Governor Worrell Warns Barbadians

There is a need to improve labour productivity throughout the economy. A gap has opened up between the cost of labour and the productivity of the average worker over the past two decades – Governor Delisle Worrell

The Governor of the Central Bank […]has decided in his infinite wisdom the best approach to communicate with Barbadians is through press releases. Even more disturbing has been the low keyed reaction by individuals and other stakeholders to concerns expressed by Worrell in his statement placed in the local press last weekend.

Press Statement by Governor of the Cental Bank (09/8/15)

Press Statement by Governor of the Central Bank (09/8/15)

Two points to note from Worrell’s press release:

  • Barbadian workers must produce more if we are to maintain the current cost base  and;
  • Government will need to borrow to finance the deficit. (This is not good news given our junk status.)

Barbadians will need to engage in an honest conversation about the state of the economy and what is required to shift from its current path. It is evident to those of us who have the capacity to filter the truth that occasionally escapes the mouths of officials, our economy continues to be under distress.   We have seen growth in tourism numbers, some reduction in government expenditure but a lacklustre approach to stimulating growth especially in the export sector. The issue the government and relevant private sector agencies need to honestly discuss is what structural changes are required to sustain the lifestyle we aspire. There is the touted social partnership which seems a good place to begin the conversation.

After 7 years of austerity we must ask ourselves if we are on the right path. Are we seeing a country firing on all cylinders driven by a shared position? Are we seeing a country tapping on our education capital fuelled by the billions invested in the sector post Independence?   What BU sees is a fractious government comprised of a garrulous lot who have failed to lead at a time when the ability to collaborate to promote a conciliatory tone is required. There is been no change to our governance structure to address transparency in government and by extension private sector.    There has been no change to redesign our education system to make it more relevant to local and domestic needs to be competitive. There has been no effort to aggressively modernize the public sector by integrating technology and performance management systems to improve productivity and efficiency. And no amalgamation of statutory boards does not frontally address the issue. There has been no significant improvement to improve the standard of transportation delivery by eradicating the sub culture …

The social and economic ‘wellbeing’ of Barbados is under threat while we continue to be engaged in irrelevant political diatribe. For the first time in his tenure the Governor appears to want to lead a narrative which points to the real issues confronting Barbados. The improvement in tourism is not relevant if we are debating what needs to change structurally to propel sustained social and economic growth/development in Barbados. Our debt burden has assumed daunting proportion which gives the country little fiscal space for the government to drive the economy. The government has reached a point where savings bonds are being issued to pay tax refunds. Barbadians should be ever so concerned.

98 comments

  • from a man who works 4hr a day?

    Like

  • “And no amalgamation of statutory boards does not frontally address the issue.”

    Whenever I read a working paper of press release from the Central Bank Governor, I always expect either a new policy initiative or change in policy in the not too distant future. For example, when the governor announced the bank was relinquishing control of determining interest rates for commercial banks, I mentioned on BU to expect a sale of government bonds at attractive interest rates.

    During his December 13, 2013 ministerial statement, Sinckler revealed that the ministry of finance formally requested technical assistance from the IMF’s Fiscal Affairs Department to examine government’s tax administration and “fiscal operational reform in the key statutory entities which rely on central government for large transfers for their operations.”

    Sinckler also disclosed during a media briefing held at government headquarters on January 6, 2014 that the future of 19 statutory corporations and their 9,000 employees would be known by April 2014. He also stated that the final report on the operations of the statutory corporations would have been completed by at least the end of January and Cabinet would examine the recommendations.

    So far, government has not made Barbadians aware of the IMF’s recommendations and they are yet to reveal the contents of the final report on statutory corporations’ operations.

    Like

  • We should expect the Governor to address the rollout plan for new government projects. The PM was suppose to head a sub committee of Cabinet to ensure projects are on time because government’s economic growth plan is dependent on efficient execution.

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  • Bona fide investors and a discerning public are at one in the knowledge that this CB Governor is an extremely biased individual and rather than take him seriously,we dismiss his contribution as the DLP party line.And we have a Westminster form of governance with all the trappings of big salaries,big entertainment allowances,police outriders,Mercybenz cars and suv’s and a PM crying about the $800,000.00 spent on hosting a Caricom Heads of Government conference just gone.What was it worth to the price of bread in Barbados?Gear Box,Sharkie,Ding Ding,Tala-Laluh,Isthmus,Beanzie,Cedilla,Back back,Lilliputian all seem to be in Bay St with King Dyal at the head of the table.We might be better off with these truth tellers.

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  • “Barbadians will need to engage in an honest conversation about the state of the economy and what is required to shift from its current path.”

    The above comments are true. However, it seems as though the majority of contributors to this forum prefer to engage in parochial matters such as Rihanna and unrelated issues affecting North America and Europe.

    Like

  • Interesting to listen to Minister of Finance waxing lyrically at the Latin American and Caribbean Debt Specialist meeting to day highlighted the need for a one strategy to debt management in the region. BU suggests we equally have to address what drives spending to support infrastructural and social development. What about plugging the leak which see wastage of public resources? See the auditor general reports. What about beefing up procurement policy.

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  • David of BU,slightly off topic but interesting reading in the Guyana newspapers of today.
    Guyana has refused entry to a number of non-nationals including Haitians.Reading the comments of the Guyanese in the Stabroek News,it is amazing that these people are in support of their government’s action,yet when Barbados tried to protect its borders from illegals,we were call xenophobic, anti-Caribbean and even worst names.
    These same Guyanese who believes they have some god-given right to invade other countries and live illegally while at the same time demanding the same rights of the nationals of the country are now crying out because other non-nationals especially Haitians & Colombians are seeking to enter their country.

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  • @Negroman

    They all try to protect their borders from allowing riff raff in but they like to persecute and prosecute Barbados.

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  • “And no amalgamation of statutory boards does not frontally address the issue.”

    Amalgamating statutory corporations, especially those that provide similar services, is a good idea, and would assist in reducing government expenditure. However, there are political disadvantages attached to this undertaking if one examines specific boards. Urban Development Commission, Rural Development Commission and National Assistance Board are three statutory corporations that could be successfully merged and their operations consolidated.
    Recall, NAB’s Housing Welfare Program was closed by the previous BLP administration and its operations were distributed between UDC and RDC.

    Government is FULLY AWARE that NAB is over-staffed. Whereas when all services were rendered by NAB with ONE set of staff, these three entities have a cumulative total of 3 Directors, 3 Accountants, 3 sets of board of directors and triple auxiliary staff. The closure of the Black Rock Hostel and Golden Rock Senior Citizens’ Home meant that staff had to be incorporated into the Vauxhall Senior Citizens’ Home.

    Presently, for example, with SIGNIFICANTLY REDUCED OPERATIONS, NAB’s headquarters employs a Secretary and 2 Clerk Typists, Human Resources Manager and an Administrative Officer, 2 Maids, as well as an Accountant and 5 Clerical Officers in the accounts section.

