Adrian Loveridge Column – Barbados Welcome Stamp a ‘Hit’

There can be no reasonable doubt that the 12 month Barbados Welcome Stamp initiative has brought the destination an almost unparalleled level of media and public awareness and kudos to all those involved in its conception and ongoing content enhancement.

Amongst, the latest exposure is the planned Lion Television Scotland 60 minute documentary, which in their words, will ‘follow adventurous British families and individuals as they take an almighty plunge and relocate in the middle of a global pandemic, to work remotely from Barbados’.

According to the news release ‘the documentary will follow millennial Ashley, who only needs his laptop to work as a 3D digital animator, young family Kris and Brigitta and their three children who have been enrolled in a local school and Steve and Amanda. Amanda has recently retired and plans to get to know the island and its locals, while Steve works remotely for a pharmaceutical company’.

When filmed and edited the show will be aired on the UK’s Channel 4.

Popular shows on this channel, like Celebrity Bake Off have recently attracted overnight audiences of 4.4 million and Googlebox, a television reality series, 4.9 million. Interestingly, the TV Station reported, following extensive research, they have recorded up to a 38 per cent year-on-year growth to the number of 16 to 34 year olds tuning into the channel, bucking past trends. This at a time, when many conclude, that younger demographics are almost exclusively sourcing information and entertainment through other social media options.

Jo Street, Channel 4’s Head of Daytime and Head of Hub, Glasgow, who oversees the UK wide daytime commissioning team, said ‘Welcome to Barbados will bring audiences some much needed sunshine and give them the chance to escape the harsh realities of 2020, whilst dreaming about life in a hammock, on the beach… Now where do I get my Visa’?

This sort of extensive coverage can only impact positively on a destination, while helping drive additional long term visitors.
Each of these so-called ‘digital nomads’ of course requires somewhere to stay, a rented apartment, house or villa. They all have to eat, whether shopping in supermarkets or dining at our myriad of eating establishments, possibly hire a car on a long term basis, whilst paying their fair share of taxes to Government.
It has to be a win-win for everyone.

Since the Barbados Welcome Stamp was launched it has been expanded to offer a number of goods and services of particular interest to visa applicants, to make temporary relocation less challenging.

Hopefully all our tourism partners will fully evaluate the potential of this new market source and target their particular product by offering added special concessions and discounts. After all, they are beneficially piggy- backing onto this pioneering proven concept that has not cost the individual sector players a single cent in promotional costs.

123 comments

  • peterlawrencethompson

    Thanks to you as well, Adrian. After all it was my arguments with you that led me to develop the idea of inventing a visa that allowed visitors to work remotely from Barbados for extended periods.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Peter

    What about Northern Observer’s suggestion to build on the Welcome Stamp to include companies that can operate mobile?

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @David
    I’m told that is already being done. A company can submit and pay for Welcome Stamp applications on behalf of all the employees that they want to work from Barbados.

    Like

  • Thanks Peter, good stuff.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Adrian
    I am very happy to see that you have had your Pauline moment and the scales have fallen from your eyes to see that Mia’s Welcome Stamp initiative is a stroke of genius.

    However, I put it to you that you are not yet seeing the full implications of this tectonic shift for the industry you love. In a nutshell it is this:
    1. The value of each visitor to Barbados is directly proportional to the length of time that the visitor spends in Barbados.
    2. The cost of each visitor, in infrastructure, in environmental degradation, in greenhouse gases, in sociological disruption, is proportional to the number of visitors.

    This means, for example, that the Cruise Ship industry imposes huge costs on us but because they stay for only a few hours it contributes only negligible value. It means that the one week vacationer is only half as useful to us as the two week holidaymaker and barely 2% as valuable as the one year Welcome Stamp visitor.

    The implication is obvious: we should transition the entire industry to visitors who work from Barbados and stay for months or years.

    Like

  • Tourism is on the Hospital bed for the foreseeable future.

    The Cruise Industry is also comatose.

    Sorry to burst your bubble, ADRIAN.

    Like

  • @ PLT
    Congrats ! It’s the only creative policy added to tourism in donkey years. Furthermore it saves this government the embarrassment of not having a single new idea to enhance the industry since it came to office. In any other country, you would be on your way to the bank.
    For all those who refuse to accept that blatant racism has hampered efforts in tourism industry and who have accused me of being an alarmist, I direct them to today’s Nation newspaper.
    The blatant racism has been against Black American citizens and locals as well.
    Once again, congrats @PLT.

    Like

  • The TOURISM INDUSTRY in Barbados has always been blatantly RACIST.

    Like

  • Thank you Peter – much appreciated. And William, absolutely – single ideas simply do not work anymore and I doubt they ever did. The more creative people who meaningfuly contribute – the much better things will be.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Hello? Barbados was built on racism. We have come a long way since those days. We have further to go. What we endure cannot be compared to what our ancestors endured and obviously survived.

    We have work to do. The obstacles are not insurmountable.

    Magic wands do not work. We just need to start meaningful conversations, organise, stop bitching on social media alone and band together, formulate a plan and activate.

    We do have the power, you know.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @ William Skinner
    “ In any other country, you would be on your way to the bank.“
    ++++++++++
    Thanks William. It is a good thing that I am not a capitalist. If I were, I would have spent all my efforts trying to stop people from using my ideas without paying me and absolutely nothing would have happened. Barbados would have missed the opportunity to earn hundreds of millions of dollars over the next year.

    Capitalism is over. Of course what we build next they will still call capitalism because that will help them adjust to the change, but we will eventually learn a simple truth from nature. Collaboration within groups makes them more competitive against groups that spend all their energy on infighting. Barbados is a small group of fewer than 300,000 souls… every time we compete amongst ourselves we are weakening ourselves as a community.

    Like

  • Things we do for love of country.

    Like

  • @PLT

    How do you describe capitalism? Is it static, one dimensional, blinkered? Or is it a living experiment, which mutates and adjusts to changing circumstances?

