Uh Coming Winnie, Winnie Uh Coming!

Submitted by Pachamama

There has never been a woman, across the histories of all times, who could have transfixed the imaginations of generations of men, and boys, as has Saint Winnie Madikizela-Mandela. Her transition leaves armies of Her men with no choice but to traverse one billion lifetimes in an eternal quest for Her divine grace – Uh Coming Winnie, Winnie Uh Coming!

Carrying the weight of the liberation struggle on Her shoulders, nearly alone and for decades, Saint Winnie bore the full brunt of the vicious Apartheid regime of South Africa with a fierce, unyielding, determination. Exiled in Her own country, imprisoned, tortured, kept under house arrest, denied work and ostracized abroad, Saint Winnie still emerged as the central personality fighting against White rule on the home front – Uh Coming Winnie, Winnie Uh Coming!

And yes! There are those who would dare to find fault of Her. They would want to speak of Her ‘football club’ and the death of one youngster in spite of two court cases with no finding of culpability, and many more dying in Her sacred defense, in a state of imposed war. These White-minded coconuts conveniently forget that a hundred-year revolution was being fought against international White supremacy. That there were untold losses on all sides, predominantly innocent, Black South Africans, at the hands of the apartheid state and its global supporters. That Her protection units had to eliminate some agents of that state, operating within, is standard practice in both revolutionary movements and state craft. Only a certain typology of Bajan slave would call for a bloodless revolution in all circumstances. ‘How long shall they kill our ‘Prophetesses’, while we stand aside and look?’ – Uh Coming Winnie, Winnie Uh Coming!

That Julius Malema of the Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) and indeed all the young men and women of South Africa see Winnie as their Patron-Saint can only serve to push the ANC ‘leftwards’. In that location they will then have to deal with a radical land reform, also needed in Barbados, as just recently passed in parliament – for the repatriation of South African’s lands to its real owners – lands that were stolen over centuries. And this is rightness – Uh Coming Winnie, Winnie Uh Coming!

It has been long clear that Saint Winnie was the real radical all along. While people like Nelson Mandela and the now President, Cyril Ramaphosa, opted to either appease racist international neoliberalism and maintain economic apartheid or personally benefit from a highly unjust system, themselves. In the case of Ramaphosa, he opted to become a billionaire, shedding the garbs of a fake trade unionism. Does he not remind you of Leroy Trotman? In Nelson’s case, he opted for personal freedom in exchange for the maintenance of economic apartheid. Nelson Mandela even won the praises of no less a person than COW Williams. A man who once joined Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan in calling Nelson a ‘terrorist’, said that Farley Hill could not be named after him – Uh Coming Winnie, Winnie Uh Coming!

Saint Winnie was no western type feminist. Long before western feminist discourses recognized the limits to the thinking of Foucault, Freud, and others, Saint Winnie knew that what the westerners were really lacking was a transgenerational feminine connection, not lesbianism. Not an irrational hatred of men. Not a postmodernist gender competitive environment everywhere. It’s the essence of what the American literary critic, academician, Camille Paglia, now likes to talk about. The critical connection of grandmother, mother, sister and granddaughter interaction and passing on traditional systems of social organization, a powerful sisterhood – Uh Coming Winnie, Winnie Uh Coming!

We beg our greatest ancestors to receive, the first amongst equals, The Great Saint Winnie Madikizela-Mandela. We shall always remember you and forever sing your sweet praises. See you again, soon – Uh Coming Winnie, Winnie Uh Coming!

95 comments

  • WW …web dubois?????…..you guys are more in line with blanche dubois…”i have always depended on the kindness of strangers”

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  • Well Well & Cut N' Paste At Your Service

    “Nelson Mandela was an icon, but the police in the country were afraid of Winnie Mandela.”

    Too early to mix it up Lawson…ya mean depended on tiefing from strangers, sober up…lol

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  • Uh Coming Winnie, Winnie Uh Coming!!!!!

