Minister STEPHEN LASHLEY’S Philosophy of Development is Seriously FLAWED

Submitted by David Comissiong, Barbados Citizen
Stephen Lashley, Minister of Culture

Stephen Lashley, Minister of Culture

The Sunday Sun newspaper has reported that Minister of Sport, Youth and Culture, Stephen Lashley, recently addressed a Democratic Labour Party (DLP) gathering on the topic of “50 Years of Independence: The Barbados Story“, and informed the DLP faithful that Barbados Scholars should NOT be required to return and work in Barbados, but should instead be facilitated to work in foreign countries and to send back “remittances” to Barbados.

Well, with all due respect to Mr Lashley– one of the more thoughtful and forward thinking Ministers of the DLP Administration— I totally disagree with this sentiment and with the philosophy on which it is based!

Barbados is a relatively young, economically under-developed country, with very limited NATURAL resources. Thus, our nation’s fundamental developmental  strategy must be one that is firmly based on the cultural and educational attainments and assets of the people of Barbados, and on our people’s capacity to evince energy, initiative, creativity, drive and a spirit of self-reliance in the development of their own country.

In other words, if we are serious about developing our country then we should be able to understand that  the primary architects and builders of the economy of Barbados MUST be the Barbadian people themselves, and in particular  the brilliant, young, highly educated and trained scholars of our nation.

It is an undeniable fact that virtually every single progressive nation on this earth not only seeks to hold on to its most brilliant and highly educated young people, but even go beyond this and seek to entice to their shores the brilliant and highly educated young people of other nations!

Take the little east Asian nation of Singapore as an example. The Government of Singapore actually gives Singapore Government scholarships to brilliant foreign students in order that they might receive their university education in Singapore and be persuaded to settle permanently in Singapore! And the same holds true for larger countries such as Canada and the United States of America.

So, why then should our nation pursue a strategy in which Barbadian citizens and taxpayers– at great expense and sacrifice to themselves— finance the university education of our country’s most brilliant young sons and daughters, and then send them off to use their skills to contribute to and develop the Canadas, USAs and Singapores of this world?

If, after 50 years of supposed “Independence” we still have not learnt that we— and in particular our talented and educated young sons and daughters– have to consciously and passionately assume the role of being the primary craftsmen of our own national fate, then we are well and truly lost as a nation.

No, Brother Lashley, we don’t want the brightest of our young people working in and developing some-body else’s country and merely sending “remittances” to their Barbados-based family members! Rather, we want them right here with us in Barbados, making their contribution to the further positive evolution of our national culture, and utilizing their intelligence, education and talent in the development of our economy and other social, political and cultural structures.

By all means let us permit them to remain outside for an appropriate period of time in their pursuit of knowledge and new experiences and insights, but let us fundamentally understand that there is no quantity of remittances that can compensate for the loss to the nation of the direct intellectual and cultural input of its brightest and most highly educated sons and daughters.

And finally, I need to make the following point to Minister Lashley and to all the other Ministers of our Barbados Government :-  it is your job and DUTY as Ministers of Government to put the relevant policies and mechanisms in place to facilitate and foster the active involvement of our very own educated and trained youth in all aspects of our national development effort. And if you don’t understand this, then you have missed the whole point of and reason for being a Minister of Government!

83 comments

  • I would not be surprise if the minister want those who have received their student loans to study abroad to do the same thing. These DLP are a real ignorant bunch. Where there is no vision the people perish.

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  • i think what the minister was trying to say is that having sold our water to cruise ships, our businesses for US $, there is nothing left to sell except our children. lets hope the minister doesn’t get the chance.

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  • David

    I was wondering since this blog fights for truth, justice and the common-good, why has there been an effort make to entertain the opposing narrative here on BU to give the blog some equilibrium?Now I have heard you said on more than one occasion that your blog is an impartial blog which seeks to bring the truth to the Barbadian public. Now if what you’re saying is true, then why don’t you encourage the opposing narrative which AC champions tirelessly everyday here on BU?

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  • Mr Lashley is merely expressing the poverty of ambition shared by Stuart and his band of brothers and sisters.

    A developed country with high levels in literacy should not have a need for remittances from her diaspora. No disrepect to other poor countries but Barbados is not a Haiti or a Bangladesh. Conversely, if Mr Lasley is serious in his request he should be creating conditions on the ground that would entice the return of the Bajan diaspora back to Barbados.

    If Barbados is serious about growing her economy this has to be the most cost effective way that it can build a strong and a sustainable future.

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  • Cuhdear, once invited to speak, …de man gotta say SOMETHING.!!!
    He has already exhausted ‘promises’ to build a new stadium; …to start a new youth service; …revitalise culture; .. rebuild the family ….. and other pies in the DLP sky…
    This scholarship position is a natural progression…in ‘engaging Bajan brass bowls.

    In the first place, this scholarship idiocy ALREADY happens…. so it is a ‘promise’ that lil Hitler can actually fulfil – for a change.

    Secondly, …why would these DLP morons want to have brilliant Bajans around? …. to do shiite like Come-and-sing-a-song? …. asking difficult questions; taking their asses to court; and pointing out their ineptness?
    Send them away and bring back Dompey …. and Walter 🙂

    The sad thing is that the short man IS probably the most capable DLP minister…. despite not having done a single shiite… except to pay Bizzy millions of dollars in rent, while many Government offices remain empty….

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  • Having tried to come up for the last half an hour with words to express how the many creatives of Barbados feel about this culture-man with ‘nothing’ coming to mind; I realized that there is no need for a lot of words except – this man, this ministry and all his chosen minions are indeed simply, NOTHING.

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  • I think the minister is looking out for himself……….after all his daughter was a scholarship recipient and if she does not want to come back, she would be covered.

