Is Enough Being Done To Prevent Crime And Violence In Barbados?

Submitted by Yardbroom

I have no evidence which leads me to believe, that the Barbados Police Force is not working “diligently” to achieve the aim as stated in their mission statement:

“To provide the highest quality Police service in partnership with our community, to ensure a safe stable environment.”

However, there is a perception widely held, that crime and violence are on the increase in Barbados, resulting in general unease in the populace.  We became complacent over the years with the relatively safe environment we enjoyed, believing it would last forever, therefore we never prepared ourselves for the social changes which introduced a different dynamic in Barbados.

There is a counter argument often stated, that our fears are unfounded as they are fed by a media which highlights major crime and a public that reminisces about a bygone age which is unlikely to return.  A fall-back position  is that the level of crime in Barbados is far lower than in some of our Caribbean neighbours, Trinidad, Jamaica and Guyana being given as examples.  Although true, no comfort should ever be taken from a comparison with countries whose crime rate is rated high, even in hemisphere statistics.

It is always wise to look at evidence; to that purpose I will concentrate here on those areas which appear to cause most concern.

(1)  Major Crimes Against The Person, Murder. Serious Bodily Harm Endangering Life, Kidnapping, Robbery etc.

YEAR     – 2006      2007     2008     2009     2010

Incidents –  790        808       819       764       923

A trend upwards apart from 2009.

(2) Sex Related Crimes.Rape, Indecent Assault. Assault with intent to rape.

YEAR  –     2006       2007     2008     2009     2010

Incidents –   200        200       171       174       169

A decrease in incidents.

(3) Major Crimes Against Property. All other Burglaries/Sacrilege/ Other Crimes ( Attempts)

YEAR –    2006       2007     2008     2009     2010

Incidents -1864       1614     1912     1831     1938

Once again with two exceptions, 2007 and 2009 the trend is upwards.

Source: Royal Barbados Force Crime Statistics

If we are to believe figures, the evidence indicates with three year exceptions, there is an upward “trend” in those three areas of criminality.  Irrespective of what raw data indicates, the perception persists that major crime is on the increase in Barbados and citizens are now more fearful than they were in previous years. It cannot be stated too strongly that the Police have an onerous task; evidenced by the recent shooting at two police officers in Christ Church.

Barbados’ society is changing and this has brought new challenges, the change has been so fast the various Law enforcement agencies are not prepared – some would contest this, particularly the Police – for this new environment.  This is not to suggest that there is a lack of will, commitment or direction by the Force.  However, the mission statement of the Barbados Police previously alluded to, can only be accomplished if the public shoulders their responsibility in this partnership.  It is the “duty” of all citizens to be active partners in this relationship thus ensuring the safety and stability we cherish.

The Police in turn must see the Public as their friend and take cognisance of that fact, the general Public is not their enemy and should be treated with the respect it deserves.  The unnecessary gruff and impolite interactions sometimes displayed are not for the modern day Police Officer.  That is more suited to a night-watchman with a big stick on a Plantation – thankfully those days of “position dominance” by force are long over.

It is always a small element that causes unrest, with the subsequent disorder that bedevils us all.  We owe no loyalty to these criminals, be they the same colour, from the same neighbourhood, or previous school friends.  They have chosen a path of criminality, society should show their displeasure by helping the Police – that is our duty in the “partnership.”

On a separate and equally important tact that is currently being peddled – sublimely – that theft from rich people is justified because they are rich.  This is nonsense.  If there is a problem with how people acquired their wealth that is a different argument and there are ways to address it, but that should never be confused with how order and stability are maintained in a free society.

0 thoughts on “Is Enough Being Done To Prevent Crime And Violence In Barbados?


  1. Quoting Yardbroom “We owe no loyalty to these criminals, be they the same colour, from the same neighbourhood [same lodge] or previous school friends. ”

    I say that it will be a cold day in hell before lodge brothers testify against each other.

