Republic of Barbados

Submitted by William Parker

Successive governments including the incumbent have teased Barbadians about transitioning to a republic. Now that we have witnessed the decommissioning of Nelson statue the question being asked is- are we there yet?

David, blogmaster

87 comments

  • Republic yes! Only if it comes with a warranty that the slavish and colonial minds of the vast majority of Bajans are also disabused.

    Otherwise it can have no meaning except for the engagement in the only industrial practice Bajan elites and minions so love – adding the title of “President” to the lexicon of repectability.

    Like

  • Steupse a long drawn out rabbit hole
    Right now govt only concern should be placing barbados on a path of economic sustainability
    wink wink talk about republic when as independent nation the whole country going to down hill faster than fast
    Yellow blue and black needs a good dress rehearsal and not one wrapped in the word Republic

    Like

  • That’s how nasty, petty and small minded DBLP are, spouting about republic for decades when in office and can create all kinds of scams to rob the treasury and pension fund, but once in opposition, the crab mentality sets in and they care even less about the bests interests of the Black population, everything becomes a pappyshow, while they play with the people’s minds and tje only goal is to tell enuff lies to be elected…

    …this dirty crowd still stinking up the haunted house gotta go, they rob the people, loose racists and thieves on them, they will create total havoc when they no longer have anyone to pass the blame to..when they commit their numerous crimes, they will see themselves now as the real slave masters….and go full blown criminal on the black populaion……Mia gotta go..

    Pacha ya right, the people on the island must rid themselves of the slave mentality and colonial bullshit that the more intelligent know is a fabrication of the same system that brutally enslaved their ancestors, , they’re the only ones who can emancipate themselves from mental slavery and free their own minds, but while transitioning, they will first they have to do something about the present sellout human rights violating government and their evil sidekicks in the tiefing social partnership….it’s now all in the people’s hands, they can SHUT all the minority businesses down PERMANENTLY, simply by not shopping with them for the next 5 years, by then they will get the message and all be gone, it’s beyond ugly how they robbed these people of their benefits…..with government’s collusion, cause government robbed the employees too…..viciously.

    Like

  • “Right now govt only concern should be placing barbados on a path of economic sustainability”
    Oh Rasshole, I dump my rum and water all over my sweater.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Northern.

    Satan lecturing sin pun being bad! 😂

    Like

  • @ chancellor David

    “My feeling is that money could be better spent building a polytechnic and community college in the north of the Island”.

    I concur…

    De former US Naval Facility 1957-1979/Temporary Prison

    Republic..

    A form of government in which the people or their elected representatives possess the supreme power
    a political or national unit possessing such a form of government
    a constitutional form in which the head of state is an elected or nominated president
    any community or group that resembles a political republic in that its members or elements exhibit a general equality, shared interests, etcthe republic of letters.

    Are we ready $ ?????

    Like

  • Before talking long winded nothingness about republic
    Mia better find an AG cause the murder rate keeps climbing and he is no where to be found near close to fifty deaths
    People bodies found in wells and gullies
    Republic where and when

    Like

  • The difference between a republic versus a democracy?

    The main difference between a democracy and a republic is the extent to which the people control the process of making laws under each form of government. A voting majority has almost unlimited power to make laws.

    Are we ready ???

    Like

  • The republic idea sounded real possible if they could get their STICKY FINGERS on 50 billion dollars of reparations money on the spirits of our brutalized ancestors…….ah guess it don’t sound so possible anymore……..🤣🤣😂😂🤣🤣

    they must think our ancestors went somewhere..

    Like

  • When people withhold spending power, they break companies. Black Friday sales in US was a bust today, totally unheard of, but Black Americans are buying Black , so they are screwed anyway , a good position to take if yall want to get rid of the minority parasites in Barbados and their nasty ways, shut them down.,

    Like

  • It is going to interesting to ‘see’ if the current administration- which has unilaterally announced its intention (without referendum) to go the republic route, banana or otherwise- will be awarding any knighthoods and dame-hoods for this year’s Independence celebrations.

    Why award a monarchical sounding title this year which would only make the person parading like a monkey in the uniform of a new banana republic look like a genuine small-island assho**le still expecting to be addressed as Lord Sir Jack Elliot and Lady Madam Jenny Miller?

    Under the new republic will the senior officers in the RBPF and the BDF be ditching in the Constitution river their royal pips and monarchical medallions which currently bedecked their uniforms?

    Why no re-label the ‘dying’ Queen Elizabeth hospital the Nita Barrow Memorial Medical Care Centre or rename it in republic style recognition of the ‘sterling’ contribution of some other outstanding Bajan medical practitioner, be it nurse or doctor.

    Like

  • Miller
    Republic would not necessarily mean the end of the demand and awarding of colonial socalled honours.

    There will be no Barbados without them.

    Like

  • Ah haven’t heard anything about republic since the reparations BUST…lol

    Miller….we shall see, am still waiting to hear Prof. Shillary..

    Like

  • @JohnA
    had to put the sweater in the wash lol….that aside, I like the sport, it is an unknown level of hypocrisy.
    @HA will tell ya I don’t like her politics. But its too sweet. And she provides a few gems occasionally.

