LIAT’s Pilot Association Calls for Disruptive Passenger to be Punished

Press Release issued by the Leeward Islands Airline Pilots Association (LIALPA)
LIAT TO UPGRADE TO 11 ATRS over two years

LIAT TO UPGRADE TO 11 ATRS over two years

(St John’s, Antigua) The Leeward Islands Airline Pilots Association (LIALPA) is waiting to be informed of the measures LIAT will take in dealing with the passenger who caused the disruption and cancellation of one of its flights on December 13th 2016. The passenger who was on-board an aircraft in Barbados, destined for St Vincent, made a serious allegation that they had detected the smell of alcohol on one of the pilots.

Read full Press Release issued by the Leeward Islands Airline Pilots Association

110 comments

  • @BushTea

    Every pilot is subjected to scrutiny from day one of student pilot training. Big brother has his eye on you from day one. Drug and alcohol testing is par for the course. Choose to fly for a major airline and you are subjected to background checks, psycho analysis prior to joining and invasive medicals every 6 months.

    Even aside from all of that you are always under scrutiny. Hotel staff and just about everybody else has their eye on you. Professional flight crews live under a kind of scrutiny that most people would never be able to fathom. We are used to it.

    Brethalyser before the start of every day? Sure. Does not both me. Pay me for the inconvenience and I personally will be most willing. If you want to do that though how about a medical before flight. There are a small handful of airlines that do that (medical) however most do not. I will leave you to ponder why (hint it’s not because they care about the employee or his right to privacy or anything like that).

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  • @ Pitflyng
    “Every pilot is subjected to scrutiny from day one of student pilot training….”
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    So what happened in those cases cited on this blo…of pilots passing out drunk at the controls? …and who said anything about medicals before every flight? … all it takes is a brief chat on a dark highway for an ordinary cop to determine if a breathalyser is warranted… and to possibly save lives.
    You are creating a mountain from nothing.

    As to why airlines do NOT do these things, …clearly because pilot unions are dominated by thinking like yours, and have managed to cow the management into compliance.

    Finally if, as you say “professional flight crews live under a kind of scrutiny that most people would never be able to fathom.” …then what was the big deal about this simple query from this passenger?…. surely that was par for the course then….

    Give it up boss…
    The passenger was just being careful …and probably just scared to death.
    The pilot over-reacted …and should just apologise – as should LIAT.

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  • When will it be possible to punish a disruptive airline for causing untold economic damage to the Caribbean?

    When will that airline repay all the resources plugged into it over decades?

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  • You are blaming the airline or shareholder government. Perhaps one and the same?

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  • LIAT,in spite of its shortcomings has a good record of stick-to-it-ive-ness.It fought off successfully competition from Caribair and Eastern,Carib Express,Air Caribbean,Carib Aviation,Caribbean Star,Caribbean Sun,Air Guadeloupe,Air Martinique,Redjet and Bwee Express.Some of us recall the days when Barclays Bank had its own aircraft and pilots.Some of us recall when Clico had its own aircraft and crew.All of them have come and gone and LIAT remains standing.Were LIAT to go,there will be a weeping and gnashing of teeth fork sure.All of you complainers better wake up and smell the coffee.We are dependent on LIAT for our recreational and commercial activities.
    I recall on a visit to the U.K. in the 80’s,seeing a full page ad in the Times critical of British Airways on time performance and customer service within the U.K.I have seen articles criticizing Scandinavian Airways for delays on its domestic routes.Servicing islands especially these Caribbean island States,each requiring lots of paper work and all kinds of statutory checks and oversight is not for the faint hearted.

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  • Gabriel January 2, 2017 at 12:00 PM #

    “LIAT, in spite of its shortcomings has a good record of stick-to-it-ive-ness. It fought off successfully competition from Caribair and Eastern, Carib Express, Air Caribbean, Carib Aviation, Caribbean Star, Caribbean Sun, Air Guadeloupe, Air Martinique, Redjet and Bwee Express.”

    @ Gabriel

    Your argument is a “moot point.”

    You cannot present your comments re: LIAT “fought off successfully competition from” other regional airlines as “fact,” WITHOUT first taking into CONSIDERATION that the shareholder governments of Antigua, Barbados, Dominica and St. Vincent USED TAXPAYERS’ MONEY to FINANCE and SUPPLEMENT the airline’s OPERATIONS.

    If LIAT did not have access to this TAX REVENUE, the airline would have ENCOUNTERED SIMILAR OPERATING DIFFICULTIES as some of the airlines you mentioned above.

    Caribbean Star and Caribbean Sun, owned by Allen Stanford, were viable alternatives to LIAT and were instrumental in decreasing the cost of inter-regional travel by offering airfares below what LIAT was offering at the time. This was possible because the airlines were FINANCED by Sanford’s company, Sanford Financial Group.

    Sanford basically “conned” the shareholder government into merging both his airlines with LIAT, which was finalized on June 15, 2007.

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  • Artax
    The fact is that LIAT is the only one standing.You are aware that most carriers are now demanding subsidies from governments including our own to defray operating costs.I recall Trump was paid to fly to Barbados.If major airlines are receiving handouts from Caribbean governments why not one of your own.Liat has been profitable before and recently.One of its major problems is the number of staff it has on payroll at its headquarters.
    Left to me those islands not supporting LIAT in anyway form or fashion would be given an overflight.
    Btw is Maloney still on the board of LIAT?

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  • @ Gabriel

    You still have to consider shareholders’ direct investments and their role as guarantors for loans to finance capital purchases.

    However, I agree with your comments re: “Left to me those islands not supporting LIAT in anyway form or fashion would be given an over flight.”

    The governments of islands such as Grenada and St. Lucia, for example, have expressed their intentions not to invest in LIAT, but want their tourism industries and economies to benefit from its services, on the backs of shareholder islands.

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  • Glad to see Pltpilot have to good sense to close his mouth .Not a good idea to publicly bad mouth your boss .it could cost u your job

    Like

  • Pingback: Sit Your Shit Down! | The Dirty Pilot

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