbados Today on January 8, 2016.
    Saved under Editorial

    There are many Barbadians, we are quite sure, who were expecting Prime Minister Freundel Stuart to update the nation on his republic plan
    when he addressed the launch of an almost year-long celebration of the island’s 50th Independence anniversary in Independence Square on Wednesday evening. That he did not was obviously a disappointment.

    It was early last year, at a meeting of the St George South constituency branch of the ruling Democratic Labour Party (DLP), that Mr Stuart announced his intention to change the island’s system of Government from monarchical to republican “in the very near future”. The choice of “in the very near future” to describe the timeline suggested the proposed change was close at hand.

    Presenting his case, Mr Stuart told the partisan audience: “We cannot pat ourselves on the shoulder at having gone into Independence; having decolonized our politics; . . . having decolonized our jurisprudence by delinking from the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council and explain to anybody why we continue to have a monarchical system. Therefore, the Right Excellent Errol Barrow decolonized the politics; Owen Arthur decolonized the jurisprudence and Freundel Stuart is going to complete the process.”

    Having established a clear link between the republican plan and decolonization and Independence, the launch of the 50th anniversary of Independence celebrations was the perfect occasion for Mr Stuart to speak at length on the issue. Given his silence and the fact that there are just 11 months remaining to the 50th Independence anniversary on November 30, a pertinent question does arise. Is the plan still on, or is it off?

    Either way, we take the view that Barbadians have a right to know in a timely fashion. If Mr Stuart believes the time is right for Barbados to sever its last remaining colonial link with the former “Mother Country”, it is important that this major constitutional change should be pursued in full consultation with the people.

    Quite a few neighbouring countries, which are also former British colonies, have gone the republican route and are no worse off as a result. The decision, however, should not be left to Government alone.

    To say that Errol Barrow took Barbados into Independence in 1966 without directly seeking the approval of the people is irrelevant in the context of today. Times were different back then. Secrecy, rather openness, was a defining characteristic of governance. Besides, Barbadians were not as enlightened and sophisticated as they are today.

    Our forebears generally trusted their elected leaders and believed whatever they did was in the country’s best interest. That is not necessarily so today.

    Six years ago, when the British self-governing colony of the Cayman Islands pursued sweeping constitutional change, it was pursued in full consultation with the people who gave overwhelming approval in a referendum after the issue was subjected to more than six months of robust public debate. What is stopping Barbados from taking a similar route on the republican question? Transparency and full participation of the people are defining characteristics of modern governance.

    Another important question which should be placed on the table is whether the shift to republican status should simply be a cosmetic exercise involving the replacement of the British monarch with a Barbadian president as Head of State, or should it involve other important reforms?

    For example, limiting Prime Ministers to serving two terms in office, introducing a fixed date for general elections instead of leaving this decision as the exclusive right of the Prime Minister, or giving constituents the right to recall a parliamentary representative in whom a majority has lost confidence?

    Stuart’s announcement almost a year ago was a statement of intention. However, effecting the change requires the support of a two-thirds parliamentary majority which the incumbent DLP does not have. The support of the Opposition, therefore, would be necessary.

    If such support is not forthcoming from the Barbados Labour Party (BLP) which has made it clear there are more pressing issues to be addressed, the plan is effectively stalled. Was a formal approach made to the Opposition to seek its support?

    Lest we forget, the last BLP administration, under former Prime Minister Owen Arthur, had embarked on a similar republican initiative in the early 2000s. There was even a Republic Song which was adopted. The plan then was shelved and no clarification was ever given.

    Has Mr Stuart’s republic plan quietly suffered the same fate? Only he can tell us. Hopefully, he will shed some light on the issue “in the very near future”.

    The above article from barbadostoday sums up in a nutshell what should happen going forward.

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  • Republicanism in Barbados