    A friend of mine daughter was an exhibition recipient. She studied in the UK and fell in love with the place and has not returned. The friend was telling me that after the dlp became the governent in 2008, they started harrassing the girl to repay the cost of the exhibition. Well, I told her that since her daughter is now a qualified professional if she sends back money, the value would be 3 to 1 so it should not be too hard on her as she knew that under the terms and conditions of the award was that she return or repay the money.

    I tend to agree with the minister a bit because there are no jobs for the students to return to and if they are better opportunities in their chosen field, they should grab the opportunity.

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  • And they have the bloody gall to used Mr Barrow’s name at times. Mr Barrow abhorred this mendicant behaviour by Caribbean politicians , especially.
    After 50 years of independence we are still asking our people abroad to send back home a little berry,so that we can tax the shirt off the recipient’s back. Next thing we will be asking for is Red Cross Parcels.
    Who are we going to beg , when the third generation in the diaspora takes over .People who who were born in the UK,Canada or America, and have very little allegiance for this country, which many have openly described as primitive, except at Crop Over, and 50 th Anniversary type celebrations.
    Ya mean ya can’t move around for beggars in Bridgetown, and now our politicians have exported this art to the international market.

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  • Well maybe Commisiong would prefer to see these young talented barbadians sitting on the block than pursuing other opportunities to their betterment. The realities of this tiny island says different it is not that easy to put forward a dream built on hope. No sense in shaming those who have an education in pursuing a better path but the upside being that those who leave these shores leave with a heavy heart having high expectations with goals in mind and intentions of returning with an vast knowledge of educating bringing back more than when they left having those knoweldgeable resources that would be enough to ignite and refuel a blood line of economic security and development for the country

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  • Well Well & Consequences

    The ministers and politicians do not want to hear from the young brilliant minds of scholars, they push them in a corner to they can listen to the semiliterates like the Biźzys, Maloneys etc and any foreign crooks with a smile and promise of money…read Clare Cowan, Del Mastros etc…..

    these young scholars have no choice but to leave or end up like one I knew who made the mistake of returning many years ago and ended up stuck in a dead end job with the then BS&T…now Massy…..many regrets for that error made back then, there is no place for them and the scholars are not allowed to contribute.

    The ministers would however, if given the opportunity, work them to death. ..Stephen Alleyne comes to mind.

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  • No matter the topic, AC is able to come up with the most idiotic, asinine, retarded perspective.
    That MUST require some SPECIAL skill …. or inspiration.

    No wonder then, that her government is building a monument to Satan on the Garrison – featuring his pitch fork…. these damn people are REAL demons – straight from hell.

    Yuh IDIOT!!
    How do you think Singapore is able to support ALL of it’s bright citizens ….AS WELL AS OTHER IMPORTED GENIUS …. on a small island just like ours?
    It is PRECISELY when we can have true talent available, …instead of the dishonest, crooked, ugly, demon-infested, parasites like wunna … that a country can blossom and bloom.

    Bushie is not at all surprised that Satan has been able to force wunna to build his monument at the damn Garrison. The CLEAREST sign yet of demon-possession among you lot….
    …and wunna don’t even know what wunna dooeth there…

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  • Morons! Incompetents!

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  • Perhaps we should all do a little empirical research and try to determine whether the contributions to the island of returning scholarship winners have been significant. I imagine it is easier to make a difference here if you studied law or history than if you studied medicine, the sciences or engineering.

    It is not easy for someone with highly specialized scientific or technical qualifications from the UK or North America to do much for Barbados. Most of these people are most productive working in large organizations collaborating with hundreds of other specialists.Barbados just doesn’t have the infrastructure to develop their potential.

    The minister is on the ball.

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  • millertheanunnaki

    @ Colonel Buggy November 7, 2016 at 9:04 PM
    “Who are we going to beg , when the third generation in the diaspora takes over .People who who were born in the UK,Canada or America, and have very little allegiance for this country, which many have openly described as primitive, except at Crop Over, and 50 th Anniversary type celebrations.”

    Good point there, C B!

    The early remittances from the 60’s, the subsequent savings (investments) to build and buy houses by the so-called returning nationals and now their pensions represent a significant chunk of foreign exchange required to feed the conspicuous consumption habit of freeloading Bajans who have never earned a dollar in forex in their lives.

    That generation of the enterprising adventurous Bajan is slowly going home and pension payments from abroad terminated.

    What will Barbados do when these easy sources of forex are dried up? As the people in St. Joseph know only too well: ‘One never misses the water until the well runs dry’.

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  • @ Chad
    …we keep forgetting that you are ‘A C’ ..as in “A Chad.”
    Try to sleep it off…

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  • My son would not live in Barbados. He finds it boring. The country is short in quality visual and performing arts. Everything I have attended has been amateurish. Now Broadway shows, no Musicals, no National Orchestra, or visiting orchestras and choirs with world famous conductors. You would never see the Treasures of the Vatican in Bim, nor an exhibition of Matisse nor van Gogh nor van Rijn.

    There is too much emphasis on reggae on the hill and kadooment. Those things are a one time wonder.

    I have, however, enjoyed some of the young musicians from the schools. They need coaching/mentoring by professionals to grow and that means studying abroad.

    Those studends who choose to stay abroad are smart. Their parents paid most of the money for their education. Barbados gives very little for scholarships and exhibitions. When it is converted to foreign currencies it is quite pithy.

    Have anyone checked the cost of sending a child abroad to study? School fees, books, student fees, accommodation, food, clothes for 3 seasons, personal expenses and entertainment. In Canada you are looking at $30k a year easily. Foreign students pay a premium to study here.

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  • millertheanunnaki

    @ chad99999 November 7, 2016 at 10:51 PM #
    “Perhaps we should all do a little empirical research and try to determine whether the contributions to the island of returning scholarship winners have been significant. I imagine it is easier to make a difference here if you studied law or history than if you studied medicine, the sciences or engineering.
    It is not easy for someone with highly specialized scientific or technical qualifications from the UK or North America to do much for Barbados. Most of these people are most productive working in large organizations collaborating with hundreds of other specialists.Barbados just doesn’t have the infrastructure to develop their potential.
    The minister is on the ball.”

