Donville Inniss Case Points to Endemic Corruption in Barbados

The blogmaster found the Patrick Hoyos article to be – without prolix – a good summary of the Donville Inniss matter. Especially as it pertains to the inference other payments were made to Donville Inniss and that bribery by elected officials was commonplace in Barbados. Although we have the Attorney General et al saying that local laws would not have permitted prosecution of Inniss this position was challenged during the Inniss trial.

The blogmaster’s wish is that we have a dispassionate debate in Barbados and a call to action by our officials regarding the honest prosecution of public officials. It is ironic former Speaker of the House MICHAEL CARRINGTON and Adriel Brathwaite, former Attorney General showed support for Inniss by attending the trial in New York. CARRINGTON’s legacy will be that a High Court judge had to issue a court order for him to release monies due his client 70+ John Griffiths, the blogmaster will remember Brathwiate for promising to report to parliament the status of Mia Mottley’s qualification (LEC) to practice before the Courts of Barbados. He never did.

The time has come to arrest the moral and ethical rot- add criminal. We have started to experience the negative fallout of pushing our heads in the sand.

Time for the authorities to do a job.

Time for the Prime Minister, Attorney General and stakeholders to lead the charge.

Importantly, time for John Citizens to hold officials accountable.

David, Blogmaster

PS. Blame the blogmaster for paragraphs highlighted blue.


patrick hoyos

Patrick Hoyos, journalist and publisher specialising in business

Four little words that spell prison

It was a four-word text that probably took only a few seconds to write and send, but the events it set in motion led to a guilty verdict on all three counts for former Minister of Industry and Commerce, Donville Inniss.

A United States jury last Thursday found Inniss guilty of two counts of money laundering stemming from two money transfers to the bank accounts of a dental office in New York, and one count of conspiracy to launder money. Prosecutors said Inniss arranged for the money to be transferred through the bank accounts to conceal the bribes. According to the Wall Street Journal, Anthony Ricco, a lawyer for Inniss, didn’t dispute the money transfers, but argued the government’s evidence didn’t support its view that there had been bribes in 2015 and 2016.

According to the Nation newspaper’s Maria Bradshaw, US Prosecutor David Gopstein, in his summation to the jury, said that Inniss was not performing consulting services for Insurance Corporation of Barbados Limited, but was taking bribes and laundering money.

The prosecutor said that up to 2014, ICBL held 50 per cent of the Barbados Investment and Development Corporation’s (BIDC) insurance contract, while Consumers’ Guarantee Insurance had 30 per cent and Trident Insurance 20 per cent.

When the time came for renewal in 2015, the BIDC board of directors recommended that the contract remain the same way, but on June 30, 2015, Alex Tasker, who was the senior vicepresident of ICBL, sent Inniss a text message saying: “We have to talk”.

This four-word message, the prosecutor told the jury, led to the bribery, which was arranged in a week and a half. The day after that text message, Inniss sent a letter to Sonja Trotman, chief executive officer of BIDC, inquiring about the insurance renewal.
As a result, ICBL increased its share to 70 per cent share, leaving CGI with 30 per cent, and Trident Insurance with zero.

The Wall Street Journal said that ICBL, which allegedly paid the bribes, “received a publicised letter in 2018 from the US Justice Department saying it was closing a probe into whether the company had violated the US Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.”

That letter said, in part, that “the Department’s investigation found that ICBL, through its employees and agents, paid approximately $36 000 in bribes to a Barbadian government official in exchange for insurance contracts resulting in approximately $686 827.50 in total premiums for the contracts and approximately $93 940.19 in net profits”. The WSJ’s Dylan Tokar wrote in Friday’s edition that “ICBL had voluntarily disclosed the bribes, enhanced its compliance program and fired the individuals involved in the misconduct, the Justice Department said.”

He added that the Justice Department had sent the letter to ICBL under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act’s Corporate Enforcement Policy which, he said, “offers leniency to companies that disclose potential foreign bribery violations to prosecutors”. This means that Donville, Ingrid [Innes] and Alex had their conspiracy exposed by the parent of the company on whose behalf the latter two were working to increase sales, or at least make budget.

Isn’t it ironic?

It is also a different version of how the story got out than what our own Attorney-General said last Thursday after the verdict was handed down. He said: “It is significant that the conviction came about because individuals who had knowledge of the events were prepared to speak out and to give evidence about wrongdoing.” The AG added: “This is something that is required at all levels in Barbados’ society whether dealing with the scourge of corruption or the scourge of gun violence.”

Meantime, Tokar noted that the Justice Department last year charged ICBL’s former chief executive officer, Ingrid Innes, and its former senior vice- president, Tasker, “who prosecutors said acted as Mr Inniss’ co-conspirators. The two remain at large, a spokesman for the department said.”

As far as I can see, the response in Barbados among the average citizen has been that it’s about time somebody was charged for all of the perceived corruption that went on under the last administration. I haven’t heard much, if any, sympathy for Inniss or his alleged co-conspirators.”

Patrick Hoyos is a journalist and publisher specialising in business. Email: bsjbarbados@gmail.com
Patrick Hoyos

 

155 comments

  • De ole man is rather slow with these things.

    But I would ask one of you bright people to read the following excerpt from Hoyos’ article and explain same to me

    “…The day after that text message, Inniss sent a letter to Sonja Trotman, chief executive officer of BIDC, inquiring about the insurance renewal…”

    Since Inniss DID NOT WORK AT BIDC is it being proposed that the Chief Executive Officer Sonja Trotman AND THE BOARD, colluded with Inniss?