    Republicanism in Barbados is a political proposal for Barbados to transition from a parliamentary constitutional monarchy under a hereditary monarch (currently Elizabeth II) to a republic.
    In 1979, a commission of inquiry known as the Cox Commission on the Constitution was constituted and under the auspices of looking at the republic issue. The Cox Commission came to the conclusion that Barbadians preferred to maintain the constitutional monarchy. The proposal to move to a republican status was therefore not pursued.[1] The 1994 manifesto of the Barbados Labour Party dealt both with the republic issue, proposing a referendum. In line with this promise, on 29 October 1996 a Constitution Review Commission, Chaired of Sir Henry de Boulay Forde was appointed to review the Constitution of Barbados.
    The Commission elected the Hon. Oliver Jackman, a former diplomat and a judge of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights as its Vice Chairman. The Commission was mandated to:
    1. “determine the necessity for retaining the Monarchical System of Government and make recommendations in respect of the Executive form of Government most suited to protect parliamentary democracy, the fundamental rights and freedoms of the citizens of Barbados and to achieve effective and efficient Government so as to position Barbados to meet the challenges of the 21st century and beyond.
    2. To advise and make recommendations concerning the appropriateness or otherwise of maintaining Barbados’ link with the Crown
    3. To advise and make recommendations concerning a structure for the Executive Authority of Barbados that is best suited to protect the Independence and Authority of Parliament and the fundamental rights and freedoms of its citizens.”
    The Commission held public hearings in Barbados and overseas.[1] The Commission reported back on 15 December 1998, and submitted its report to His Excellency the Governor-General of Barbados.
    The Commission recommended that Barbados adopt a Parliamentary republic system. In 1999 the Barbados Labour Party’s Manifesto proposed that the findings of the Commission and its recommendation that Barbados become a republic would receive the early attention of the Government
    A Referendum Bill was introduced in Parliament and had its first reading on 10 October 2000. With the dissolution of Parliament just prior to the elections in 2003, the Referendum Bill was not carried over.] A referendum on the issue was proposed again in 2008, but never was held..

    2008 proposed referendum
    A referendum on Barbados becoming a republic was planned to be held in Barbados by August 2008, near to the time of the parliamentary elections.However, it was reported on December 2, 2007, that the vote was to be held at a later date instead.
    According to the Referendum Act 2005, the question to be asked is:

    Do you agree with the recommendation of the Constitution Review Commission that Barbados should become a Parliamentary republic with the head of State of Barbados being a President who is a citizen of Barbados?
    

    Debate

    The Government of Barbados announced its intention to hold a referendum on the republic issue in February 2005. It introduced a Referendum Bill that month. The Bill was passed into law in October 2005. The Act did not set a date for the referendum, but instead specified that the “Referendum Day”1) could be proclaimed by the Governor-General, being no more than 90 days and no less than 60 days from the date of proclamation.The Act itself could not amend Barbados’ constitution, because under section 49.1 a majority of two-thirds of Parliament is required to make any amendments.
    Mia Mottley, who was Deputy Prime Minister of Barbados, said: “we feel that it is the right thing to do to have a Barbadian head of state. We accept that there was a concern that the Government alone should not make that decision in this day and age and we are therefore committed to expressing our views to the public and having them pass judgement on it.”

    2015 proposal

    On 22 March 2015, Prime Minister Freundel Stuart announced that Barbados will move towards a republican form of government “in the very near future”. Stuart told a meeting of his Democratic Labour Party: “We cannot pat ourselves on the shoulder at having gone into independence; having de-colonised our politics; we cannot pat ourselves on the shoulders at having decolonized our jurisprudence by delinking from the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council and explain to anybody why we continue to have a monarchical system. Therefore, the Right Excellent Errol Barrow decolonized the politics; Owen Arthur decolonized the jurisprudence and Freundel Stuart is going to complete the process.”
    According to the country’s constitution, a two-thirds majority in parliament is needed to authorize the change. The Democratic Labour Party has a two-thirds majority in the Senate of Barbados but not in the House of Assembly where it would need the support of the opposition Barbados Labour Party to approve the transition. Mia Mottley, now the leader of the opposition, has not commented on the prime minister’s proposal,[however, the Barbados Labour Party has advocated the adoption of a republican system in the past when it was in power.
    In the event that Barbados becomes a republic, it will retain its membership of the Commonwealth of Nations.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Republicanism_in_Barbados

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  • ac;

    Thanks for the unembellished information.

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  • This was the question asked and to which Mia Mottley answered YES agreeing and passing as proposed law

    Do you agree with the recommendation of the Constitution Review Commission that Barbados should become a Parliamentary republic with the head of State of Barbados being a President who is a citizen of Barbados?
    

    Would be interesting to see how she unloaded this heavy watering bucket with pretentious attitude

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  • Political hacks will always twist bare facts even when obvious. A referendum was proposed and that is a fact.

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  • Sinckler does not ask the citizens before he imposes new taxes. … And the masses will pay.

    Other ministers insult the citizens on a daily base. … And the masses will be silent.

    The Central Bank and GOV are responsible for excessive food prices. … And the masses will pay in the supermarket.

    Why should their boss ask anybody if he wants to make a Banana Republic? … And the masses will obey.

    And so on and so on …

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  • The Fact being Mia said in no uncertain terms that barbados head of state should be a person of barbadian ancestry
    However in the face of mounting opposition by the BLP foot soldiers it would be of interest to see how if an when a vote is taken in parliament on the issue of Republic for Barbados if Mia would weak kneed and cow tongue to the anus of political yardfowlism or remain steadfast in her agreeing and presentation of her beliefs/reason/ on the issue of barbados becoming a Republic

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  • Well Well & Consequences2

    Yeah….now when will Freundel engage the people and ask their opinion and permission about Republic status.