    Like

  • ?

    “Why no re-label the ‘dying’ Queen Elizabeth hospital the Nita Barrow Memorial Medical Care Centre or rename it in republic style recognition of the ‘sterling’ contribution of some other outstanding Bajan medical practitioner, be it nurse or doctor”.

    The name:

    Queen Elizabeth Hospital will be something of forgotteness

    Our National Hospital will be: Ernest Deighton Mottley Medical University Hospital.

    On the date of selection???

    Like

  • no offence but… 280,000 on 431 km² becoming independent is no big deal

    Like

  • Any man who drinks rum and.water cannot be a logical or critical thinker
    A real man either goes on the rocks or a mixture of coke
    But rum and water lol i just fell.off my chair dying wid laughter

    Like

  • “Any man who drinks rum and.water cannot be a logical or critical thinker. A real man either goes on the rocks or a mixture of coke.”

    @ NorthernObserver

    Whenever I ask Mariposa anything, it seems not only to upset her, but other people as well. So, to avoid any conflict, I decided to take up this issue with you instead.

    When people say they want a rum, scotch, gin, vodka etc, ‘on the rocks,’ it usually means they want the beverage served with ice ONLY.

    I’m trying to understand something here. Lets assume, as Mariposa suggested, you decided to sip shot of Old Brigand ‘on the rocks,’ which, I’m sure you’ll agree, is essentially rum and frozen water.

    When the ice melts, even if you decide to add more ice or not, doesn’t your drink become rum and water?

    At this stage, do you lose your status of being a “real man” and ability to “be a logical or critical thinker?”

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Artax
    ac can provide a few gems. This last one, is one of those gems. Too, too sweet. You simply cannot make this stuff up.

    Liked by 1 person

  • A good initiative to attempt to get into the heads of the young ones.

    Mia tells students of leadership roles
    Head boys and head girls from 85 public and private primary and secondary schools have been told of the importance of their leadership roles.
    This was the advice of Prime Minister Mia Amor Mottley yesterday as the children were presented with their badges in a ceremony at the Gymnasium of the Garfield Sobers Sports Complex.
    Wear with pride
    Telling the children to wear the badges with pride, she said: “Long after all of us are gone, I want you all to remember this moment. Leadership is at all levels in this society, not just at Prime Minister.”
    Mottley said that “leaders insist that the right things must be done”.
    Minister of Education Santia Bradshaw, in addressing the audience that included Members of Parliament (MPs), senators, parents and education officers, told the new “leaders” to “write a different narrative”.
    “We see you as the future of the country. We have seen negative behaviours and images in the schools and that isn’t all that can come out of schools. We the leaders of the nation have to inspire you to be the change we need,” she said.
    The students were presented with their badges by various MPs after knocking elbows with Mottley and Bradshaw.
    The near two-hour ceremony saw performances by Dominic Brathwaite and De Mighty Bit Bit. (NS)

    Liked by 2 people

  • https://barbadostoday.bb/2020/11/28/university-professor-says-accountability-lacking-in-caribbean/

    “Professor Alleyne said while the Barbados Labour Party administration recently made an attempt to pass integrity legislation, it was unfortunate it was foiled.

    He predicted that legislation would be brought up at the next election.

    “It was a bold attempt to implement legislation, because every time corruption comes up it is when there is an election. A year or so after, nobody is interested in the corruption anymore so it becomes a political tool,” Professor Alleyne said.

    “As life would have it, in August 2020 it was defeated. I guess it will probably come back up around election time.”

    The game and it’s outcome are known, but it will still be played. 2023, 2028, …

    Liked by 1 person

  • Has John Beale statednanything new we have not aired in this space?

    Liked by 1 person

  • I love Mottley long winded speeches not only do they provide comedic relief but they also tickle my funny bone
    Hee hee
    Now on to the business of leadership
    Mottley has been a member of Parliament ever since Eve was a gal
    She knows all the ins and outs of govt
    Yet for the life of me i am yet to see her leadership directed by moral persuasion
    The Nelson Statue comes to mind for within the removal was pomp and festivity no chastising of Nelsons wrong doings on slavery
    BLM comes to mind her words indicative to represent that the issue did not called for retribution
    The workers severance pay comes to mind
    Toni Moore being placed as a govt minister when her purpose as Union Head would have been better served absent of full-fledged govt intrusion
    Allowing COVID to enter barbados shores as an alternative to building the economy
    Homosexual Unions
    Tax waivers for the wealthy

    Liked by 1 person

  • John Beale is an honorary diplomat, interfering with the internal affairs of Barbados. He should be called in by the foreign minister and given a good talking to or, preferably, the government of Belize should be asked to withdraw his honorary position. Bet you nothing will happen.
    He is not the first; we had that Guyanese guy, I think his name was Faria, who got involved in all kinds of things. We are incompetent, the state has failed and it will all end in tears.