    And the “bad” boys on the block know this and they ask who will testify against the “bad” lodge boys (and girls)

    And which lodge boy (or girl) will tell us which of our senior police officers are lodge brethren (or sistren) and which of our judges are lodge brethen? and which of our politicians are lodge brethren (or sistren) and who in our business community receives favours from their lodge buddies? Favours funded by the tax money of those of us who are not lodge members.

    The bad boys on the block ask these questions.

    Who will answer them?


  2. It cannot be stated too strongly that the Police have an onerous task; evidenced by the recent shooting at two police officers in Christ Church.

    … shot at? or SHOT? I recall they each got hit with multiple bullets….

    I like to hear people say, that the police want their help solving crime, well guess what people, it’s you the public it is being committed against, so if you don’t help, don’t cry when it is your turn.


  3. Whose responsibility is it to prevent crime and violence? Is there a distinction between preventing crime and controlling crime?


  4. @Bimbro: “The NET result is that Bim is now ungovernable n i in gine nuh way bout day ever again!

    You’re up rather late Bimbro (as, obviously, am I).

    Why are you saying that you will never visit Barbados again?

    I thought you lived here….


  5. Yard, i think that YOU, David, I n every one else know d answer to dis question, but wunna would rather not face it! My enduring hope, is that some intelligent, kind Barbadian will please return Bim to the serene, peaceful country which I knew as a child. In fact, I don’t think I even HEARD the word crime, until AFTER I LEFT Bim!


  6. Hi Chris, no, I’m an Englishman now, n i in gine nuh way where crime is the order of the day! i plan to res my lil ***kside hay in Blighty till d good lord ready to sen fuh me! Mind u, I should dearly love to see the isle of my birth again, but wid all d wuflissniss which gine on bout day dese days, i think i’ll keep my tale in Inglan bo! LOL!! 🙂


  7. @Bimbro: “no, I’m an Englishman now

    Thanks for being honest.

    To share, I’m a Canadian who happened to have a Father born here in Barbados.

    It might be NISE if you didn’t try to discourage people from visiting Barbados.


  8. Hi Chris, I’m ALWAYS honest bro! In fact, many would say, “too honest by far”! In fact, so honest that many are unable to take it! I should LOVE to invite more people to visit Bim. The question is, however, will they have a pleasant experience and, with all that’s happening in Bim these days, plus their acclaimed bad manners and aversion to intelligent, customer-care, I doubt very much that they would! Anyhow, do u think your request should be addressed more to the author of the piece, rather than to me – a good, home-loving, kind Barbadin?!! LOL!!


  9. @Bimbro: “The question is, however, will they have a pleasant experience and, with all that’s happening in Bim these days, plus their acclaimed bad manners and aversion to intelligent, customer-care, I doubt very much that they would!

    Thanks for that.

    It speaks volumes.


  10. Yes, very sad occurrence that one, Dave. Was reading about it just a couple of hours ago. Can hardly believe that in the 21stcentury [nevermind the late 20th century] that Bim doesn’t have building measures in place to virtually guarantee that such an incident couldn’t happen. I’m, once again, disappointed in Bim!


  11. Dave, to place my remarks in their true context, please publish my earlier post in which I describe how long it is since I’ve been in Bim but that my opinions r influened by my readings of posts on this and other sites and on the views expressed by other Barbadians who’ve had the good fortune to visit Bim, with whom I have spoken! Many thanks!


  12. observing | September 3, 2011 at 12:24 AM | Whose responsibility is it to prevent crime and violence? Is there a distinction between preventing crime and controlling crime?

    +++++++++++++++++++++++

    Bingo.

    If the society produces criminals there will be crime!!


  13. BimBro
    You can’t be right in your head
    Only last month the young people of your adopted land burnt down the place, kill people, loot the stores and you say you will not return to a country where on average you can move around with common sense and not experience no crime.
    I just returned from New York and people got shot and rob in the streets and even right in their apartment lobby. Police are always on the streets and these things still happen.
    The problem is that the “good society people” buy the stolen articles from the criminals and therefore electronic equipment, cell phones and all those things always have a market.


