Adrian Loveridge Column – Keep On Working it

Spirit Airlines, the Miramar (Florida) based leading low cost carrier has recently signed a memorandum of understanding with European based aircraft manufacturer, Airbus, to add 100 aircraft to its fleet by 2027 plus an option to buy an additional 50 planes, at a later date. The airline already operates 500 flights to 67 destinations daily.

In a statement issued by CEO (Chief Executive Officer) Ted Christie, ‘this order represents another milestone for Spirit’ and ‘the additional aircraft will be used to support Spirit’s growth as we add new destinations and expand our network across the US, Latin America and the Caribbean’. The order includes a mixture of Airbus A319, A320 and A321 models. By the end of this year, Spirit already will have a fleet of 145 aircraft and anticipates another 48 will be added during next year and 2021. This despite being particularly hit by the cancelling of 768 flights, because of Hurricane Dorian during September, which cost the company an estimated US$25 million in revenue.

Could Barbados benefit from this proposed expansion without alienating existing airlift from the United States specifically JetBlue and American Airlines?

Our United States visitor numbers have dramatically increased during the last few years after close to a decade of near stagnation, which has largely fuelled recent record arrival numbers.

Is a there destination currently served by Spirit that may offer an attractive new route to Barbados?

Even the smallest aircraft in Spirit’s new order, the A319neo (new engine option) has a passenger capacity of between 110 and 140 seats in two classes with a range of 3,750 (nm) nautical miles, opening up almost infinite pairing possibilities. Maybe a return to Atlanta (1,833 nm) or Dallas (2,353 nm) could be on the cards, or an attempt at Houston (2,222 nm) and maybe attract first time visitors from the long winters of Chicago (2,259 nm) and Minneapolis/St. Paul (2,567 nm).

All quite operationally plausible nonstop in around five hours or less!

New smaller planes with extended range and greater fuel efficiency present the opportunity to grow new markets with direct flights into targeted areas, so surely we can fill at least one 100 plus seat A319 weekly from the cities mentioned?

Caribbean cities currently serviced by Spirit include: Aruba, St. Thomas, St. Croix, Port au Prince, Kingston, Montego Bay, San Juan, St. Maarten, Punta Cana, Santiago, Santo Domingo, Cancun and Cabo San Lucas. We have been blessed to have benefited from the skills and expertise of Petra Roach and her team from the New York office of the Barbados Tourism Marketing Inc. Let us hope that the recent changes in personnel does not in any way diminish that momentum and it will be maintained under new leadership.

94 comments

  • @ Mr Adrian Loveridge

    A great article.

    You not only profiled the provider, you provided context for the offering.

    Detailed your proffering with distances and type and size aircraft

    Provided preliminary Due Diligence cum Air Worthiness evaluations

    Then went into the Do Not Compete Considerations for the Tourism Nitwits that abound.

    Then, as if only to confirm my lax comment above you went on to direct your suggestion to a person in whom you have confidence as to delivery of this vision!

    I commend the submission BUT DE OLE MAN THINKS IT GOING FAIL BECAUSE, AS EASY AS YOU HAVE LAID OUT THESE PARAMETERS, “IT BE A BRIDGE TOO FAR FOR BARBADIANS, Loveridge”

    We, bajans ent mek this way, you have to bring the entire concept sliced and diced to us.

    This is like a bajan at a bus stop, 2 feet away from a garbage bin.

    Dem have a box of Chefette with 3 legs and two breasts and a drink.

    When dem done eating WHERE YOU TINK DAT BOX GINE?

    In the garbage bin 2 feet away or behind bem lazy ass back?

    Your concept IS TOO MUCH EFFORT FOR OUR LAZY ASSES.

    Good article notwithstanding

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  • @ Adrian

    A very good piece. Quite informative.

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  • Mr. Loveridge: You certainly lay out a good argument for Barbados to be served by Spirit. It would appear, however, that many of the Carribean and South America destinations are served from hubs and very little direct or nonstop service from the possible origination cities mentioned. The fares are low on Spirit but the ancillary charges can bring the cost up to comparable to fares on legacy carriers. However, there must be a market or they would not thrive. The problem with providing incentives is that everybody wants them going forward. It remains to be seen if there is a market for an ultra-low-cost carrier or in fact the clientele would be taken from the legacy carriers or a new market created. At any rate an interesting proposal!

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  • A LOT OF UNKIND THINGS HAVE BEEN SAID ABOUT ADRIAN ON BU, BUT ADRIAN KNOWS HIS ONIONS, AND OUGHT TO BE COMMENDED FOR HIS DILIGENCE ENDURANCE AND PERSISTENCE IN SEEKING TO PROVIDE AND PROJECT WORTHY IDEAS FOR OUR TOURISM PRODUCT ON BU, OVER THE YEARS

    I SALUTE YOU ADRIAN !

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  • With all due respect, Barbados is not as clean, not as well landscaped, not as well provided with tourist-related infrastructure, and not as feature-rich as most of the destinations already on the Spirit Airlines map.

    So if I am the CEO of Spirit Airlines, what in the world would impel me to fly farther and longer to a destination like Bridgetown that offers my passengers less value at a higher cost?

    Barbadians have been spoiled by elite British tourists who visit our island in part because it is not as Americanized as other, better-appointed Caribbean islands. But let’s remind ourselves of our limited appeal to North American tourists.

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  • Ewart Archer: I would disagree on the limited appeal of Barbados to North American tourists. I think this is evidenced by the increase in service. In my opinion, the charm of Barbados is the fact that it is not as tourist-related and feature-rich as some Americanized destinations. I am sure the majority of British tourists do not consider themselves elite. I think the British heritage and language is a draw as well. I would think that perhaps those attracted to ultra-low-cost carriers would provide much revenue to any hotel above the 3-star level.

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  • This is a good place to record that the Chinese will support Dominica to build a state of the art airport. How will the airport be paid for? You guessed it!

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  • St. Kitts used a Citizenship-by- Investment (CBI) program to pay down a crushing foreign debt.

    Now Dominica says it is using a CBI program to finance much of the cost of its planned international airport.

    Barbadians are apparently too proud to go the full CBI route. We prefer to default on our foreign debts and then go hat in hand to the IMF to beg for loans.

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  • @ Ewart Archer

    While you might not know this Barbados does have a Citizen & a Resident “by Investment” programme

    It is just that the proceeds of both programs go into the personal pockets of certain Immigration Officers as opposed to the Consolidated Fund

    If you doubt me go and check out Humpty Dumpty house and de rest of de possee houses and palaces dem built pun dem salaries

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  • Piece the Legend

    I am aware of the fact that Barbados has a longstanding CBI program. But it has not been prioritized, updated and promoted effectively, using the full weight and resources of the Government.

    That is what I meant when I wrote that Barbadians have declined to pursue “the full CBI route”. Without proper promotion, CBI does not succeed.