    Like

  • How do you know the details of the protocol guiding the accreditation of Beale?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Dont know whether Beale should have kept mouth shut or opened but this i know Commisiong opened his mouth and said this
    Xxxcccc

    Regarding Beale’s belief that Mottley should reduce her 24-member Cabinet, Comissiong added: “The test of whether a Government minister is justified is whether that minister is giving value for money. If that minister is producing and delivering something of value to the nation that justifies the expenditure on the minister. That should be the test you apply, not simply a question of numbers

    Commissiong words are appropriate to say the least which fits Commissiong like a glove
    In the two years of which Commisiong has been part of govt he has collected a salary for doing nothing

    Liked by 1 person

  • https://barbadostoday.bb/2020/11/28/legal-changes-to-govern-lawyers/
    (The truth is… First, I want back my money/property and then you can penalize the lawyer. I don’t want him/her resting up in jail planning how to spend my money when released. Claw back ill gotten gains)

    BT
    “There are, however, some challenges that we have to address and the Chief Justice has opened up discussions with me about bringing some much needed amendments to the Legal Professions Act so that we could more swiftly and more effectively deal with lawyers who run afoul of the code of conduct and in particular those who use their client’s monies,” Marshall said.

    “I expect that we will be giving some priority to making the necessary amendments to the Legal Professions Act, which, truth be told, is in serious need of being modernized and being made more responsive to the needs, not just of the lawyers but to the needs of clients and the community that they serve.”

    Like

  • @ Hal
    John Beale should be dismissed/removed immediately. And then you have Mottley’s chief defender , Ambassador David Commissiong stepping in critiquing John Beale;two ambassadors expressing disagreement in public. This is who we are. Pure nonsense.
    Peace

    Liked by 1 person

  • @William

    Out of curiosity, who is the sending state?

    Who should dismiss Beale?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @David : ” A good initiative to attempt to get into the heads of the young ones.” Good , yes. Initiative(new/start) maybe not.
    The Hindsbury Primary School recently installed 32 prefects.

    From an enrolment of 366 at the all-girls school, this group of young leaders, along with their teachers, will be promoting high standards and discipline at the school.

    ​After receiving their badges, the new prefects pledged before their principal, teachers, parents and well-wishers to “honour and uphold the school rules” and assist teachers in developing and maintaining discipline amongst the pupils.

    Corporate communications administrator with the Barbados Light & Power Company, Jackie Marshall-Clarke, was the keynote speaker and encouraged the children to strive every day to be at their best.

    With the theme Pushing The Boundaries Of Excellence, Marshall-Clarke said good habits and a positive attitude were major drivers in achieving excellence.

    “Actions become habits and excellence emerges as a result of your actions performed well and consistently over time,” she said.

    Principal of the school Nola Cummings-Lewis congratulated the parents first of all on the achievement of their children.

    ​“The good work and good habits being recognised today must have started at home.

    ​“We support this and ask that parents continue to work with their children to develop habits that will shape their future,” she said.

    Included in the young leadership team, were head girl, Makayla Carrington and deputy head girl, Kianna Mason.

    Along with the other prefects, their responsibilities will include assisting with lunch-time supervision and becoming a “big sister” to other students. (PR)
    Nation Newspaper October 24th,2014

    Liked by 2 people

  • @Artax
    I was once told if rum was made for children it would have in sweet drinks. So, rum and anything is for children. Real men go straight up !
    Peace

    Like

  • @WS
    Very Good…
    🙂 But highly offensive to a man who believes the God rested on the seventh day with a rum and coke.

    Now I may have offended GP
    🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ William

    We do not even understand the common rules, In fact, the Barbados government should not even have to demand he be removed, that should automatically be done by the Belize government.
    It comes back to competence and failure. Beale could not have done that in any developed country unless he had his bag packed.
    In fact, I cannot understand how a former Barbados diplomat could turn up as an honorary diplomat for another country.
    Tomorrow is independence day, after 54 years we know even less than we did all those years ago. @William, ignore the apologists. Stupidity knows no bounds. Plse remind me: is Beale a black man? Don’t answer. I know.

    Like

  • You are clawing back now that Mia should dismiss Beale?

    How dishonest.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ David #2 A good initiative to attempt to get into the heads of the young ones.” Good , yes. Initiative(new/start) maybe not.
    Prefects get leadership training
    Article by
    nationnews
    Prefects get leadership training
    Share
    THIS YEAR, the students were in control of the annual prefects’ seminar.

    President of the Barbados Association of Principals of Public Secondary Schools, Vere Parris, said the decision had been taken for the prefects to have key roles this time around to give them added life experience as young leaders.

    “This year the format is somewhat different as it is being led by the prefects and not the prefect masters. We believe there is a lot to be gained from young leaders of Barbados coming together to exchange ideas, network and learn from others who can inspire them,” he said.