    Brilliant! Masterstroke my dear Chad 9 by 5 1/2.

    You have just argued the perfect case for the closing down of the Faculty of Law to put the likes of Jeff C out of the freeloading business.

    Since Barbados cannot export lawyers (given the hundreds that are surplus to requirements) why carry on with a cost centre which is not providing any kind of service or worthwhile contribution to the other profit centres in the Bajan economy and society?

    Do you think the same legally-trained bullshit talking minister represents exportable material capable of surviving and earning his keep in London, Toronto or even Port-of-Spain or Kingston?

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  • No reason why all our young who can afford it should not go away and learn and experience a different life but to say that should they do well, dem should send remittances home is quite frankly rude. Remittances should be sent because the person sending them wants to help family and friends from their own heart and not because a Minister of government says it should be done. Perhaps the Minister’s family abroad have been signalled out for starting the trend in good faith, if they would like a list of artist suffering under the myopic partisan views of the Ministry of Culture to send their monies to, I am sure this could be easily dealt with. After all, surely they would want to make their Daddy proud by listening and acting upon what he considers to be a great idea.

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  • This issue forces us to answer the question -why do we educate our people, our children?

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  • As far as Bushie is concerned, if the Auditor General is not prepared to include in his recommendations, that SPECIFIC persons be charged as a result of clear and specific violations of the law (in relation to tendering, signing contracts without proper authorisation etc),”

    Mr Bushie please do not knock the Auditor General for doing what he is by law supposed to do. What you are asking the Auditor General to is not in his job description . This is the function of the Director of Finance to whom the Auditor General reports specific maters of malfeasance and the Public accounts committee to which the Auditor General is accountable for his findings presented in his annual report to Parliament

    “Section 13(1) to 17(1), 31 and part xi of the Financial administration act cap .5 refers.

    If any shortage ,loss or irregularity is discovered by a member of the Audit Department, the Auditor-General shall, if he considers the case to be sufficiently serious, inform the Director independently of the report made by the head of department , and shall also inform the accounting officer and the head of department concerned, and the Accountant -General.

    The Director shall cause such investigation to be carried out as he thinks fit, and , if necessary, report the matter to the Commissioner of Police if that has not been already done.

    Where in respect of the loss of Government funds or irregularity bin Government accounts

    a criminal charge is preferred the Registrar shall immediately notify the Auditor General of the fact and of the consequence of any such charge or proceedings ”

    and Bushie the last Auditor General who I know of that operated outside of his remit had to unceremoniously leave office but I believe was compensated for his years when another Government assumed office and was subsequently appointed to chair the Public Utilities board.
    I remember in his swan song speech remarking that ‘he was hit below the belt’ but a lot of us couldn’t care less because we considered him to be a tyrant of a boss.

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  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @David November 8, 2016 at 1:23 AM re “This issue forces us to answer the question -why do we educate our people, our children?”—–

    Of course for the same reasons all the world does: to lead us forward by building on that education to develop new and improved products, services and processes.

    That various scholarship worthy talent can return to BIM and, as @Chad45 suggests, marry their personalities and talents to be leaders in cutting edge those products, services and processes is certainly difficult to extrapolate . That would take vision and significant planning.

    Essentially, a Silicon Valley mentality to build the welcoming environment for those talented Bajans and of course others from Jam, T&T and across the globe. Our own small but powerful incubators.

    Don’t let’s mek sport do…dat happen here! LOLL.

    And talking about mekking sport…..what about this Keiron Pollard news? Different type of scholarship but same elements of the Minister’s thinking: top talent want to engage overseas and not keen to return so just require remittances instead.

    Pollard wants to play in SA and not in the local tournament – just like a talented scholar. So the WICB has said we will refuse you the option to work in SA (no NOC) unless your employers pay us a 20% levy on the wages you will receive. Wow! They assert that is needed as compensation for the development of the persona and foundational skills which they are now unable to deploy among the next generation of scholars as a mentor.

    One can only wonder that @Prodigal’s friend exhibition winning daughter would have blown a gasket and quickly employed a lawyer had the Bajan government told her the same thing…to restrain her work and trade options. Of course her Exhibition contract likely clearly states conditions triggering repayment…but nothing so draconian

    To paraphrase, Dr. Walter Rodney wrote about the West under-developing the Third World by taking/(buying) our natural resources at £1 a lb – makes a 100 pieces. The finished products sold back to us for £5 … minimum purchase 100 pieces. A quite alluring profit possibility gain there.

    So what has changed den…we still giving up the natural resources…still alluring and now quite willingly!

    A wry irony that WICB is leading this charge – misguided, though this one be – to claw back some of that wealth lost.

    Taken in its entirety the WICB and this entire debate would be a hoot of laughter if not so frigging serious!!

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  • Well Well & Consequences

    Bajans…….try 30-40 thousand dollars a term, if it’s Canada and universities like Waterloo, the government stingily gives the money in small increments, so you better find the majority yourself and then are disgusting about it to, those shitheads for civil servants.

    Baraados is no place for genuinely brilliant young people…It’s unhealthy for their minds.

    Just look at whom government ministers consider magnates and barons and a lot of other stupid titles, which taking taxpayer’s money and poor into these fools, that alone tells you that intelligent scholars have nowhere to call their own to develop and spread their wings on the island, they will stagnate.

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  • Well Well & Consequences

    ………while taking taxpayer’s money and pour into those parasitic fools for business people which as we know give them very little returns for the treasury, except for their bribes and kickbacks, instead of investing in the brilliant minds of their scholars.

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  • Bush shite…No matter the topic ac can come up with one idiotic…..