    As it relates to the Home Care Service, according to Chapter 6, sub 6.124 on page 194 of the 2014 Auditor General’s report:

    “Cabinet decisions set the policy direction of the Government on matters, and state agencies are expected to carry out those decisions. The National Assistance Board employed more persons that it was authorized to, by retaining persons in posts that should have been transferred at the closure of its Housing Programme as directed by the Cabinet. It also did not follow the Ministry of the Civil Service is guidelines for creating new posts but unilaterally increased its staff complement. Consequently, the Board exceeded its allotted staff complement by fifty-three (53) posts.”

    Additionally, in 2009 the government amended the National Assistance Board Act, Section 4, Cap 48 to increase the number of members on the National Assistance Board of directors.

    Over the years, NAB, RDC and UDC have been used by both BLP and DLP administrations to solicit votes, through the provision of jobs, contracts to artisans and house repairs for constituents of parliamentarians under whose portfolio these entities fall.

    NAB currently operates under the Ministry of Social Care, UDC is overseen by the Prime Minister and RDC is under the aegis of the Ministry of Housing (Steve Blackett, Fruendel Stuart and Denis Kellman respectively). Government’s unpopularity (as well as that of Blackett, Stuart and Kellman) are growing daily among Barbadians. As such, they must distribute a considerable amount “incentives” to the electorate in an effort to solicit votes. This task could be undertaken by these three entities.

    Obviously, it will not be politically advantageous for the government if they seek to merge and consolidate the operations of these statutory corporations.

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  • At a time when many countries around the world, some with a “push” from the IMF, are re-structuring their labour markets in order to become more competitive. Barbados, on the other hand has been steadily marching in the opposite direction by introducing regressive labour legislation that really belongs in the middle 20th century. The extreme procedures and penalties exacted on employers in the Employment Rights Act are such that no company is going to take the chance to re-structure because the cost will become prohibitive. But it is only with re-structuring that companies will be able to break from old practices and lurch into the 21st century where maximum flexibility in the use of labour is essential to be competitive. Let’s not kid ourselves here. The Barbados labour force has been so mollycoddled by excessive labour legislation that many are now happy to perform the absolute minimum without fear of sanctions. On the other hand, employers have been more than slow to employ the kind of technology that can improve productivity, and when they have, they have committed the cardinal sin of not sharing the benefits with their employees. Another factor, identified by the Productivity Council, was that of absenteeism. We are not set up in Barbados to keep employees at work. The polyclinics are not open in the evening, school form meetings are held in working hours when they should be held after school (and work), and we line up for hours to pay bills that could easily be dealt with on line. Even the National Insurance office insists that persons should bring information in person when they have a string of inspectors on the road who could easily pass by employers to gather the information without and employee leaving work for the day! Sorry Dr Worrell, but it is successive governments that have created this situation through constant courting of the unions and the public sector labour force in order to win elections. BU states above:
    “The social and economic ‘wellbeing’ of Barbados is under threat while we continue to be engaged in irrelevant political diatribe.” With this being the case, we will never be competitive.

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  • August 12, 2015 at 1:13 PM # @Negroman

    They all try to protect their borders from allowing riff raff in but they like to persecute and prosecute Barbados.

    Two wrongs do not make a right. They are ways and means of doing things. If the laws devised by Caribbean Governments governing entry of Caribbean nationals persons into Caribbean countries are not breached by persons seeking entry then they have every right to enter free of harassment.

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  • “Obviously, it will not be politically advantageous for the government if they seek to merge and consolidate the operations of these statutory corporations.”

    Very true and neither advantageous politically or financially for some Ministers to relieved of their half day work duties and the Ministries amalgamated

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  • BU agrees with the PM and A when they advised our officials to do their jobs!

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  • BU agrees with the PM and A when they advised our officials to do their job!

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  • @David,

    Are you watching what is happening with the stock markets today ? Not good.

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  • @Hants

    The Chinese unexpected 2% devaluation of the Yuan has the market in a tizzy.

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  • Glad to see everyone staying on topic here. It says a lot about our attention to productivity

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  • Violet C Beckles

    He cant warn no one,, We warn you all many times ,This man is part of the problem , who help lie and cover up for the DBLP government ,20 years at making $200bds a week ,,, its in your face ,,,,and all bills moving up and none can pay them ,, then what?

    All of them are she-it that they now want to say well after it happened ,, more shit to come , more pain to come,

    Vote CUP and see the scum on the walls of Barbados come clean.

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  • I have stated on BU before that the Severance Payment Act,the Employees Rights Act and the Holidays With Pay Act are each devastating to employers and so are disincentives to investment.Employers have few rights.It’s ironic that employees who hold a heavy deck of cards in the scheme of things hold the upper hand in an economy that is in dire straits.When will the elected idiots learn.Hardly,they have never had to work at keeping their business afloat.

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  • David August 12, 2015 at 12:44 PM #

    “Interesting to listen to Minister of Finance waxing lyrically at the Latin American and Caribbean Debt Specialist meeting to day highlighted the need for a one strategy to debt management in the region.”

    From the Nation

    MINISTER OF FINANCE Chris Sinckler wants the global community to do more to assist Caribbean countries with debt relief.

    “For us small states, it is not enough to just speak almost despairingly about our negative debt matrices, as if pouring scorn on us for daring to pursue the development of our people and societies,” Sinckler said.

    Sinckler said actions by the managers of the global economic system had placed many Caribbean and Latin American countries in the “invidious position” of having to incur heavy outlays of fiscal expenditure while access to export markets was shrinking and the cost of interaction with private capital markets was increasing.”

    Those remarks might impress his audience, but not so sure they will encourage the global community to go easy on them.

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  • For f…. sake Governor, you and everyone know productivity of the average worker is not the sole problem.Be man enough to say that politicians need to butt out and let the place run properly.This condition of productivity or lack thereof does have a source, governance.Right up into Parliament with Ministers procuring incomes they did not earn at the ballot box.

    best prac·tice
    noun
    plural noun: best practices
    commercial or professional procedures that are accepted or prescribed as being correct or most effective.

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  • Stupse, he has not a clue and neither does the MOF.

    Warn Barbadians??? Why don’t THEY do their jobs well.

    The rest of us bussing xxs and paying for their incompetence with huge tax bills.

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  • Why 6 out of 13 Caricom countries carrying debt to GDP of greater than 100% Minister Sinckler?

    If the BU household wants to improve our way of life we plan our debt to ensure we can manage/afford it. We don’t spend injudiciously.

    Why must taxpayers pay for the poor decisions successive governments have made?

    Now we have to suffer the indignity of listening to our MoF begging the international community to bailout small island middle income states like Barbados.

    Why the hell did we educate you lot?