    The event included remarks from Parris, the feature address by managing director of the Freemind Institute Errol Griffith and a series of group sessions. (CA)

    Nation newspaper October 15th 2014

    PS I know some guys who are into coffee makers. They are always buying the latest with the newest gadgets attached. They always say they have the newest with the latest “bells and whistles”. I never heard them talk about if the quality of the coffee had improved. Becareful with bells and whistles my Dearest David , concentrate on the quality of the product. Students need environmentally healthy schools and the poorest still need tablets. But right now MPs handing out prefect badges is really about the latest bells and whistles.
    Peace

    Liked by 1 person

  • You are so dumb. I believe that English is a foreign language to you. Mia cannot sack Beale because she does not employ him. He is an honorary Belizean diplomat; and the foreign minister can request that he be withdrawn by the Belize Government, or remove him from the country, not sack him.
    Alternatively they can call him in and give him a rollicking. This is clarity for the blog, not for the chairman who would not understand in a month of Sundays.

    Like

  • @WS
    Very good.
    You are shiwingt great form early in the day.

    Like

  • Kiss to you.

    Lots of love.

    #onbehalfofthebuhousehold

    Like

  • Remove John Beale from the country?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Typo looks like an insult.
    “You are showing great form today “

    Like

  • RE Remove John Beale from the country?

    WHY? IS HE NOT A BAJAN? IS THIS STATEMENT AND THOUGHT NOT RANK RACISM
    HOW IS HE DIFFERENT TO THE SLIME AND SCUM THAT LEADS THE COUNTRY. AND SOME HERE THAT THINK THEY ARE IMPORTANT?
    MUST WE ALL SAY WHAT YOU THINK?
    IS HE NOT ENTITLED TO AN OPINION JUST BECAUSE HE IS WHITE?
    YOU THINK JOHN BEALE CARES ABOUT WUNNAH?

    WHAT HE SAID WAS TRUE

    Like

  • There you go, John Beale is an old Lodge boy.

    Like

  • I KNOW THAT………. SO WHAT ? “EVEN” LODGE BOYS ARE BAJANS (L0L).
    PK CHELTENHAM WENT TO LODGE TOO
    I HAVE A BROTHER WHO WENT TO LODGE

    Like

  • See this comment posted earlier by the man from the Covid 19 infested country across the pond.

    You are so dumb. I believe that English is a foreign language to you. Mia cannot sack Beale because she does not employ him. He is an honorary Belizean diplomat; and the foreign minister can request that he be withdrawn by the Belize Government, or remove him from the country, not sack him.
    Alternatively they can call him in and give him a rollicking. This is clarity for the blog, not for the chairman who would not understand in a month of Sundays.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Hal
    No need to combat the Blogmaster. He’s a really nice guy, not dumb at all, he just loves his country more than anybody else.
    @ TheOGazerts
    We need to discuss our major export product more. Rum . Its the only thing we , who think for ourselves , have in common with some on BU. We drinkit , they drink it. @ Austin promotes gin ! oh well…….or were you referring to the bells and whistles on the coffee maker ?
    Peace

    Like

  • Rum production and distribution in the main is not controlled by Barbados concerns.

    Like

  • So at what is usually one of the proudest moments of a young person’s life they are told don’t tief or else.

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2020/11/28/lawyers-who-break-bond-of-trust-will-get-no-sympathy/

    Like

  • Apologies to the BU for straying out of the lane but I have strong feeling about the issue of Client funds.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David BU
    Normally I would recuse my self from commenting on this posting; but pray tell:
    What do Mr. Beale’s nationality,colour of skin, and alma mater have to do with his expression of views in a democratic country such as Barbados?

    Like

  • @Vincent

    Colour – nothing. It was brought up by people who are always shouting that Barbados is racist.

    Alma mater – it was injected to support the point he was schooled in BIM and how would Mia be able to toss a bona fide Bajan out of the country.

    Liked by 2 people

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David Bu
    Thanks on two counts. Wuh Loss!!

    Like

  • FWIW I agree with Beale, as “David” wrote he hasn’t said anything that hasn’t been said multiple times on this blog, he is a Bajan and entitled to his opinion like everyone else. I don’t know anyone who can support the large number of cabinet ministers with a straight face. One of the first acts of the PM amounted to a betrayal of the electorate who were supposed to fall for the “many hands make light work” tripe from a PM who when in opposition was very critical of the governing party for its number of ministers.

    Like

  • “How in God’s name can you have CARICOM that changes management every six months?” Beale queried.”

    Beale must be drinking too much, why would he want any of these small minded PMs sitting between the Caricom chair and the Bureau for more than increments of six months to corrupt it..

    notice the new CJ is not telling the older lawyers not to tief, they play that game everytime there is a new batch of lawyers…yet the older ones are exposed right through the year for tiefing client funds or sabotaging their cases.

    Like

  • In the current ” bloated ” cabinet some ministers are just over paid ineffective de facto civil servants obstructing competent Permanent secretaries from doing their jobs.

    Like

  • @ Mr. Skinner

    It may be true ‘real men go straight up.’

    This is NOT a reference to you, but I’ve seen several ‘real men….. and women’…. go straight up from the rum bottle and directly into the stomach. And, when those two meet, a battle ensues. It’s not usually a ‘pretty sight.’

    Like

  • Q Beale must be drinking too much, why would he want any of these small minded PMs sitting between the Caricom chair and the Bureau for more than increments of six months to corrupt it..