    Like

  • @ Peter

    🙌🏻🙌🏻

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Hal
    I describe capitalism as a socio-political-econimic system that believes two big lies: that material riches are a measure of worth, and that unregulated markets are the best way to generate community prosperity. But that’s just me.

    Of course capitalism mutates and adjusts… just 10 generations ago the cornerstone of capitalism was chattel slavery, so I’m very grateful that we made that particular adjustment.

    Like

  • @ Adrian
    Sometimes we see things differently but I am quite aware of how you turned around your establishment. Furthermore, you remain one of the very few hoteliers , who have put themselves in public discourse .
    Quite frankly, that area toward what we call the end of Christ Church , should have been better developed but somehow it always seems to escape investors.

    Like

  • @PLT

    Good on ya.

    Like

  • I AM ALWAYS SKEPTICAL OF THOSE WHO CLAIM TO HAVE AN ORIGINAL IDEA “WELCOME STAMP” ESPECIALLY ONE WHICH HAS BEEN AROUND FOR YEARS.

    WE MUST LEARN TO GIVE CREDIT WHERE CREDIT IS DUE AND STOP PRETENDING TO BE SO BRIGHT WHEN COPYING FROM OTHERS CALLING BARBADOS THE FIRST.

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    14 countries welcoming remote workers

    From beaches in Barbados to mosaics in Barcelona, countries have designed visa programs that encourage remote workers to spend an extended time in a new destination.

    Each country requires an application process, which often entails providing proof of income, an active passport, and medical insurance.

    These programs are becoming even more popular as countries search for ways to boost their tourism economies.
    It is important to note that while the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention no longer advises against nonessential travel, it does warn that “travel increases your chance of getting and spreading COVID-19.”

    People around the world are dreaming about escaping their tiny urban apartments or suburban homes, and countries are making it a reality.

    Some destinations, like Barbados and Bermuda, have recently launched remote visa programs for incoming visitors, while other countries, like Portugal and Germany, have had similar arrangements in place for years.

    Today, these programs are even more appealing for countries and prospective visitors.

    Workers are learning that they can do their jobs from anywhere. Meanwhile, countries are hoping to support local economies that have been decimated due to closed borders and lockdowns. The hope is that these long-term visitors will support local economies without displacing any permanent residents’ jobs.

    https://www.insider.com/countries-welcoming-remote-workers-live-and-work-2020-7#mauritius-just-announced-a-new-premium-travel-visa-though-details-are-still-scarce-1

    Like

  • @ BAJE

    It dose not matter who’s idea it was. It bares some fruit. Yes, it’s not substantial by comparison prior to world change.

    Please give us some Marketing ideas that would bare much fruit during this unfortunate period in our lives.

    Like

  • @ BAJE

    It dose not matter who’s idea it was. It bares some fruit. Yes, it’s not substantial by comparison prior to world change.

    Please give us some Marketing ideas that would bare much fruit during this unfortunate period in our lives.

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    SOME MONTHS BACK IN ANOTHER TOPIC I DID HOWEVER AS USUAL LOST IN THE CLUTTER OF LONG TALK ON BU.

    I AM NOT KNOCKING THE WELCOME STAMP IDEA HOWEVER JUST THE MISINFORMATION THAT THE IDEA FIRST ORIGINATED FROM BARBADOS

    WE MUST ALSO LEARN TO CALL A SPADE A SPADE AND NOT A DIAMOND OR AN ACE.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @BAJE
    Barbados was the first to innovate a year long visa aimed at remote workers in the wake of the COVID pandemic. It was announced at the beginning of July 2020, about 9 weeks after a big wheel in the BLP asked me to write a memo to the economic development team in the Ministry of Finance detailing the ideas that I developed arguing with Adrian right here on BU (but leaving out all the parts where I cussed the Government and BTMI).

    Here is a list of countries & territories that directly copied the Barbados example of visas for remote workers since July:
    Anguilla
    Antigua & Barbuda
    Bermuda
    Cayman Islands
    Croatia
    Dubai
    Estonia (they had a digital residency for years but did not copy our physical residency visa until August)
    Georgia
    Jamaica

    The digital nomad hotspots like Bali in Indonesia and Koh Lanta in Thailand cater to a substantially different demographic of young backpacking people looking for the cheapest possible place to have a party adventure. They are constantly trying to evade immigration rules by crossing borders only to cross right back over the next day because Indonesia and Thailand are not particularly pleased with their presence and did not innovate long term visas for remote workers.

    Portugal has long had a visa program that offers temporary residence for independent workers, but it is only for applicants who can demonstrate that their skills are needed in Portugal. Spain has also had a visa that allows individuals to live and work in Spain for up to a year, but it is only for self employed people, not for the vast majority of remote workers in the post pandemic era. Germany has long had the “freiberufler” visa designed for freelancers who want to be their own boss, but this visa only lasts for three months and again is not for the vast majority of remote workers in the post pandemic era. Mexico has long had a temporary resident visa designed for retirees, and no doubt many younger people use it too; to be eligible you simply need to show that you have US$27k in the bank. Costa Rica has one similar to Mexico’s but you need to engage an immigration consultant to apply, and you need to deposit US$60k in a Costa Rican bank.