    Liked by 1 person

  • How does the Governor of the Central Bank manage his driver productivity ,who sit in a car with the Ac runing , waiting for him to walk around the garrison

    Liked by 1 person

  • Dr. Worrell mentioned in his article “Another major challenge faced by government is the implementation of measures to improve the efficiency of the public service.”

    An increase in productivity basically means each worker must be able to produce more output (labour productivity growth). This can occur through an increase in either the human capital or physical capital utilized in the production process.

    I have to agree with the Governor’s opinion that the social partnership must assist in devising strategies to address productivity in Barbados, especially for the private sector. Obviously, the goals of the private sector are somewhat different from those the public sector seek to achieve. Motivation in the public sector may be premised on the idea that those individuals who choose to work in that environment have an ethic that is oriented toward public service and a sense of duty to their country.

    Government’s policy on improving productivity in the civil service seems to be concentrated primarily on reducing expenditure (i.e. retrenchments, compulsory retirements and merging or complete closure of statutory corporations.). However, this reformation also entails providing tools and equipment to enable workers to operate effectively and efficiently in the process of enhancing production.

    The global recession created an environment in Barbados where the population has been placing significant demands on government spending. For example, non-communicable diseases and violence and continued layoffs in both the private and public sector, have placed tremendous pressure on the resources of the QEH and social services respectively.

    Additionally, the public, firms and potential investors doing business with government entities, expect to able to access goods and services promptly and at times that are convenient to them. The public sector needs to meet those expectations. Unfortunately, civil service culture “can be cautious and slow-moving, focused on process not outcomes, bureaucratic, hierarchical and resistant to change.” As such, government has to address these challenges by reforming the sector and these services.

    As part of increasing productivity, government needs to invest in the physical capital that would allow ministries to respond promptly and efficiently to challenges and confront reoccurring problems with new innovation strategies. Also, Barbados needs (if this is possible) a politically impartial civil service.

    There is no reason why in this age of technology people have to wait in long queues to pay VAT, NIS contributions, land tax, road tax and when renewing their driver’s licenses, or temporary public sector workers having to wait 5 months before receiving their salaries.

    These are the types of issues that adversely affect productivity, since people have to spend inordinate amounts of time away from work to process their business; and workers who have to wait long for payment would not operate as efficiently as they should.

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  • David

    “Why the hell did we educate you lot?”

    I do not mean to convey any malice by deflecting or digressing from the topic before deliberation. All I wish to do is to stress the fact that even though education is an important element in good governance, it is just one of the more important factors needed for good governance. I have not too long ago emphasized the fact to Artax that President Harry Truman governed America with a mere high school education, and did it more effectively than President Woodrow Wilson who held a PhD in Political Science, and President George W. Bush who attended two Ivy League schools: Yale and Harvard. Also bear in mind that these three men were faced with a crisis war during they presidency: Wilson was faced with World War One; Truman was faced with World War Two; and Bush was faced with the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. So even though education is an integral factor in effective governance, history has taught us that it is not the sole factor needed for effective governance.

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  • Piece Uh De Rock Yeah Right

    Unlike the other long and convoluted answer which I KNOW that you will ponder long on when you get ready to sleep tonight, as you do for their submissions, every night, in none less than Latin, I will be short

    “Why the hell did we educate you lot?”

    “So that they can lie convincingly and beg for loans to prop up our respective economies!!”

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  • Barbados unemployment problem could be solved as Guyanese move back home to enjoy massive wealth from Oil.

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-07-21/exxon-s-guyana-oil-find-may-be-worth-12-times-the-nation-s-gdp

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  • Hants

    Barbados unemployment rate can be solved if Barbadians follow the Guyanese back home to Guyana to enjoy the benefits of the potential oil profits as well.

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  • Piece

    Now why do you have to go there grandpa? Constructive-criticizism I can appreciate, but to criticize just for cheap thrills befouls the collegiate discourse and invites the wrong kind of attitude. I know that this may come to you as a shock, but I am trying to adhere to Donna counsel and stay on the positive tip as far as my contribution goes here on BU. So can you as least give the Devil the much needed respite, and stop employing Him as though He is your little plaything?

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  • @PUDRYR

    Barbados has been the model for the Caribbean, the fact we find ourselves in the middle of the debt soup what does it mean?

    Asked tongue in cheek of course.

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  • Barbados was prospering until 2008.

    Construction, road building and rich tourist converged to create a TEMPORARY economic boom.

    There was no plan for a sustainable economy. A prison does not produce goods and services.

    Barbados needs to find new industries while CONTINUOUSLY IMPROVING existing industries.

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  • @Hants

    The Governor use to remind Barbadians about the payment due of 30 million due every January. We may quibble about the cost of the prison but the security of the island is important and Station Hill was not cutting it.

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  • @David,

    I am not suggesting the prison was not needed. I am trying to make the point that infrastructure projects like prisons and roads do not continuously produce profits.

    Barbados has to find new ways to earn money and employ more people.

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  • Interesting story. Look what can happen when you drop out of University.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2015/08/11/kurtis-ling-aui_2000_n_7973224.html

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  • Hants

    I am in no way claiming that education isn’t an important ingredient for financial success, but if you look at the three most successful men in America today Bill Gates, Steve Jobes and Mark Zuckerberge, of which one is now deceased, you will find a common denominator between them all. They are all college dropouts who did so to pursued their own dreams of which brought them an overwhelming financial success, and much fame and notoriety. But the success of these three men who have dropout of college ought not be misconstrued or in anyway misinterpreted as the course any young person who is attending university ought take. Because a good education these days helps supply the much needed intellectual-infrastructure which enhances the critical thinking skills.

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  • For those who care or care not to know: I have attended college in the States during the late to middle 80’s and part of the early 1990’s, and would you believe that prior to 1990 an university education in America was devoid of the critical thinking skills element, and that’s an unadulterated-fact. So to me that doesn’t not speak well for those persons who were taught a whole lot of theory devoid of the practical guide of knowing how to apply that theory in an analytical way, prior to the prescribed date above. Now spewing and parroting theories and theorems doesn’t in any meaningful way indicates that Bushie is an intellectual-savant, all it does show or demonstrates is the fact that Bushie has the uncanny ability to retain and recapitulate the data beholding to others.

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  • There must be a new model and trajectory of development brought about in Barbados.

    The current Westernist oligarchist exploitative dependency “model of development” has been terribly flawed and bankrupt and – on its current trajectory – has been producing many dedevelopmental crises, decays, collapses, ruinations, etc, across many spheres of life in this country.

    There must instead be brought about in Barbados an indigenous, egalitarianist, participatory, people-centered model of development for this country. Such a model of development must, et al, be well thought out and precise in its designs, core principles and methodologies and in its applicability to many social, political, material and financial facets of this country. It must – on its own trajectory – help bring about sustained and balanced growth and development to this country.

    PDC

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  • “Hants August 12, 2015 at 7:55 PM #

    Barbados unemployment problem could be solved as Guyanese move back home to enjoy massive wealth from Oil.”