  14. Hi Observing
    September 3, 2011 @ 12:24am
    Quote:” Whose responsibility is it to prevent crime and violence?
    Is there a distinction between preventing crime and controlling crime.”

    It can be said that if the perpetrators of crime are apprehended, this in turn can “prevent” crime, as many criminals are recidivist.
    The above is not meant to lay blame, it is a response to a direct question.

    Hi Bimbro
    September 3, 2011 @ 11:04am

    Quote: “It would be interesting to hear from Yardbroom or anybody else, why YOU think that crime has been on the increase!

    There are many reasons, not only that Barbados has changed, all societies change over time but with reference to Barbados, in the last twenty years or so the input from many areas has altered the mix of a small island community.

    The closeness due to size which was unavoidable in Barbados, kept people in place because of a tight-knit society. Those with no societal ties were not so constrained. They care little of what people who do not know them or their background think.

    Some young people are attracted to a way of life which seems exciting but they have not got the finance or employment opportunities to honestly acquire that lifestyle – they are then easily tempted to engage in unlawful activities.

    The drug trade has also raised its head. Where there are illegal drugs, there will be guns, where there are guns there will be violence. A small community is less able to withstand these pressures than large metropolitan communities, with capital and a properly financed state structure.

    The above list is not exhaustive, but what I can immediately think of as contributing factors.


  15. @Clone

    Good to have you back.

    The problem with benchmarking is that while you command a great sense of where you are compared to others, there are the underground issues gnawing away which have to be addressed. In a small community like Barbados the societal impact will incrementally more disastrous.


  16. My darling Yardbroom
    I would answer your question with a resounding ‘YESSSSSSSSS’. No society likes to know that it has to grapple with an increase in crime and violence but I guess that these two are a few of the evils that will always be prevalent amongst us. We can make a concerted effort, starting in the HOME, by teaching our young ones how to cope with peer pressure and anger. But when we see the young parents of today who’ve had little or no parental guidance themselves, why are we so astonished at the behaviour of their offspring.

    So Yardie, do you think that enough will ever be done to prevent or limit such evils in society? I doubt.

    How you doing udda-wize Honey?


  17. Hi Bonny Peppa
    You were missed, it’s so nice you are with us again, I note refreshed and rearing to go.

    There is a “silence” taking place in Barbados, where people in high positions do things which are very questionable. Some look away and say nothing but they keep an “angry silence” when the opportunity presents itself they do dishonest things and justify their actions by pointing to those in authority.

    We often get the society we deserve it is true, but we must try to do our best to change society.

    No better examples can be set by teachers, preachers, politicians, or police than that set by parents in the home…it is those examples within four walls that will determine to type of society we have – and wealth, colour, class or social position has very little to do with it.


  18. “it is those examples within four walls that will determine to type of society we have”

    This is precisely why we have the type of society we have now.

    @yardbroom
    All perpretrators at all levels for all crimes would need to be visibly brought to justice. Alas this does and probably will not happen.


  19. @Bimbro , et al. When I read the British papers online daily, I am happy to know that I had made the decision to return to Barbados and not to loiter in England. Apart from the recent riots, England is no sweet bread these days.Certainly we are going through a phase back here, a phase which many of the UK inner cities, especially, have been experiencing for the last decade.


  20. Hi Clone, the fact is that I wouldn’t live in NY either. It’s not too bad here at the moment. I’ve hardly ever been directly affected by crime over here. It’s more than 20 years since my appartment was burgled and a similar length of time since I’ve actually witnessed a mugging. Anyhow, wherever there’re ‘certain people’ you WILL find an increase of crime. It’s inevitable. It’s within their DNA and I don’t imagine they can avoid it, for a moment – which is why I does keep my tail well clear uh dem, dese days – since I grow up n get sense!! Nutten at all to do wid ‘good society people’! I got all dem tings, mobile phone, expensive watch n all d res, n it never occur to me jes once, to riot or go n mug somebody! It’s in d DNA bro – simple as!!