    There is no doubt that we could learn a lot from studying the European and Central American examples of long term visas; however we should give credit to the current Government of Barbados because it is the first time in my lifetime that Barbados has taken the lead on any economic development innovation and made the rest of the world has had to play catchup.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @BAJE
    “NOT KNOCKING THE WELCOME STAMP IDEA HOWEVER JUST THE MISINFORMATION THAT THE IDEA FIRST ORIGINATED FROM BARBADOS”
    ++++++++++++++
    So yes BAJE, not only did the idea originate in Barbados, in had its genesis right here on BU https://barbadosunderground.net/2020/04/27/recovery-project-to-support-tourism-industry/ with loads of input from a range of contributors: Critical Analyzer, Dullard, Hants, John A, Greene, NorthernObserver, PoorPeacefulandPolite, David BU, Enuff, Hal Austin, Adrian, de pedantic Dribbler, Lawson, Miller, Sargeant, William Skinner, and even Tron 😉

    Dullard specifically pointed me towards analysing the experiences of Germany and Portugal with similar visas, and I must presume that smart people in the Ministry of Finance did due diligence in crafting the Welcome Stamp, because they did not replicate the shortcomings of those examples.

    Like

  • @BAJE
    Barbados was the first to innovate a year long visa aimed at remote workers in the wake of the COVID pandemic. It was announced at the beginning of July 2020, about 9 weeks after a big wheel in the BLP asked me to write a memo to the economic development team in the Ministry of Finance detailing the ideas that I developed arguing with Adrian right here on BU (but leaving out all the parts where I cussed the Government and BTMI).

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    FINALLY GETTING SOME TRUTH FROM YOU.

    PLEASE NOTE THAT I AM NOT ONE OF THE ONE’S EASILY FOOLED OR MISLEAD ON BU.

    AS FAR AS YOU WOULD LIKE OTHER GULLIBLE PEOPLE TO BELIEVE BECAUSE THE BLP APPROACHED YOU DURING THE PANDEMIC MONTHS AGO THIS “IDEA” WAS ORIGINALLY CONCEPTUALIZED AND THEN OTHER COUNTRIES FOLLOWED LIKE BLIND SHEEP WITH NO IDEAS OF THEIR OWN.

    WELL WELL WELL WONDERS NEVER CEASE.

    THE FACT REMAINS WELCOME STAMP WAS AROUND YEARS BEFORE THIS PANDEMIC SO FOR YOU TO CLAIM ORIGINALITY IS ABSURD AND TYPICAL OF WHAT I EXPECT OF YOU AND SEVERAL OTHERS ON BU.

    THE FACT ALSO THAT YOU HAVE CREATED A WEBSITE BECAUSE OF AN INSIDE LINK WITH BLP GOVERNMENT TO CREATE A PROFIT DRIVEN MOTIVE FOR YOURSELF WHILST OFTEN ATTACKING ADRIAN LOVERIDGE SPEAKS TO YOUR INTEGRITY AND CHARACTER.

    IN LIFE THERE IS NOTHING WRONG IN GIVING CREDIT WHERE IT IS DUE EVEN IF ONE IMPROVES ON THE “ORIGINAL WELCOME STAMP” IDEA AS IN THE CASE OF BARBADOS AND OTHERS.

    Like

  • I trust with the welcome stamp we will also change our bank regulations to allow these people to open USD accounts easily on the island, or failing that local accounts. After all we want the foreign exchange they will generate from their local consumption and not allow it all to be charged to their credit cards at bank of America and other such establishments.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @BAJE
    “FINALLY GETTING SOME TRUTH FROM YOU.”
    ++++++++++++++++++
    Everybody on BU, except you apparently, already knows the full story because so many of them were intimately involved in the development of the idea. I have always given credit to everyone: Adrian and the BLP Government included, without hesitation. In fact people here on BU drag me over the coals for being far too nice to the Government.

    I proved to you above in painstaking detail exactly why the Barbados Welcome Stamp was an innovation that is very distinct from what came before, just as the automobile is distinct from the horse drawn carriage even tough they share having four wheels. I know from personal email correspondence that in Bermuda, and Antigua they were were explicitly following Barbados’ lead because that is what the bureaucrats who were emailing me to get information told me (no, I did not charge them for my advice either).

    I am lucky to have played my very considerable part in helping Barbados and the wider Caribbean survive and prosper in the face of the pandemic, but that is what it is: luck. My idea was worth absolutely $0 until implementation through the Barbados Welcome Stamp and all the other programs that imitate it. We in Barbados often suffer from ‘implementation deficit disorder’ so we should celebrate when any of our organizations, public sector or private, actually gets things right. It is a rare enough occurrence.

    You seem to be in the grip BAJE, of that other very common Bajan malady, ‘crabs in a bucket syndrome’.

    Liked by 1 person

  • David
    This is a lot of marketing talk so far. Do we have any estimates as to what percentage of tourism revenues, viz a viz last year’s, is this gifted idea likely to generate?

    Like

  • Critical Analyzer

    @John A November 16, 2020 2:16 PM

    I don’t see any need for them to open any bank accounts here since they are not working in Barbados but they are living here and paying the associated living expenses like any tourist. Only difference is they are a very long stay tourist.

    They can do all their transactions with credit cards like they normally do back home and maybe open a local bank account for easier access to the limited local funds they might need to facilitate access to quick cash.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @John A November 16, 2020 2:16 PM
    “… allow these people to open USD accounts easily on the island…”
    ++++++++++++++++
    You are absolutely correct John. Our banking system is one of the biggest headaches that Welcome Stamp Visitors are facing. At the moment I am obliged to counsel them to open Charles Schwab American bank account because that allows them to withdraw cash from local ATMs and Charles Schwab will refund them the service charge that our banks charge.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Critical Analyzer November 16, 2020 2:35 PM
    There are problems because when they pay rent for example, with cheques drawn on their foreign accounts, it is taking local banks three weeks and more to clear the funds into the landlord’s bank account after deposit. The vast majority of landlords do not accept credit cards for rent payments because of the extortionate fees and restrictions put on credit card merchant accounts by local banks.

    Like

  • @Peter

    Based on what the blogmaster was told, once the welcome stamp citizens present the relevant documents supported by the Welcome Stamp Visa from government opening an account is not an issue.

    Like

  • @PLT

    Know your customer?

    Like

  • You seem to be in the grip BAJE, of that other very common Bajan malady, ‘crabs in a bucket syndrome’.