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  • Mottley said that Liat is doomed

    Browne responds

    PM Browne Secures LIAT Loan in Successful Visit to Venezuela
    Article Published: November 5, 2019 1 COMMENT

    PM Browne left Antigua and Barbuda today on a quick visit to Venezuela that saw Antigua and Barbuda being formally inducted into ALBA Bank as a new member, as well as the signing of the Financing Agreement relating to the loan of US$15.8 million for injection into LIAT.

    On his arrival PM Browne was met on the tarmac with an honour guard by Vice Minister Yuri Pimentel of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and he was then whisked away to his meetings in downtown Caracas.

    The 22ndmeeting of the Ministerial Council and the 72ndmeeting of the Executive Board of ALBA Bank were held in Caracas Venezuela during the morning at the headquarters of the Central Bank of Venezuela.

    The Governor of the Central Bank Mr Calixto Ortega welcomed PM Browne and stated how pleased he was that Antigua and Barbuda was becoming the seventh member of ALBA Bank, joining Venezuela, Cuba, Nicaragua, Dominica, St Vincent and the Grenadines and Bolivia.

    During the meeting, PM Browne formally deposited the instrument that allowed Antigua and Barbuda to join the Bank, and he expressed his satisfaction at the good financial position of the Bank which would, in his view , engender trust and confidence.

    Both St Vincent and the Grenadines and Dominica, in offering their congratulations, indicated that they fully supported the ‘bold move’ by Antigua and Barbuda to join the Bank.

    Prime Minister Browne speaks with Venezuelan media
    ALBA Bank was established in 2005 as the brainchild of former President of Venezuela, Hugo Chavez Frias, and the former President of Cuba, Fidel Castro, and was envisioned as a regional development bank that would provide resources to fill the development needs of the countries of the region.

    In signing the Financing Agreement, PM Browne indicated that although the Government of Antigua and Barbuda was assuming the financial liability, in fact the loan injection into LIAT would benefit the entire region that LIAT served.

    ‘LIAT is our infrastructure that links our scattered islands into a single economic space,’ Mr Browne said, ‘and it breathes oxygen into our tourism industry.’

    After the meetings at the Central Bank, the Prime Minister had a bilateral meeting with the President of Venezuela, Nicolas Maduro Moros in the Miraflores Palace.

    Prime Minister The Hon. Gaston Browne signs agreement with Chair of the Executive Board ALBA Bank Raul Li Causi.
    Both leaders reviewed the situation in Latin America and the Caribbean and agreed to work more closely together to achieve the goals of sustainable development in the region. Accompanying President Maduro in the meeting was Vice President Delcy Rodriguez; minister of foreign affairs Jorge Arreaza; and Vice Minister in the ministry of foreign affairs and chairman of the Executive Board of ALBA Bank Raul Li Causi.

    PM Browne returned to Antigua and Barbuda last evening

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  • And your point is again?

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  • David i guess that question is for Mariposa
    My point being that Browne unlike Mia who wanted to make a financial detour to find a way out
    Browne bit the bullet and made a very hard decision trying to save the ( as Mia Moe stated the doomed airline)
    Say what you make about Browne the long and short of Browne decision gives Liat another chance to recoup and regroup
    Isnt it ironic that on the same day Browne was to acessed the loan Mia Moe made such a gawd awful statement
    Makes for wonder what kind of political stealth is made of.
    In any case Browne is now in the driver seat to call the shots on Liat

    ########:wordsmatter

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  • Browne offered to buy Barbados shares and pulled out,capiche? You are getting so boring with your obvious partisan positions. Barbados will not change because of people like you. You constructively criticize is what we need to do.

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  • David your above comment also reflects a die hard commitment to this govt
    Now moving forward the story on Liat has been positioned that despite Mia wanting to sell the shares at unreasonable bargaining price which included Barbados debt in Liat
    Browne still was able to negotiate an agreement to pull Liat skyward
    I know the jealous rampage that u will hoard now seeing that Browne did not need Barbados shares to accomplish a bigger stake in liat at the negotiating table when liat board and shareholders meet to discuss Liat problems will make u and Mia green with envy
    It would be of interest to sit across the table when these meetings are held and to see the interaction between Browne and Mia

    ##########brownemanofthehour

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  • David! Brownes accomplishment might not be a big deal enough to u
    However looking at the alternative of having a ” doomed “airline this loan has saved the tourism industry including the Caribbean basin millions of dollars not to mention many jobs some in Barbados
    So u can poop poo my comments all u want but kudos should be extended to Browne
    Mia on the other hand can eat her sour grapes

    ########miamoesourgrapes

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  • David BU

    “Don’t mind the background noises,” Mia Mottley is living RENT FREE in Mariposa’s head. As usual, the yard-fowl has purposely ignored important information to politicize this LIAT issue…….. in keeping with the mandate set by her George Street pay masters.

    Mottley said LIAT was “doomed” under its current ownership structure and the heads of the other shareholder governments are “not on the same page” as it relates to the future of the cash-strapped carrier……. and NOT based on what is being suggested by “ac.”

    Based on the recent history of LIAT, any honest, rational thinking individual would agree with Mottley because her comments are correct. The heads of the shareholder governments non being on the same page is evidenced by the fact that Gaston Browne has opposed every effort to restructure LIAT.

    Recall in February, 2015, LIAT’s board of directors made a decision to shift the airline’s fleet base from Antigua to Barbados, in a bid to raise revenue, lower overheads and cut perennial losses. However, although acknowledging Antigua did not possess the necessary shareholding to block the move, Gaston Browne said he would RESIST the decision BY ALL MEANS.

    In response, chairman of the shareholder governments, SVG PM Ralph Gonsalves, urged member states to put their passions aside and to look at the move from a pragmatic, business point of view. He said “It is one network and you don’t need to be a rocket scientist. The place where most people pass through in the LIAT network is Barbados; that is the reality.”

    In April, 2016, former Minister of International Transport and Tourism Richard Sealy reiterated that a decision has been taken by the airline’s board of directors to shift its “fleet base” from St John’s to Bridgetown. Browne said Sealy was not the PM of Barbados and perhaps “spoke out of turn,” while also saying any plans to shift the airline headquarters will be strongly resisted by his administration and announced plans to INCREASE the island’s SHARES in LIAT.

    This ONE EXAMPLE of how heads of the shareholder governments are “not on the same page.”

    I’ll give you a few more.

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  • Dont mind that Mariposa lives in Artax head RENT FREE he just can help but to respond to Mariposa

    The Word Doomed uttered by Mottley was unnecessary
    However she felt the necessity to use the word to produce a negative impact on Brownes agreement
    The fact and history would show that he took a giant leap to prevent the airline from a doomed fatality
    Mia continues to show the political werewolf she is
    Mia understands that words mixed with effect has clout

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  • As an unapologetic regionalist, all I can say is that we need leaders and have needed leaders, for a long time, who were clear thinkers and understood the importance of true Caribbean nationhood.
    We simply have not produced such people. The back and forth over LIAT, is a prime example of their collective inability to lead us into true Caribbean nationhood.
    Hopefully new leaders with broader visions will spring up in the not too distant future.
    We have and have had chatter boxes not inspirational leaders.