    Is it being said that HAD THE BOARD NOT MADE THIS SUBSTANTIAL CHANGE, this specific act of bribing WOULD NOT HAVE OCCURRED?

    Do any of you remember the “where is my cut?” text by Down Lowe?

    Will members of the BIDC board be sanctioned?

    Is the CEO Sonja Trotman still CEO?

    By the way, did anyone notice that the article https://barbadosunderground.net/2019/04/15/file-complaints-against-lawyers-here/ has been immediately removed from the list that the Blogmaster put up ?

    Heheheheh

    Maybe it has something to do with his paragraph there that reads

    “…The blogmaster gives credit to PUDRYR for his input which led to the creation of this initiative…”

    You people are so intent to keep any opposing comments that show definitively HOW TO DESTROY THE RAMPANT CORRUPTION, especially when 2 bloggers, Piece uh de Rock Yeah Right or I, Piece the Legend, post them that your small minds run and tek down posts like dat.

    Parvi parvos delectant!

    Liked by 1 person

  • The nerve of lying Dale whistleblower…so where is the red bag of evidence Mia was waving aroung and saying..”we got all the evidence right here on DLP corruption”…so why not hand it over to FBI your red bag of evidence that yall showed the world…since yall being so transparent now.

    “It is also a different version of how the story got out than what our own Attorney-General said last Thursday after the verdict was handed down. He said: “It is significant that the conviction came about because individuals who had knowledge of the events were prepared to speak out and to give evidence about wrongdoing.”

    Like

  • Still no statement on Donville from the president, Freundel or the commissioner of police? Why?

    Like

  • @Hal January 24, 2020 6:46 AM

    Indeed, there haven’t been statements by the political class apart from the leader of the Dems and she had no choice. They are all guilty as sin. Doesn’t say much for this country does it?

    Like

  • GP -ONE OF THE REJECTS OF BARBADOS

    They are all guilty as sin. THAT CAN NOT BE DENIED
    WHAT MAY ALSO BE TRUE IS THAT They are all guilty OF THIS sin.

    MURDAH

    Like

  • RE Parvi parvos delectant!
    PIECE ARE YOU SAYING HERE THAT THE PETTY OR SMALL MINDED DELIGHT IN LITTLE OR PETTY THINGS?

    TIS TRUE

    Liked by 1 person

  • Never Move from My Points Crooks ,Liars,and Scumbags , No Rule of Law, Land and Money laundering Drugs and Guns by the BLP & DLP =Crime, Criminals & Corruptions from the GG, PM, AG,DPP, COP Heads of Government Departments Family & Friends

    Like

  • Dr GP,

    I thought that it meant small things amuse small minds.

    De ole man was only repeating what I thought de children was used to say when dem was learning dem book work at school and I was teiffing a 2nd hand education.

    And you know who I am referring to though heheheheh

    Liked by 1 person

  • The day after that text message, Inniss sent a letter to Sonja Trotman, chief executive officer of BIDC, inquiring about the insurance renewal.

    As a result, ICBL increased its share to 70 per cent share, leaving CGI with 30 per cent, and Trident Insurance with zero.

    ++++++++++++++++
    If the Board made the decision to renew the insurance at the same percentage as before how come the CEO was able to circumvent the Boards decision?

    Like

  • PIECE
    RE I thought that it meant small things amuse small minds.
    INDEED!

    MUCH THE SAME AS THE PETTY OR SMALL MINDED DELIGHT IN LITTLE OR PETTY THINGS

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Dr. Lucas

    The matter is considered sub judice because lawyers for Inniss have signaled he will appeal.

    Like

  • Bajan Free Party 2023 0r sooner

    No free Press

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    David Blogmaster u are being quite like ‘Alice’ when u state:
    “Time for the Prime Minister, Attorney General and stakeholders to lead the charge.”

    You are in ‘Wonderland’, brother.

    I knew, like and respected a young Dale Marshall when he lived just before the ‘bridge’ in St. George but I know not this man now other than his public persona and there is NOTHING to suggest he has any internal fortitude (or ‘de balls’ … love that ‘Jones’ skit) to initiate serious change.

    I consider that Brit initiated review a further money transfer action that will be more heat that actual charges to be laid.

    As Hoyos alluded to… Mr Marshall was caught out as paying lip service by his own words … which if taken in blunt terms were basically lying to the people when he said :

    “It is significant that the conviction came about because individuals who had knowledge of the events were prepared to speak out and to give evidence about wrongdoing.”

    The other ‘lie’ that nothing could be done to corral Inniss under Bdos law was atrociously ridiculous… but maybe I am misquoting the brother there.

    If the AG himself were to speak out and to give evidence about wrongdoing what a difference that would make.

    Or put another way he has a superb opportunity to restore some of his school pride following the trauma of a crooked former PM… or is that just too ‘old school’😎

    I remain hopeful at how John Citizen will make a difference with these officials but really not ‘expectant’.

    I gone.

    BTW: David, Hoyos for some years now has been writing some very penetrative articles… We should discuss more of his stuff more often!

    Gone, gone .(hope to be back tho, Doc 😂)

    Like

  • Nonsense. An appeal dos not come under the sub judice rules.

