22 thoughts on “Non Invasive Surgery: Using Focused Ultrasound And Magnetic Resonance Imaging


  1. Well Georgie Porgie for us the duncy can you elborate in a clear and precise layman terms what the Doc is explaining in the picture. I await your thorough explanation even though i am suspicious that the above comment was that of an imposter


  2. 1. As David said I DID POST
    2 As David said the doctor was very clear in what he said.
    3 @ AC I am sure you recall using a magnifying glass to focus the rays of the sun on a sheet of paper causing it to catch on focus. Similar thing is discussed here. That is the analogy I would use.


  3. @GP

    What is the significant of a second to treat the area identified in the brain as an example in the vid by sustain temperature of 50+ degrees.


  4. To david:
    This is simply a continuation of the developments in applied technology in medicine, but you need to check out what is being done in bio technology with the use of nano technology, the results could be less invasive than this. My disappoint is that he does not cite one case of an adverse effect; there must have been many during his experiments; the rise in the temperature of the liquid around the area of the operation is key and the limit of the duration of the sonic burst.


  5. Thanks Lemuel, it is the one area of concern which the video tosses up unanswered. How is the optimum time arrived at for the different procedures?


  6. To david:
    What happens is that at times technicians will be using two pieces of technology independently and one day something happens which shows the possibility of integration. This is what this seems to be. Few people know that is possible to actually cut solid objects by using water. When water is under pressure it can be very deadly; this may account for the devastation seen when tsunamis rush ashore at 300 hundred miles per hour. That technology is currently being used in factories. This technology has the potential to fry the brain or area that is being treated if the exposure to the sonic blast and mri focus is too long. Furthermore, those people with metal implants may not be able to use this technology because of the MRI, magnetic.


  7. Georgie Porgie.Why hasn”t BU hear much from you on such matter your input has been appreciated over the years enough though many of us in the duncy class never admitted it.


  8. “My disappoint is that he does not cite one case of an adverse effect; there must have been many during his experiments; the rise in the temperature of the liquid around the area of the operation is key and the limit of the duration of the sonic burst.”

    lemuel,

    There is only so much information you can squeeze into a 16 minute presentation. Dr. Medan (his D.Sc. and B.Sc. are both in engineering by the way) provides a science kit to accompany his presentation here… http://www.insightec.com/Science_Kit_TEDMED.html . You will find information on clinical trials, patient stories, peer reviewed articles etc. When thinking about adverse effects, you should keep in mind the risks associated with conventional invasive techniques… scalpel, laser, RF…

    “This technology has the potential to fry the brain or area that is being treated if the exposure to the sonic blast and mri focus is too long. Furthermore, those people with metal implants may not be able to use this technology”

    I am not sure why you would include “mri focus” in your concern about ‘frying’ the brain, but you are correct about the limitations of using mri where metal implants are concerned. There are also limitations imposed by bones and air ‘pockets’ which inhibit ultrasound and the additional challenge of focusing on moving organs. As far as ‘exposure’ times go, that is where the benefit of marrying MRI with ultrasound comes in. MRI provides real time visualisation and thermal feedback so the surgeon can continuously monitor targeted and surrounding tissue throughout the procedure down to 1mm resolution. This limit is imposed by the accuracy of the MRI, as focused ultrasound can be even more precise… here is an application with a focal point of 0.3 cubic mm… http://www.eyetechcare.com/uk/eye-1/eyeop12.html


  9. To Mock Engineer:
    Thanks for this information. My concern is the lack of these technical skills in Barbados. It seems to me at times that physicians are more involved in the technical side of these technical applications to medicine than they ought to be. Physicians do not have the time or patience to conduct health education sessions. Because of this patients do not fully understand what is being done to their bodies or why.

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