    A HE IS OBVIOUSLY THINKING ABOUT STABILITY……….WOULD YOUR LIFE BE STABLE IF YOU GOT A DIFFERENT MAN EVERY SIX MONTHS?……….WOULD YOU NOT BE CONSIDERED A WHORE AS EXIBITED BY CARICOM that changes management every six months?

    BEALE IS NOT STUPID JUST BECAUSE HE WHITE…..IS HE?

    Liked by 1 person

  • RE I’ve seen several ‘real men….. and women’…. go straight up from the rum bottle and directly into the stomach. And, when those two meet, a battle ensues. It’s not usually a ‘pretty sight.’

    THIS PRACTICE OF THE USE OF ETHANOLIC IMBIBATION FOR GASTRIC LAVAGE IS AN EXCELLENT PRECURSOR FOR PANCREATITIS AND CARCINOMA OF THE PANCREAS

    Liked by 1 person

  • “Apologies to the BU for straying out of the lane but I have strong feeling about the issue of Client funds.”

    Apologies not needed.

    Thinking that you have put away enough to have a comfortable retirement and then have someone shave off a big percentage would give rise to strong feelings.

    We don’t want to hear “don’t steal”, “penalties” and of some fund that don’t have enough to make one victim whole..
    Trinidadians call that a pappyshow

    Liked by 1 person

  • There was a time I would have advise a young man to look elsewhere if he is being frustrated. I have changed my advice…
    Hang in there, no matter how tough
    Get big ass pockets
    Make some political connections
    Don’t be boastful, loud or obnoxious.
    When your time comes, if it is not nailed down put it in your pocket.

    Like

  • Obviously, with a 30-0 win, Mottley had to find ‘some work’ for the majority of her newly elected members of parliament. She knew the public would remind her that, as opposition leader, she often criticised the size of Stuart’s Cabinet and would similarly criticise the size of her Cabinet.

    It’s all about political strategy. Recall a few days after the election, she and Marshall appeared before the press, waving about documents and sharing information to suggest the former DLP administration left the social and economic affairs of Barbados in such dire straights that she needed ‘all hands on deck’ to rectify the situation, hoping Barbadians would buy into the narrative.

    So, we all know the “many hands make light work” tripe” is only a political gimmick to justify her bloated Cabinet.

    Like

  • @William

    You owe me a drink. I do not promote gin; I drink it. But you are right about rum being our only international product. The reason why our governments, tourism officials and professional middle classes do not promote rum is because it is a manufactured product. They prefer services, and not just services, but some services.
    They live in a dream world. First, we need a legal definition of Barbadian (Bajan) rum, then we can talk about training staff and setting up distilleries. It does not appeal to the lawyers who think they are on par with others.

    @William
    There is another myth that if you were born in a country you cannot be deported from that country. Nonsense. International law states a person cannot be deliberately made stateless. There is a difference.
    One such case is now going through the high courts in London. Tell that to home secretary Priti Patel.

    Like

  • .”WOULD YOUR LIFE BE STABLE IF YOU GOT A DIFFERENT MAN EVERY SIX MONTHS?”

    looks like you’re drinking too…none of that works in SLAVE SOCIETIES..

    Like

  • WURA-War-on-UNovember 28, 2020 1:02 PM

    ARE YOU STUPID?
    CANT YOU UNDERSTAND THAT I AM SAYING THAT YOUR LIFE WOULD NOT BE STABLE IF YOU GOT A DIFFERENT MAN EVERY SIX MONTHS?”
    CANT YOU UNDERSTAND THAT MY ANALOGY WAS AN ILLUSTRATION?
    FYI I DONOT NOW DRINK , NOR DID I EVER START

    Like

  • “The reason why our governments, tourism officials and professional middle classes do not promote rum is because it is a manufactured product. They prefer services, and not just services, but some services.”

    Yet we have a whole Food and Rum Festival. SMFH!

    Like

  • GP…keep ya drawers on, wuh happen, things slow at the WH…

    Like

  • HOPE BARBADOS DOESN’T BECOME A BANANA REPUBLIC LIKE NORTH KOREA

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    Kim Jong-Un is reportedly displaying ‘excessive anger’ over the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic, ordering the execution of two people

    North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is said to be angry about the coronavirus pandemic and its economic impact, South Korea’s spy agency said on Friday.

    According to the Associated Press, Kim has ordered the execution of at least two people, locked down the capital of Pyongyang, and implemented other measures to slow the spread of COVID-19.

    One of the two people who were executed was a well-known money changer in Pyongyang, who was reportedly blamed for North Korea’s falling exchange rate.

    North Korea’s economy has suffered in recent months as the country was forced to seal its border with its biggest trading partner, China, back in January.

    According to The Associated Press (AP), Kim is also said to be ordering “irrational measures” to slow the spread of COVID-19, including ordering the execution of at least two people, banning fishing at sea, and locking down the capital, Pyongyang.

    The latest information from the Hermit Kingdom comes from South Korean lawmakers, who spoke to reporters on Friday after having a private meeting with the National Intelligence Service (NIS), the country’s chief intelligence agency.

    The NIS reportedly informed officials that one of the two executed people was a well-known money changer in Pyongyang, who was reportedly blamed for North Korea’s falling exchange rate.