    Liked by 1 person

  • It is also a different version of how the story got out than what our own Attorney-General said last Thursday after the verdict was handed down. He said: “It is significant that the conviction came about because individuals who had knowledge of the events were prepared to speak out and to give evidence about wrongdoing.”
    +++++++++++++++++
    Dale Marshall is in over his head, he is perhaps the longest serving Atty. Gen having held the post in two different Cabinets as well as being the Opposition spokesman on legal affairs, yet he continues to confound, confuse and mislead anyone seeking clarity on any matter that comes under his direction.

    Is this the best that we can do?

    Like

  • @ Sargeant

    You miss a key point: the president only appoints people she thinks she can talk over their heads. Marshall is the inferior lawyer to the president and he knows that.

    Like

  • The comments of several prominent lawyers and politicos were carried in the press last week and all to a man and woman cited no comment. A couple mentioned sub judice because it is an ongoing matter.

    Like

  • An appeal does not come under the sub judice rules. If so, only in Barbados, a jurisdiction that does not understand anything about the rule of law.
    The more likely explanation is that any lawyer saying that does not know anything about the sub judice rules. They should go back to law school. Name and shame the lawyers who made that claim.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ dpD at 9 :49 AM

    If it is”a le Jones”, should it not be “testitudinal fortitude “?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Read AGAIN and then READ AGAIN…they all have to go to prison, in Barbados’ case it has gone on for FAR TOO LONG.

    “In recent years, a series of leaks has revealed the extent to which the financial system continues to be abused by the rich. The Panama Papers helped expose the role played by “secrecy jurisdictions”, shell companies and “professional enablers” such as lawyers and accountants. Investigations into laundromat schemes for money laundering have shone a light on the role of corruption in the judiciary. And through scandals such as the one engulfing the Danish bank Danske Bank in Estonia, we have learned about longstanding failings in the compliance procedures of the banking sector.

    Despite all this, it is sometimes difficult to see the true impact of the wholesale theft of national wealth. That’s what’s significant about the latest dump of documents, called the Luanda Leaks because of their connection with Angola. They reveal not only how Isabel dos Santos, daughter of José Eduardo dos Santos, the former president of Angola, was able to amass a fortune of more than $2bn; they also reveal the misery inflicted by the theft of national wealth.

    While the winners enjoy the luxuries of living in London, partying in Mediterranean resorts and winter sun aboard multimillion-dollar yachts, the losers’ lives are blighted by sewage, eviction and disease.”

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Hal Austin at 10 :34 AM

    Are you going to condemn the whole jurisdiction of Barbados because of the opinion of a few? Or is it one ?

    Like

  • “The Panama Papers helped expose the role played by “secrecy jurisdictions”, shell companies and “professional enablers” such as lawyers and accountants.”

    that is how i was able to put my hands on the multimillion dollar bank account numbers, social security number and names for Money Launderers Inc, Barbados…as long as they remember i still got them.

    Like

  • @ Vincent

    Only if the one is the AG or the learned chairman. Otherwise I believe thy know better. As to the rule of law, check out the 84 murder cases still waiting to be settled.
    Seriously, it can be frustrating when you know something is wrong, you point it out, and some nutcase insists he is right.

    Liked by 1 person

  • There is a perception that PAYING BRIBES may be commonplace in Barbados but we all know that Elliot Ness and the untouchables are untouchable in Barbados.

    Only those who accept bribes are guilty.

    Those who PAY bribes do so to protect the jobs of ordinary Bajans.

    buh doan mine me. I jus writin shiite as usual.

    Liked by 1 person

  • https://cnn.it/30QIJOF?fbclid=IwAR2Q-gSlOZEtknz1Yz5vMVuO9g3AFbmq4D5XI3KbdXkPaccvR5yQ0LxBsHI

    Well if Wells Fargo can get BANNED…who are these shitehounds in Barbados and the Caribbean.

    “New York (CNN Business)Former Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf on Thursday agreed to a lifetime ban from the banking industry and a $17.5 million fine for his role in leading the bank through its massive fake accounts scandal and other sales practice misconduct.

    In addition to Stumpf, the US Office of the Comptroller of the Currency fined seven other former Wells Fargo (WFC) executives about $40 million in connection to what the OCC described as “the bank’s systemic sales practices misconduct.”
    The civil charges brought by the federal agency say the executives “failed to adequately perform their duties and responsibilities, which contributed to the bank’s systemic problems with sales practices misconduct from 2002 until October 2016.”

    Liked by 1 person

  • “Hal AustinJanuary 24, 2020 10:15 AM

    @ Sargeant

    You miss a key point: the president only appoints people she thinks she can talk over their heads. Marshall is the inferior lawyer to the president and he knows that.”

    What sayest thou? The present Attorney General has his LEC; to the best of my knowledge Ms Mottley doesn’t

    trying to be humorous

    Liked by 1 person

  • I thought the blog master asked for a “dispassionate” debate.

    Instead of feasting on gossip and railing against a prominent scapegoalt and his associates, Barbadians should use the Inniss case to reflect on the obvious weaknesses of the political system we have created.

    Most political activity is expected to be self-financing. Is this a reasonable expectation?

    Political parties are costly to establish and maintain, particularly in an age where so many ordinary voters seek gifts and favours in exchange for their support. When ambitious politicians must somehow find ways to pay all their bills, the pool of candidates for high office is going to be extremely small.

    Of course, if a politician is lucky and gifted enough to succeed, it only gets worse. He will be expected to find the resources to look and live like a leader, and to bring relatives and friends along with him. He will likely be thrust into the company of millionaires and billionaires with lifestyles he can only dream about. And he will have to make plans for contingencies — like an unexpected demotion or an election defeat.