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  • Meanwhile some people still celebrating Rhodesia

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  • Let them go down there and see if they can find their heads when it’s all done, it would be a bloodbath, we all know that’s the intent, even in the small Caribbean islands starting in Barbados, the intent is to start up that evil racist shit again,but this time, you destroy them before they can have a rebirth.

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  • Now we understand why Mugabe chased their evil white asses out of Zimbabwe, now we understand why South Africa has to chase their evil asses out, they will not stop so they have to be chased off the continent.

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  • CNN International today featured a train going into rural areas of South Africa,outfitted with medical doctors,opthamologists,pharmacists,interns,and psychologists and all the resources of a well outfitted hospital on wheels to provide medical care for folk in these remote areas.What I found admirable was firstly,they were all professionals,black, young,intelligent and not one white man or woman was in the feature.The other thing is it is so well organized with sleeping accommodation,clean and working to a schedule with lots of logistics involved in its execution.Features of this nature can do more for character building for blacks than most of these hairy fairy handouts by well intentioned but ill informed dogooders who think only a white is bestowed special drawing rights to knowledge and know-how.

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  • IT GETS BETTER…a young female university student in Nigeria from one of the neighboring African countries just developed a cure for cancer in Africa, here is hoping she is protected and not murdered by greedy jealous whites like they did the young South African inventor and stole his invention…Africans are rising.

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  • “Student in Nigeria develops cure for breast cancer – Nigerian Tribune
    http://www.tribuneonlineng.com › Latest News
    Jul 4, 2017 – A female student of the African University of Science and Technology, Abuja, Sandra Musujusu, has developed an alternative treatment for breast cancer. The scientific breakthrough might lead to a lasting solution in the treatment of breast cancer prevalent among women world over. This was made known ..”

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  • Wow lots of good news out of Nigeria a long lost relative of mine passed away and has left me 29 billion dollars as I am his only living relative. When I send the 20 thousand dollars to his lawyer for probate I won’t have to work anymore he tells me. WW can ya help me out

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  • Well Well & Cut N' Paste At Your Service

    Yeah Lawson…I can help you out, your relatives in the minority community in Barbados need your help, they need people to go to prison for them in other jurisdictions and i know how you love to support the minorities on the island..

    .. their house negros drew the line at that….leaving them stranded, so I am imploring you on their behalf…how bout it, on humanitarian grounds. ..help out ya brithers and fellow man.