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  • So wait AC…
    Are you telling us that Froon has gone ahead with the lotta shiite talk bout a republic (or the lotta talk about a shiite republic 🙂 ) …and that this is all conditional on the BLP giving him support in Parliament so that he can join Barrow and Arthur as luminaries…?

    You can’t be serious….
    Wuh only a simple minded, retarded, brass bowl would open themselves to such OBVIOUS embarrassment from their political enemies….. He would be setting himself up to be a laughing stock of biblical proportions…

    Unless of course this is all planned by the Eager Eleven …as their plan B…..
    Any bet Stinkliar and Pornville behind um…. LOL ha ha ha

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  • Bushtea;

    I think you might be partially wrong on this one! LOL.

    FS must have got inspiration and encouragement to be following the path you described from someone in the loop. Perhaps the eager 11 suggested a superficially feasible plan C, somewhat like the following, to him;

    Offer to elevate OSA to the presidency of the Republic to secure his vote since it might be thought that OSA might not budge unless he gets a really big inducement. FS might therefore have to settle for only the signal and lasting honour of delinking the monarchy from Barbados’ constitution, not the presidency.

    They would then only need to offer serious inducements to 3 or 4 of the current BLP MP’s to secure a 2/3 majority to pass the constitutional bar.

    Thus FS would make the putative Republican Pantheon complete; Barrow – the bringer of Independence, OSA – the delinker of our jurisprudence from Britain and Stuart – the ultimate delinker of the British monarchy from our Constitution.

    Plan C needs a bit of work but I think there are some elements in it that FS might be able to use to concretize his republican dreams for the Island.

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  • @are-we-there-yet

    And Agard Vice-President! 🙂

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  • Bit of wishful thinking for the Froon to think that after he lambasted the BLP in 2013 with his nasty rhetoric that they are going to help him write his name in history’s place.

    No, no……..the BLP will not help him………..he wants a legacy? His legacy will be that he was the WORST PM Barbados ever had.

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  • LOL @ AWTY
    You may be right.
    It would take an even higher level of idiocy for Froon to place OSA in the role of President…. after being on record for years cussing his ass all over Barbados…. but then again he made him adviser to his esteemed finance guru Stinkliar….

    Bushie can picture the new president now, ..drunk as a fish, and calling people in the early hours of the morning to ask back for the SIRs and other titles from those who pissed him off..

    YUP!!! sounds like the kind of plan we can expect from Froon and company…

    Like

  • Tron

    Now is the time for Agard to play her cards………….if I was her and they wanted my vote, I would play hardball!

    Like

  • Tron;

    I don’t think that Agard has enough leverage and gravamen to merit a Vice-president position at this time. I think also that such a position best suits an old man or woman. With her now sitting on a limb, ordinary inducements might do the trick.

    Prodigal son;

    While I agree with you that ordinarily it would have been anathema to even consider that the BLP could side with FS on this republican question, I somewhat sadly have to consider that many things have changed to the extent that one cannot be sure what people, and particularly politicians, will do under certain circumstances. Did you think that OSA would have wielded his cudgel with such intemperate violence against the BLP as he did last year? Did you think that he would ever sit on the edges of the DLP Government’s ministerial benches in the House? Did you think that OSA would sit so near to the people who “stripped him naked” on his return to the house after his first defeat by the DLP?

    I think it might be foolhardy to say as you have done “No, no……..the BLP will not help him………..he wants a legacy? His legacy will be that he was the WORST PM Barbados ever had”.

    He can’t erase the fact that he is indeed the worst PM that Barbados ever had but I think it is remotely possible that he could burnish his absymal prime ministerial performance by wheeling and dealing support for his republican dreams from former “enemies” like OSA.

    Like

  • ….. and Prodigal;

    Remember FS only needs to induce 4 BLP MP’s to vote with him on the republican matter. I suspect that there might well be 4 or more who, given the proper inducements, would claim with straight faces that since they had previously supported OSA’s republican thrust that they could not now, in good conscience, oppose it. I say 4, only because I would expect that to be the most likely stance of OSA, given his recent mouthings on reasons why he is so diametrically opposed to Mia Mottley.

    Like

  • Whoever the Pres will be:

    DLP has an outstanding record of creating new posts to get folks into their boat.

    Examples:
    – more and more embassies around the world = new ambassadors and staff, tax free everything
    – more and more constituencies = new MPs
    – more and more ministries = new ministers, new S1 and other staff
    – more and more judicial posts for daughters of former DLP politicians.

    I call that increasing the structural deficit.

    Like

  • talk all wunna want the BLP is locked stock and barrel into the Republic issue ,they would look like hypocritical blasted fools distancing themselves and their role in the quest for barbados to become a Republic

    Like

  • And Fruendel has the country talking Republic, not economy, not crime, not governance, not transparency legislation…

    Fruendel is a boss.