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    I HAVE MY OWN TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS OUTSIDE OF BARBADOS SO WHY WOULD I BE ENVIOUS OF YOU.

    YOU SEEM TO BE TOO TIED UP IN YOUR ARROGANCE.

    I NOTE THAT YOU HAVE NOT ADDRESSED MAKING MONEY FROM THIS “WELCOME STAMP” IDEA THROUGH YOUR INSIDE CONTACT WITH BLP.

    YOU ARE DISHONEST HENCE THE REASON WHY YOUVEHEMENTLY DEFENDED CHARLES HERBERT SOMEONE I KNOW PERSONALLY MUCH BETTER THAN YOU.

    AS YOU HAVE TRIED SEVERAL TIMES TO CLAIM TO HAVE ALL THIS INPUT FROM ALL THESE PEOPLE ON BU CAST ASPERSIONS ON YOUR OWN MORALS AND ETHICAL STANDARDS.

    I HAVE BEEN READING BU FOR SEVERAL YEARS.

    THIS IS A WAY FOR YOU AND YOUR INSIDE PERSON WITHIN THE BLP TO MAKE MONEY POINT BLANK.

    AS AN ENTREPRENEUR I HAVE NO PROBLEM WITH YOU OR ANYONE MAKING MONEY, HOWEVER WHEN COUPLED WITH DUBIOUS CLAIMS AND ALIGNMENT IT MORE THAN HIGHLIGHTS WHO YOU REALLY ARE AS A PERSON.

    Like

  • @Pacha

    The Welcome Stamp Program is a work in progress. If you discuss with realtors there has been appreciable activity in the sector. Hopefully the Governor will be able to report on it at next review although he deflected to the BTMI regarding data collection during the recent review.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Pachamama November 16, 2020 2:34 PM
    There is little transparency in the Barbados government, so good data is hard to come by. I am informed that by the end of October over 1,600 applications had been approved, covering over 3,000 individuals because many are family applications. They have not told me the ration of family to individual applications, but it is clearly very different from the traditional digital nomad market where the vast majority of nomads are single people. In addition, there are a large number of people who come here to work remotely for 6 months of fewer on a visitor’s visa, so Welcome Stamp statistics do not capture that part of the market.

    Even when we limit ourselves to only Welcome Stamp visa holders, that 1,600 households represents an annual local spend of about US$80 million without even counting the approximately US$4 million that the government collects in visa fees.

    By comparison, in 2019, Barbados recorded a whopping 853,200 cruise passenger arrivals who spent only about US$60 each in Barbados. That ads up to only a little over US$50 million, so it is clear that the Welcome Stamp program has already outstripped the entire Cruise Ship industry in importance and revenue for the Barbados economy.

    Like

  • Stanton(Stan)Carter

    @ PLT – Nov 16/2020
    Noticed reference made to my 2020/04/07 – recovery-project-to-support-tourism-industry submission. Delighted to be of assistance.
    P.S. You should check out the Philippines retirement program which has been in effect for many tears.

    Like

  • Painting jamaican flags on computers so they will run faster is not much of a technology business Baje. Peter good job, dont worry about the naysayers its the way it always is, those who can do those who cant criticize.

    Like

  • PLT
    A good showing, for the first half year.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @BAJE November 16, 2020 2:51 PM
    You clearly have little understanding of me or what I do. I would be much happier going back to my non-profit pro bono consulting because I have been lucky enough in life to have saved up and inherited enough for a modest existence without the need for income. That’s OK, because it is not a crime to be lacking understanding.

    However, when you make statements like “THIS IS A WAY FOR YOU AND YOUR INSIDE PERSON WITHIN THE BLP TO MAKE MONEY POINT BLANK” it is defamatory, which is a crime. You are alleging corruption which does not exist. I have no inside person at the BLP. The person who asked me to write the memo is a merely a distant acquaintance.

    It is clear that you have no concept of life beyond selfish personal gain, so it is incomprehensible to you that I acted and continue to act in the interests of my neighbours rather than my own. That is sad for you. Happily the vast majority of people in Barbados and even on BU can see a clearer picture, and so they join me in building Barbados rather than tearing it down.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Stanton(Stan)Carter November 16, 2020 3:03 PM
    Yes indeed, there is probably much we can learn from the Philippines, and I thank you for drawing it to my attention. Beyond their retirement program there is their Business Process Outsourcing programs which are going to comprise a rapidly growing segment of the global economy during and after the pandemic.

    Like

  • @PLT
    “Business Process Outsourcing programs”
    if you don’t already know….the “God” of such, is Accenture. It is they who developed outsourcing in Manila and Mumbai.

    Like

  • This interview was on CBC radio Toronto a couple of weeks ago, there is a video with the same individual

    https://www.cbc.ca/player/play/1813812803572

    Liked by 1 person

  • QUOTE

    It was announced at the beginning of July 2020, about 9 weeks after a big wheel in the BLP asked me to write a memo to the economic development team in the Ministry of Finance

    QUOTE

    However, when you make statements like “THIS IS A WAY FOR YOU AND YOUR INSIDE PERSON WITHIN THE BLP TO MAKE MONEY POINT BLANK” it is defamatory, which is a crime. You are alleging corruption which does not exist. I have no inside person at the BLP. The person who asked me to write the memo is a merely a distant acquaintance.

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    FIRST REFERENCE FROM YOU TO ME TO A MYSTERIOUS BIG WHEEL IN THE BLP APPROACHING YOU NOW IT HAS TURNED TO A DISTANT ACQUAINTANCE.

    HMMM.

    ONE HAS TO REALLY QUESTION ANYTHING COMING OUT THE ISLAND TO BE TRUTHFUL AND FACTUAL.

    I WATCH YOU ATTACKING ADRIAN LOVERIDGE WEEK AFTER WEEK NOW AN ABOUT FACE WHEN CONFRONTED BY REALITY.

