How to Change Education – from the ground up

You are invited to watch the video delivered by Sir Ken Robinson. He “addresses the fundamental economic, cultural, social and personal purposes of education. He argues that education should be personalized to every student talent, passion, and learning styles, and that creativity should be embedded in the culture of every single school.”

5 thoughts on “How to Change Education – from the ground up


  1. It is refreshing to listen to an academic who attempts to stimulate the thinking process. The BU household is absolutely up to here having to put up with the political BULL.


  2. This is an enlightening lecture that hits the listener between the eyes with the shortcomings of education methodologies in the industrialised world. Whilst the UK & US education structures are vast and will take time to dismantle and rebuild for the world we now live in, why can’t Barbados use one BIG advantage – our small size – to fast track changes that produce more creative and adaptable graduates?

    It seems to me that such changes would be good for teachers, students and the country. Alas our political system thrives on long talk and inaction, so I can’t see it happening unless and until we dismantle and rebuild our political structures. That requires brave and visionary leaders to step up, and there aren’t any of those around,.. unless someone knows different!


    • The poignant part of the lecture is when he refers to the creation of rock and roll which was not created by any minister of culture.


  3. @Chattel
    Question – “…….why can’t Barbados use one BIG advantage – our small size – to fast track changes that produce more creative and adaptable graduates?

    Answer – Teachers


  4. @Nostradamus

    If by “Teachers” you mean the people that sit in front of classes and follow the dictates of the MoE, then fair enough.

    I was hoping that a paradigm shift in policy might allow some proper teachers to emerge who know how to thrill students with the wonder of knowledge… I have this rose-tinted belief that lots of young teachers start with this mindset and get beaten into submission and mediocrity over their career.

    To be fair, there are some good teachers out there… can we please give them a chance to do a proper job with our kids?

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