    Like

  • Well Well & Consequences2

    Distracting tactics which will of course return to bite Froon & Co in the ass.

    Like

  • @David @12:58am, that is not Stuart…Barbadians are much more comfortable arguing partisan politics than any matter of substance…on which there is the need for some thought and not mere knee-jerking!

    Like

  • @Jeff

    He is the political leader of the country and he is not leading.He is playing on the predilection of Barbadians JAs to go with the obvious.

    Like

  • BTW how many articles did BU post on the Republic story in less than a month? just asking and did FS entice ! coerce! or intimidate BU into posting those articles ?

    Like

  • You continue to be a JA.and a yardfowl supremo. Most if not all of the articles about Barbados going Republc submitted posted by members of the BU family NOT the BU household.

    On 11 January 2016 at 10:35, Barbados Underground wrote:

    >

    Like

  • OK My bad! BU did not play a partials role in driving the Republic issue therfore keeping it on the table ! soo sorry wrong website ! maybe ac meant BFP ,, My sincere apologies

    signed YARDFOWL extraordinaire

    Like

  • Caswell Franklyn January 9, 2016 at 9:30 AM #

    “Too many of our people can’t find food to feed their families, and now not even water, but the Government finds time and money to engage in frivolity (circus) using the pretext of the 50th anniversary of independence. The people love a fete and turned out in their numbers, maybe we like it so.”

    A few years ago the government built about ten stalls on the environs of the temporary Golden Square Market, in Probyn Street, which were to be used to by those individuals who remain operating food and drink stalls on the site of the demolished Fairchild Street Market.

    I sent BU photos of these stalls, some of which are being used as homes by vagrants, while others are being stripped of lumber, windows, doors and in some cases, fittings.

    ANOTHER EXAMPLE OF WASTING TAXES.

    Everything this government undertakes seems to be accompanied by a fete. A fete was used to give keys to tenants of newly built NHC houses (Alf Padmore was one of the tenants at that time).

    Like

  • are-we-there-yet January 9, 2016 at 3:47 PM #

    “Yesterday morning I heard the tail end of a report by David Ellis that appeared to have been a new Moody’s rating of Barbados’ economy. I have not seen anything of that report since then on any news cast. Did anyone hear the full report and is there a new rating for Barbados?”

    I read a small part of that report, which is dated December 17, 2015, and it began by stating: “Our assessment of Barbados’ economic strength considers the very low growth dynamics, small size, and limited diversification of the economy, which outweigh its relatively high GDP per capita ($ 16,183 in PPP terms in 2014).”

    It also mentioned that “the economy has virtually been stagnant.”

    Unfortunately, however, the document is locked and anyone who wants to access all the information contained therein, would have to purchase the report.

    Like

  • Well Well & Consequences2

    Yeah Alvin…pay some money and buy Moody’s latest report re Barbados’ ” punching above it’s weight” and the 2016 repercussions……yep….uhhhhhu

    Like

  • Artaxerxes;

    Perhaps you could post the URL on BU and some benefactor could get it from behind the pay wall and post the important extracts from it?

    Like

  • are-we-there-yet January 11, 2016 at 8:59 AM #

    The URL will have my personal information at the top of the page, since I have registered with Moody’s to receive certain articles and economic data. However, anyone could visit Moody’s website to seek the necessary information accordingly.

    Like

  • @Artaxerxes, my understanding is that Moody’s gave a credit opinion but has not taken a rating action. The thrust of the credit outlook is that the economy continues to underperform, which is why I regard with some scepticism the proclamations that we are on the path to growth. Increased tourist arrivals do not a recovery make. I too would be interested in seeing the full Moody’s credit opinion report and also look forward to the upcoming CBB’s review of the Barbados economy for 2015.

    Like

  • @ caribbeantradelaw

    Yes, the Moody’s opinion is not a credit rating and I too share your concern that an increase in tourist arrivals could be used as a basis to determine signs of economic growth. If we want to use this factor, since tourism is seasonal, then the growth supposedly measured will be short- term.

    The following excerpts were taken from January 7, 2016 edition of Caribbean 360:

    “………. debt in the Caribbean countries has generally trended upward over the past half-decade and now averages about 80 per cent of GDP, with Jamaica having the largest public debt at 131 per cent of GDP and Barbados the SECOND HIGHEST at 111 per cent; the AVERAGE FISCAL BALANCE DETERIORATED, estimated at -3.0 per cent of GDP for 2015, with the primary balance put at 0.3 per cent of GDP.”