    YOUR CLAIM THAT YOU HAVE SAVED BARBADOS AND OTHER COUNTRIES IS JUST A LOGICAL EXTENSION OF BULLSHIT.

    HOWEVER YOU MAY CARRY ON SMARTLY AS I AM NOT ONE SINGING FROM YOUR CHOIR.

    YOUR HYPOCRISY HAS NO BOUNDS.

    I GUESS LIVING ON THE ISLAND SOMETIMES ONE CAN’T SEE DECEPTION FROM TRUTH.

    YOU CAN ALSO CALL THAT DEFAMATION.

    Like

  • @ critical
    Our plan should be for them to transfer a lump sum Into their Barbados account and then we should make it easy for them to have access to either a local account or USD account as a matter of urgency. That way we get the house rent currency, the car lease currency, the food currency all going into our banking system as opposed to Biden’s.

    In other words it must be a total transformation for them to the bajan way of life. If some are over 50 we should make it possible for them to join BARP etc. Let a one year visit turn into 2 or 3 instead by Removing all the hurdles to the movement of hard currency on to the island.

    Like

  • Who will this “come and work form Barbados” really benefit??? Which “”Barbados””??? The privilege “Barbados”” with their millions of dollars which they don’t want to spend or the other “”Barbados”” is made up of BLACK POOR BARBADIANS who have little money????

    Are these people from overseas coming to stay in the “”New Orleans””, or “”Deacons farm””, or “”the Pine”” or “”Country Road””???? or are they going to the PALATIAL homes of people who already have money, millions of dollars????? Apartments of the well to do???? The rich and famous who have two and three story houses?????

    Like

  • Are these people from overseas coming to stay in the “”New Orleans””, or “”Deacons farm””, or “”the Pine”” or “”Country Road””???? or are they going to the PALATIAL homes of people who already have money, millions of dollars????? Apartments of the well to do???? The rich and famous who have two and three story houses?????

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    YOU ARE OUT OF ORDER NOT SUPPOSED TO ASK THESE SORTS OF QUESTIONS BUT MUST GO WITH THE FLOW,

    REMEMBER IT IS SAVING BARBADOS AS YOU HAVE SAID WHICH BARBADOS.

    Like

  • One has to wonder if some of you are aware the world’s economy is gripped in the hold of a pandemic. If you do not have anything to contribute remain in the Facebook space.

    Like

  • Is Carson overseas….?
    If he is not, I recommend deportation.

    The salemites/pick-a-noise crowd might not know constitutional law or reasoned responses, but they can put up a good fight.

    I love you guys.

    Like

  • How will this change the balance of Barbados???? Will the WHITE BAJANS AND INDIANS be still on top even though they make up only 3% of Barbados????

    Will BLACK PEOPLE benefit from this unitive other than as than as maids, groundmen, cooks, watchmen, laundry people etc.?????????

    Will BLACK PEOPLE be still hewers of wood and drawers of water as they are now???? Will it make any significant Financial difference to BLACK PEPOPLE??? or the RICH WILL GET RICHER as the saying goes??????

    Will the 3% people be still at the top of the Totem pole as they are now???? What is being done with this “”come and work from Barbados””” for BLACK PEOPLE?????

    I SEE WHAT IS BEING DONE FOR THE 3% OF THE POPULATION.

    Like

  • Lord, I am not singing in your choir?????

    Like

  • Salemite/pick-a-noise: 50
    Not-Enuff: 10
    🙂 feeling silly 🙂

    Be yourself. Laugh if you feel like laughing. Don’t let the guys with starched shirts and stiff collars set your mood.
    Have a good night.

    Like

  • Where was carson cadogan when his dlp was running rampant with all types of maladministration?

    And he aint complained then so he’s lost the moral authority to do so now.

    That is what party alliances do to yuh.

    Like

  • Are these people being told that Barbados is the 4th most expensive place in the World to live according to a recent international study???

    Who will control their money?????

    Who is giving them information about where to stay?????

    We know that poor people don’t have any websites????

    Will they be allowed to mingle with Locals or will they be offguard as they are now????

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @ Carson C Cadogan
    I understand your skepticism and I share it. I am trying to make sure as far as I can that they buy their vegetables from roadside vendors and from Cheapside. I make them feel ashamed to go to Harbour Whites instead of a little rum shop. I tell them to check to see that the places where they spend their money are owned by Black people.

    But of course I need to do much more.

    Like

  • Critical Analyzer

    @John A November 16, 2020 4:28 PM
    Allowing them to hold foreign currency accounts locally will be more trouble than it’s worth in terms of the money laundering and FATCA implications it poses for us.

    To me, it benefits them and us to continue to have their salaries paid to their bank account in the US and they wire funds to their local BBD account which they can use to pay for things locally they must use cash for which will not be too many things.

    Transferring large sums of money back and forth will be a financial institution’s nightmare.

    Like

  • @ Critical

    They can use either a local or USD account locally the end result would be the same for us, but they will be more comfortable knowing they can move their money freely through a USD account.

    Also remember under the revised USD account guidelines the PM introduced its free movement without the central bank interference as long as the principle account holder is the same person. To be honest and fair to the PM the legislation has been eased a bit on the USD Accounts, but we still got a way to go.

    Like

  • Critical Analyzer

    @Carson C Cadogan
    You are not grasping the concept because you are not aware of the changes COVID has brought to make this possible.

    Companies worldwide have been scared to try work from home on a massive scale because nobody wants to take the plunge first a part from a very few maverick companies. COVID dragged all the companies into it whether they wanted to or not in less than 1 month.

    Now they have done it for the last 6 months, they now have the financial and work performance statistics to determine how it effective it is compared to the old way and how that impacts their bottom line.

    In the US you have people getting rid of their expensive condos and apartments in the crowded city and buying cheaper houses in the countries with lots of space at a fraction of the cost because they no longer need to live close to work so they can go into the office to get their work done.