    Human nature is what it is. Why do we put such extraordinary pressures on ordinary people, and then celebrate their downfall?

    Like

  • The ex CEO of Wells Fargo has been banned for life because of good regulation. Where is the insurance regulator in Barbados re ICBL? World class, punching above our weight.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Hants
    the theme of the article, suggests where the bribe began. DI didn’t demand it?
    And the ICBL gain was only the 20% contract formerly held by Trident. Albeit, they may have had info they were losing additional share
    What the trial didn’t offer was a historical perspective of the premiums paid. And since they were TWO payments, it is unclear whether the numbers quoted included TWO years worth of business.
    Around the time, there was a picture in the papers of Innes/Tasker along with S.Lashley as Min of Sport, and DI as the elected constituency person, at the Desmond Haynes courts at the top of Holders Hill, where ICBL had paid for renovations. The “deal” likely included more than the two payments to Crystal.

    Like

  • @ Sergeant

    Your question of how the CEO was able to do as he likes and go against the board, i had said a few weeks ago should of led to 2 things, were any of them there ” worth the salt” as the bajans say.

    First If the board members had any backbone they would of called in the press and publically resigned.

    Secondly had the owners any backbone they would of called for the full resignation of the board and especially of the 2 staff members directly implicated.

    So answer me this why hasn’t the board been called to resign by the owners of the company? Is their failure to call for their resignation to be taken as a sign of condoning this type of activity as long as business is got from it?

    Say what wunna like, if this happened in the good old USA heads would of roll and action would all like now have been taken by both the owners and the state.

    But here if you going thief then thief big. Don’t take up a can of corn beef though or you tail ” loss way.”

    Like

  • The other issue not fully addressed is the reason for the Board dropping Trident to do with it not being BEST rated. It should be noted that CGI that retained the other business is also not BEST rated.

    Liked by 1 person

  • “It is also a different version of how the story got out….”
    Yes and no.
    This the Fraud Section letter to ICBL lawyer
    https://www.justice.gov/criminal-fraud/page/file/1089626/download?mod=article_inline

    However, the prosecution was able to get the former ICBL CFO, Ms.Millar, to testify (albeit in exchange for protection against prosecution) Possibly it was the AG’s view it was this testimony which made the case.

    The letter above stated ” (6) ICBL’s remediation, including but not limited to terminating all of the
    executives and employees who were involved in the misconduct”….is interesting. Ms Innes RESIGNED in Jan 2017. Mr.Tasker announcement of his joining Digicel was in July 2017, and Ms Millar left [according her LinkedIn profile] at the end of Dec 2017. So, WHO got terminated? Ms Millar? or whom else was deemed to be ‘involved’.

    Liked by 1 person

  • “Secondly had the owners any backbone they would of called for the full resignation of the board and especially of the 2 staff members directly implicated.”

    Only Ms Innes was a Board member. She left the Board the day of her resignation as CEO.
    May the good Lord help us, if the BOARD, is to responsible for the rogue conduct of ALL employees. Who would ever join a Board?

    Liked by 1 person

  • We all knew the noise was shite, then all the fowls and co-conspirators lined up in a row to cackle too.

    “Foreign Minister of St Kitts and Nevis Mark Brantley has dismissed as “unnecessary noise” the recent position taken by Caribbean Community (CARICOM) chairman, Barbados Prime Minister Mia Mottley, in opposition to talks held here this week involving some of her CARICOM colleagues and the United States (US) Secretary of State, Mike Pompeo.”

    Like

  • @ Northern.

    The board knew well before the whole issue broke that the CEO had over ruled a board decision. It was at that point they should of called the press and resigned.

    To stay on after that was done at board level is to condone the act.

    Remember when Tony Marshall resigned from the NIS board? He didn’t wait for Sinkler to print for 3 years first, he did so once the board decision was gone against.

    Like

  • @JohnA
    which “board” are you referring to?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Northern

    I speak of the ICBL board

    Like

  • @JohnA
    OK
    “The board knew well before the whole issue broke that the CEO had over ruled a board decision”
    So the ICBL Board knew well before the whole issue broke (the bribery?) that the (ICBL?) CEO, had over ruled an ICBL board decision.
    What board decision did the CEO overrule? Should the resign or fire the CEO?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Northern

    Well this is the point where in my view everything broke down.

    My point here is what has the board and the owners put in place to ensure this will not happen again? What action either civil or otherwise, will the company be taking against those involved?

    If nothing is done what message does that send to ALL of the employees at ICBL, even the ones that may consider stealing a stapler?

    Total lack of corporate management and the enforcement of discipline.

    Like

  • @ John A

    If the board knew, then the CEO should have been sacked. Incompetence.

    Like

  • The change in supplier of insurance services would have been recorded in Board Papers. What was the explanation recorded and what do the meeting minutes record of the explanations from the officers of the company present when matter was discussed.

    Like

  • @JohnA
    but….you didn’t share what decision the ICBL CEO over-ruled?

    Read the Fraud Section letter to ICBL lawyer and you will see the claims of changes made.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Blogmaster
    u now refer to the BIDC Board?
    ICBL and BIDC are to similar and can be confusing

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    Too many Boards.We need to be clear on which board. The BIDC Board to whom an explanation would be in order. The ICBL Board re what?A slight rise in the costs of Dental services? Man,we mekking sport yuh.