    “Eight of the 13 countries in the region improved or saw little change during 2015, with the FISCAL BALANCE WORSENING in five, among them BARBADOS, Suriname and Trinidad and Tobago. Conditions on the financial markets are expected to toughen with reduced global liquidity and a gradual rise in the cost of raising funds on the international markets.”

    >

    Under these prevailing circumstances and given the above information, we are more caught up discussing Barbados becoming a “republic” and the yearlong 50th anniversary of independence celebrations, when the performance of the economy is much more important.

    It also begs the question if the economy is under performing, how does this affect the sustainability of these ventures?

    Like

  • Barbados foreign reserves fall…….Caribbean economic report newsletter

    http://goo.gl/iTrEMw

    Like

  • millertheanunnaki

    @ Vincent Haynes January 11, 2016 at 1:58 PM

    Barbadians should thank St. Matthew the patron saint of traders for the massive fall in oil prices during 2015.
    If not for free falling oil prices the spectre of devaluation would have been staring Barbados in its face with foreign reserves probably below the $200 million mark even with the help of the sale of the remaining NIS shares in the BL&P.

    Mighty King Oil is in need of a major war in the ME to put him back on the commodities market throne.

    Like

  • We all love our country so we have to be thankful that oil prices are so low (though we cannot see the benefits of it)………..otherwise Barbados would be in perpetual trouble.

    Thank God!

    The country is in trouble and one would think that any sensible responsible government would try to contain expenditure but no, no, no……….instead they embark on a year long spending spree to fete the starving masses!

    How sensible is that!

    Like

  • Miller yes barbadains are thankful unlike you and the other fourheaded blp beast who have been praying for a colassal devaluation of the barbados dollar. The next two years going to be better putting more heat and pressure on the blp who have yet to formulate any worthy solutions for the economy
    The masquerading of political antics as solution is not going to help the blp going into the next election.good luck bro the blp goose is overcooked

    Like

  • @millertheanunnaki January 11, 2016 at 2:34 PM #

    Chuckle…..Yes the Gods are smiling on this Govt.

    Like

  • Source: Broad Street Journal, January 8, 2016:

    The Caribbean Economic Report newsletter, published by RBC and compiled by RBC’s Group Economist Marla Dukharan, notes that Barbados’ reserves fell by 9.1% y/y to US$457 million – the lowest level in two years – which is estimated to be around 13 weeks of imports.

    According to the Caribbean Economic Report, the recent Central Bank (CBB) release has highlighted “the ineffectiveness of fiscal spending in generating sustainable growth, and the urgent need for public sector reform, shortly after Moody’s affirmed the B3 (NEG) rating in mi-December.”

    The Moody’s report on Barbados noted that “the consultative process surrounding Barbados’ consensus-based policymaking framework has made implementation of re-forms more challenging.” Moody’s added that “budget flexibility is constrained by entitlements and transfers to loss-making state-owned enterprises, as well as high and increasing debt service costs.”

    Moody’s added that although the government committed itself to fiscal consolidation, “we think their efforts will continue to be constrained by weak economic growth, difficulties in implementing further cuts to socially-sensitive spending, and a high interest burden.” As a result, Moody’s said its projection of the fiscal deficit was higher than the government’s, at between 5% and 6% of GDP in 2015/16. This, it said, would contribute to “the continued buildup of government debt, which we project will surpass 100% of GDP in 2015.”

    To the AC yard-fowls

    “The next two years (is NOT) going to be better putting more heat and pressure on the DLP who have yet to formulate any WORTHY SOLUTIONS for the ECONOMY,” as is evidenced by the successive credit rating downgrades and the recent Moody’s report.

    “The masquerading of political antics as solutions (e.g. the yearlong 50th anniversary of independence celebrations) is not going to help the DLP going into the next election. Good luck bro the DLP goose is overcooked.”

    Like

  • @Artaxerxes January 11, 2016 at 4:44 PM #

    “The next two years (is NOT) going to be better putting more heat and pressure on the DLP who have yet to formulate any WORTHY SOLUTIONS for the ECONOMY,” as is evidenced by the successive credit rating downgrades and the recent Moody’s report.

    “The masquerading of political antics as solutions (e.g. the yearlong 50th anniversary of independence celebrations) is not going to help the DLP going into the next election. Good luck bro the DLP goose is overcooked.”
    ……………………………….

    Artaxerxes

    I really admire you greatly. You can really take the ac’s apart using their own words!

    The DLP has been the government since 2008. They have completely wrecked the economy and eight years later they are still blaming the BLP yet they want the man they blame to come and help them. These morons are delusional.

    The foreign reserves have plummeted to $457 million. Not a word about this but they are talking foolishness that the BLP have not yet formulated any worthy solutions for the economy.