    ……………………………….
    No matter the topic bush sh te has all the answer another yahoo who have wasted his education on being the town crier of knowning every thing.bush shite with all your vast knoweldge and expertise would it not be better to be a good steward and use your education in helping to develop a better barbados that spoutting half a.ss theories and regugitating jobby

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  • Commissiong made note of countries that invest in foreign students education with a hope of benefiting to the country
    Yes a very plausible argument however most notable that private sectors in those countries are mostly involved in pulling the heavy load for the foreign student education which can help in decreasing much of the financial burden to the taxpayers
    However in the Carribbean Private sourcing to aid and help government sponsoring through education is hard to develop very few private companies in the carribbean have stepped forward or step outside their financial comfort zone to contribute any thing outside that which makes them profitable

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  • Bushie:

    Mia Mottley pass by you lately? When I read your pieces here they sound a lot like those BLPites whose hearts are bursting at the seams in anticipation of THE BLP WIN next elections.

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  • When you spend all of your money investing in engineers (who really do little or no original thinking), doctors (who prescribe by the instructions book) and these lawyers whose only propensity is to tief, where will the free thinkers and your creativity come from? It is like telling Barbados to go to fully green when those efforts will do little to stymie the loads of pollution coming from the like of the USA, China etc…

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  • To many on this post are of the….we cant do this or that we are too small,etc,etc…mentality.

    They should take a look at the can do mentality of Singapore and Iceland or even the we have a solution mentality of Tanzania.

    We have heard time and time again how the bright ones are rejected when they try to assit……right here on BU we have heard stories from GP and Cl Buggy to this effect.

    The power lies in the hands of the people if only they would use it responsibly as opposed to electing any charlatan that promisses to fix all the wrongs when they come to office a la Trump and then proceeds to outdo previous govts.

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  • I see people comparing Barbados to Singapore all the time.

    Do any of these people understand why Singapore has been successful?

    Apart from having (Chinese) citizens who combine unusual thrift, frugality and personal discipline with exceptional intelligence, Singapore has the geographic location and the racially based networks to broker a large share of the trade between the Western hemisphere and the Eastern hemisphere. It therefore enjoys the profits that come from its middleman status.

    Barbados does not have the geography, the racial connections, or the discipline it takes to build a copy of the Singapore model. The only Caribbean island that has some of the elements I am talking about is Jamaica.

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  • I wonder why it is so difficult to look up the origins of present day Singapore which was no different to the Caribbean prior to Lee Kuan Yew’s arrival on the scene.

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  • I have come to the conclusion that any country run by blacks is doomed. Apart from Botswana can anyone name a black-led country that functions well? To be frank with you I believe that just like enfants we are incapable of developing our nation. Let’s admit this fact and move on. Time for us to welcome back the old Massa.

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  • Oftentimes it is difficult to know the context of the statement when it is partially reproduced for editorial purposes but the Minister is probably echoing the thoughts of many Bajan parents when they look to the future and wonder what it portends for their progeny. If we are realistic we would acknowledge that the country does not have the wherewithal to provide suitable employment opportunities for many graduates and it is a question of Economics 101 if the supply is here and the demand is elsewhere they will try to satisfy that demand.

    They are not all lawyers who can hang up their shingle and wait for a client to walk through the door (we have reached saturation point with lawyers) but people are trained in other disciplines which they cannot utilize in a meaningful way in the Bajan environment and if I had a child who studied in another country and had the opportunity to make a meaningful living there I would certainly encourage him/her to grasp that offer.

    Some students will not want to live in a foreign country beyond their period of study but it should be a personal decision as many of their cohorts will choose other options, Barbados suffered a brain drain in the 50’s;60’s and the early 70’s, that trend was reversed over the last three decades but the recent economic downturn will propel young people to seek greener pastures.

    We should get used to it.

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  • @ Exclaimer
    Blacks were not designed to be albino-centric….
    We have turned our backs on our natural community-centric disposition and are trying to compete with the experts in greed, selfishness and spite….

    What would you expect….?

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  • But as usual Commisiong would come on BU with a preversive view of small economies
    The facts and realities of comparing countries with higher economic leverage and geographical advantages to the carribbean islands is like comparing apples to oranges.
    But then the yahoo brigade led by the most honourable bush tea would throw fact and truth out the window to formulate a conclusion which borders on hyperbole

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  • peterlawrencethompson

    @exclaimer said “Time for us to welcome back the old Massa.”
    The old Massa never left; haven’t you noticed? The economic levers of development have never shifted from the oligarchy which has controlled them for ALL of our history’s “fields and hills beyond recall.” The psychological levers of development, even more important, remain hobbled by the attitude that permeates your comment (even if it was intended to be tongue in cheek). The “old Massa” appears to have taken up residence between your ears.

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  • In order to attained to kind of development Mr. Commissiong is speaking about regarding our schalors creative input, Barbadians most first be receptive to the foreign way of doing things. Now I am not saying that everything foreign is great and fits the design of the Barbadian society, but at least give the idea some currency.

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  • Vincent Haynes

    Please answer my questions carefully, one at a time

    Does Barbados have a strategic location on a narrow body of water that is used as a marine highway by most of the shipping that carries goods between the Western Hemisphere and the Eastern Hemisphere? Hint: The answer is No.

    Does Barbados have an energetic, disciplined, motivated, intelligent, technically proficient labour force? Hint: The answer is No.

    Does Barbados have insider connections to the business elites of East Asia, South-east Asia, South Asia, North America and western Europe? Hint: The answer is No.

    If the answer to any of these questions is No, the Singapore model cannot work.

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  • peterlawrencethompson

    @ Chad99999
    Singapore in 1965 did not have either “an energetic, disciplined, motivated, intelligent, technically proficient labour force” or “insider connections to the business elites of East Asia, South-east Asia, South Asia, North America and western Europe.”

    But of course you are correct that the Singapore model cannot work in Barbados in 2016.