    Like

  • It’s Friday and WordPress has its usual Friday blues….and I gotta run….sooooo
    I do not have access to the court transcripts, so rely on reports.

    ”Also taking the stand today was Wight, ….he said after he became aware of the transactions on October 4, 2016, he sought a response from both Innes and Tasker, to no avail” [qoute BT Jan 14 2020] For the record Wight was Chair of ICBL AND CEO of parent company BF&M

    “Legere said she had tried repeatedly to get information from Innes, former chief financial officer Kamante Millar and BF&M’s former chief information officer Paul Matthews, to no avail.” [quote BT Jan 15 2020] For the record Legere was CFO at BF&M.

    You mean to tell me, and I am no lawyer, that DI lawyers didn’t PEPPER the two BF&M employees taking the stand, with questions about how the ^&*(^%$# as CEO/Chair and CFO they could rest with responses which were “to no avail”?? Why they didn’t push for answers? Did they know more than they admitting? If I am going down, it will not be without a fight.
    Shouldn’t they, Wight and Legere, have called a meeting pronto to determine EXACTLY what the two payments to Crystal Dental labs were about? They obviously had NO URGENCY, nor discovered much, for Mr Tasker was still an ICBL employee at least 8 MONTHS after the payments were brought to their attention.

    OR….?????

    Guess more will be revealed at the sentencing.
    And we hear where the DOJ cases against Innes and Tasker stand.

    Like

  • @Yes, BIDC Board. What was the CEOs input if the matter was raised for discussion. If we were to assume it was discussed …

    Like

  • @Hal

    Yes 100% agree with you that is what should of happen. Corporate structure is there for a reason, if we ignore it then it’s a ” brek for yourself ” scenario.

    Like

  • Was the BIDC CEO a member of the BIDC Board? It is the Board Chair and the Annual Report of the BIDC , oh I forgot, our public bodies don’t do Annual reports any longer.
    In seriousness, the matter may require a Special Report, every supplier contract may not reach the Board, esp if there is some ‘funny stuff’

    Liked by 1 person

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @Northern, you seem to be the one on track here.

    I have NOT reviewed the details but I am a bit perplexed WHY or HOW a board (of ICBL) would have prior knowledge that the ‘sales team’ had castled Trident to win the additional 20% of business.

    As you suggested are folks conflating Boards here.

    And as you said WHAT ICBL board decision did the CEO overrule.

    I am missing details but at ame time the convo seems strange.

    The only push back I have with ur analysis is the ‘dismissal’ of the additional 20%.

    The raw numbers may be small but that’s a sizable increase of that client’s premium portfolio… that type of bump could definitely make for a great sales year (for an exec) if all others things are going well.

    And thinking in terms of that Amazon US cloud contract won and lost amidst complains from competitors one has to examine the Blogmaster’s point re: The other issue not fully addressed is the reason for … dropping Trident to do..

    Wouldn’t their CEO be concerned ; did he have no one to text and say “we need to talk”.

    Enquiring minds wonder how all that really went down!

    High end day to day sales is ruthless and people do deliberately take you down!

    Liked by 1 person

  • “You mean to tell me, and I am no lawyer, that DI lawyers didn’t PEPPER the two BF&M employees taking the stand, with questions about how the ^&*(^%$# as CEO/Chair and CFO they could rest with responses which were “to no avail”?? Why they didn’t push for answers? Did they know more than they admitting? If I am going down, it will not be without a fight.”

    Then more things you DON’T WANT TO COME OUT WILL..lol

    Like

  • @Northern Observer

    Is it not standard for officers (by invitation) of the company to present management reports to the Board?

    Like

  • @ David January 24, 2020 9:13 AM

    “The matter is considered sub judice because lawyers for Inniss have signaled he will appeal”

    So what ? Barbados is an entirely different jurisdiction to the US. Making a statement in Barbados will not affect the outcome of the case. The local legal fraternity use this sub judice thing to cow free expression. In America when the OJ case was going on, commentators were having a field day. This is a ruse to intimidate the populace and I will not observe it.

    Like

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Dr. Lucas

    Some of you do not get it.

    Tongue in cheek remarks that is.

    Liked by 1 person

  • ” ENDEMIC CORRUPTION IN BARBADOS ” ?

    So why are we BUvians only discussing one case of Donvilledidit and won the race to the USA court conviction.

    ENDEMIC ” a condition regularly found among particular people or in a certain area.”

    So let us add other instances of corruption so as to give credibility to the use of the word endemic.

    Those who PAY BRIBES and those who ACCEPT or DEMAND BRIBES are equally GUILTY.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Blogmaster
    yes. and it is selective versus exhaustive.
    As a comparison….neither the Annual report covering the annual 2018 period, for FB&M nor ICBL, makes any reference to this matter. They will likely argue it is “immaterial”.
    Yet….FB&M only owns just over 51% of ICBL, it is over 2,000 Barbadians who own 48% and who were faced with a large dividend decline last year. These shareholders need to be ‘keeping noise’. And find out out which of FB&M and ICBL have been booking the various charges.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Northern

    You may find it in the small print of the notes as ” an adjustment” LOL

    Like

  • @ Northern

    If it not there it might be under the other 2 darkholes they like to drop embarrassments into in the notes.

    UNUSUAL EXPENSES
    MISCELLANEOUS

    You could loss way $80000 bajan In there and the average shareholder wouldn’t even know to look in those 2 Pandora boxes.