    Hey, morons, in case you did not notice, you are the government, not the BLP. Remember you told the BLP to keep any ideas “wunnah” got to “wunnah” selves.The BLP has Dr Clyde Mascoll and Ryan Straughn working hard and they will be the ones to painstakingly try to put this economy back together for the people of Barbados.

    ac’s, why not be honest for once and concede that you dems do not know what the hell you are doing…………..nothing you have tried has worked, we are at a standstill.

    Professor Michael Howard’s comments this weekend should wake you morons up that you are out of your depths!

    Like

  • One of the things that most concerns me is how on earth have our reserves continued to fall in the face of low oil/commodities prices and record tourist arrivals. It also concerns me that after years of usually getting my foreign exchange two-three weeks before I travel, the last two times I travelled (last month and in November), the banks I went to told me I had to wait until the week I was travelling before I could get USD, which I must say isn’t always convenient. I think there is a lot we the public are not being told and it is sad that too many Barbadians are allowing themselves to be distracted by the Republic proposals (which the Government has backtracked from) and the year-long 50th anniversary independence celebrations (another waste of taxpayers money) when we really do not know the true state of the economy.

    Like

  • @Alicia

    The banks have been placing those wanting to buy foreign currency on a list for some time now. Things are not as rosy as the PR machinery makes out.

    Like

  • @ David

    It’s interesting you and caribbeantradelaw mentioned the banks, David, and you writing: “Things are not as rosy as the PR machinery makes out.”

    How do either of you view the recent statements made by the managing director and chief executive officer of Republic Bank, Ian De Souza, relative to this island’s economic recovery and growth.

    While speaking to guest at reception at his Royal Westmoreland villa last week, De Souza predicted that “Barbados is on the road to recovery and should reach it “towards the end” of this year.” Ironically he was predicting economic recovery as far back as 2014.

    Is De Souza relying on the increased business his bank has received as it relates to the disbursement of loans and issuing of credit cards as a basis to determine economic growth?

    Yes, it means that people are spending in the economy, but this economic activity of relying on households to use loans and credit cards to spur economic growth results in high debt percentages to national income, and according to the IMF, it “would put the gradual recovery of the past five years in jeopardy.”

    Like

  • @Artax

    De Souza is the recipient of easy deals from government.

    Like

  • @Artax

    By the way, do you know o what basis is Donville Inniss forecasting 2% growth?

    Like

  • @ David

    I now understand why you mentioned: “Things are not as rosy as the PR machinery makes out.”

    Like

  • @ David

    I assumed Inniss’ prediction was based on a number of projects (which were listed in yesterday’s Sunday Sun) that are supposed to be undertaken, to resume this year, on hold, pending and out to tender. Listed among those projects are:

    ….. Sandals Barbados, phase 2
    ….. Beachlands
    ….. Luxury residences at the site of the Former Kings Beach Hotel
    ….. Hyatt Hotel
    ….. Waves Villa in St. James
    ….. Condominiums and villas at The Crane
    ….. Sandy Cove, phase 2
    ….. Regent villa and spa
    ….. Port Ferdinand
    ….. Le Meridien (Starwood) at the Pierhead

    Four Seasons Clearwater Bay is one of those projects listed “to start.” But judging from the track record of anything bearing the name “Four Season,” I’ll have to wait until it actually starts.

    Government projects listed as “pending” include the construction of a number of NHC starter homes and a NEW hospital.

    However, this is what Inniss had to say as reported in the January 7, 2016 edition of Barbados Today.

    http://www.barbadostoday.bb/2016/01/07/inniss-predicts-better-days-in-2016/

    Like

  • @caribbeantradelaw

    I do not wonder about the degrading FX reserves. There are two reasons in my opinion:

    1) The structural deficit in Bim caused by the public sector. They do not contribute to FX, but spend most of it.

    Read this = http://biba.bb/dont-bank-on-government-jobs/ Worrell copied my past contributions to BU!
    “Increasing the number of jobs in the public sector is more harmful than helpful to growing the Barbados economy. This was the position of the Central Bank Governor, Dr. Delisle Worrell, in a December 31st commentary on ‘The Future of the Barbadian economy’. Calling inefficiency in the public sector “the largest blot on the country’s competitiveness corecard”, Dr. Worrell said that “obstacles to growth” must be removed.
    “There will be dislocations in the transition to a higher growth path, which must be managed in a sympathetic way.” He said it is a “fallacy” that Government can grow the economy by expanding the public sector and creating more jobs. “Government employment does not generate any foreign currency,” he maintained. “The Barbados dollars the newly-hired workers earn go towards increasing total spending in the economy, which means that supermarkets must import more food, dealers must import more LPG, hairdressers must import more supplies and more people will be flying to New York to pack their Christmas barrels.” But this increased spending eats up the country’s foreign exchange reserves, says Dr. Worrell.