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  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Vincent Haynes November 8, 2016 at 10:50 AM #
    The comparison of Barbados to Singapore is useful, but it’s a mistake to think that the starting points of our development were similar. The differences in “domestic values and cultures” are critical; in the case of Barbados the differences are deeply rooted in the “historical background of oppressive slavery.”

    The mentality which has crippled public services in Barbados is intimately related to that which has made the local private sector dependent on economic rent seeking rather than productive innovation. The legacy of slavery has damaged not only the descendants of slaves, but also the descendants of slave masters.

    Governance reform is indeed sorely needed, but this is only part of a solution. It is naive to pretend that productive investment will follow governance reform without accompanying structural reforms which change the way capital is deployed in the local economy.

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  • peterlawrencethompson November 8, 2016 at 12:02 PM #

    Would you care to do a comparison between Barbados and islands such as Curacao and Martinique both of whom had a slave past.

    The point about Singapore that everyone keeps missing is Lee Kuan Yew……he had a vision and forced it down the throats of a fractured community made up of malay indians and chinese descendants…….he also ensured that his succession plan was activated.

    His contemporaries at The LLC were EWB and FB with EWB refusing to implement the vision and FB trying to achieve it initially but changed his plans mid stream.

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  • @Peter

    Interesting comment, the economy has shifted from plantation to financial but the beneficial ownership of the two remains the same.

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  • PLT

    You are wrong wrong wrong.

    The British, Chinese and East Indians in Singapore had insider connections to the trading groups connecting East and West. Before Henry Kissinger opened China to world trade, China wanted Hong Kong and Singapore to be the two main hubs of East-West trade.

    I studied alongside students from Singapore in North America during the 1960s. They all wore a uniform of white shirts and dark pants, lived like monks, studied every night of the week, saved money like Lebanese merchants, etc. Very different from young people from the Caribbean.

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  • Does AC understand that what Minister Lashley is proposing is to change a governmental policy that currently exists? At present the policy is that Barbados Scholars and Exhibitioners are required to work in Barbados for at least the number of years during which the Barbados Government financed their tertiary education. Minister Lashley is proposing to abolish that regulation, on the ground that if they work abroad they will be likely to send remittances to their family members and that that should be good enough for us!!!!

    David therefore poses a very good question for Minister Lashley to ponder on— what then would be the purpose of Barbados educating its people? Merely to have a hope that some of them might send remittances???

    So who is to be responsible for the development of Barbados? The foreign investor? The Hyatts and Butch Stuarts of this world?

    I say NO. We need to understand that the primary responsibility for developing Barbados must reside with us— the people of Barbados– and in particular with our educated and talented young people.

    Incidentally, one of my daughters is a Barbados Scholar, and I am very proud that having completed her medical training she is working at a rural medical clinic in Barbados serving the Barbadian people and also contributing to the cultural and artistic evolution of the country through her musical and artistic skills and her engagement with other young and not so young Barbadians. In other words the contribution of the returning scholars is not only by way of the work that they do, but also through their social and cultural engagement.

    Let me hasten to say to Prodigal Son and Chad though that I do not have any difficulty with the idea of the scholar working overseas for a period of time either to gain further experience and knowledge, or where a job or an opportunity for self employment is not immediately available in Barbados, but what I object to is this notion that the scholar should not be required to return to Barbados at all, and that the possibility of them sending remittances should be good enough for us.

    Finally, I would like to say to “Bajan” that the countries that currently possess national orchestras, world famous conductors, and exhibitions by world famous painters did not always possess that level of cultural development— their people invested their time, energy, intellect, and passion in developing such societies. We too must be prepared to do likewise, and our trained, talented and educated youth must be in the vanguard of such a mission.

    That is the type of message and aspiration that we must preach to our young people, and we must make it clear to Minister Lashley and all the other Ministers and political leaders of Barbados that their primary DUTY is to put policies and mechanisms in place to facilitate our youth in so expressing themselves and making such a contribution to the development of their nation.

    DAVID COMISSIONG

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  • peterlawrencethompson

    @chad99999 November 8, 2016 at 12:28 PM #
    I accept your inside knowledge of students from Singapore in North America during the 1960s. However let me point out that I studied alongside Caribbean students in North America during the 1970s; the did not live like monks, but they did study every night of the week and most went on to extraordinary material and career success. The only ones of my acquaintance who returned to the Caribbean before they had made their fortunes were the white boys and girls. Kind of makes you go hmmmm.

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  • Chad9999

    Why is it that East Indian Hi-Tech skills are in such high demand in America and the wider world? And as you ought to know: India was arguably the poorest country in the world some 5 decades ago. But India’s educational success has probably little to do with retaining its best and brightest, and more to do with restructuring its academics system as well as its economy and gearing it towards science and technology etc.

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  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Vincent Haynes asked “Would you care to do a comparison between Barbados and islands such as Curacao and Martinique both of whom had a slave past.”

    Both of these islands chose to deepen and make permanent their affiliation with their European colonizers. Being part of a European country certainly brings material benefits; they hold European passports and enjoy an (almost) European standard of living. However, they still have to deal with the deep and resurgent racism that is exemplified by neo fascists like Le Pen in France and Wilders in Holland, so the slave past is not entirely past.

    Like

  • David

    If you go abroad, earn a PhD in geology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, statistics, marine biology, computer science, accounting, finance, petroleum engineering, chemical engineering, or whatever, there are very few jobs in Barbados for you.

    Barbados already has more credentialed people than it can put to work. Most of the PhDs who occupy the positions that are available are lazy, third rate academics and professionals who spend their time drinking and playing politics rather than keeping up with the frontiers of knowledge in their fields.

    Most returning graduates also have to put up with unusual jealousy, resentment and office politics from the local people they encounter– locals who, like the Hilary Clintons of this world (that is to say like the people everywhere who believe they are clever but are without accomplishments), must prove that they are “equal”.

    Like

  • Mr Lashley does not understand that it is the knowledge transfer that we need, not the remittances. This is the level of public intelligence that returning professionals will change.