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  • @ William

    The to and fro about LIAT, as you say is the result of incompetence. I am still not sure if the PM wants to sell our 49 per cent share of the airline. Are you telling me that we cannot even sell shares? What jokers. Our national problem is incompetence, not corruption.

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  • Who wants to buy some one problems with strings attached
    That was Mia first mistake in assuming that Browne would pay a mob a ton of money for the shares plus take on bsrbados share of debt
    Browne took the initiative to bail leaving Mia to hold the dirty bag of rotten goodies

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  • @William

    If you have a chat with people very close to LIAT it confirms what many like Artax, Miller et al have been saying, the problem did not start with Mia Mottley. It has become a political football.

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  • David u are circumventing a view that is not true
    All and sundry knows that the problem with Liat has been on going
    However Mia after becoming PM made several comments to the extent of saving Liat from disaster
    Then in about 360 degree placed the shares up for sale
    Now as if behaving like a spolied child not getting its way responded with damming words about the airline

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  • @ David

    I did not imply it started with or rests with anybody. LIAT like most Caribbean projects has fallen into and remains in the hands of “incompetents”. Who ever the shoe fit let them wear it!

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  • @William

    Stated it on your behalf, no sense beating about the bush,

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  • @ William

    We have a tendency in Barbados to make the basic seem complex. Barbados owns about 49 per cent of shares in LIAT, which it appears it wants to sell. It can do this at market value, however that is determined, or at an agreed price with the would-be buyer.
    It appears, however, that Barbados has also incurred other debt during the re-capitalisation of the airline and wants to offload its shares, not only at market value, but the buyer must also under-write the debt.
    Are they mad? Who is the lunatic advising the government. I have said before that politicians know zilch about finance and this confirms it. If the government is being advised by Prof Persaud or any of its economic advisers I suggest they read Mergers & Acquisitions 101.
    Buyers underwrite debt if the asset is strategically important. Is LIAT strategically important to Antigua, apart from a few jobs? I doubt it.

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  • Would be interesting to see how this tug of war plays out
    Browne attitude as that if a pir bull and Mia attitude of being entitled
    Knowning Browne any thing that Mia offers at the meeting table he would oppose especially if his country got to carry plenty of the weight

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  • Don’t get beside yourself Mariposa, it seems as though you haven’t noticed my comments were addressed to David BU…… NOT you.

    However, I’ll respond to your comment re: “The fact and history would show that he took a giant leap to prevent the airline from a doomed fatality,” which is shiite.

    Gaston Browne securing a US$15.8M from ALBA bank to invest in LIAT cannot in reality compare with the government of Barbados’ commitment to repay the US$65M loan from the CDB, which was used to assist with the purchase of aircrafts for LIAT under a Fleet Modernisation Project,

    Additionally, I’m forced to REMIND you of three (3) contributions you made to BU on March 22, 2019:

    (1). 9:54 AM:

    “Look everything about Liat organisation and administration has been going down hill for years. One would believed that if a company is not making a substantial profit to be capable of self support after many years. Then the best way forward would be to file bankruptcy. Many airlines over the years has used such an alternative and reorganized and began with a new page. It is not fair for govts to be expecting tax payers moneies ( in a time of economic duress) to be paying to prop up an unprofitable airline. Liat would not be the first or last airline to go under.”

    (2). 12:09 PM:

    Employee having no confidence. Flying public having no confidence. Cant get other Caricom members to become shareholders. That is enough to tell that Shareholders govts are dabbling in shite which has grown to fowl shite leaving a stinking odor all over the places and a mess which should be cleaned up and got rid of.”

    (3). 1:04 PM:

    “Look Liat was a good initiative which has gone wrong. Nothing wrong with shareholder govts saying they gave their best shot but nothing seems to be working. Maybe shareholder govts can hire financial advisors that handle investments who can show them the way forward in capatalising on Liat through outsider investors/ sharholders internationally or locally
    It is not fair that shareholder govts are relying on taxpayers money to help bail out Liat everytime they have an economic problem.”

    Please read and compare what Mottley had to say about LIAT with your three (3) above comments.

    You are essentially AGREEING with Mottley that “LIAT is DOOMED under its CURRENT STRUCTURE.”

    It goes to show you criticize just for the sake of being critical.

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  • It would appear that the original post was hijacked but in this forum is not uncommon. LIAT is subject to political interference, which I would think no one would disagree with. Each Nation adds its tax and service charge to air services, and immigration and customs charges, even though the passenger is in transit and is in a sterile zone. It may not be that the airfare is prohibitive to encourage usage, but the added service and taxes. Ther is no great shame in the Airline industry to go bankrupt and rise like Phoenix from the ashes and fly again, to wit Air Canada! LIAT can be viable if the local governments were more cooperative in the matter of service charges and taxes.

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  • @Robert

    The post was not hijacked, the management of LIAT and its implication for regional tourism and integration (CSME) is a burning issue that transcends. It is a constructive discussion to weave into ongoing discussions every opportunity.

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  • David BU

    As it relates to LIAT’s board of directors’ decision to sever 180 employees and relocate the airline’s fleet base from Antigua to Barbados, in a bid to raise revenue, lower overheads and cut perennial losses, Gaston Browne officially wrote to Vincentian Prime Minister and LIAT Shareholder Chairman, Dr. Ralph Gonsalves, to request that no further action be taken on the meeting’s decisions.

    In his letter, Browne cautioned Gonsalves that: “The government of Antigua and Barbuda has made – and continues to make – a heavy investment in LIAT, and there are CONSEQUENCES for the ECONOMY and the WELL-BEING of the PEOPLE of Antigua and Barbuda ARISING from DECISIONS pertaining to the airline.”

    Browne also said: “I am not exactly sure the proposed hub in Barbados would necessarily solve LIAT’s problems. I believe the directors and certainly the shareholders must look seriously at the issue of a subvention coming from all of the governments on an annual basis for LIAT.”

    In March 2015, the regional media reported about a “leaked document” that allegedly detailed a strategy by which Barbados should divest its shares in LIAT, acquire several of the airline’s new ATR aircraft, either through a shareholder decision or through a reassignment of title by the Caribbean Development Bank, (which funded the purchase of the new fleet)…….to establish a new regional airline called “NEWCO.”

    Browne described the plans as “treason,” and stated he would demand the resignation of then LIAT CEO, David Evans, if it was found that he played a role in the creation of the plan.

    Browne was also reported as having said: “We buy flour from St Vincent, we buy juices from Barbados, vegetables from Dominica and all I am saying to them, LEAVE US with LIAT,” We have EVERY RIGHT to DEFEND what’s in the BEST INTEREST of Antigua and Barbuda.”