    2) Bim finances its long-term obligations by short-term loans (eg from NIS, Credit Suisse). Lots of banks crashed in 2007/08 due to this strategy.

    If the FX reserves vanish as in 2013 there will be no other Credit Suisse to bail us out. Only Poseidon can help then.

    Like

  • The region’s New Year Resolution should be to make integration of the Caribbean a reality – to let the strength of solidarity of one people conquer the weakness of separateness. It can never be too late to do what is right.”

    I wish the same.

    Like

  • “Mia Mottley, now the leader of the opposition, has not commented on the prime minister’s proposal,[however, the Barbados Labour Party has advocated the adoption of a republican system in the past when it was in power.”

    “Mia Mottley, who was Deputy Prime Minister of Barbados, said: “we feel that it is the right thing to do to have a Barbadian head of state. We accept that there was a concern that the Government alone should not make that decision in this day and age and we are therefore committed to expressing our views to the public and having them pass judgement on it.”

    Like

  • but I think it is remotely possible that he could burnish his absymal prime ministerial performance by wheeling and dealing support for his republican dreams from former “enemies” like OSA.

    Mr Stuart made it quite clear that politicians from both parties are not enemies because they belong to the political class. Cussing each other is all part and parcel of the political game.

    Like

  • Well Well & Consequences2

    Dumbville Inniss is a jackass, who would trust what he thinks he knows since he did not even know that the hoverboard that he was gliding around on last week, showing off his skills could literally blow up beneath his feet, it was reported worldwide since October or before, the defect in the hoverboard is deadly and there he is unaware and advertising..who would trust someone like that with their future, just to see it blow up under their feet…steupse.

    Like

  • Well Well & Consequences2

    Cariblaw….if you want to know what’s going on and what happened to the foreign exchange in the Central Bank just ask Bjorn Bjerkham, one of DBLP placed him there as a Director to do only they know what, as per usual am sure that too has returned and is biting them in the ass but they are too ashamed to say and are afraid the secrets get out to the public.

    Like

  • “The masquerading of political antics as solutions (e.g. the yearlong 50th anniversary of independence celebrations) is not going to help the DLP going into the next election. Good luck bro the DLP goose is overcooked.”

    Must admit that despite the downgrades and gloomy forecasts for over seven years; the economy has not collapsed and the reality of the situation up to now does not lend credence to that prediction but rather that things would continue to go merrily along as AC has been arguing.

    Like

  • The Banks have reason to smile because Bajans have been taking advantage of the “low” interest rates and taking out loans like hot cakes. Since the Banks no longer have to follow a CBB mandated minimum interest rate for savings deposit, they can afford to offer lower interest rates for loans for mostly consumption purposes. In regards to the stated projects, many of those had been in the pipeline for years. Until those projects start, I see no reason to celebrate. We’ll get some money trickling in from purchasers who buy off-plan but even so, the same happened with Four Seasons and look how that turned out….

    Like

  • @ balance
    Skippa, we fell off the cliff a while ago. the fact that things “would continue to go merrily along as AC has been arguing” just says that AC is a mindless yardfowl….

    You know the story of the fellow who fell off the roof …and was heard to say – while passing the 20th floor …. “so far so good…”

    AC’s big brother…. 🙂

    Like

  • There is the saying you never let a crisis go to waste. What structural changes have we made to the economy and OUR individual behaviours to learn from historical.

    Like

  • The more things change the more they remain the same.Mencea Cox is on record in 1937 lamenting the state of water delivery to Bajans living in the “country”.Grantley Adams called a select few who broke away to form the DLP a ‘pack ‘o wild boys’.
    Eric St John passed on and we hearing the voice of one braddie criticiising OSA when the same braddie ran off to Antigua when a crucial vote was before the House and the said OSA tried to reason with the loutish man to no avail….braddie,where is your integrity?

    Like

  • balance January 12, 2016 at 6:13 AM #

    “Must admit that despite the downgrades and gloomy forecasts for over seven years; the economy has not collapsed and the reality of the situation up to now does not lend credence to that prediction but rather that things would continue to go merrily along as AC has been arguing.”

    Perhaps you can inform me where in my contributions or the contributions of anyone who commented on the state of the economy, wrote anything to SUGGEST or PREDICT the ECONOMY will COLLAPSE.

    My friend, the ACs’ comments on the economy are not based on an understanding of economics, but are driven by their desire to defend the DLP’s economic policies, which is usually emphasized by political rhetoric.

    There are stark differences between an economy going through a recession and an economy collapsing. An economic collapse may occur in situations where an economy is experiencing a severe economic recession, which could prevail for a number of years. It can be caused by “crashes” in the financial market, stagnation or hyperinflation and may be accompanied by high increases in the level of poverty, civil unrest and severe economic depression. The “Great Depression” is a perfect example of an economic collapse.