    We are now able to do things working remotely that were not possible last year. That changes the game and opens up significant possibilities for those smart enough to capitalize.

    Like

  • Would these people not be bringing in foreign exchange? Would they not also be patronising local businesses that employ Barbadians? Obviously this would not change the status quo wrt blacks and whites or rich and poor but there will be some spinoff benefits, surely.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @BAJE
    “ FIRST REFERENCE FROM YOU TO ME TO A MYSTERIOUS BIG WHEEL IN THE BLP APPROACHING YOU NOW IT HAS TURNED TO A DISTANT ACQUAINTANCE.”
    I see that you are having problems with basic English comprehension. Let me help. The “big wheel” is a guy who was in sixth form at secondary school when I entered lower first. He has a younger brother who was in lower first with me and that is how I knew his name. When he emailed me to ask me to write the memo it was the first time we had communicated with each other in over 50 years. Is that distant enough for you?

    “I WATCH YOU ATTACKING ADRIAN LOVERIDGE WEEK AFTER WEEK NOW AN ABOUT FACE WHEN CONFRONTED BY REALITY.“
    Did you not read Adrian thanking me above for acknowledging his central contribution to the development of the idea?? Is this you English comprehension problem again?

    “YOUR CLAIM THAT YOU HAVE SAVED BARBADOS AND OTHER COUNTRIES IS JUST A LOGICAL EXTENSION OF BULLSHIT.“
    Again with the English comprehension problem… or maybe it’s an arithmetic problem now. To “save Barbados” from economic catastrophe will take about US$1.3 billion. US$84 million, while it is a start, is just a teacup in the bucket. It is about 6.5% of the job we need to accomplish together. We have barely got started.

    “HOWEVER YOU MAY CARRY ON SMARTLY AS I AM NOT ONE SINGING FROM YOUR CHOIR.“
    This I thank you for, because you are dreadfully off key 🙂

    Like

  • these are “”nice”” protocols::

    Like

  • Critical Analyzer

    @John A November 16, 2020 5:53 PM
    Technically them having local and overseas accounts in US currency makes it easier but I fear it will open up a can of worms for money laundering and moving money offshore and those sort of ticklish thing.

    The USD revised guidelines are targeted towards locals that come into contact with US currency on a regular basis or work overseas and get paid in US currency in an effort to get that currency into our banking system instead of in the mattress or held offshore.

    If they have not done so already, they will have to adjust those regulations to prevent the money laundering issues that can come from them parking US money in Barbados and transferring it back when they leave.

    The people are technically tourists to us when they are not working remotely for their workplace overseas and have to be treated as such or we will have blacklisting and FATCA problems.

    Like

  • This is what Don has to say:

    Like

  • Critical Analyzer

    Is that one of the fancy new electric buses with air conditioning they were traveling in in the video?

    Like

  • @ critical.

    Yes that could be a concern but remember they had to declare their annual earnings when they applied for the yearly passport. AS long as their Inflow stays within that range they can not be accused of money laundering by anyone. After all if a person who declared on their permit that their annual income is $250,000 USD, then moving $100,000 in for a year would be well within their means and claims of money laundering would be unfounded.

    Like

  • (Quote):
    What about Northern Observer’s suggestion to build on the Welcome Stamp to include companies that can operate mobile? (Unquote).
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Isn’t that covered comprehensively already by IBC legislation?

    What Barbados needs to do is to get its digital nomad or e-residency infrastructural framework (like internet and ground services) up to date to rival the likes of Cyprus and Estonia.

    Why not make it more attractive to an e-nomad to work in a safe tropical oasis called Barbados any day than anywhere else in cyberspace?

    Like

  • PLT

    I DON’T LACK COMPREHENSION, I AM NOT TOLERANT OF BULLSHIT.

    YOU TOSS AROUND GHOST NUMBERS AS THOUGH YOU HAVE SPECIFIC FACTS EVEN THOUGH YOU ADMIT THAT GETTING FACTUAL HARD NUMBERS FROM GOVERNMENT IS NOT EASY TO COME BY.

    SIMILAR TO YOUR FALSE CLAIM THAT YOU CAME UP WITH THE ORIGINAL IDEA FOR WELCOME STAMP ALREADY UP AND RUNNING SEVERAL YEARS AGO ELSEWHERE.

    YOU MAY HAVE THE LAST WORD.

    Like

  • @BAJE November 16, 2020 3:55 PM “FIRST REFERENCE FROM YOU TO ME TO A MYSTERIOUS BIG WHEEL IN THE BLP APPROACHING YOU NOW IT HAS TURNED TO A DISTANT ACQUAINTANCE.”

    It is possible for someone to be both a big wheel in the BLP AND at the same time to be Peter’s distant acquaintance.

    For example my paternal first cousin’s, maternal first cousin is a BLP Cabinet Minister. My first cousin and I grew up in the same village, ate out of the same pot, slept in our mutual grandmother’s bed, the same we talk every day. But I have never met her maternal first cousin who is BLP Cabinet Minister. I expect that if I wanted to meet the cabinet Minister, I could, but why annoy a Cabinet Minister when at present I have nothing important to share with him?

    Like

  • Thanks Peter for going to look at the place where I am an occasional housekeeper [even if officially retired] and for so quickly uploading the information to your site. The place is currently occupied by family, and a previous long term visitor is booked from Christmas to the spring. But maybe we will be ready for a Welcome Stamp Visitor late spring.

    You are being far too nice to BAJE.

    I remember once I said on here that I grow produce because I enjoy doing so, and that I give away much of it, maybe most of it, and one of the capitalist on BU expressed disbelief.

    I have less that 20 years left on earth. The “children” are adults, hard working, capable, smart, well educated, so why do I need to accumulate more, more, more, more?

    Like

  • “This I thank you for, because you are dreadfully off key.”