    Not necessarily true Hants- Farmers tell me that agriculture in Barbados suffered when Guyanese were sent back en masse in the early days of the Thompson administration under the catchy slogan ‘ever so welcome, wait for the call’
    The only reason Guyanese labourers/workers find work here is because they are willing to do jobs mostly shunned by locals for one reason or another.

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  • The system is obviously ineffective as far as accountability and the prosecution of those persons who think that their are above and beyond the law because their enact and enforce the law. But the system of governance isn’t without repair because all that is obviousy needed is the effective Checks and Balances coupled with the necessary sustainable transparency designed to expose the irregularities of those in high office.

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  • Balance if Guyanese return home to ascertain the financial benefits of this newly found Oil as Hants has suggested, and given the economic atmosphere in Barbados these days, do you not think that their absence would leave a vacuum in the employment shunned by Bajans who would have, but no other alternative, but to do the degrading jobs if their wish to eat?

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  • The Central Reports show Barbados was never a significant agriculture producer. The Guyanese contributed to agriculture ouput but it was not significant and we have to consider the squalor some of them endured which must count to social cost. Also the exotic industry benefited as well.

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  • @ balance
    Farmers tell me that agriculture in Barbados suffered when Guyanese were sent back en masse in the early days of the Thompson administration under the catchy slogan ‘ever so welcome, wait for the call’
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Bushie finds it quite amazing that you and Enuff cannot see that Bajan farmers were exploiting the unfortunate circumstances in which Guyanese citizens found themselves as a result of racism in their own country.
    This is the same shiite that has been done to us blacks for centuries – where others exploited our unfortunate circumstances in order to make themselves wealthy AT OUR EXPENSE.
    Somewhat like the damn Israelis who complain bitterly about how the Nazis treated them …and who now treat the Palestinians even worse….

    If there was one thing that David Thompson did right ..it was that policy of “ever so welcome wait for a call”, …because ANY PERSONS COMING HERE TO WORK SHOULD BE TREATED WITH THE SAME DAMN RESPECT AS WE WOULD EXPECT FOR OURSELVES.
    …this business of exploiting others to do shiite that we consider to be below our status is plain WRONG…..especially when done by people with OUR damn history.

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  • Bush Tea August 13, 2015 at 7:24 AM #

    “Somewhat like the damn Israelis who complain bitterly about how the Nazis treated them …and who now treat the Palestinians even worse….”

    Bushie, I don’t want to stay away from the topic, but it’s quite interesting you raised the above point. I was having similar thoughts yesterday. However, I also reasoned that one of the central points in Christianity is FORGIVENESS as taught by Jesus and the “Lord’s Prayer” (“And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us”). We are also taught we should pray for the Jews since they are God’s chosen people.

    Yet, up to this day the Jews have NOT forgiven the Nazis, and Christians will try to JUSTIFY this unforgiveness and treatment of the Palestinians.

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  • @ Artax
    We are also taught we should pray for the Jews since they are God’s chosen people.
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Being ‘chosen’ by BBE is highly over-rated skippa…
    Paul described the condition as ‘being a slave….’, bound to perform a particular role on behalf of BBE.
    That the ‘Jews’ were chosen by BBE to be the people ‘bound to perform a particular role in history’ hardly makes them any better than anyone else …and may indeed justify calls for us to pray for their donkeys…

    Wuh you think Bushie likes this whacker burden….?
    …having to lick the stuffings out of the likes of AC, Dompey and other shiite – talkers?
    Skippa, Bushie would MUCH prefer liming down by Donna …sipping a lemonade ..and trying to convince her of certain realities in life…. LOL

    Look carefully and you will see that the history of the ‘Jews’ is an object lesson in the true meaning of life on Earth and of the SPIRITUAL consequences of doing shiite….
    THAT is what they were ‘chosen’ for… not because they are (were) better ..or smarter than anyone else (au contraire … 🙂 )

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  • Bushie, I have to agree with your response because, in my opinion, they make sense.

    You gine bring out Zoe and GP wid them comments, yuh.

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  • LOL @ Artax
    Zoe and GP won’t be back for a while…
    They are somewhere on a mountain …probably in Nepal …doing extensive exegeses to try to rationalise their ridiculous conceptualisation of BBE as three individuals comprising some stupid ‘Trinity’…. LOL
    …all Bushie asked them was ‘what happened to their “trinity” while Jesus was dead for those three days after Calvary….’ and their whole religious foundation get mash up…

    Ha Ha Ha …at first Zoe was going down the line that ‘Jesus never REALLY died’ … but he like he smelled that rat ..and “back-backed… ”
    Bushie believes that they could be on construct number 32,546 by now… 🙂

    They are two good fellows, …but too hard ears….

    With respect to Governor Worrell, one has to wonder why he would not just call it a day (or in his case a damn century) and go long home… SURELY he can’t still be living paycheque to paycheque… He brings NOTHING to the table …. and he don’t even look like he is ‘able’….

    He should be ashamed to be supporting a Government that is sending home 60 year-olds from statutory corporations WITHOUT regard to productivity, ..while keeping his near century-old donkey at the central bank hiding from reporters questions…..

    LOL
    He probably afraid someone ask him about currency exchange rate policy again ..to see if he still spouting the same shiite…. LOL ha ha ha

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  • The truth is finally coming out BIDC management offered NUPW the arrangement for retrenched workers now approved by the Court . It was rejected by the NUPW leadership.

    The NUPW lawyer Nicholls tries and fails to spin the outcome as what his clients wanted all along. Why the unnecessary civil commotion then Nicholls? The truth is this foolishness could’ve been settled long before the economic and social drama of a national shutdown. We await McDowall and Smith’s mealy mouthed explanations.

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  • Piece Uh De Rock Yeah Right

    @ the Clown who espoused this idiocy

    “….would you believe that prior to 1990 an university education in America was devoid of the critical thinking skills element…?”

    And you know this because

    (a) you know what ALL “critical thinking” is, how it is packaged, across ALL disciplines and, most omnisciently, how it manifests itself in 8 billion people!!

    (b) YOU ALONE, having attended an online university in the 1990’s, ALONE are the SOLE BENEFICIARY of Critical Thinking instruction!!

    (c) You, as part of your online education that gave you a doctorate in Critical Thinking, abbreviated as CT, or in your case, C**T, have done a review of the curricula OF ALL of the Universities in Amurica, and have come to this cuntclusion.

    Why you doan hush doah??

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  • @ PUDRYR
    Why you doan hush doah??
    +++++++++++++++++++++++
    …and keep all that shiite inside he…??!!!
    Septic….!!!
    He won’t last a week…. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  • Piece Uh De Rock Yeah Right

    You must not fault Governor “Eveready” for his allegiance to the hand that feedeth him.