    Like

  • @chad99999

    Why must these credentialed Barbadians have to ‘put up’ with anything? Why can’t they act as catylst for change? Be leaders!

    Why according to you they go lazy and assimilate?

    >

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  • At times, Chad can be so disappointing….
    International competitive advantage is a direct function of national creativity, bravery, and productivity. In other words, questions about strategic locations, productive and creative work forces and insider connections are REALLY questions about leadership, intellectual capacity and BALLS.

    Is Chad aware that Barbados was once the world’s richest and most prized colony -and that this was all built upon sugar and institutionalised slavery…?

    After WW2, Japan was a poor wasteland, marked by nuclear radiation and were piss poor …. only to rise in the 1990’s as a global super power …on the back of an intellectual philosophy related to productivity.

    The ONLY reason that Barbados has become a place of failure and debt, is that we have been entertaining idiots, fools and plain jackasses in positions of authority … and most recently, we have elevated some who seem to be aligned to Satan himself.

    As Vincent says, Singapore is a result of Lee Kuan Yew’s visional, balls and determination to achieve victory …in the face of brass bowlery…

    Barbados is a case where the brass bowlery won the fight…. which is only natural if we export all the potential Lee’s

    Liked by 1 person

  • At the end of his life, Lee Kuan Yew wrote his autobiography.

    So now, we have platoons of Barbadians reducing the complex post-WWII history of Singapore to the Lee Kuan Yew story.

    That is pure BS. There were powerful (hidden) forces working to lift the fortunes of Singapore that had nothing to do with Lee.

    Do not reduce the complexity of world events to simple-minded nonsense.

    Like

  • Well Well & Consequences

    “The ONLY reason that Barbados has become a place of failure and debt, is that we have been entertaining idiots, fools and plain jackasses in positions of authority … and most recently, we have elevated some who seem to be aligned to Satan himself.”

    Barbados’ population also for decades remained a constant 275k people, stagnating economic growth and progress, while Singapore’s population with a country yeah bigger than Barbados in square mileage, grew a population of nearly 6 million people…that is a vibrant economy with lots of currency circulation. ..

    Barbados on the other has also has the added blight of a 5% minority population aided by government ministers who collude to keep the island and majority population. ..stagnant.

    Like

  • During the ’70s I had reason to visit Singapore on a number of occasions and become acquinted with it first hand,I listened to the people and observed Lee in action.
    I stand by my previous statements.

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  • I referred to Iceland and Tanzania as well….so why no rebuttal on their respective efforts.

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  • Le Pen&Wilders are equal opportunity xenophobes who object to all foreigners,other european countries that have individuals like them are Germany&Austria also the UK……so far they have not become a force to be reckoned with.

    Those islands also have a minority wanting independence,in general those islands enjoy a far superior standard of living than we do.You will find in Holland a number of businesses owned by these islanders.

    Speaking as one born and raised in Curacao,the apartheid system(Dutch word) as seen in Bim never existed over there and that is the perpetual invisible yoke being carried by those born and raised here which is responsible I posit for the mainy failures of succesive govts to move its people forward.An incestous fire feeding off itself.

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  • Vincent

    Please don’t compare Barbados to Iceland. Iceland has abundant, cheap renewable hydro-electric and geothermal energy resources to support manufacturing. Plus the fish.

    I don’t know much about Tanzania, except that it is much poorer than Barbados.

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  • chad99999 November 8, 2016 at 3:12 PM #

    I am dealing with the spirit of the people……Iceland a vast inhospitable area with only 300000 odd thousand people with a can do spirit….Tanzania poor and corrupt with Magufuli attempting to bring it forward.

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  • “If you go abroad, earn a PhD in geology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, statistics, marine biology, computer science, accounting, finance, petroleum engineering, chemical engineering, or whatever, there are very few jobs in Barbados for you.”

    Fossilised thinking!!!

    Like

  • @ Enuff
    It is fossilised thinking if you have an interest in national development and are seeking to make a contribution to such…
    If you are looking to see how much you can get for yourself and as quickly as possible, then Chad is right that this large developed societies present better opportunities.

    His is the quintessential albino centric predisposition….

    Like

  • Bush Tea and Enuff

    Like I said before, you are both ……

    BT, Just because some forms of comparative advantage are created by people doesn’t mean all forms of comparative advantage are entirely man-made. Some are gifts of Nature.

    Like

  • Chad9999

    “If you’re looking to see how much you can get for yourself as quick as possible”

    What Bush Tea in all of his philosophizing and intellectualizing has forgotten is the fact that in order to attrach the best and the brightest, one has to offer financial incentives, as Donald Trump, Steve Jobs of Apple, Bill Gates of Microsoft, NESSA etc have and continues to do. Now with that being said: give a good reason Bush Tea, why would Sir Arthur Lewis wished to returned to the Caribbean to work for chump change, when he was offered a professorship at Stanford University working for big bucks?

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Dompey
    I could not ignore the fact that you put Trump in the company of Jobs and Gates… this is nonsense, Trump is not an entrepreneur, he is a con artist. If he had simply invested his inheritance in an indexed fund he would have more money than he made through all his bankruptcies and scams and real estate development businesses. He has no talent except for lies and self promotion.

    Liked by 2 people

  • Anonymouse - The Gazer

    @Dompey
    “why would Sir Arthur Lewis wished to returned to the Caribbean to work for chump change, when he was offered a professorship at Stanford University working for big bucks?”

    Good question.

    We in the Caribbean must find some way of getting our brightest and our best to come back home and serve. A first step, may be to forget where they come from (especially if they were nobodies) and give them the respect due to their achievements. It is not always a question of money; Barbadians try to pull you down to the same level you were at before you left the island.

    The US and richer counties welcome our best minds and benefit from this brain drain; our leaders must try to encourage these brains to return home instead of just looking for a check to cash.