    Liked by 1 person

  • peterlawrencethompson

    I remember hearing of a DLP cabinet minister who put a bunch of money that he was trying to hide into his mother’s Bank account. But then when his mother died, his siblings demanded their share. Who was that?

    Like

  • @DIW
    “The only push back I have with ur analysis is the ‘dismissal’ of the additional 20%.”[quote]

    The DOJ letter referenced above, pegs the premium(s) from BIDC, to ICBL, at US$687,000. I ‘suspect’ they may cover premiums from TWO years. Hence the 20% in premiums, held by Trident are “relatively small”. What is does subsequently, is raise why ICBL chose to offer 5% of the TOTAL business??? This may suggest, word was out was that BIDC was giving ICBL LESS than the prior year, hence their desire to hold on to what they had, plus more.

    ICBL Annual report 2018 year….”Net Loss and EPS
    The Net Loss attributable to the shareholders of the
    Company for 2018 was ($8.9M) compared to a loss
    of ($1.2M) in 2017, resulting in EPS of ($0.23), a $0.20
    reduction year over year. ”

    Tings were tight????

    Like

  • There was a minority shareholders association. What has become of it?

    Like

  • @JohnA
    ICBL report
    https://icbl.com/media/1549/icbl_annual_report_2018.pdf
    FB&M report
    https://www.bfm.bm/getattachment/d4e7aeec-ed7e-4ee3-a570-789d1ddf4d57/2018-Annual-Report.aspx

    see if your search can find anything. Didn’t have time to seek the needle in the haystack

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Northern

    The info you desire would be in the accompanying notes to the audit which do not have to be made public.

    Anyhow as you washing their laundry let me get piece lol. So you lose one year $1.2M and wunna come back in $2018 and loss $8.9M. In all of this the same board et al watch the two top brass tek up $36k USD and pay a dentist in New York for dentures or something so!

    All that said the same board there and not a single case brought by ICBL nor we Legal Eagle in government. I would say something fishy here, but wuhloss it smell like Oistins market after the water did lock up for a month!

    Like

  • There is enough for the FSC to commission a governance review of ICBL and the finds could possibly trigger the investigation that has been late in coming.

    Like

  • @ david.

    The supervisor of insurance should of been on this like flies on horse dung! There is more than enough to support an enquiry here. Likewise the DPP in conjunction with the fraud squad as well.

    This has got to be the biggest joke making the rounds now in the Florida court system.

    Like

  • @Hal

    what you are talking about is director disqualification which falls under the company act in most jurisdictions. whilst i havent researched it, i doubt Bim has such a rule.

    sub judice doesnt preclude any person from discussing in general terms any court case but we like to use it as an excuse. in addition no lawyers has to discuss this matter sub judice or not.

    @dribbler
    quote] Or put another way he has a superb opportunity to restore some of his school pride following the trauma of a crooked former PM… or is that just too ‘old school ]quote

    kindly explain how that former PM was a crook

    Like

  • Yall ain’t getting that none of them want an investigation, who is sitting on whose board and who is investing in this or that taxpayer funded project with the taxpayers and pensioners ALWAYS THE LOSERS will come to light. Not even Donville was brave Enuff to put on a defense. Too much will come out and trigger enuff investigations to last 30 or 40 years, they will all be going to court with walking sticks…or in prison for that length of time.

    they are all just sitting and praying that all this will just go away, while we are all praying and hoping that there are really 17 sealed indictments waiting for all of them….as people have been saying for some time.

    Like

  • The former AG and Carrington must lose their admission to the bar. Both damage the reputation of the Barbados legal profession by openly standing up for the Don. Their behaviour gives foreign investors the impression that in Barbados the legal profession is closer to drug trafficking and forced prostitution than being an honourable profession. Both defame an entire profession.

    Ideally, the Bar Association should revoke the admission of ALL DLP party members and then re-admit those who exceptionally prove to be innocent.

    Like

  • @ David January 24, 2020 3:29 PM

    That is not a tongue in cheek statement. I meant every word. I am not particularly interested in what these jokers in the judiciary say. Let me repeat what I have stated else where on this blog. I have no faith/confidence in the judiciary of this country. Remember, it took the Caribbean Court of Justice to inform these jokers that a man remanded for five years must have the five years deducted from the actual time he is required to serve. It was then made impossible to sue the asses ( that is what they are,pompous asses, walking around the place in their wigs seemingly never having heard Hans Christian Andersen song,” The King’s new clothes). The easiest course at University and these nit wits want to lord it over people.

    Like

  • @Hoyoa “June 30, 2015, Alex Tasker, who was the senior vicepresident of ICBL, sent Inniss a text message saying: “We have to talk”.

    I know that we are not supposed to impute motive, but i wonder what motivated Tasker to call Inniss?

    Like

  • @Tron
    Bullshit.
    The former AG and DI have been friends long before politics.
    Maybe even business associates.
    Nothing wrong in supporting your friends, even if they do things they may regret.

    Like

  • re Minority Shareholders Assoc
    dunno. Did they ever meet with any success? C&W? or any other?
    Really tough when your position is <10%, and or, a single entity has >50%.
    BTW…a JV between ICBL & NIS is mentioned, what is that?

    Like

  • @ Northern.

    Don’t waste you time. Why not ask Tron why his beloved Attorney General has not moved on this matter?

    Why has a party that run of Accountability and Transparent with the intention of stamping out Corruption not done one RH to pursue this matter in light of all that came out of the Florida Case?

    Bare hot air and long talk that is all we ever get from politicians.