    After all he was not one of the Eager 11 who have seen their Fumble in action and sought to oust the King, sorry Prime Minister OR should I now be saying Premier of the new Republic of Barbados, Dictator in Waiting…

    What he has said is true and he is to be congratulated in confirming what many here have been saying in different words “what we are investing in, producing, or seeking to produce for the economic benefit of the nation, IS FAILING!!

    All this talk about productive this, and GDP and what the Social Partners should and should not do is what Artaxerxes, Prodigal, Hants, the Annunaki, OOB, Walter Blackman, Hants, David[BU], Baffy, Lawson, Loveridge, have been saying every day.

    So he has echoed a baseline wisdom but where he deviates radically from enhancing that with meaningful direction is where he starts to equivocate is when he starts talking about “producing more”

    More of What??

    Sugar Cane? What is he, the leading advisor on the nation’s financial supplies, recommending as a strategy? THere must be some other model where he has seen the efficient functioning of a central bank which would cause hime to step out of his “comfort zone” of running around the Garrison like the Hampshire Pinto Pony (the shortest pony in the world) and make a real man recommendation to the Fumbles and Stinkliars about where BIM must go…

    “Is there No One here on this island of 270K bajans and the 40K Guyanese (no I ent gine mention Barbados DPP Leacock here today) dat prepared to stray outside their comfort zone just a little, and give these lost sheep a little nudge, and say, “wunna is lost by this is an alternative way….?”

    Like

  • Piece Uh De Rock Yeah Right

    And of course High Priest in the Rum Shop Bush Tea….forgive de ole man, I did was trying to ‘member all de name dem and de one dat i was going to put last as he who does trail blaze here wid de wacker, de ole man forget…

    When you get to be me age, dem tings will happen doah

    Like

  • Bush Tea August 13, 2015 at 10:08 AM #

    “With respect to Governor Worrell, one has to wonder why he would not just call it a day (or in his case a damn century) and go long home… SURELY he can’t still be living paycheque to paycheque… He brings NOTHING to the table …. and he don’t even look like he is ‘able’….”

    Despite the criticisms Dr. Worrell has received relative to his modus operandi, surely we have to agree that, from an economic point of view, this is the best working paper he has produced so far. However, I am of the opinion that his comments contained therein are a precursor to a policy initiative soon to be presented by the minister of finance.

    In June 2012, the British Government released a working paper entitled “The Civil Service Reform Plan.” The paper mentioned that, despite government’s significant fiscal consolidation achievements, the budget deficit remained at 6.4% of GDP and outlined various reasons why the civil service should be reduced and reformed to enhance productivity.

    Ironically, Dr. Worrell mentioned similar comments in his paper as follows:

    1) The Barbados government established its commitment to fiscal consolidation reducing the deficit from 12% of GDP in 2013 to under 7% in 2014.
    2) Another major challenge faced by government is the implementation of measures to improve the efficiency of the public service.

    But he also stated that “government will NEED to BORROW to finance the deficit, adding 4% of GDP to the debt stock this year.” Dr. Worrell is basically implying if government does not continue to reduce expenditure, they will have to borrow money, thereby reversing the gains supposedly achieved by fiscal consolidation.

    Dr. Worrell’s paper was strategically released at a time when government has to look at reducing and merging statutory corporations and weeks after their controversial attempt to forcibly retire BIDC employees. We must also bear in mind that the report on statutory corporations, which was to be completed and discussed by Cabinet at the end of January 2014, is yet to be released.

    Although he outlined and explained the economical implications a lack of productivity would have on competiveness and growth, the Governor did not mentioned any strategies government should employ to address productivity in the civil service, but placed the onus on the Social Partnership to devise such strategies.

    It is against this background that I am of the opinion government has relied on Dr. Worrell to present a case, through his worker paper, for them to continue their retrenchment program, this time concentrating specifically on statutory corporations.

    Like

  • The AG in a contribution in Parliament this week to approve the borrowing of 76 million from the NIS indicated the NIB expressed an interest in contributing to the cause given its standing as a citizen of Barbados. Two questions come to mind:

    Why is the government continuing to borrow from the fund?

    What motivated the NIS to want to support the government and police?

    Just asking!

    Like

  • @ Artax
    Despite the criticisms Dr. Worrell has received relative to his modus operandi, surely we have to agree that, from an economic point of view, this is the best working paper he has produced so far…
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    cuh dear Artax… Bushie can be wicked with the whacker, at times… but shiite man…. are you saying that the best paper produced by his “Govenorship” so far – is some shiite saying that ‘we all need to work harder…’?
    …Wuh even Alvin probably have figured that out …. probably the subject of his next book. 🙂

    Like

  • @ Bushie

    Bushie, read the paper within the context it was written. Dr. Worrell explained the economical implications a lack of productivity would have on Barbados’ competiveness and economic growth.

    Shiite, Bushie, Worrell ain’t as bad as Cummins….. hahahahaha!

    @ David

    I know you will not respond, but as Bushie would say “cud dear, David…… you like you ain’t following the economic realities in Barbados as you should.

    The government has been experiencing problems repaying its debt. Mia Mottley challenged Sinckler about government’s inability to pay the $88M to Credit Suisse, He subsequently admitted providing partial payment of $41.23M. The IMF has advised against the Central Bank financing the deficit by printing money.

    Additionally, the CB cannot continue engaging in quasi fiscal activities such as guaranteeing VAT returns for small and medium sized business. (Note, that effective April 13, 2015 the CB established a Value Added Tax (VAT) Receivables Liquidity Facility (VRLF), guaranteeing small businesses more prompt refunds owed by the Barbados Revenue Authority.)

    Under these circumstances, the government has no other option but to borrow from the NIS fund.

    Like

  • @ Artax
    “There is a need to improve labour productivity throughout the economy…”
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    …not to prolong the issue …and with all due respect to wunna economic gurus who have been schooled in the art of (fooling people with) economic gibberish talk…. this is somewhat like the Minister of Youth saying that “…we need to find ways to prevent our young people from using guns for violence… ”
    …or like the Arch Bishop saying that we must learn to “live in peace and harmony”….

    Lotta shiite….
    MEANINGLESS WORDS FROM EMPTY BRASS…

    Shiite man!!
    At his pay scale should Worrell not be detailing exactly HOW this improvement is to be achieved? Who the hell is he waiting on for the details…? …Dompey?

    Who is Stephen Lashley waiting on for the DETAILS and ACTIONS needed to solve the problems of violence with our youth…?

    Shiite man… Bushie notes that the Cadet Corps (which was a school based organisation with that very mission) now seems to be part of the “do-nothing-but-parade” army….
    The Scouts always seem to be scraping the damn barrel for resources ….and the Girl Guides only seem to come out for shiite parades…
    Oh wait… Lashley must be too busy wukking up at kadooment to have time to come up with the details of making these youth organisations function effectively….