    Like

  • Chad999
    Your problem is simple–you’re too focused on subject and as such rigid in your perception of what job suits a particular subject/degree. A phd in chemistry does not mean one has to work in a chemistry related field. We are looking for thinkers/innovators/leaders/problem solvers/doers not “related course material” unless it is one of those professions that require specific training like medicine etc. For example, look at the Akanni McDowall case. He performed the duties of a post for 2 years only to be told he is not qualified. What does that say about the required “subject” areas if he was able to carry out his duties successfully? In the real world doctors, lawyers, engineers, english grads etc are working in the big accounting firms providing consultancy services in areas that have little or nothing to do with their “subjects” but they can read, analyse, synthesise and formulate.

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  • Much attention should be paid on how the socialist pigs come jumping out of the wood work to lend their support at the mention of Singapore.
    A country that is govern with socialist idealolgies.
    It is so amazing that those who always seem to be lovers of those countries that are ruled by dictatorship never take flight or seek refuge and nestled among such gloriuos fanfare of wealth but would rather stay put in an uncomfortable situation and moam and groan about how hard life is in their country of origin.

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  • peterlawrencethompson

    @ac said “Singapore. A country that is govern with socialist idealolgies.”
    That is a moronically ill informed comment even by your low standards. You could not have made a bigger error.

    Like

  • Cant envision barbados offering scholarships to foreigners on an educational scale that would be sufficient or better than what a person in the USA can avail themselves
    Furthemore what these international countries offer on a financial level to attract foreign students barbados nor any other Carribbean island cannot afford

    Like

  •  

    Politics of Singapore

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Singapore

    Coat of arms of Singapore (blazon).svg

    This article is part of a series on the politics and government of Singapore

    Constitution

    The politics of Singapore takes the form of a parliamentary representative democratic republic whereby the President of Singapore is the head of state, the Prime Minister of Singapore is the head of government, and of a multi-party system. Executive power is exercised by the cabinet from the parliament, and to a lesser extent, the President. Cabinet has the general direction and control of the Government and is accountable[1] to Parliament. There are three separate branches of government: the legislature, executive and judiciary, though not necessarily meaning that there is a separation of power, but abiding by the Westminster system.[2]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Politics_of_Singapore

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @ac said “… attract foreign students barbados nor any other Carribbean island cannot afford…”
    Are you aware of the American University of Barbados as well as all the other American Medical Schools scattered across the Caribbean?

    Like

  • So wait…
    Wunna SERIOUSLY arguing with AC…?
    Steupsss…
    One does not argue with a jackass…
    One brings out the whip….

    Like

  • When I listen to the ASSonalists on CNN and MSNBC pointing out the clear path to 270 electoral votes and a massive win for Hilary Clinton, and I look at the Barbados political landscape, I do not see the CLEAR PATH for a BLP victory in the next elections. This is the WEAKEST BLP team I have seen in years. Could it be saying something about the leadership of the BLP?

    Miller, your turn!!

    Like

  • A dictatorship is a place where a leader does not entertain discussions with the people – or with the damn press.
    It is where the dictator sides with known CLICO crooks, court-identified thieving speakers, signs underhand CAHILL contracts -and then lie about it, and builds monuments to Satan.

    A dictator holds on to power as long as possible -even though everything that he touches turns into shit.

    @ AC
    Using those clues, try to identify a dictator that is close to your heart.

    Like

  • Bush shit no sense arguing with you since you have not hid your preferences for dictators like castro and the late chavez so yes you might be right with your clues however given the alternatives by rule of the iron fist i rather be governed by those who failures and flaws are known within a democracy

    Like

  • @Mr. Commissiong

    It is good to see you responding to comments on your articles. I was beginning to think you were not interested in the discussions. Re the youth, the young musicians I have heard on my visits are talented. They need to pursue music studies abroad, work abroad for a period of time travelling with a group AND then return home. When you have about ten or so, then you can start a small orchestra.

    Instead of bringing in shyte artists from Jamaica and tiefing fake preachers from the US, Bajans can take the same money and build a performing and visual arts centre, designed for purpose with the proper acoustics, etc. Then you will have a place for the youth to play, you can bring in good performers where all feel welcome unlike the elites who are invited to Holders Hill.

    Like

  • Why wunna confusing wunna heads?

    Policy what?

    The Minister’s daughter who was at Queen’s College a few years ago with my Little Johnnie got a scholarship or exhibition did she not?

    Stupssseee!!!!

    People so foolish.

    Like

  • @bajans November 7, 2016 at 11:30 PM “My son would not live in Barbados. He finds it boring.

    A Simple Response “Maybe your son is the boring one. The last married Bajan woman I hear complaining about how boring Barbados is and she can’t live here really wanted to run back to New York so that she continue to sleep with a boss.”

    @bajans November 7, 2016 at 11:30 PM “The country is short in quality visual and performing arts. ”

    A Simple Response: I am not sure where you and or your son go when in Barbados for to see and hear the visual and performing arts, but I question your statement. Barbados in fact has a population of only 326,936. If we exclude those younger than 20 and those older than 70 we are working with a population of 227,491 people. I put it to you that those people have produced just as much or greater quantity and quality of artistic riches that most Canadian towns of the same size.

    In addition and for example many, many Americans find Canada boring. And many, many Canadians find their own small towns to be boring. In fact some Bajans who live in Toronto will tell you that they find Scarborough to be boring.

    The point being that it is really really, hard to replicate something like Broadway unless one can, like New York, call on a population of 8 1/2 million people both to create the art and to pay the artists for their creative work.

    @bajans November 7, 2016 at 11:30 PM “no National Orchestra or visiting orchestras…”

    There is a National Youth Orchestra and a very fine police band. I just looked at the website of the Frank Collymore Hall and for December alone the Hall will host 4 concerts, and a film show. I know for certain that the hall regularly hosts visual arts exhibitions, film shows visiting and local orchestras etc. I’ve attended many of these events myself.