    “Even in terms of the share holding positions of the various governments, I BELIEVE the shares of Barbados SHOULD be DILUTED because they believe that because they have the majority shares, that everything must move to Barbados.”

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  • @Artax

    It is political!

    He can pump all the money into LIAT however if the poor management and political involvement doesn’t change it will be wasted money.

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  • Artax i know what i said over the years about Liat
    I stand by those words.
    However in the political arena where govt have committed and agreed to certain rules and guidlines in negotiations
    Mia cannot take a self serving stand at the eleventh hour after verbally stating that barbados govt would do what ever necessary to stop the airline from failing
    Her last response of a talked about liat doomed smacks of a political bile aimed at attacking Browne through the back door method
    I am not a politician but i can speak from a point of view most often told by economist that when a product is not performing well take it off the shelf or reduce its price
    If Mottley was as interested in off loading the shares she would have brought to table a viable market value that would be of interst to other shareholders
    Browne step forward and what he saw and observed he did not like
    Mottley think she is very smart politically but everything she does as a proposal within the Caricom nations makes her look like one who would take advantage of other Caricom nations
    One can bet that the Dominica deal stands clear in the minds of the people of the caricom nations and their govt
    Most likely she is now seen as a wolf in sheep’s clothing
    Browne is a person who one can rightly assumed puts little trust in people he suspect wants to take advantage of the people of Antigua
    Mia right now is high on his list

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  • @Artax

    A question for you.

    How is Browne able to borrow money to pour into LIAT without Board ratification? Has Antigua received direction from the Board?

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  • “Oh what a tangled web we weave, When first we practice to deceive….”

    Mariposa, your November 7, 2019 6:26 AM contribution can be only described as NONSENSE and is a failed attempt to “back track and a save face.”

    The contribution is not based on RATIONAL ANALYSIS or FACTS, but on silly political rhetoric, speculation and things you made up as you go along.

    RE: “However in the political arena where govt have committed and agreed to certain rules and guidelines in negotiations.”

    Please explain to BU what are these “certain rules and guidelines” government has committed and agreed to?

    RE: “Mia cannot take a self serving stand at the eleventh hour after verbally stating that Barbados govt would do what ever necessary to stop the airline from failing.”

    Please explain the above gibberish in plain, simple English.

    RE: “Her last response of a talked about liat doomed smacks of a political bile aimed at attacking Browne through the back door method.”

    Over the years, shareholder governments have been investing taxpayers’ funds in LIAT, yet the airline continues to accumulate losses annually.

    And this is a FACT EVEN YOU ALLUDED TO.

    Please explain how is Mottley saying if the SUCCESS of LIAT was left in the hands of the shareholder governments ALONE the regional carrier was doomed, “attacking Browne through back door method?”

    RE: “Browne step forward and what he saw and observed he did not like.”

    Your above observation is similarly applicable to when a decision was made to relocate LIAT’s fleet base to Barbados. “Browne stepped forward and what he saw and observed he did not like.” He managed to have that decision reversed, saying the talk of relocation was mere “idle talk”…….. and in June 2015, Antigua invested US$400,000, which was part of US$10M the island promised to invest by the end of 2015.

    Or to the leaked document that allegedly detailed a strategy by which Barbados should divest its shares in LIAT, acquire several of the airline’s new ATR aircraft, either through a shareholder decision or through a reassignment of title by the Caribbean Development Bank, (which funded the purchase of the new fleet)…….to establish a new regional airline called “NEWCO.” Browne stepped forward and what he saw and observed he did not like,” described what your DLP administration’s proposal as “treason” and called for Barbados’ shares in LIAT to be diluted.

    RE: “One can bet that the Dominica deal stands clear in the minds of the people of the caricom nations and their govt.”

    What is the correlation between Ross University making a financial decision to relocate from Dominica to Barbados and Mottley saying if the success of LIAT was left in the hands of the shareholder governments ALONE the regional carrier was doomed?

    I suggest that, at the next “blame Mottley for LIAT” meeting at George Street, ask to committee members to do some research on LIAT, before sending you to BU to post information that’s not true.

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  • ****** “back track TO save face.”

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  • @ Mariposa

    The business model of LIAT is a joke. The airline is a low-cost flying ferry, moving people between many of the 7000 odd islands in the Caribbean. It is NOT a blue chip airline, even if it would like to think it is.
    Here is a good example of what a low-cost airline can provide: Ryan Air recently offered return flights from London to Norway for £6, or about Bds$18. Extras cost a hell of a lot.
    Its executive team has failed it and, typically in the Caribbean, there is too much political interference. Privatise it. By the way, what is the debt to assets ratio? What are its debt covenants?

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  • And the major difference between the two airlines is what again? Islands hopping between a number of islands many less than a 100 millions makes intra regional travel a challenge.

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  • Hal Austin
    November 7, 2019 8:00 AM

    “@ Mariposa
    …… The airline is a low-cost flying ferry, moving people between many of the 7000 odd islands in the Caribbean…..”

    Hal Austin,
    Do we really have that many islands in the Caribbean?
    Or is this a typo?

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  • @ Walter

    The Caribbean archipelago encompasses more than 7,000 individual islands in an approximately 1-million-square-mile region (Quote)

    The Bahamas alone has 700 islands.

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  • David
    November 7, 2019 6:31 AM

    “@Artax
    A question for you.
    How is Browne able to borrow money to pour into LIAT without Board ratification? Has Antigua received direction from the Board.”

    David,
    Artax has done an excellent job in educating us about the political and financial considerations that impact decisions related to LIAT.
    He has informed us of “Gaston Browne securing a US$15.8M from ALBA bank to invest in LIAT.”

    I am acutely aware that your question was not directed at me but I found myself instinctively asking: Would the LIAT Board look into the mouth of this “gift horse” and turn it away when the airline is cash strapped? Even if no prior approval was secured from the Board? Do Caribbean people and their leaders generally allow principle and procedure to stand in the way of million of dollars?

    Does this cash injection amount to a quid pro quo transaction, thus ensuring that LIAT’s hub remains in Antigua?

    However, I do hope that Browne’s action was sanctioned and ratified by the LIAT Board.

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  • Artax how can u say i back tracked
    Well on economics Mia and i might agree
    However on the principles of negotiations after govt signed agreements and MIa recent promises to keep Liat skyward we part company
    Maybe her offering of selling the shares maybe govt way of a promise to keep Liat in the air
    However after the deal fell through her mouth became hushed as to what other alternatives might have saved the demise of Liat
    Now with Browne holding the financial best option available for Liat
    Caricom govts wait to hear what proposal barbados have to adress the ongoing problems as it tries to rebuild and restructure

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  • If LIAT services 20 islands in the region that is a lot.