    …don’t talk bout the Attorney General “…ahmm ahhh umm ahh we will have to put our heads together to come up with a solution….uhnnn ahhh …and soon…”
    steupsss … bet he ain’t putting his salary anywhere but in his bank though… while talking a roll all over the damn place…

    steupsss..
    How you manage to pick through these people’s shiite …looking for pearls ..defy logic.
    Must be the practice yuh get from responding to AC … 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  • “How you manage to pick through these people’s shiite …looking for pearls ..defy logic.
    Must be the practice yuh get from responding to AC …”

    Hahahahahaha…. now, that’s a good wun, Bushie.

    However, point taken.

    Like

  • @ Bushie…..more “words”

    ““I am honoured that my academic and professional work has been recognised as significant enough for me to be invited to join this prestigious group,” commented Governor Worrell. His selection is based on his contribution to championing economic growth and advancing global finance. “This membership will grant Barbados access to some of the great minds in the world of business and finance.” –

    http://www.nationnews.com/nationnews/news/70914/central-bank-governor-joins-bretton-woods-committee#sthash.oArOFLKf.dpuf

    Like

  • LOL @ Hants
    No doubt they will ask him to do a paper on something like ..”Exchange rate parity management in small and developing shiite economies where brass bowls run things…”

    Wuh you don’t feel that those Bretton woods people like a good laugh too…?
    besides, the fellow that Worrell hosted some time ago must have told the others what a ball he had bout here …. 🙂

    “This membership will grant Barbados access to some of the great minds in the world of business and finance.”
    …does that mean that Worrell is moving to Bretton Woods ? ha ha ha
    ..thus creating a vacancy that could (possibly) lead to such access…? LOL

    Liked by 1 person

  • “The Central Reports show Barbados was never a significant agriculture producer. The Guyanese contributed to agriculture ouput but it was not significant and we have to consider the squalor some of them endured which must count to social cost. Also the exotic industry benefited ”

    Very unenlightened post but I am glad to see that you have come around to the view that agriculture is a dying industry. However, your ears with respect to the contribution of Guyanese labourers with respect to their positive impact on what little positive impact agriculture contributes to the economy generally are obviously not on the ground.. I have always posited that Barbadians have long moved away from the view that agriculture is a saviour and the younger generation are not enamoured by the thought of finding a living in the hot sun. Fiurthermore, agricultural products such as ground provisions are not generally popular with those born after the sixties.

    Like

  • …”this business of exploiting others to do shiite that we consider to be below our status is plain WRONG…..especially when done by people with OUR damn history.”

    Bushie that was a fashionable view and caught on but it was not the general view. Yes, unfortunately; even some bajans not all trying to remain illegally in the USA do find themselves exploited by unscrupulous characters but this does not mean that it is the norm.

    Like

  • “This membership will grant Barbados access to some of the great minds in the world of business and finance.”

    Congrats to the Governor; Good, then perhaps we should be able get some meaningful and trustworthy information from the Central Bank once again.

    Like

  • @balance

    You like others chose to ignore the conditions Guyanese were forced to live and how they were exploited by the system. It is the height of hypocrisy simply to support a comfortable narrative. It is what Bajans do best.

    Like

  • Cheese-on-bread David Man!!!
    Bushie was just about to drive the whacker into that bush that balance planted at 7.04am …only to find that you already trimmed it ‘nice and gently’ with a little sickle….

    spoil sport…. 🙂

    Like

  • Piece Uh De Rock Yeah Right

    @ David [BU] and Brother Bush Tea

    With regard to the exploitation of labourers has either of you gents “an ear” at SLIME & SLOW?

    If you really want to hear about exploitation and how workers are being mistreated by the new massahs on the recolonized island of Little England reach out to LIME staff (those who have the balls to speak out) and you will get the real down low on what is happening there

    Under the watchful eye of our so called unions.

    You see how a few S6 Galaxy phones to FTC staff and family can undermine an entire cuntry?

    That is why I believe that the punishment for these “Griffiths” and people of this type who are selling out Barbados like this should be nothing less that a public execution like that afforded traitors and incompetents in China see http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/10/world/asia/10iht-china.1.6587520.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

    If we had this practice of eradication of incompetents as a national cure, something similar to “China executes the former head of its food and drug agency published: Tuesday, July 10, 2007 see http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/10/world/asia/10iht-china.1.6587520.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0 wunna feel that Cahill or LoweDown of the eager 11 and the rest of these bandits who set up companies for them wife or muddah to run, wunna feel that shy*e like dis could flourish in BIM like it is now?

    Like

  • @PUDRYR

    It appears the players who should be watchdogs are smitten by the opportunity to acquire a smartphone.

    Like

  • Piece Uh De Rock Yeah Right

    30 Pieces of Silver Oh Blogmaster.

    De ole man going predict this.

    The generation of Turncoats at the FTC WILL NOT PERISH AWAY FROM THIS EARTH before a time arises when the ease and availability of internet, the equivalent to the Barbados Public Library, (an institution that is dying/dead) is a resource that will not be affordable, nor available to our lower income folk

    For whereas competition overseas has MADE INTERNET ACCESS available to every cat or dog what this S6 FTC crew has done lies in the echelon of what the DLP has done to the hopes of the poor man/woman in the street, and a generation yet to be born.

    They have made slaves of a nation TO A MASSAH that we thought we had gotten rid of.

    Peggy Griffith and people of her ilk deserve nothing less than a *** to the back of the head.

    If that seems harsh I am sorry but this is the way that slavery commences, under the guise of exploring new horizons of integration and assimilation, then one day you wake up and wonder, how it happened like this. how w got here…

    Waste foops….

    Like

  • @ PUDRYR
    If we put yardfowls in charge of our national gates …it is only obvious that we will be sold out for scratch grain…

    LOL
    You are VERY right about the benefits to be derived from applying Chinese methodologies to these traitors who are selling out our children’s future….
    The next best thing is for Caswell’s BUP to publicly expose their dishonest tails for all to see..

    …unfortunately, the problem is that there are so many damn thieves in Barbados that most of us don’t want any such exposure ..
    …and we DEFINITELY DON’T want Chinese methods…. 🙂

    Boss, …why do you think that THE VERY FIRST STATEMENT from our current Attorney General was that “He will not be hanging a boy….” ?
    ..and up to now he has offered NO ALTERNATIVES….

    Um is a free fuh all bout here bozie…. perhaps we need to start with his retarded donkey…

    Like

  • Have a look a the 35% increase in cost of our exports over the last several years caused by the increased value of our currency. How is it possible that a 1.75 litre bottle of Caribbean rum in Miami costs $12US and in Barbados it is $20US . Why would a consumer in the export country pay such large premiums. They wont. Then look at the cost of imported things like furniture or biscuits. Costs of importing have gone down by 35%. How is a furniture maker or a biscuit maker able to compete with that kind of subsidy. Many of them simply give up adding to the cost of our non productive labour.

    Like

  • July 10, 2015 Jeff Cumberbatch was appointed chairman of the FTC.

    Can he make a “difference”?