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  • A GUY’S VIEW: WINNIE MANDELA, THE UNDER-APPRECIATED HEROINE

    Sun, 04/15/2018 – 12:00am
    BY:
    R.E. GUYSON MAYERS
    “If you limit your actions in life to things that nobody can possibly find fault with, you will not do much.” Charles Lutwidge Dodgson
    Winnie Mandela, the wife of Nelson Mandela, has transitioned from this plane having done her service to mankind in her allotted time. Hers was a service from which every human being benefited and should properly be acknowledged as a genuine service to mankind. She excelled beyond anything most of us mere mortals will accomplish.
    The enormous stature of her husband, Nelson, compels one to still introduce Winnie as the wife of Nelson, but she did enough to merit an introduction that would not need Nelson to support her. She was a phenomenal woman who was willing, and able, to carry the burden of an entire people in a just cause.
    Like any freedom fighter who wages battle in an environment where her opponents represent the status quo and control the sources of information, she suffered from false news and the poisoning of the minds of some of her own people against her. But she pressed on with her fight.
    It is standard procedure that the law is always used to counteract the efforts of those who fight against their oppressors, for the law is instituted by those who oppress and seek to maintain their privileges. Her case was no different. The police spied on her, harassed her and spread lying propaganda about her. She knew that if she spat on the street she would be arrested. And yet she pressed on with her fight.
    The approach of the apartheid regime in South Africa in trying to undermine her efforts was akin to that adopted by the oppressive regime in Barbados during the 1930s. Our historical record shows that persons were arrested and charged for sedition for statements as dangerous as “Today is a funny night”. Apartheid South Africa and colonial Barbados were hardly different.
    For much of the time of her struggle, her later illustrious husband was imprisoned. Since then, many edifices have been erected in his honour. Individuals, groups, organisations and countries have accorded him great respect. Parks, buildings, roads and all manner of landmarks have been named after him. But not a lot is said of the fact that for most of his life, Winnie fought for him, on his behalf and for South Africa. He was the inspiration, but she was the one who carried the fight. He became President. She became invisible.
    Much was made in the media about her tactics in fighting the enemies of her people. Rather than condemn her, she rightly deserves the highest commendation for her determination to stop at nothing to achieve her righteous end. There can be no question of illegality when one is locked in a war of life and death, and that is where Winnie found herself.
    When the British people who had migrated to America wanted to end their colonial relationship with the country of their origin, they went to war and much blood was spilt. When two factions of the American people could not agree on the way forward for their adopted country, they fought what we call a civil war, and brother slew brother. When our forefathers wanted to be free of their bondage, they fought, even though nearly weaponless, and blood was spilt – although mostly theirs. When the people of Ireland decided that they no longer wanted to be controlled by England, they formed the Irish Republican Army and much blood was spilt, both English and Irish. That is the nature and reality of struggle. And in no situation was a traitor given a pass.
    Although she was fighting against white suppression, some of Winnie’s major foes were to be found among the black people that she was trying to liberate. In this regard, her experience would have been similar to Moses. Just as the people that Moses led grumbled against him, some of those who sought her company were plants of her and their oppressors. A fiery necklace was deserved punishment for them.
    White South Africans learnt late what was known in this part of the world for a long time: you do not have to control a Government in order to control a country and a people. As long as you seize the reins of the economy, the country is yours. Black South Africans can now vote and travel around their country with greater freedom. But these common rights have not otherwise changed the lives of the vast majority of them. Except for politics, which may still be no more than fastidious apparel, the power structure has not changed.
    The African National Congress continues to battle over its leadership, but those leaders seem to have lost sight of the fact that there is still an unfinished battle to wage for the development of the people who elect them.
    All of South Africa’s post-apartheid leaders owe their positions to the effort of Winnie Mandela. When she was on the front line, some may have been too young to join her and many of them were probably hiding. It is unforgivable that they were willing to allow her to drift off the scene because of the scandals that were created about her. They failed to grasp the opportunity to use her to inspire the younger South Africans beyond the traces of comfort which some may now come to enjoy. But there may be good reason for this. She would never have tolerated the watered down policies which they have adopted since their rise to power, sorry, political authority.
    Winnie took great risks and paid a terrible price. But she knew the devil she stood against and she did not surrender to it, even when she was lifted on her cross. The unholy superstructure which sought to control and manage her was strong because it was imbued with great evil. The faint hearted could not undertake her task.
    However, although she has not been sufficiently credited, she won a great prize. It is because of her efforts that the black South African people have been able to take their first steps towards regaining their freedom from white oppression. Her risks were great, but the rewards of her people were potentially greater. She was willing to pay any price to achieve her goal. Jean Jacques Rousseau helps me to express how I think Winnie’s role should be considered: “Every man has the right to risk his own life in order to preserve it. Has it ever been said that a man who throws himself out the window to escape a fire is guilty of suicide?”
    Winnie Mandela was dealt a difficult hand in the game of life and she played it well, given all of her circumstances. When she had to throw herself out the window of a moving vehicle, she did so. But it was never to save herself. She did what she did to save a people. If there is a reward beyond here, I am sure hers will be great.

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  • WW your husband was spotted at the westminister show or was it your husband was spotted at the westminster show either way tell him woof from me.

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  • yeah Lawson I will, ….from woof to woof.

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  • Excellent commentary on Winnie Mandela. Yes she was indeed the voice of the liberation struggle when Mandela consorted with his captors in prison and the voice of the global movement calling for Mandela’s release.

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  • Could it be that after so many years in prison Nelson Mandela may have been experiencing the Stockholm syndrome?

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  • Got that right, 30 years in prison breaking rocks would break anyone, Mandela was not made of stone.

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