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  • CDB Director pleads for easier intra-regional travel

    Dr. Justin Ram, Director, Economics, CDB

    (Guyana Chronicle) Director of Economics at the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB), Dr Justin Ram, has said that intra-regional travel should be made easier for Caribbean citizens so that governments can cash-in on greater cash flows within the region.

    Speaking at a recent Private Sector forum, Dr Ram said, “What I’m saying to governments across the Caribbean is reduce taxes on travel and aviation and let’s get more regional travel.”

    He highlighted that over the last 10 years, a majority of Caribbean citizens were travelling extra-regionally, particularly to destinations in North America and Europe, while intra-regional travel declined.

    He said that the decline in this intra-regional travel was owed to the high taxes and fees associated.

    And pleading with governments to make this intra-regional travel easier, the economist said: “You will recoup the revenues because I know when people travel to your country, they will be buying stuff and they will be paying more Value Added tax (VAT).”

    Read more at: Guyana Chronicle

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  • ome / Local News / Stuart dropped ball on CARICOM – Mottley

    Stuart dropped ball on CARICOM – Mottley
    Article by
    Luova LabsPublished on
    February 26, 2018
    The Barbados Labour Party (BLP) is holding Prime Minister Freundel Stuart responsible for Jamaica’s threat to quit the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Single Market and Economy (CSME).

    However, the BLP said it was confident it could influence Kingston to remain in the regional grouping should it win the upcoming election, due by the middle of this year.

    The Andrew Holness administration has said it may pull out of the CSME if a clear programme and definitive commitment to have it fully operational within the next five years do not materialize, insisting that in its current state the trade, work and travel mechanism did not benefit Jamaica.

    Addressing a party meeting at The Lester Vaughn School in St Joseph last night, BLP leader Mia Mottley said as the country with lead responsibility for the CSME, Barbados had a responsibility to lead the process to ensure it works for all the people of the region.

    However, she said Stuart had displayed no leadership and his inaction had weakened the regional initiative.

    “We know that the Prime Minister has dropped the ball, but the truth is we know that we can turn it around and we can make things good again in this region and in this country,” Mottley told supporters.

    “I have a message for Andrew Holness, the Prime Minister of Jamaica tonight from this platform. I ask you to hold strain. Hold on, my brother,” the BLP leader said.

    “To our brothers and sisters in CARICOM, within three months of being elected as the next Government of this country we will get the Single Market and Economy going. We will start to take the steps to let you know that we are not just in this because it is a framework or agreement that we signed, but it is because we know it will make a meaningful difference to the people [of Barbados] . . . to be able to go into other countries and sell their services, or to work … in whatever capacity, especially if you’re not getting work at home”.

    The Opposition Leader said the CSME held possibilities for every CARICOM citizen, “but you have to get the architecture right”.

    Mottley suggested that Stuart was notorious for his inaction, which she said led to the ongoing sewage mess on the south coast.

    It is this very inaction, she contended, that “has caused Jamaica to now say they don’t know whether they want to stay in the CARICOM Single Market and Economy, because nothing has happened in the CSME under the leadership of Freundel Stuart . . . in the last almost ten years, and certainly in the last seven [years]”.

    CARICOM leaders are meeting in Haiti this week for their intercessional, at which Jamaica’s concerns will be discussed, Stuart said.

    Like

  • @ William

    When Andrew Holness was leader of the Opposition, I once sat next to him at a London breakfast meeting and during our conversation he poured scorn on CARICOM.

    Like

  • 00:0001:55
    A report from Peter Richards of the Caribbean Media Corporation

    CARICOM sources say Prime Minister Andrew Holness stormed out a meeting at the 40th Annual Heads of Government summit in Castries, St. Lucia on Thursday.

    Mr. Holness apparently disagreed with his regional colleagues on the position adopted on the contribution to be made by the so-called developed countries of CARICOM.

    The Prime Minister supposedly indicated that Jamaica has financial issues to deal with and noted that a decision had been made some years ago that the country would not be part of the second tranche payment to the CARICOM Development Fund (CDF).

    The CDF is mandated to provide financial or technical assistance to disadvantaged countries, regions and sectors in CARICOM.

    Informed sources say Jamaica is questioning the accuracy of report of previous meetings on the matter.

    Jamaica’s position is reportedly to opt out of making a contribution to the CDF at this time.

    However, some Caribbean countries such as Barbados, Trinidad and Tobago, Antigua and Barbuda, St. Vincent and the Grenadines and St. Kitts-Nevis contend that Jamaica cannot opt out and that it is an obligation of each member by way of treaty.

    Further, sources say that the other Caribbean countries argue that if Jamaica cannot pay at this time, they should acknowledge that they owe and make it a debt payable.

    Like

  • NB Holness stormed out of the above early July 2019.

    Like

  • @ Hal

    Jamaica did not even want to be in the Federation. The apologists can say whatever they like. It’s obvious that we don’t have the leaders to push the regional agenda. We have s lot of grandstanding but try really are incapable. The two articles I submitted are for those who don’t wear blinkers .

    Like

  • History repeats itself ?

    Like

  • All of what Mottley stated before winning the election was a game of fluff hot air and smoke and mirrors
    Evidence shows that after a loud welcome from the caricom basin
    Here first mission was to poach the Ross University from Dominica without even having one thread of decency to be transparent to the people of Barbados
    Now after her first gladiator mission to undermine a poor sister nation
    It would indeed be easy to sumarise that Mia words would be effective in making any changes to the Caricom Community
    Most likely Mia is gazed upon with nodding heads and evil eyes

    Like

  • @ William

    Good old Bustamante. One mystery is why the president is not doing more to press regional unity, over and above the hand-weaving? One example that comes to mind, because I am reading about an insurance case as I write, are shared regulatory standards. This is one policy development that should come out of Clico.
    Instead of this, the president has been making noise about the World Bank’s lack of support for the Bahamas. That is a CARICOM issue.

    Like

  • @ Hants

    Who singing that? Is it the Mighty Sparrow or Freundel Stuart?

    Just asking.

    Like

  • @ Hal

    If calypso were a part of the school curriculum, we would not have people going around making asinine statements that are gobbled up by the uninformed. That calypso submitted by @ Hants is a history lesson. That is the kind of calypso that you and I would have been exposed to as youngsters. Today anybody can get up and talk ignorance because they know that people are uninformed and don’t research anything.
    @ Hants

    Thanks for sharing. It puts the matter in a clearer perspective and debunks the crap that some prefer to eat.

    Like

  • @ Hal

    You are absolutely correct!

    Holiness was anti CARICOM long before he became PM. While in opposition he was highly critical of CARICOM.
    It is therefore inaccurate to suggest that his actions as PM of Jamaica were influenced by other leaders.

    Like

  • @ William

    This is the problem with CARICOM and its organisations. Look at the CCJ, some members opting in and others opting out; nonsense. You should be in or out, a member or a non-member.

    Like

  • “How is Browne able to borrow money to pour into LIAT without Board ratification? Has Antigua received direction from the Board?”