    Like

  • Piece Uh De Rock Yeah Right

    @ hants

    Jeff Cumberbatch, as straight shooting as he is in the various areas of law that he is taxed with CANNOT and WILL NOT be able to make a difference in the entrenched machinery that is the Unfair Trade Emission (of bad air from the nether region)

    Here is what happens to these men and women.

    Known for their big ones they ultimately get appointed to these positions as change agents.

    They genuinely wanted to make a difference when they were in the trenches with the bullets whizzing over their heads

    But once at Batallion HQ with three square meals and the comfort of a soft mattress at night, it does not take long for them to quieten down like some have said of Sir Hilary, I mean evry now and again they will rouse to seemingly cross swords with a fellow, but not anywhere to mek a real difference

    It is not that these champions join with the oppressive forces not that is active engagement or collusion with the enemy, NO this is atrophy brought on by simple disuse or passivity.

    Bring him in put him to chair a meeting or two, some three course meals, a xmas party or two, one of the office girls to smile at him now and again, Ms. Griffith to stroke his ….ego and Whaplax, like Pilly do at the Barbados Attorney thing, dem does abdicate dem duties, for as long as they remain Chairman and then retirement rolls in, or another appointment elsewhere in the vulture kingdom and they roll into the obscurity of the ages.

    Like

  • LOL @ Piece..
    Boss, you know the thing…
    …and if by any chance Jeff decides to rock the boat or to jettison some of the shiite cargo and passengers on board we will hear how he is “not a team player”…. how he “won’t take advice”, he is a secret ‘BLP’ looking to do political damage…. or they will simple “change the Board” as the minister “seeks to revise his political strategy….”

    If Jeff gets on real ingrunt … (like Frank Alleyne or Sir Cave Hilary) and tries to change anything seriously then they may just kick him ‘upstairs’ to some harmless position on some legal review commission, ..to pro vice Chancellor… or such shiite.

    LOL
    Perhaps they think that since Jeff is a BU family member we will go easy on him – while Flow re-establishes the old plantation system back in Barbados…
    Brass Bowls ….
    ..the whacker can be even more devastating when fixing up home bush…. 🙂
    Ask GP…. LOL ha ha

    Like

  • Piece

    Sometimes it is easily said than done to escape the entrenched culture of any given institution. I told the story of this politician who was elected by the people to bring about real change. So this guy started boasting about when he gets down to Washington how he is going to bring about the kind of change the people wanted. Man, this fella got down to Washington and it didn’t take him too long to fall in the rut of the common herd, so feeling ashame and dejected that he didn’t living up to his promises, told his constituents that the external pressure was too great in Washington so he faultier under the it. Then a little smart mouth boy ( much like Bushie, but better looking yah hear) standing in between his parents and in close proximity to this dejected leader, shouted in a loud but rather lucid voice: where was your internal resolve to withstand the culture of Washington sir? The poor guy already feeling bad that he was unable to live up to his promises, walked away with his head hung low without uttering a single word.

    Like

  • @balance

    You like others chose to ignore the conditions Guyanese were forced to live and how they were exploited by the system.

    Definitely not unlike you I have assisted such Guyanese in times of need but of which system do you speak? for these persons were exploited by unscrupulous individuals seeking to profit from the difficulties of another human being.

    Like

  • To repeat: we have a right to protect our borders and we will. Immigration is a big issue in the US and Europe, your attempt to trivialize the problem we faced in 07/08 is based on emotion. How can a country allow any Tom, Dick and Jane to enter without considering factors which will impact social and security well being of the country?

    Like

  • @ balance
    I have assisted such Guyanese in times of need but of which system do you speak? for these persons were exploited by unscrupulous individuals seeking to profit from the difficulties of another human being.
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    This is WAY below your usually high level of contributions balance….one wonders why..?

    MOST whites back in the days of slavery probably said the identical thing about black Bajans. Until recently, one “John” came on BU talking shiite about how kind and supportive some whites (the Quakers) were in ‘assisting blacks in times of need…but that unfortunately the “system” forced them to keep slaves…
    Lotta shiite…
    IT IS WRONG TO EXPLOIT VULNERABLE PEOPLE… W R O N G !!

    If strangers are welcomed to our shores then we should treat them AL LEAST as we treat ourselves …and really we should treat them even better.

    It is only OBVIOUS that if our lazy-ass farmers can get some poor soul to work for 1/10th of the going rate, while still selling the produce at market prices, he is EXPLOITING that poor soul. …Wuh ANY jackass can ‘succeed’ under such circumstances, especially if it is possible to extent the arrangement for 400 years…

    Pinch yuhself and wake up man….
    Bring back the balance… 🙂

    Like

  • @Bushie

    Let us take it further – we are Caricom states with divided territorial air and sea space yet the LIMES now FLOW charge roaming fees with impunity. Why not insist these regional players for profit treat the Caricom region as ONE economic space IF we are serious?

    Like

  • @David, Bushie and Pieceuhderock,

    Can you remember anytime in the history of Barbados that a product,service or business was “boycotted” by Bajans?

    There seems to be a disease in Barbados. I call it Mustconsumititis.

    Like

  • St George's Dragon

    “Why not insist these regional players for profit treat the Caricom region as ONE economic space IF we are serious?”
    Because we are not serious. Caricom is a sham. No Caribbean country does anything more than pay lip service to it. There is no political will to progress Caricom or integrate the countries further. There is no will in society to do this either.
    Politicians are happy to do nothing because it means they remain in charge, rather than have to give away some degree of sovereignty (control) to a “higher” body.
    The only way Caricom will become a reality is if outside influences make it happen such as external funders making it a condition as a result of Chris Sinckler’s debt relief call. Even then, politicians would find a way of obstructing it.
    Part of Caribbean countries’ problem with debt is that they all like pretending to be first world countries. We all have to have our own High Commissions around the world; we all need to write our own versions of the same laws; we all have separate (but similar standards for imports etc. There are efficiencies to be gained by greater integration, which means less tax or less debt. I can’t see anything changing for a generation, though.

    Like

  • Dragon, the unification or as you have put it, the further integration of the Caribbean is a real possibility I do believe. The pages of the history books give us many examples of this that stretching from as far back as Roman-Empire to the American Republican form of governance. But it would be a monumental-task for any political scientist to attempt to unify the Caribbean given what we know of the Caribbean people and their attitude towards each other today.

    Like

  • Well said Dragon

    Like

  • I do not consider my opinions to be devoid of criticism. Healthy criticism in my view is acceptable because we can learn from others but I see no emotion in my remarks and one needs not get hot under the collar if another person sees an issue in another light.. Yes, countries big or small ought to have systems in place to protect their security and other national interests but it is my strong belief emboldened by a conversation I overheard between a MInister and party faithfuls at a funeral that the policy was politically motivated rather than holistic and born out of the electioneering euphoria of which the issue of Guyanese migrants to our shores was very much a part. The statistics from the immigration department at the time would not have supported the fashionable contention that Guyanese were emigrating here en masse. I again wish to point out that there are laws under the treaty of Chaguaramas devised by Caribbean Governments governing the entry of persons into the respective countries and the circumstances under which persons breaching these laws can be denied entry or deported or prosecuted. Exploitation of others seeking domicile elsewhere is another issue and persons exploiting others should when caught be punished in accordance with the laws of the land. so there is no need for lynching.