    OUCH!

    Like

  • Cuhdear Bajan,

    I believe you. Nothing to doubt.

    By the way…. today I saw my first cucumber.

    Like

  • @Carson C Cadogan November 16, 2020 4:45 PM “Who will this “come and work form Barbados” really benefit??? Which “”Barbados””??? The privilege “Barbados”” with their millions of dollars which they don’t want to spend or the other “”Barbados”” is made up of BLACK POOR BARBADIANS who have little money???? Are these people from overseas coming to stay in the “”New Orleans””, or “”Deacons farm””, or “”the Pine”” or “”Country Road””???? or are they going to the PALATIAL homes of people who already have money, millions of dollars????? Apartments of the well to do???? The rich and famous who have two and three story houses?????”

    Actually the owner of the apartment where I am the occasional housekeeper is a lady from deep, rural Barbados who only had the opportunity to attend an “all age elementary” school. Remember those? Two room neighboring schools which went from lower primer to class 2, and from class 3 to class 7. Lower primer, Infants A and Infants B shared one room, no partitions, no walls, and class 1 and 2 the other. The headmistress had her desk at the top of Infants B, she did not have an “office” The lady migrated. Worked and put herself through school. Entered an always in demand profession. pand worked for 40+ years. Is deeply committed to Barbados so built a place here, but instead of building a 2,000 to 3,000 sq foot house. Built a modest 2 bedroom apartment, and a one bedroom on the same lot. Used the rents from those to repeat the process over a 15-20 year period. She could have built a 5 bedroom, 4 bathroom house, and bought a big ride. But does a retiree really need 2,000 sq ft of space? She had errands to run today. She took the bus. I too haven’t owned a car for more than 20 years, but I have owned a house for more than 30. I left school with 5 O’levels. Anything after that I had to pursue on my own as I was one of many, many children.

    Like

  • @ Miller,
    I have been to African countries like Kenya and have witnessed first-hand their prowess with technology. They are innovators.

    PLT has offered one option that will benefit the economy of Barbados in the short term. I suggested that the country should offer sanctuary and the appropriate infrastructure to 100 Information technological savvy East Africans.

    Kenya is currently building a large IT complex to accommodate the country’s burgeoning surge within its IT industry.

    PLT’S “Nomad” workers are a good temporary stop gap in the face of Covid-19.

    I believe that importing technically talented African IT specialists would boost our economy and offer the country a sustainable development model.

    Like

  • @Donna November 16, 2020 9:06 PM “By the way…. today I saw my first cucumber.”

    Wonderful.

    My cucumbers this year were the ones referred to as “Bajan boys” hardier and more drought tolerant than the imported varieties. They do not bear as many cucumbers at the same time,but they do bear for a longer period. Today i picked one that I had allowed to over ripen on the vine, turned brown and crackled. I am drying the seeds now. Will try planting a few in a week or two, but may save most for the beginning of the next rainy season.

    Like

  • After putting the seeds aside, i peeled and sliced the overripe cucumber. The flesh is white instead of green but it still nice and crunchy in salads and sandwiches.

    Like

  • @PLT good work sir!

    So far so good. But Barbados really needs to grind out its first mover advantage and make hay.

    The Dullard has several ideas on how this initiative could be built out and taken full advantage of but unlike you The Dullard is a ‘capitalist’ and his expertise is not free. LOL. Besides he has no inheritance and ‘retirement age’ is decades away. lol

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Cuhdear Bajan
    Thanks for letting me know a little about some of the people who are not rich White people that are in a position to benefit from the Welcome Stamp program. I’m very grateful.
    I still take Carson C Cadogan’s criticisms very seriously because the stratification of the monetary benefits is a significant risk that the program poses for Bajan society.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Dullard
    Thank you.
    I totally understand that I am extraordinarily lucky not to have money worries, so I’m not advocating that everyone give away their ideas.
    If you want to partner to develop an idea I will sign any non-disclosure you wish ahead of time. I’m always reachable peter(at)remoteworkbarbados.com.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    By the way, earlier tonight I was at a Global Entrepreneurship Week event put on by the nonprofit Barbados Youth Business Trust. Kerrie Symmonds was also there in his capacity as Minister of Energy, Small Business and Entrepreneurship, and I’d never met him before so I introduced myself. His face lit up and he asked if I was the same Peter Thompson who wrote the memo that got the Welcome Stamp started. I told him that I was and he asked me if anyone had ever thanked me. I told him no but that I was not looking for thanks, but he thanked me on his own behalf because he had been the tourism Minister back then in April. We had a longish chat where I tried to get him to understand how he could leverage the new market of thousands of Welcome Stamp visitors to help develop early stage entrepreneurship at a grass roots level (Carson C Cadogan’s criticisms were still on my mind). Let’s hope something comes of the conversation.

    Like

  • @Peter

    Good stuff, we need 10 more like you.

    Hint Dullard.

    Like

  • @ PLT
    Well this is amazing ! The administration literally stole your idea; the PM all over the international media taking credit; the then Minister of Tourism did not even make any effort to have a chat with you and they have the nerve to talk about we in this together.
    At the very least the PM should have been upfront and should have told the public that you were the citizen , who conceptualized the idea.
    Regardless of how generous you are , there is no excuse for such poor manners.
    And then we get on BU promoting these BLPDLP miscreants.
    You are on the way to making our country millions at a time we are really in need. Is it any wonder therefore that creative citizens carry their talents elsewhere?
    Unbelievable.

    Peace.

    Like

  • Anyone cares about what is happening to the WORKERS At CLUB BARBADOS which is a part of the Barbados Tourist Industry????Where is the BARBADOS WORKERS UNION???

    Or we are only fixated about “”come and work from Barbados”” program??????

    Like

  • @ William

    Did this behaviour surprise you? I have already told of my small encounter with Invest Barbados. I have had one academic regurgitating my ideas as if they were his originally and one politician doing the same.
    I know you do not like the term, but it is cultural, the Bajan Condition.