    David BU

    I have not read any information that suggest otherwise.

    If you read information pertaining to the ALBA loan, Browne was reported as having said: “We have taken the decision, instead of buying Barbados’ shares, that we will invest directly in LIAT — SUBJECT to the APPROVAL of the other shareholder governments — and I don’t see why they should stop us from investing directly in LIAT…… LIAT needs the cash.”

    Another example is Browne approaching Sir Richard Branston to invest in LIAT, subject to the approval of the other shareholder governments.

    Walter

    You are correct. I believe it’s a bit ludicrous to suggest “LIAT moves people between many of the 7000 odd islands in the Caribbean,” when SIMPLE research would reveal the airline services 17 Caribbean territories…….. namely, Antigua, Barbados, Dominica, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Guyana, Martinique, Puerto Rico, St. Croix, St. Kitts, Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Maarten, St. Thomas, St. Vincent, Tortola and Trinidad.

    Seventeen (17) territories, which represents approximately 0.24% of 7,000, cannot be realistically considered as “many.”

    Like

  • Artax,
    Thanks for the insights and keep up the good work.

    Sometimes I find it quite useful to use a technique that Vincent has already confessed to using:
    Ask questions which you know the answer to, as a means of encouraging others to think for themselves.
    That said, in this case, I genuinely did not know that 7,000 islands existed in the Caribbean sea.

    Like

  • @ Walter

    Don’t ask questions unless you know the answer is a legal and journalistic technique of questioning and cross examination. About the many and not the few is a juvenile argument. Many is indefinite.
    When does a number qualify as ‘many’? As to the 7000 Caribbean, many are no bigger than football pitches, it does not mean that LIAT goes to the majority. Barbados is the size of some Brazilian and Australian sugar plantations, does that disqualify our island home?
    The fact is LIAT goes to many Caribbean islands. Is that not so?

    Like

  • Hal Austin,
    You love a serious debate and I admire you for that.

    Here are two statements you made:

    “The airline is a low-cost flying ferry, moving people between many of the 7000 odd islands in the Caribbean.”

    “LIAT goes to many Caribbean islands.”

    Do you think those two statements convey the same meaning to the reader?

    Artax, and implicitly the blogmaster, think that, given the fact that LIAT actually services 17 islands, the first statement is a bit ludicrous in terms of what it suggests to the reader. Do they have some justification for thinking so?

    Do you think they would have a problem with your second statement?

    Can we therefore view your second statement as a correction or “tightening up” of the first?

    Like

  • @ Walter

    Yes. LIAT goes to many Caribbean islands, a statement of fact. LIAT goes to many Caribbean islands, and there are 7000 islands. Have the facts changed? Discuss.

    Like

  • @ Mr Hal Austin

    Hal

    Several is the word you are looking for.

    Several means more that 2 (I think) .

    Many refers to a quantity that is not exact buy which perforce is less than many.

    Of course I speak under connection but that is what my eavesdropping on the children taught de ole man

    Like

  • @Artax
    “and I don’t see why they should stop us from investing directly in LIAT…… LIAT needs the cash.”
    Interesting. The question becomes what/who is the security for the US$15 loan from Banco ALBA? When Antigua injects funds into LIAT, is it a loan, are they buying equity, or some other debt instrument.
    I see today’s headline in Antigua is the GoA&B is talking about $100M loan from a consortium of US banks. Primarily for telecommunications infrastructure, it is also to repay an existing higher interest loan, airport upgrades and unspecified ‘financial resources’ for the Treasury.
    “The key question of how this additional funding would be repaid was answered [by Minister Nicholas] saying, “any time we make investments, we expect them to pay back for themselves with increased economic activity.”[Quote Antigua Observer]
    https://www.antiguaobserver.com/government-seeking-another-loan-this-time-for-us-100-million-2/%5D

    Seems this Minister attended the same finance school as former Barbados MoF Sinckler. Possibly, after a GoA&B owned bank failed a few years back, some may go to purchasing at least one of the two currently available.

    Like

  • Mr. Blackman

    There are some contributors to this forum that believe they have the patent for intelligence. No matter if their opinions are ludicrous or incorrect, they try to intellectualize their folly by mentioning some perceived “technicality” to make it seem as though those highlighting their silly, juvenile arguments are “appallingly ignorant” and not them.

    The word “many” cannot be “indefinite” if you mention a “figure,” which in this case is 7,000. And don’t care what anyone says, 17 out of 7,000 cannot be realistically deemed as many.

    Additionally, for anyone to mention “About the many and not the few is a juvenile argument,” then, how would you HONESTLY describe the following silly, irrelevant comment re:

    “As to the 7000 Caribbean, many are no bigger than football pitches, it does not mean that LIAT goes to the majority. Barbados is the size of some Brazilian and Australian sugar plantations, does that disqualify our island home?”

    Like

  • Many refers to a quantity that is not exact buy which perforce is less than many.

    Of course I speak under connection but that is what my eavesdropping on the children taught de ole man

    wait, u been touching de bottle? or is it

    SEVERAL refers to a quantity that is not exact buy which perforce is less than many.

    Of course i speak under CORRECTION but

    Hence herein lies the possible coNNection of which you spoke

    Like

  • A constant feature of these articles is the constant clarion call to flavors of the month airlines to bless us with their presence while longstanding partners are often ignored.

    I was perusing Air Canada in flight magazine (en Route) for November when I came across a series of full-page ads sponsored by Air Canada Vacations devoted to Barbados. They were targeted at potential Winter visitors and the properties in the ads in order of appearance were Sandals, The Sands, The Club, Starfish Discovery Bay, Barbados Beach Club, Turtle Beach and Accra Beach. I don’t know the relationship of these properties to AC perhaps the ads are a joint promotion but when people read the magazine think of winter vacations the little nugget planted by those ads may be effective and Barbados may well figure in their plans even if they decide to stay at other locations.

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    RE: “The question becomes what/who is the security for the US$15 loan from Banco ALBA?”

    On Tuesday, November 5, 2019, Gaston Browne visited Venezuela to formally join Baco del ALBA and receive a US$15.8M (EC$40M) loan in the process.

    Upon signing the Financing Agreement with the bank, Browne indicated the Government of Antigua and Barbuda was ASSUMING the financial liability.

    The loan is supposed to be termed over a period of 10 years at 6% per annum, with an annual repayment of EC$6M (or approximately US$2.2M).

    RE: “When Antigua injects funds into LIAT, is it a loan, are they buying equity, or some other debt instrument?”

    On Tuesday, October 29, 2019, a resolution was passed by Antigua’s Parliament, allowing Browne’s administration to secure a US$15.8M (EC$40M) loan from the ALBA bank to PURCHASE ADDITIONAL SHARES in LIAT.

    Browne told Parliament he negotiated the loan on Wednesday, September 11, 2019 and that “A condition of this new capital would be that there has to be cuts, including a reduction in salary and wages,” adding, “I’m pretty sure that there’ll be some changes even with the directorship of LIAT.”