    Hi Yard, n thanks for your reply. I’m CERTAIN that when all is said and done, when u check the ‘input from various communities’ to which u referred, you’ll see evidence of the same beasts to which I referred just now, and that they’re at the helm of the increased level of crime in Bim, just as they are in whichever part of the world they happen to be living in! I’m afraid one can’t avoid DNA and it’s miraculous qualities! – u know who I referring to – i in got to spell it out in capital letters! wunna ALL know, jes pretending that wunna don’t!!

    So Bonny, u wouldn’t even say hello to me! alright!

    Hi Colonel, yes, I’ve been told by people who’ve visited there, that Bim isn’t the country which I knew as a kid. The reason why my heart bleeds for Bim, is that I KNOW it’s only going to get WORSE and the reason and the cause of it, and that the authorities aren’t doing anything to enable me to live in my beloved Bim again! THAT is why my heart bleeds for Bim! At least uv managed to avoid what seems to be the impending race war, up here – and all thanks to those **** JA people!!


  21. Uh lie, uh lie, uh lie, uh lie,

    uh lie, uh lie,

    i jes remember sumting! About 2 months ago, i went to my patio door, about 8- 8 something in the morning, only to see some dirty, likkle JA boy, (look nuh more dan about 8 yrs old u know) trying to break intuh my car. D dirty, little swine was dressed in school uniform, satchel on his back but, on his way to school, he thought he’d just break into my car first, to c wha he could steal before continuing onto school. I din even bodda tuh say anyting to e. he couldn’t c me n i know that when u attract their attention too much is when they give u even more trouble. so i watch d dirty dog try n try to open d door until, in the end, he gave up and wandered off to school! I thought, dirty little dog. nothing better to do. can c where he’s going to end up in a few years time n, don’t waste time asking me where he’s from – you know just as well as I do! all in d DNA n genes bo – dem people?!!


  22. Bimbro
    murdahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh, ya got ma cryinnnnnnnnnn. you is hopeless. I meanz hopeless. Dis blessed Sundee mornin ya got ma belly hurtin. How ya get so nah?
    Wid u back, I kno dare ain’ gine be anudda dull moment fa me on BU.

    I shout you out pun anudda post. I even ask ya fa dah brudda a yourz. He lock up or he get kill durin de riotz?

    Ya tu swoiteeeeeeeeeee. fa tru.


  23. In one of yesterdays newspapers, names and photos of all the recent Lotto winners were published. This is irresponsible. The Lotto people in their efforts to prove that their operation is above board are unwittingly setting up individuals for potential criminal attacks.
    One letter to the editor in todays Nation,spoke tongue in cheek of arming and training the supermarket check out boys to protect the expensive groceries when transiting the car park.


  24. Imagine a average person in Barbados winning that Super Lotto of almost 9 million dollars and some lawyer standing by to recieve it for him/her for the handsome fee of 900 thousand dollars, just to hide the winner’s identity.I think the lotto people have to find another method of proving the winnings are lawful.


  25. @Chris

    The terms and conditions of winning the lottery require that the winnings be collected by a ‘body’. That is what the Scout referred to: the practice of some winners preserving their anonymity by paying a lawyer or other person to collect the winnings.


  26. @David: “The terms and conditions of winning the lottery require that the winnings be collected by a ‘body’. That is what the Scout referred to: the practice of some winners preserving their anonymity by paying a lawyer or other person to collect the winnings.

    OK. Understood.

    What is the cost of that service?


  27. At one time in the UK, I do not know if its still exists, Pool winners were allowed to conceal their identity in the published photos, by donning a batman type mask.
    But have you ever tried reading the fine print on the back of a lotto ticket?


  28. The type of high pressure advertising we see on TV and the Press and hear on Radio may be a contributing factor to some types of crime. In essence we are being told that if we do not own a Mode A Thin-a-merry ,then we are not with the programme,as the saying goes. And we are seeing nowadays that people who cannot afford these things are going all out to acquire them by hook or by crook,aka Snatch and Grab. Brand name gear,Blackberries , gold chains etc. The ‘Must Have ” and “Must Get” attitude has taken over the mind of many.

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