    Under the prevailing economic environment, the Barbados economy is still experiencing the effects of the 2007 global recession. You must also take the economic cycle into consideration, which clearly illustrates an economy experiences fluctuations between periods of expansion and contraction.

    Like

  • @balance,

    The dems should thank the good Lord for the continuing fall in the price of oil. This is what saved the morons.

    Had the price of oil not fallen significantly, Barbados’ economy would have collapsed. With reduced revenue and high oil prices and with the morons continually spending more money that it receives, what do you think would be the state of this country’s economy?

    You would notice that they do not talk about blaming OSA now or “we inherited a mess”, they cannot play those cards any longer……………they have made such a mess that they have to take some responsibility for their mess.

    The governor was saying over the Christmas celebrations that Barbadians are better off today than in 2008………..yea, governor…………things are much, much better off for the likes of you , your driver, Froon, Stinkliar, Michael Lashley, Michael Carrington, Dennis Lowe, Steve Blackett, Stephen Lashley, Donville Inniss, Adriel Brathwaite, Darcy Boyce, Ronald Jones, Esther Byer Suckoo, Mara Thompson, Physical Deficit Ince, Todd, Harry Husbands, Maxine McClean, Irene Sandiford-Garner…………..the Sandals group, Mark Maloney, the Jada group Innotech group and all the dlp yardfowls who cater and get all the rest of the contracts …………….but not for the rest of us!

    Like

  • Thanks very much Arta for your enlightened response at 9.44 am ; so am I understand from your response then that our current state of affairs has nothing to do with mismanagement of the economy or bad governance but with the recession. Just want to be clear.

    Like

  • …………….”but not for the rest of us!”


    I do not agree with the Governor that things are better off now than in 2008 at least for me for I have been made to pay much more for goods and services with no concomitant increases in pension and though there has been no devaluation of the dollar in form there has been in substance since my dollar is worth much less than in 2008. Maybe I am naïve Mr Prodigal but like you I expected the economy to collapse based on the revelations of those who should know like for example Wild coot , Ryan Straughan, Dr David Estwick, Owen Arthur and the desperation measures employed by the Government which mostly affected those at the lower end of the social strata in more ways than one but honestly rather than the untold suffering I was expecting all I see is people feting more and more whether it is for free or payment.

    Like

  • Hmmmmm

    How can DESCRIBING the difference between an economic collapse and a recession be INTERPRETED as “…….so am I understand from your response then that our current state of affairs has nothing to do with mismanagement of the economy or bad governance but with the recession?”

    Sheesh, COMPREHENSION is a bitch.

    Like

  • “Sheesh, COMPREHENSION is a bitch.”

    It is, you know Arta, it is and I must admit it was not one of my strong points so I suppose that is why it is difficult for me to get you to comprehend that I am not questioning your erudite explanation of the difference between economic collapse and recession but is merely asking if in your view charges of mismanagement of the economy are no longer valid but rather the recession to blame. That is all. I respect your views because they are usually well researched and free of speculation.

    Like

  • Sir i am not an economist ! Neither I am not a Pessimist! my views are drawn from experiences of life entrenched with a philosophy ” no matter how high the tide one must keep swimming there is always a shore line on the other side “

    Like

  • I respect your views as well, since your comments are always, as your name suggests, balanced.

    No, I have not changed my views that this DLP administration’s economic policies are responsible for “our current state of affairs.”

    The government’s response to and their macroeconomic policies during the global economic crisis, made effects of the recession. Their “home grown” IMF policies were highly pro-cyclical and included measures such as tax increases and large cuts in public expenditure. With the economy remaining weak, such fiscal reduction could affect any prospect for economic recovery as well exacerbating the problem of public debt.

    The DLP’s own Dr. David Estwick publically admitted this fact and offered alternative solutions. His solutions were rejected by his own party, which is unfortunate, since the DEMS are always saying rather than being critical, we should “bring solutions.”

    Surely you have noticed a trend with this administration, especially when matters of the economy come to the fore. They distract many of us by holding some sort of celebration or highlighting issues such as Barbados becoming a republic.

    Could you imagine, Moody’s Investor Services gave an opinion about Barbados’ economy, which has not been made public as yet, we have learnt from other sources that our foreign reserves have declined, and we don’t find this much more important than discussing the republic nonsense. Okay, Barbados becomes a republic, buy the economy is in shambles, would the island be “better off?”

    Like

  • ac January 13, 2016 at 6:16 AM # Sir i am not an economist ! Neither I am not a Pessimist! my views are drawn from experiences of life entrenched with a philosophy ” no matter how high the tide one must keep swimming there is always a shore line on the other side “

    Wish you were fair enough to employ that philosophical approach when the BLP was in power. Your comments would carry more weight.

    Like

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