    “There should be a fresh capital call in which we will have the existing shareholders and possibly new shareholders recapitalise LIAT.”

    He also said he was hopeful that the other shareholder governments will bring the total anticipated contributions to the airline, to an estimated US$35 million.

    “Now clearly THIS MATTER HAS NOT BEEN APPROVED by the shareholder group AS YET, but recognising that LIAT is in need of urgent money, I cannot see the existing shareholder governments REFUSING to have a capital call to ensure viability or survivability for that matter of LIAT in the first instance and ultimately its viability and sustainability.”

    Like

  • Mariposa

    RE: “However on the principles of negotiations after govt signed agreements and MIa recent promises to keep Liat skyward we part company.”

    The above comment reads like gibberish you made up. So, I’ll ask you once again….. please explain what are these “principles of negotiations after govt signed agreements,” and what are “Mia’s recent promises to keep LIAT skyward?”

    RE: “Maybe her offering of selling the shares maybe govt way of a promise to keep Liat in the air…”

    Please explain the above comment within the context that the US$44M realized from the sale Barbados’ shares to Antigua would NOT be financially beneficial to LIAT……because the money would go DIRECTLY to Barbados’ Treasury.

    RE: “However after the deal fell through her mouth became hushed as to what other alternatives might have saved the demise of Liat.”

    Which is it? On one hand you mentioned “Mia’s RECENT promises to keep LIAT skyward….. and on the other, you are now “saying” “her mouth became hushed as to what other alternatives might have saved the demise of LIAT.”

    RE: “Now with Browne holding the financial best option available for Liat.”

    Perhaps you meant to “say” “now with Browne holding the financial best option available for ANTIGUA.”

    RE: “Caricom govts wait to hear what proposal Barbados have to address the ongoing problems as it tries to rebuild and restructure.”

    If your above comment is a reference to LIAT, then, I’ll have to remind you LIAT is NOT…… and has NEVER been a CARICOM issue.

    Like

  • @Artax

    How can Browne speak so out of turn about the Board of LIAT agreeing to a capital call? Mia has indicated on more than one occasion Barbados is in no financial position to answer that call.

    Like

  • Jeremy Stephens speaks on Gaston Browne 15million loan

    Like

  • Artax
    November 7, 2019 9:13 PM
    “Mr. Blackman
    There are some contributors to this forum that believe they have the patent for intelligence. No matter if their opinions are ludicrous or incorrect, they try to intellectualize their folly by mentioning some perceived “technicality” to make it seem as though those highlighting their silly, juvenile arguments are “appallingly ignorant” and not them.”

    Artax,
    Given its small size, Barbados has a high proportion of very intelligent people. I know how frustrating it can be when you are trying to make a point in earnest and a response reflects silliness and puerility.

    Intelligent people are reading and blogging on BU daily. You can rest assured that your points are being well made and being well and appreciatively taken. We might be a meek people, but we are not stupid.
    As I exhorted you before, keep up the good work.

    Like

  • David BU

    Perhaps Browne “speaks out of turn about the Board of LIAT agreeing to a capital call,” because, despite Barbados, St. Vincent, Dominica and recently, Grenada, are the other shareholder islands…….. he seems to believe the airline BELONGS to Antigua.

    Ironically, former PM Baldwin Spencer accused Browne of being “bombastic” in his approach to dealing with the problems facing LIAT.

    He said: “I find that he is just ARROGANT and BOMBASTIC and is just creating all sorts of problems in saying whatever he likes, however he likes and just getting at individuals without sitting down and thoroughly examining what is required to be done and how we are going to get the cooperation and understanding of other persons.”

    Browne, on the other hand, said Spencer had been “cordial” with the other shareholders and as a result “they pulled the rug from under him.”

    He added: “I understand that he believed so much in them that whenever they had discussions they allowed him to talk and he would say ‘look I accept the recommendations of the other prime ministers who spoke. I don’t think it was a case that he did not have a contribution to make, he chuckled at them when they had their sinister motives,” I am saying here NOT under MY leadership.”

    This may give us some insight as to why Browne’s actions display an “arrogant contempt and “blatant disregard” for the recommendations of the heads of the other shareholder governments……. and why he has chosen to pursue an adversarial relationship with them.

    Mr. Blackman

    Thanks.

    Like

  • @ NorthernObserver

    You are correct, even after suggesting “several” to Mr Hal Austin I placed the “many” definition in the stead of several and reiterated the meaning of many.

    Old Brigand for de ole man perhaps?

    Like

  • @Artax
    He can certainly rock a boat, let’s hope he doesn’t tip it over.

    I imagine every foreign owned business in Antigua is holding their breath. Imagine if he decides any sale, not the closure, but a business continuation under new ownership “may not be in the best interests of Antiguans”. And seeks to block it. One can only hope Barbados is a beneficiary of investment dollars otherwise bound for Antigua.

    Like

  • Score another one for Browne hate him or love him
    His stand against Scotia Bank forced Scotia to hold strain
    In the meanwhile antiguans that work for Scotia Bank can sigh a breathe of relief

    Like

  • What happened to the employees in the other countries Republic Bank has taken over ?

    Spot on!

    Like

  • I know u hate Browne and anything he says or state u will be quick to throw a flaming torch against
    That is ok also
    But at times one should sit back and crtique whether his actions has hurt or helped
    At present the doom and gloom that Mottley choose as a prescription for Liat did nothing in way of keeping Liat skyward
    However Browne singlehandedly took the initiative to put his credibility on the table and start a process of keeping Liat skyward
    Now for argument sake which of the two leaders that being Browne and Mia deserves a hand shake

    Like

  • You are unable to answer the question? Let us repeat it.

    What happened to the employees of scotiabank that were taken over by Republic bank?

    Like

  • Say what u may
    Browne is leaving a foot print of tenacity across the region
    He fought Sandals by a process of putting his people and country first
    He now fights with Scotia Bank and Scotia has back down somewhat
    He designs a plan to fight for Liat which also one would envision getting a return of value for Antigua
    Now as if to say “he is not finished” goes after Harvard University for reparations due to Antiguians
    Arguably Browne is a person whose vision sees what is best for his country in a take it or leave it style
    In the meanwhile Barbados has a leader who in one year has used the spotlight on her self with her numerous trips which has shown a return of nothing for the people while having a torrid indulgence of rubbing shoulders with celebrities and other big wigs

    Like

  • So all see you made an incorrect statement you are unable to defend.

    You felt the same way about Browne when he told Donville Inniss to shut up?

    Did he say the same to Richard Sealy?

    Maybe this blogmaster hates Browne to the same degree you Mia Mottley.

    Spot on!