    Like

  • Three points: First, Governor Worrell has lived a life of air conditioned luxury. Now he wants all Barbadians to work like dogs (“improve their productivity”) so that his extravagant pension is not in danger. Take a hike, pal. It’s hot out here. I don’t want to see Barbados become a rat race like New York and Toronto.
    Second, a system of arithmetic democracy cannot be expected to produce exceptional political leaders most of the time. We get people of average ability in leadership positions because they are “relatable” as regular guys. The best and the brightest are not electable, and they usually have little influence because they threaten insecure leaders of average ability.
    Barbados is already maxed out. We have a financial services industry based on billions of dollars of fugitive capital from North America and a tourist industry that rakes in hundreds of millions from visitors. There are no better ideas out there for making money. We do not have the strategic location or the demographic assets of Singapore so forget the stuff about the S Model.

    Like

  • He is not asking Barbadians to work lie dogs he is simply asking them to be more productive. There are too many government workers yes too many. Some workers do less than 20 hours of work and lollygag for the rest.

    Like

  • Imagine both parties have bloated the public office to pursue narrow self-interest to promote their popularity and the whole country must pay for it. When Sandiford was forced to trim the public service and implement the 8% cut what happened? Successive governments have cancelled the effort of 92-93.

    Like

  • “When Sandiford was forced to trim the public service and implement the 8% cut what happened?”

    If Mr Sandiford had managed the economy properly; there would have been no need to trim the public service or cut salaries. When Mr Sandiford was warned about his profligate spending and possible negative effects of an economy sliding into recession; his response in his own ‘like it or lump it ‘ style was to refer to those concerned as ‘prophets of doom and gloom’ and announce in his own words that the economy was ‘ batting better than Gary Sobers’.

    In addition the circular of 31/12/81 from the Chief Personnel officer to Permanent Secretaries/ Heads of Department with respect to the instructions from the Prime Minister re- Employment of Substitutes does not support the view that Governments ‘bloated the public service to pursue narrow self-interests’.

    Excerpt from the Circular reads thus;
    “All Ministries/Departments are advised in appropriate cases, to so re-organise their functions as to avoid the necessity of employing substitutes”

    ” You are required to include in each request for a substitute adequate justification for approval of the request ”

    “Any breach of this instruction may result in the officer authorising the employment of a substitute being surcharged if the period of employment is not subsequently approved”.

    Like

  • balance you have missed the substantive point: both political parties have engaged in indiscriminate hiring in the public service to inflate popularity. If you recruit based on a false position the process to sustain it is like building a house on sand.

    Like

  • Your substantive point though speculative might very well be true and is taken but the information I proffered indicates that there was a policy in place by Government at some time to avoid the prevalence of what you claim as fact.

    Like

  • Piece

    Might I reiterate to you once more sir that: whenever I attempt to post any information here on BU, is almost always factual, and not hypothetical as you seem to think.

    Now, as far as my point regrading the teaching of the Critical -Thinking -Skills prior to 1990 goes here is the evidence:
    William M. Bart from the University of Minnesota has stated that: ” Over the past three decades, the focus of education in the United States of America has changed from curricular content to outcomes, with a major emphasis on helping students learn to Think Critically.” He went on further and stated that: Most colleges and universities in the United States of America had included Critical-Thinking-Skills as an important educational objective in their goal statements, and many accrediting agencies included measurable gains in Critical-Thinking-Skills into their accreditation criteria in 1990.”
    Now, Piece, the emphasis on teaching Critical-Thinking-Skills necessarily leads to the need of some kind way of determining its effectiveness, and would you believe that the National League of Nursing here in the States, has mandated that all accredited nursing programs must teach Critical-Thinking to their nursing students and must empirically verify the efficacy of their instruction through testing. Old one you mustie tink I was meking sport or someting; man I was real serious as tail?

    Like

  • Get out yuh cheque book Bushie. Increase yuh Real Estate portfolio.

    http://www.nationnews.com/nationnews/news/71109/posh-homes-steal

    Liked by 1 person

  • @balance

    What policy is it you have speculated was in place?

    Nonsense!

    There was no policy, the property market has changed that all. The financial institutions have become more aggressive in a climate of high delinquency and bad debt. Have you not been reading the story of the Canadian banks?

    Like

  • @David,

    Have you read the front page of the Nation?

    Is this a further sign of impending doom ?

    Like

  • @Hants

    The mid property market had been under distressed for some time. It us the middle lass (Black) who has born the brunt of a depressed economy the last five years. This is a middleclass with a high debt burden, like government. If is the risk of taking on debt in an uncertain time especially now the government has been instructed to trim tax benefits.

    Like

  • @David,

    One of my favourite columnist.

    Very interesting article.

    http://www.nationnews.com/nationnews/news/71155/wild-coot-fatca-bra

    Like

  • Country’s financial system ‘stable’
    THE financial system in Barbados has been described as very stable.
    This is according to the latest Financial Stability Update for 2015, published jointly by the Central Bank of Barbados and the Financial Services Commission.
    According to the two Government institutions, the capital reserves that are set aside by institutions to protect them against unexpected losses are enough to ward off adverse occurrences of sizeable proportions.
    Additionally, they said that one of the tables in the report “suggests that in the event of a systemic crisis, the parent entities of the banks remain well positioned to assist their subsidiaries and branches; they remain well capitalised”.
    Commercial banks, finance houses, credit unions, and insurance companies are among the key players in the Barbados financial system. The joint report of the two agencies also stated that “evidence of a slowly recovering financial system emerged over the 12 months ended March 2015 as the loan portfolios of major deposit taking institutions expanded by just over one percentage point of GDP.
    They also reported that “regulatory authorities continued to build on efforts to enhance the domestic supervisory framework”.
    They added that the Central Bank of Barbados launched guidelines on measuring capital adequacy for controlling interest rate risks on the banking books.
    Both the Bank and the FSC are jointly responsible for the continuous oversight of the financial system, the assessment of vulnerabilities and the initiation of policies that increase the resilience
    of the system in the face of possible adverse events.

    Like

  • Referring to the growing cost of labour and underproductivity in Barbados, it seems that we have reached a classic Lewis Turning Point where the supply of inexpensive labour is no longer forthcoming from the agricultural sector for the modern sector. Growth, according to W Arthur Lewis will now depend on Barbados finding alternative and cheaper suppliers of this vital component factor of production . . . . We should ensure that if we must open our doors to immigration that it should be for the higher value-added sectors of the economy !

    Like

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