    Like

  • @David January 24, 2020 9:13 AM “The matter is considered sub judice because lawyers for Inniss have signaled he will appeal.”

    Question for the legal eagles: if matter is sub judice in the USA is it also sub judice in Barbados?

    “In law, sub judice, Latin for “under a judge”, means that a particular case or matter is under trial or being considered by a judge or court. In England and Wales, Ireland, New Zealand, Australia, South Africa, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Canada, Sri Lanka, and Israel it is generally considered inappropriate to comment publicly on cases sub judice, which can be an offence in itself, leading to contempt of court proceedings. This is particularly true in criminal cases, where publicly discussing cases sub judice may constitute interference with due process” Wiki

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Ewart Archer January 24, 2020 11:26 AM “I thought the blog master asked for a “dispassionate” debate. Instead of feasting on gossip and railing against a prominent scapegoalt”

    Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear. So now we the ordinary voters are responsible for the downfall of a prominent?

    My auntie was Donville’s constituent. She was disabled and at home for the better part of a decade. She lived within easy walking distance of Donville’s office. Never saw him. Weeks after she died a cheap postcard showed up at the then empty house. I don’t know if Donville saw that as help. It was NOT help. and I immediately threw it into the garbage. I was her principal caregiver and to the best of my knowledge she received NOTHING from her MP. No material help. No referral to government help, no visits, no phone calls. If MP’s ignore their elderly disabled constituents, who then are they giving all of this help to?

    I don’t know where this rumor has arisen that we the electorate are a burdren on our MP’s.

    Our MP’s typically ignore us except when THEY WANT SOMETHING FROM US, that is when they want a vote on election day.

    Too many of them, all parties are too damn useless.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ peterlawrencethompsonJanuary 24, 2020 4:51 PM

    Did you download that menacing story ?

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @Greene, re ‘kindly explain how that former PM was a crook”.

    Having been called to account all I can say is:

    ‘Bajans need to know if their PM is a crook. He was not (convicted as) a crook.!’

    Your brother was (not) a saint.

    Like

  • If you listened carefully to the first press conference given by the AG when he mentioned the ICBL matter, he intimated that ICBL underwrites a significant share of government business. Somewhere in the statement an answer is lurking.

    Liked by 1 person

  • This podcast is an eye opener (you may have to deactivate your cookies to listen to it). It is a high quality investigation carried out by The Guardian newspaper on Isabel dos Santos. By extension it helps to explain the relationship shared between White Oaks and the BLP.

    https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2020/jan/24/how-isabel-dos-santos-became-africa-richest-woman-podcast

    Like

  • “The easiest course at University and these nit wits want to lord it over people.”

    that is most of them, uppity, ignorant and full of themselves, all of them educated at the people’s expense and all they know to do is tief, sell out and show off, nothing positive or progressive to help lift up the people and country, that is foreign to them…the lawyers and other self serving politicians have destroyed the island with stupidity..

    everyone now awaits their… reap what they sowed moments…Donville was first.

    Like

  • The Barbados Bar Association has expressed its disapproval of money laundering in the wake of a recent guilty verdict against former Minister of Commerce and Industry Donville Inniss.

    President of the Bar; Rosalind Smith-Millar said the association did not condone the breaking of the law in any form by any person.

    “I think it is very sad that someone who had achieved such a position of power in public life has found himself in this position. I think it is important that we hasten to get integrity in public life legislation in place. “To speak on behalf of the Bar, all I can say is that we do not condone breaking of the law by anyone under any circumstances. Those who break the law will have to face the consequences,” she said.

    Meanwhile members of the fraternity remained mum when asked to comment on the case, particularly on Inniss’ defence strategy where no witnesses were called and he said nothing in his defence.

    Queen’s Counsel Hal Gollop said he could offer no comment on the matter

    “I am a lawyer, and my information is that matter is on appeal which means it is sub judice and I have no comment to make about it,: he said

    Other prominent attorneys responded similarly.

    Michael Lashley and Andrew Pilgrim, both QC;s as well as Douglas Trotman, said they preferred not to comment on the issue.

    Inniss who remains on bail, will return to court on February 13 for sentencing.

    He was arrested in 2018 following a year-long undercover probe by the Federal Bureau of Investigations.

    Sunday Sun, January 19, 2020, page 3A

    Like

  • I notice that ICBL had to forfeit the profit made from this business transaction…..$93,000 US…..that is all taxpayers monies……can we all acknowledge now why the economy went down the drain and why no buses, garbage trucks, police vehicles could be bought and why no roads could be fixed……the bribes had to be paid at the expense of Barbadians.

    Even the mighty US got some of our taxpayers’ monies.

    Has anyone stopped to think that bearing in mind the nature of Barbadian politics that maybe the AG is hoping that the US bring the charges and not the local police?

    Liked by 1 person

  • “President of the Bar Rosalind Smith-Millar said the association did not condone the breaking of the law in any form by any person.”

    Yet they have no problem when lawyers steal client’s funds which they have been doing for decades or steal whole estates from generations of beneficiaries of the elderly or go into people’s million dollar bank accounts and remove every penny ….these liars and frauds from the bar association calling themselves heads.

    Like

  • When you have made yourself notorious and believe you will always be untouchable..

    Like

  • An article on Mia by a journalist making the rounds on FB. That false sense of entitlement and pretend invincibility is OVER…………alyuh criminal syndicate is in the full glare of the world and everyone is watching. I would much prefer to be me any day than any of you.