    Like

  • Yes, Barbados is a failed state. The blogmaster wrote it for you.

    Like

  • Ben and David:

    Like

  • Critical Analyzer

    @Carson C Cadogan November 17, 2020 4:32 AM
    This is only the first of many more severance payment problems to come and it is entirely government’s fault.

    They should have extended unemployment to last at least as long as the state of emergency exists.

    Like

  • @Critical Analyzer

    Why state the obvious? Covid has and will continue to negatively affect the hospitality industry. Until it bounces back or alternatively grow organically, what would you have done?

    Like

  • @ David
    At least you should have the guts to look at the bigger picture here. You are the one who is always talking about transparency and good governance. You seem to be a part timer . It’s only relevant when you are blasting Stuart and company.
    I know there are companies that invite any employee from any level to make suggestions. Should any of those suggestions be implemented, according to their worth to the company, that employee is usually promoted , given a raise and the company acknowledges often publicly , from whom the idea came.
    I respect @PLT, he debates at a high level and he is obviously a genuine philanthropist but Mottley should be ashamed to have not publicly elevated the gentleman, not as Peter Thompson , but as a CITiZEN whose idea is the ONLY new Tourism policy of her administration , that after two years , has been short on new approaches. Quite frankly if you remove your blinkers , you would note that almost ninety per cent of what is being skillfully termed as new legislation is nothing more than persistent tampering and “ changing up” of what happened in the so-called “ lost decade”.
    And allow me to say that the same way you and others talk about the “lost decade “@Hal also has the right to make his pronouncements as to how he sees his country. I don’t agree that my country is a” failed state”and I have certainly not bought into crap about some “ lost decade”.
    Peace.

    Like

  • Critical Analyzer

    @David

    Why state the obvious? Covid has and will continue to negatively affect the hospitality industry. Until it bounces back or alternatively grow organically, what would you have done?

    I already did state the solution, extend NIS unemployment at least as long as the state of emergency declared by government remains in effect. Ideally it should keep going for 1-3 months after the declaration ends.

    Businesses would be able to plan better knowing they can maintain skeleton staff to keep the plant maintained without the burden of paying staff with no revenue or huge severance payments hanging over their heads when they don’t know if they have a chance of staying afloat long enough to avoid bankruptcy.

    Like

  • @ William

    You miss a key point. One of the lessons of management theory, the doctrine of collegiate management, is that you encourage members of the team to out-perform ; they get recognition for their out-performance and, at the same time, as their manager, you are also praised.
    I will give an example: as editor of a publication, if you have an outstanding young writer you give them a free hand; if they win any awards, by implication you are also a winner. So by implication, if my paper won an award, then I too was caught in the slip stream as the captain of the ship.
    What I am trying to say is that if @PLT is recognised for his tourism proposal, and the idea grew out of BU, then BU and its founder/moderator/chairman will also get the much sought after recognition.
    Sometimes people act against their own interest – unless there is a higher interest?

    Like

  • @William

    You have joined others to add labels to the blogmaster, nothing new here. This blogmaster prefers to accept that a citizen of Barbados feels compelled to do all in his power to help his country. If and when he is rewarded will not detract from a noble ideal. The fact that Kerri Symmonds acknowledged his contribution (an ardent follower of BU) should give an indication to you about what is possible. If greedy wait hot will cool.

    Now back to Rh off.

    Like

  • The blogmaster is not looking for recognition as defined by you. You have no credibility in the eyes of the blogmaster. You are on record of accusing the blogmaster of being an agent of a foreign force, that we are covertly monetizing the blog etc. ALL Rh lies.

    The blogmaster derives satisfaction from in a small way contributing to making Barbados a better place. No reward expected from others.

    Your mind is your wealth. Your heart is your riches. Your soul is your treasure. Your life is your reward

    Mashona Dhiliwayo

    Like

  • David
    Pachamama is a witness to the charges laid. But when you bring a perennial liar before this bar of justice what could you expect but denial after denial, even in the face of incontrovertible proofs.

    Like

  • @ Hal
    I have long recognized the Blogmaster’s predicament and I am certain he has also recognized mine. I backed off the Blogmaster a long time ago.
    I also know very well that there are mobs who throw stones, burn and loot. I usually find myself agreeing with them.
    I have only called the Blogmaster an apologists and an obstructionist. He calls me a RH and a JA. Nothing new there , he is just following his newly minted mentor.
    But there are mobs and then there are intellectual mobsters and intellectual mercenaries. The Blogmaster is not either of those but I am a RH and a JA. He is an apologist and obstructionist. Hopefully after his tutorials , he would remain those. I would really hate to see such a really nice guy become an intellectual mobster and mercenary.
    It’s a known fact that there are proper ways to recognize and reward workers and citizens. I guess turning up at a function and seeing @ PLT and telling him : Oh you’re the guy who came up with that brilliant idea, nice to meet you , is a fit and proper recognition.
    Peace.

    Like

  • How many time will PLT have to say he is not looking for thanks/ recognition for others to stop being his self appointed seeker of recognition? PLT recognition will come at an appointed time and may be in a way that he appreciate even though he say he doesn’t need it.

    Like

  • Is this good for the customer????

    Like

  • Are the Bajan authorities selling their Welcome Stamp initiative to the Chinese, the world’s largest ethnic group with the second largest economy?

    After all the Chinese government is a big player in the economic affairs and political landscape of Barbados. So those digital nomads from mainland China should feel somewhat at home.

    Wasn’t little Barbados one of the early nations to recognize the People’s Republic of China (since 1977) and the geo-political dumping of Taiwan?

    Like

  • @Miller

    Do the Chinese have a Covid problem?

    Like

  • @ David November 19, 2020 9:34 AM

    Do the Americans and Europeans have a “Covid problem”?

    Like

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