    Kim also implemented a ban on fishing to stop seawater from being infected with the virus, the NIS said.

    https://www.yahoo.com/news/kim-jong-un-reportedly-displaying-170526831.html

    Like

  • Kim sounds frustrated, guess North Korea is not on anyone’s travel list..

    Like

  • Commisiong got some real hard knocks against his big egotistical head for criticizing Beale words of truth
    Couldnt help but throw a few punches against his big head
    The nerve of Commisiong running to the media to defend govt extra large cabinet after two years of him doing nothing whilst holding the title of Caricom Ambassador
    As a matter of fact he owes the treasury a refund

    Like

  • @ Hal
    I owe you a drink , you don’t promote GIN You just it. My apologies. Name the place and time. Are we doing Roebuck orGeorge Street bar?I have good friends in both places. 😊

    Like

  • Open for foreign investment, says Toppin
    Minister of International Business and Industry Ronald Toppin says Barbados is keen to welcome new foreign investment despite the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic and monitoring by international bodies.
    Last week he issued an invitation to Scotland businesses to invest in Barbados, adding the hope was that some of the digital nomads here on a Barbados Welcome Stamp visa would eventually transition to become business owners here.
    He was speaking at the opening of a virtual Scotland trade mission.
    Toppin said the 12-month Welcome Stamp “has proven to be very popular with the international business community and is a signal that Barbados is so much more than a leisure destination”.
    “As a result of the Stamp, our real estate sector is enjoying healthy traction and there is an open invitation to our nomads to transition and establish businesses of substance in Barbados, further contributing to the country’s development,” he told officials, including Scotland’s Minister of Trade, Investment and Innovation Ivan McKee.
    “Ours remains a welcoming climate in which to live, work, play and invest. Our borders have never closed and we are very
    much open for business.”
    Toppin said Government was “extremely desirous of attracting foreign direct investment and actively seeks to encourage businesses of substance to establish here. The opportunity to engage in partnerships and joint ventures is also a feasible option.
    “Our vision for future investment is to build world-class financial platforms and services in several new areas, including medicinal cannabis, e-health, e-education, the management of life sciences, culinary sciences, robotics, retirement villages, data and cloud engineering, FinTech, cybersecurity and an increased menu of exports.”
    “Our aim is to become a leading hub for experiments, for pilot and scale ideas, while seeking to attract investment that helps to propel the continuous pursuit of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.”
    He noted that in spite of Barbados’ reputation for transparency, judicious governance and compliance, the country, like a number of similar jurisdictions, “has found itself under the monitoring regime of international organisations which on occasions impose stringent judgements on global financial centres and tax jurisdictions.
    “Nonetheless, Barbados has been resilient in attaining the requirements of the consortium of international financial regulators as it diligently presses to maintain its image as a globally competitive and compliant jurisdiction.”
    (SC)

    Like

  • Culture is our greatest export
    A lotta tings I been tru To express myself, and hold a meds and sing tune What you allow will continue Believe in yuhself, trust de instincts dat in you Chief Diin, “Believe in Myself”

    These lyrics from Bajan dancehall artiste Chief Diin, could speak on behalf of the entire Caribbean.
    The product of its turbulent history is a rich, vibrant and dynamic culture that has impacted and continues to impact the world in a way that is beyond its small size. Where the Caribbean has truly punched above its weight is in the arts and culture.
    And yet it is doubtful that the region has truly reaped the full economic and social rewards of its innovation in this area. Far less, has it reached its full artistic and cultural potential.
    Culture is the Caribbean’s greatest export. It is not sugar, ganja or tourist memorabilia that leave these seas and uniquely influence the rest of the world. It is the Caribbean vibe, which travels in vessels of music, dance and style. But a look at Caribbean cultural policy and the region’s handling of the so-called creative industries would not necessarily tell you that.
    A survey of the Caribbean public’s attitudes to the role of art may not reflect this reality.
    And so we export culture practically for free. In fact, possibly at a loss. This should come as no surprise. We farm sugar and lose money to export it so that foreign companies can use it as a raw material in value-added products to be resold to us at a profit.
    We spring the raw talent and potential of a Bob Marley or Rihanna, for them to be exported and repackaged overseas to build up other people’s industries and culture. From reggae to RiRi, we produce only to lose out to others who are ready to value and reap what we take for granted.
    We have to stop undervaluing our own cultural and artistic ingenuity.
    Too often, we don’t appreciate our own till someone else does. I remember meeting an American journalist who came to Barbados to
    research spouge after being amazed by Lew Drayton, of the Draytons Two.
    Drayton had opened for a reggae artist in the United States. Little did this journalist know that he was coming to retrieve spouge from an overflowing, Bajan cultural waste bin.
    I’ve been told that at one time spouge was rocking the entire Caribbean.
    It seems that we didn’t believe in ourselves and the instincts within us.
    So, we threw spouge away.
    Chief Diin goes on to sing, Let me down when I wanted
    support
    I stand firm and never fold Because I believe in myself
    The arts and cultural industries of the Caribbean need support but have been let-down by governments and private sectors which failed to see the wisdom and vision of investing in them. Narrow numbers based economics cannot account for the power of intangible heritage.
    It takes a deep sense of identity to invest emotions or capital into works of art when immediate profit is not sure. Modern day pirates and plantation owners of the Caribbean are only interested in the booty of sure votes or a quick turnaround on investment.
    On this eve of Independence, there are signs for hope. Prime Minister Mia Amor Mottley expresses a deeper understanding of the importance of art and culture to self-image and the relationship between national selfimage and societal progress than previous leaders.
    It is an understanding that is rare in an age where so many only seem to understand dollars and cents. The National Cultural Foundation is harnessing the disruption of COVID19 to explore new avenues of cultural development.
    Barbados is full of artists who stood firm and never folded despite the lack of support, who’ve supported and shaped national consciousness often without reward. They’ve been independently Bajan all the while, inspiring
    us to believe in ourselves as Barbadians and as Caribbean people.
    They are ready for the nation to be ready for them.
    Adrian Green is a communications specialist. Email: Adriangreen14 @gmail.com