    Dumbass ass fowls can continue following, everyone will be happy to see the end result embarassment.

    Like

  • Yep…the criminal syndicate that continues to rob vulnerable black people in the Caribbean cannot hide anymore, they are MAGGOTS feeding off the living and their time has come to be exposed ..they have carried on their fraud against people long Enuff…how does it feel to see your thieving pretense selves being shown to the world..

    https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=2725062994275102&id=100003142830469

    Like

  • I notice this story was on Barbados Underground before with this very same journalist who realised that the black faces in the parliament were fighting to keep the apartheid and racism against the black majority alive and well. EVIL NEGROS.

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/thepeacefulcaribbean/permalink/2400460586727286/?sfnsn=scwspwa&extid=w9crQvNyAE6VijA2

    Like

  • @ Greene

    You are right. A ban can also be under regulatory rules. Look at the former CEO of Wells Fargo. As to sub judice, a breach is a criminal offence ( I know, the SFO threatened me), but it does not apply in judge-only cases.

    Liked by 1 person

  • “but it does not apply in judge-only cases.”

    those frauds for lawyers in Barbados would never tell the people that, they have always used it as a weapon of fear…to muzzle people, even their own clients.

    Like

  • Well it’s true, the skunks at the bar association know well enuff that personal injury cases are judge only, yet they MUZZLE even the injured from talking, don’t even want them to open their mouths in the courtroom..then they claim to practice westminster style law, but only when it suits their evil purpose…….FRAUDS and liars the whole of them.

    the vile supreme court of crooks and thieves…MUST BE DISMANTLED.

    Like

  • Bet no one in blp camp touch the above issue
    To them it is a dead issue but the underlying sequences lies closely attached to corruption in high places
    However Donville Inniss for all intents and purpose would remain the poster child of corruption in Barbados
    Wow750 thousand dollars a lot of money towards campagain financing

    Like

  • Hmmm seems like toes been steeped on very quiet up in here

    Like

  • Mariposa

    What is your point?

    Everyone with a modicum of commonsense knows both BLP and DLP present and former Ministers have been crooks and dishonest people and ALL NEED LOCKING UP.

    Anyone who takes up for them is a bigger jackass and probably involved in the rampant dishonesty/stealing on the island.

    Like

  • Baje

    Fair and balanced
    Fair and balanced reporting if u know what that means

    Like

  • A funny thing…
    More interested in what happened to the salt-bread case than to Donville Innis..
    Don’t want that poor man to fall through the cracks for 12-years.

    Like

  • @ Mariposa January 25, 2020 7:43 AM

    So why don’t you go to the police as a complainant with the evidence? Isn’t that what your previous boss man recommended?

    Why didn’t your excessively incompetent corrupt deceitful lying party prosecute the OSA heist while it was in office during the lost decade?

    Why are you so proud of promoting Donville as the poster boy for the next general elections political horse race which the badly injured DLP is advised to consider itself ‘Scratched’ until further notice?

    Why can’t you stop yourself from being used (as the mouthpiece of that totally discredited party) like a thin roll of toilet tissue or as a recycled condom?

    Where is your mirror image, Ms Many pussies? Is it that of a blue-blooded johnny?

    Like

  • @ Theo

    What salt bread man. He was remanded until January 2, today is Jan 25, yet our great newspapers have not yet reported on the outcome, unless I missed something. If he was Chinese it would have been on the front page of the Advocate.
    We are world class when it comes to the rule of law, we punch above our weight.

    Like

  • As usual the big thinkers here missing the larger picture, Mariposa is a spokesman for the “buy local” program. If Donville had bought local i.e. received his campaign contribution in local shekels as was done in the past we wouldn’t have fodder for this discussion.

    We would be more focused on “We gatherin”.

    Like

  • @ Mariposa

    Baje

    Fair and balanced
    Fair and balanced reporting if u know what that means
    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    WHAT MORE FAIR AND BALANCED DO YOU WANT WHEN NEITHER PARTY BLP OR DLP HAS EVER PROSECUTED EACH OTHER FOR THE CORRUPT DEEDS THEY HAVE EXPOSED OR ACCUSED EACH OTHER IN LOCAL COURTS?

    AS IT IS ALL BUSINESS AS USUAL WHILST MISLEADING THE GULLIBLE LOCALS.

    IN THIS CASE, IT WAS A FOREIGN ENTITY (USA) OUT OF LOCAL CONTROL AND TRICKS THAT EXPOSED AND PROSECUTED TO UPSET THE LOCAL APPLECART.

    Hope this helps to remove the cloud in your head and see the bigger picture if u know what that means

    Like

  • @ NorthernObserver January 24, 2020 6:41 PM

    “Friends”??? These are nice friends. I’d call them accomplices. Both persons supported a convicted criminal, a foreigner who had abused his residence permit in the USA for crimes under federal law, in public and thus gave the world the impression that Barbados is a criminal hole in nowhere.

    We must correct this false picture immediately. We need a major cleansing with the Demon Hammer in the Barbadian legal profession – immediately.

    We don’t need lamenting, fables and pretty talk anymore, but tough decisions. The time for male gossip and losers is over in Barbados. Men have ruled Barbados since time began and have done nothing but get women pregnant out of wedlock.

    Time for our beloved Mia Mottley to tidy up among the bunch of men and take a hard line on some of these good-for-nothings. She is married to Barbados, as all the deadbeats on the island could not meet her high standards.

    Like

Join in the discussion, you never know how expressing your view may make a difference.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s