    @bajans November 7, 2016 at 11:30 PM “You would never see the Treasures of the Vatican in Bim, nor an exhibition of Matisse nor van Gogh nor van Rijn.”

    You won’t see these in Scarboro either. Nor in Richmond Hill, Latchford, Ajax, Bancroft, Caledon, Deep River, Essex, Fort Erie, Grimsby, Huntsville, Innisfil, Kapuskasing, Milton, New Market, Oakville, Parry Sound, Smiths Falls, Tecumseh, nor Whitby. And I put it to you that it is easier and sometimes quicker to get from Barbados to Toronto ($700 CDN, 5 1/2 hours) to for example to enjoy their film festival (as I did this year) that it is to drive 9 hours from Kapuskasing, or take the or take 4 hours 10 mins flight with multiple stops from Kapuskasing to Toronto. So what is your point? Small places mostly cannot provide the cultural richness of metropolises. But there is plenty of boring to go around in Canada too. Barbados for example possesses a rich and diverse landscape and seascape. I doubt that you could find any 166 sq mile section of Canada that is as biologically diverse. There is probably more biodiversity in my village than there is in the whole of Toronto.

    @bajans November 7, 2016 at 11:30 PM “There is too much emphasis on reggae on the hill and kadooment.”

    A Siimple Response “Maybe your son loves the wuk-up festivals, and the very beautiful women who attend those festivals. You may think that there is “too much emphasis” but I would bet anything that your son loves, loves, loves the wuk-up festivals.

    @bajans November 7, 2016 at 11:30 PM “Those studends who choose to stay abroad are smart. Their parents paid most of the money for their education. Barbados gives very little for scholarships and exhibitions.

    A Simple Response “Not true (and I know becausin’ my little Johnnie got a scholarship too, hee!!, hee!! hee!!) The Barbados government pays the tuition and makes a contribution to airfare, housing, warm clothes, and ground transportation. Reasonably, why for example should the Barbados taxpayers feed our kids when they are abroad? If the kids were living in our house we would have to feed then, not so? So when they are abroad the parents should simply send them their fair share of the household’s weekly/monthly food money.

    @bajans November 7, 2016 at 11:30 PM “In Canada you are looking at $30k a year easily. Foreign students pay a premium to study here.”

    And indeed foreign students should pay more. Why should the Canadian taxpayers carry foreign students? Those foreign students have not yet paid taxes in Canada so why should they get a free ride off the backs of the Canadian taxpayer? Let the parents [and the students] tighten their belts do.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @bajans

    Even though Holder’s Hill is owned by a wealthy family, or by a family that used to be wealthy, and is now trying very hard to make a living from their very nice high maintenance property, it is NOT an invitation place only for the elites. Holder’s hosts public events. Anybody can attend. The place is 5 to 10 minutes walk down the hill from the corner of Holder’s Hill. Anybody who has $4 can catch a Wanstead bus or a route 3 ZR, which leaves from by the main post office in town and runs along Black Rock and attend events there. Tickets cost as little as $40 BDS so anybody who has a Barrow ($50 BDS) can attend an event, and if you can spare a Grantley ($100) once a year you can attend two events and still have change left over for busfare for a couple of days.

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  • @Well Well & Consequences November 8, 2016 at 4:29 AM “30-40 thousand dollars a term, if it’s Canada and universities like Waterloo.”

    Not quite true.

    Foreign students pay $36,810 CDN per YEAR for Architecture (the most expensive) and $24,830 CDN for applied health science, art, environment, accounting and financial management (the cheapest) at Waterloo.

    So therefore between $18,765 BDS and 28,819 BDS per semester (half year). High cost yes. But nowhere near your stated “30-40 thousand dollars a term…[at] universities like Waterloo

    Like

  • And nowhere near the cost of attending these and similar American universities:

    $31,320 USD ($63,226BDS) per year at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign for example

    Or the $49,062 USD ($99,105) per year at New York University

    Which is why Canadian Universities are putting licks on American universities.

    Better than a Black Friday sale.

    Lolll!!!

    Like

  • @David Comissiong November 8, 2016 at 12:42 PM “understand that what Minister Lashley is proposing is to change a governmental policy that currently exists? …I say NO. We need to understand that the primary responsibility for developing Barbados must reside with us— the people of Barbados– and in particular with our educated and talented young people…Let me hasten to say…that I do not have any difficulty with the idea of the scholar working overseas for a period of time either to gain further experience and knowledge, or where a job or an opportunity for self employment is not immediately available in Barbados, but what I object to is this notion that the scholar should not be required to return to Barbados at all, and that the possibility of them sending remittances should be good enough…we must make it clear to Minister Lashley and all the other Ministers and political leaders of Barbados that their primary DUTY is to put policies and mechanisms in place to facilitate our youth in so expressing themselves and making such a contribution to the development of their nation.

    Well thought. Well said. I cannot add anything else.

    Like

  • @Well Well & Consequences November 8, 2016 at 2:28 PM “Singapore’s population with a country yeah bigger than Barbados in square mileage, grew a population of nearly 6 million people.’

    It seems clear to me then that the Singaporeans were NOT living like monks.

    As it is NOT possible to live like a monk and at the same time have a rapid increase in population.

    it seems to me that the Singaporeans were/are as busy as bunnies.

    Somebody was fooling wunna.

    Like

  • @Dompey November 8, 2016 at 4:55 PM “why would Sir Arthur Lewis wished to returned to the Caribbean to work for chump change, when he was offered a professorship at Stanford University working for big bucks?”

    I doubt that he was attracted to Stanford primarily for the big bucks. he probably went there for the opportunities to teach and for the opportunities to conduct to research…that said, he did work for many years in Barbados heading up the Caribbean Development Bank, and he was for all his life a man of modest tastes, notwithstanding his stellar achievements.

    Like

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