    Like

  • Barrow’s legacy: the two-party system
    By Ezra Alleyne
    The celebration of Independence which Errol Barrow brought to Barbados is as good a time as any to reflect on aspects of the two-party system which he helped to bequeath to Barbadians.
    When Barrow and his breakaway colleagues from the then ruling Barbados Labour Party (BLP) formed the Democratic Labour Party (DLP) in 1955, the seeds of two-party democracy were well and truly planted. It is a major part of the Barrow legacy that the DLP has done so well enough to have survived for 65 years.
    Free secondary education and tertiary level education established within the first five years of Barrow’s tenure of office were potent fertilisers of support for our democracy. The founding of CBC radio and television station soon deliberately followed. Communication was a key aspect of a true democracy. So too, was an informed electorate.
    In 1976, when he accepted the people’s verdict and ceded office to Tom Adams, political analysts could glowingly contrast Barrow’s mature sobriety, with the power-drunk attachment to high office of some global leaders.
    Having regained office as Prime Minister in the 1986 election; his death in June 1, 1987 was a body blow to Barbados. It shook his beloved DLP to its foundation. The aftershocks have not yet subsided.
    Barrow’s directive
    A few months before his untimely death, Barrow did say that after him it was Lloyd Sandiford and after Sandiford it was Philip Greaves, and thereafter any number could play. Barrow was a clear far-sighted thinker and he must have been wondering how his party would have fared after his death.
    I suspect however he would now be pleased that the Prime Ministers from the younger brigade of BLP leaders have embraced two of his more progressive and uplifting flagship policies, namely tuition free tertiary level education and restriction of the fiscal deficit to small and controllable percentages of GDP.
    Equally, he would be shocked that the two DLP regimes that followed his time in office, have failed to manage the economy in such a manner that they could have maintained these policies which are clearly in the national interest but that the BLP leaders have succeeded in doing just as he did.
    But then he would simply remind us all that as he often said, there is no copyright in a political idea, and that a policy, if beneficial to the nation, can be adopted by any party.
    The truth is that any seriously reflective analysis of the Sandiford and David Thompson/Freundel Stuart regimes have left many of Barrow’s fellow Barbadians wondering loudly about the DLP, and trying to work out how and if it can bounce back, after the red wash election defeat in which all seats were won by the BLP.
    The first point of departure for any analysis would have to be the accession to the leadership after Barrow’s death. It was a matter on his mind. Barrow’s judgement was impeccable. Sandiford was the best choice to succeed and his election victory in 1991 confirmed his genius. But the seeds of the 1994 destruction (and the red wash too) had been sown right from the day of Barrow’s death.
    Questions were raised about Sandiford’s appointment. Nobody, not even perceptive rivals like Dr Richie Haynes and Branford Taitt ever came under starter’s orders. There were no leadership stakes and no leadership race. It was not what was done, but rather how.
    The genesis of the “current problems” within the DLP is of cardinal importance to all political parties in this country. Political leaders must be chosen by crystal clear transparent methods.
    The 2008 election victory was a lesson to both the parties. It was misunderstood by both parties, and they both suffered for it. There was a looming generational shift by the electorate in their choice of leaders. The late Owen Arthur sensed it when he said in 2005 that he would be retiring before the 2008 election.
    Lost to Thompson
    Alas, he did not and lost the 2008 election to David Thompson. The BLP then
    chose Mia Amor Mottley to be their Leader in Opposition. Good move, and then the unfortunate death of David Thompson left the DLP exposed.
    The choice by the DLP of Stuart as Prime Minister meant that Mottley, on sheer electoral preference, if nothing else, would be the winner whenever Stuart called the election. But the shift back to Arthur as Leader of the Opposition was a serious mistake if one took the signals for generational change from the electorate seriously.
    Those signals were not accepted by the BLP and the electorate, in order to drive home its point and its utter disgust, gave the DLP an election victory by the slenderest of political margins.
    The red wash was forming in the skies and the episode of the Eager Eleven in a strange kind of way, tried to head it off, but once again we have an example of the right idea badly executed.
    The 30-0 victory was an emphatic response by the voters. Arthur and Stuart were both gone. Now, we can all wonder why Thompson, on his death bed, appointed Chris Sinckler as Minister of Finance. Was Thompson, like Barrow, looking to the future?
    And what was the Eager Eleven all about?
    Ezra Alleyne is an attorney at law and former Deputy Speaker of the House of Assembly.