    Like

  • @ David
    Unfortunately i cant give a verifiable answer since i am not in possession of documentation to do so
    However with most restructing processes some go and some stay
    The ongoing process at times during the course of restructing can make as many changes that deemed necessary viable and optional that is in the company best interest
    At times the process can be long without a given period for long term sustainability for employees
    At the end employees is not given a suerty of job security
    Most likely Browne took into consideration that Scotia stay presented a plausible and more secured enviroment for the employees rather than Scotia selling and him having to deal with an entity whose proposal are harsh and most likely leaves the employee best interest separate and apart from the business interest
    Browne is not a fool he knows how to play hard ball and does not give up easily
    Maybe a lesson or two can be learned from Browne way of thinking

    Like

  • If you can’t give s verifiable answer why make the statement?

    Like

  • A B, D and Caribbean thing

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2019/11/09/development-funds-going-unclaimed/

    One must wonder why these funds go unclaimed. Is it a lack of projects or is a greater level of accountability making it more diffifcult to just “grab the money and run”? I am not to bright, but it seem like the mouth of the kitty-jar is much smaller.

    “Over 2,000 public officials have been trained over the past three years. We will be launching e-modules to extend access to this training to an even larger number of public servants. Training is also being provided through the CDB/World Bank-financed Caribbean Procurement Training and Consultancy Centre, the first permanent centre for procurement excellence in the Caribbean,”

    “In addition to training, we are encouraging behaviour change through, for example, institutionalised delivery mechanisms or through project-by-project capacity and institutional building support. We have also been working with other development partners to develop joint approaches to our common programmes,”

    Like

  • Sometimes you have to past the headlines and read what was said..

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2019/11/08/imf-prime-minister-agree-economy-on-track/

    Read the statement from the IMF guy and chew on it..

    Congratulating the Government on its efforts to stabilise the economy and move forward with the reforms, Zhang said: “We are glad to be a part of the process, to be your partners and we remain committed to supporting and moving ahead together with you.

    “As you said, there is a lot of work that needs to be done in the future, and we will remain as committed, as ready and as prepared to move ahead.”

    Is the congratulation on the results or is it for the efforts? Does it make a difference?

    Like

  • Mariposa

    RE: “At present the doom and gloom that Mottley choose as a prescription for Liat did nothing in way of keeping Liat skyward..”

    You are a LIAR. You continue to MISREPRESENT Mottley’s comments for your own political reasons.

    The PM said LIAT was “doomed” under its CURRENT OWNERSHIP STRUCTURE and the heads of the other shareholder governments are “NOT ON THE SAME PAGE,” as it relates to the future of the cash-strapped carrier.

    Please explain to BU what is in the above comments that is NOT TRUE and can be honestly interpreted as “Mottley choosing a prescription of gloom and doom for LIAT?”

    Rather than being so DISHONEST and UNTRUTHFUL, you should try as much as possible to be FAIR and HONEST in your comments.

    RE: “Browne is leaving a foot print of tenacity across the region. He fought Sandals by a process of putting his people and country first….”

    More DISHONESTY and “political meandering.”

    I remember you calling Browne a “tin horn dictator” when “he fought Sandals by a process of putting his people and country first.”

    Like

  • I hope they remember to terminate the roaches…..
    https://barbadostoday.bb/2019/11/08/cockroach-video-causes-stir/

    Like

  • I’m surprised you’re now seeing Browne as a hero, especially if one considers the disparaging remarks you made about him previously, as it relates to the Sandals issue.

    Let me give you an example:

    January 14, 2018 1:08 PM

    “Boy did Browne learn the hard way almost tremble in his boots and piss in his pants when Butch told him they were closing the hotel for maintenance boy was he ready to talk concession to Butch and time limits for reopening of the hotel .
    What these small island dictators need to realize they can not have their cake and eat it too and be realist and know when to hold them and know when to fold them…his country is economic doldrums and Gaston trying to mash corns at the wrong time.”

    Like

  • @ Commander Theophillus Gazerts

    You said and I quote

    “…One must wonder why these funds go unclaimed.

    Is it a lack of projects or is a greater level of accountability making it more diffifcult to just “grab the money and run”?

    I am not to bright, but it seem like the mouth of the kitty-jar is much smaller…”

    The reason that the development funds are not being drawn down is for 4 reasons

    Two which you mentioned.

    1.Development agencies are requiring more compliance and reporting

    2.Development agencies are under pressure from their constituent shareholders AND DONT HAVE MUCH MONEY TO GIVE AWAY FREELY

    3.There are no projects to fund IRRESPECTIVE OF ALL THE TRAINING

    AND

    4.The abilities of the project writers is paltry!

    Items 3 and 4 ARE NOT THE SAME.

    And de ole man wanted to make this point clearly.

    Let me use the Wasteful Project Edutech 2000 as an example.

    Being skillful in reporting on the Edutech project AFTER IT WAS APPROVED takes no particular skill. That is where all those e training courses come into focus.

    A RENTED DONKEY COULD DO THAT BY FOLLOWING THE TEMPLATES PROVIDED.

    The problem lies with creating viable projects THAT QUALIFY FOR THE FUNDING and that is where the region falls down.

    We have vision less leaders and technocrats WHO ARE DEVOID OF ANY PROJECT CREATION SKILLS and this is why we are where we are AND THE MONEY IS SENT BACK, EVERY BADWORD YEAR.

    Until finally, the aid providers decide they ARE NOT GOING TO SEND ANY $$ TO THE REGION, and shift their focus to other global jurisdictions WHERE THE MONEY IS USED!

    Like

  • An article on Development Aid should be written here on BU but de ole man done submitting tings to Barbados Underground for a while cause, depending on who dem does be about they dont get print

    Heheheheh

    I sticking to commenting on what other People on Barbados Underground think is worthwhile to write on.

    And barring the shy$e that Grenville Phillips aka Bedroom Policeman aka Iso TALIBAN does post, I will comment where I can say something (usually acerbic and rarely complimentary cause there rarely is much in our country that is positive heheheheh)

    Like

  • Leaders lead presently the purpose for Liat is to find a resolution not for leaders to sound off the doom and gloom alarm
    Please take not that it is not a stance of whether or not i take a position on Browne method of doing things but what Browne believes takes precedent in the best security and interest of his people
    Artax u can rewind or engage on my past comments on any issue
    However your insistent on calling me a liar does not change the present situation or problems small island nations faces today
    Browne however may not be right in all things but he make steps that are necessary for changes to happen and people to stand up and take a look

    Like

  • Jeremy confirms this LIAT business is political.

    He refers to LIAT model working because of a couple developed airports like Barbados for example. How is this model described as good if LIAT has been racking up debt for years?

    Jeremy’s position is predicated on the Board of LIAT approval of this deal whatever it is, a cash injection or buying equity.

    Like

  • While ‘we’ have gone off topic, I still cannot understand how the Barbadian taxpayer stills owns 49.4 per cent of LIAT and has ploughed millions into the airline over decades, but to the best of my knowledge their accounts have not been made available to the public and ‘we’ truly do not know the level of debt and liability.

    Like

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