    Like

  • @ William

    As it is you \I will go down market and slum it. How about Champagne? I leave gin for special occasions.

    Like

  • The blogmaster will join you for a Mauby or lemonade.

    Like

  • Republicanism is an excellent move to cement our Supreme Leader´s reign as first President for life.

    Like

  • @ Hal
    Once @ David in de do , it will be fun. Like I tell you he ain’t a bad fellow , he just loves his country more than anyone else. I sticking to white rum and a dash of cranberry. Maybe you two can bury the hatchet hopefully not in each others back.😊 Peace

    Like

  • My soul brother Adrian Greene understands that our culture is what sustains us. Our culture, when nutured, can produce nuff dollars and cents. It is the beginning of prosperity.

    Like

  • Political parties and transparency
    THERE IS AN INCESSANT DISCUSSION about integrity in public life and the promise to root out corruption in Barbados. This optimistic objective which all citizens should support will not, however, be realised as long as the lawmakers continue to look in the wrong place and ignore the obvious.
    The Mia Amor Mottley administration is determined to get this legislation on the statute books since it will score points for fulfilling a key manifesto promise.
    But, if there are gaping loopholes in the draft bill, then it will be an ineffective law.
    The introduction of legislation in Parliament which requires political party registration and financing, and disclosure on campaign financing, is an absolute necessity. This must happen if we are truly serious about addressing corruption.
    As important non-governmental organisations (NGOs), political parties are critical institutions in our nation, particularly for the party occupying the seat of power. They represent the interests and issues of the public in Parliament and are lobbied by the rich and powerful who have their own agenda.
    This is why we must get our governance arrangements right, as they relate to these organisations. In the same way the Government plans to introduce legislation to ensure greater transparency of how other NGOs operate in Barbados, political parties must not continue to be the exception to this rule. The true financial operations of both the Barbados Labour Party and Democratic Labour Party, the two main political institutions, must not remain top secret.
    There is unlikely to be any obligation by the political parties to share their audited annual accounts with the public and disclose their major financial backers, especially in the lead-up to an election campaign. The law must be in place to make them adhere to good governance by having their operations opened to public scrutiny.
    This can be achieved through annual independent audits which should ideally be under the control of the Electoral and Boundaries Commission (EBC).
    In 2018 there was a spending spree in the general election campaign and the source of those funds was never made public. The public will remain in the dark even to the true amounts shelled out in the by-election campaign held last month in St George North. Citizens are very conscious that those sources of funding do not come purely from members’ dues or even the staging of special events.
    The desire is not only to have disclosure about the top contributors to the parties, but to ensure those with deep pockets and vested interests do not corrupt the system. Our political organisations must not be on auction to the highest bidder, which is why full transparency is necessary. We need to amend the Representation Of The People Act and the laws governing the EBC.
    Those measures, correctly done, will allow for greater scrutiny and accountability of our political parties. Our clarion call is that there must be greater oversight and disclosure.
    There is unlikely to be any obligation by the political parties to share their audited annual accounts with the public and disclose their major financial backers . . . .

    Nation Editorial

    Like

  • The most important event since 1966.

    Barbados could become a Republic in less than 6 months from now.

    Like

  • @Hants

    It appears from the little info in public it will be a ceremonial one give the sprint to November.

    Like

  • @ David December 7, 2020 5:40 AM
    (Quote):
    In 2018 there was a spending spree in the general election campaign and the source of those funds was never made public. The public will remain in the dark even to the true amounts shelled out in the by-election campaign held last month in St George North. Citizens are very conscious that those sources of funding do not come purely from members’ dues or even the staging of special events.
    (Unquote).
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Blogmaster, how would you rate the above Editorial from this financially compromised member of the struggling fourth Estate which might soon mourn the final passing of that old lady on Fontabelle?

    Some of your “radicalized” polish from the Fifth Estate must be rubbing off as the politically constricted members of the remaining Fourth Estate mine the pages of BU in order to up their readership game.

    I think it is ‘Excellent’ and goes to the heart of the future governance of the coming republic.

    There can be no functional democracy under the new republic unless the people are allowed to know who are those ‘shadows’ paying the piper playing the decision-making political party tune at the Cabinet level.

    It would interesting to ‘hear’ your views about the method which ought to be employed to appoint the First President of the Bajan republic.

    The PM must have already identified and prepped the ‘puppet man’ to be selected for the sinecure post but without the ceremonial title of KCMG which could be replaced with the Order of Roebuck Street.

    Like

  • @Miller

    There is no country persons existing in the shadows will not exist. The challenge is to try to ensure more lighted than dark places exist for cover.

    Like

Join in the discussion, you never know how expressing your view may make a difference.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s