A System Of Policing Which Breeds Brutality, The Time Has Come For Reform

Jonathan Birchmore Richard Barrow (l), Melanie Shantelle Lakeisha Denny (r)

… King promoted a non violent philosophy and was killed. Malcolm promoted a philosophy of being non violent with those who are non violent with you. But don’t try to be non violent when people are killing, maiming your men women and children. The assassin’s gun found him also. Laws have changed but the people enforcing the laws are still acting the same. Amodou Dialo is still dead and the police that shot him 19 times are not held accountable. Brandon Johnson here in Indianapolis is beat unmercifully by three police officers that kick him in face until his eye is swollen shut, with his cheek bone broke and his teeth kicked out of his mouth. The prosecutor said he committed no crime still the police exonerated. Even if we wanted to forget, with the police still acting like this how can we forget. And the society keeps exonerating them which sends the signal its alright. Martin himself had the Deacons of Defense!! Have you forgotten? Man it is time for men to be men who have the nerve and courage to protect our women and children from this brutal behavior. Here in Indianapolis we have formed a militia to protect Brandon and his family. Bishop T. Garrott Benjamin, Pastor of one of the largest church’s here has just put up several hundred dollars to purchase a security system for the family. Hell, we aint going to be relying on police to protect our women and children. We are going to do it ourselves. Noooo!! We haven’t forgot. We REMEMBER!!Mmoja Ajabu

The story this week that two of our finest were charged for allegedly assaulting a Jamaican woman while in custody should be of concerned to Barbadians. It could not have come at a worse time for Barbados given the Myrie Affair which continues to get strong ‘airplay’ in the region. For too long we have heard stories about the behaviour of some members of our police force which betrays its credo to serve and protect.

Barbados is a small society which owes a large part of its success to a strong belief in a law and order system. The idea for example that elements in our society would routinely engage in gunplay directed at the police is alien to our culture. The same cannot be stated for what occurs in a few neighbouring countries. The reality however is that as our society changes so too irrelevant laws and practices must be tweaked to ensure their relevance and effectiveness. If we continue with the police using the insensitive and ‘brawn’ approach to delivering enforcement, rebellion by the ‘new citizen’ will be the unavoidable outcome.

The heralded Police Complaints Authority has been a no-show to date. To expect the police force like the Barbados Bar Association and other key agencies to police itself is a big joke. We live in a society today which is conditioned to challenge anything. The advent of social media and other technologies has made the task of suppressing unsavoury activity very difficult for agencies like the police. The best way to deal with the expectations of the ‘new citizen’ is to ensure transparency.

The admission last week by the minister of home affairs the police force may soon have to recruit from outside our shores is indicative of another problem which looms. They are some who believe that the nuances, mores and idiosyncrasies of a people can only be understood by having been a product of the same environment it has to serve.

If one is to look for the silver lining beyond all of the gloom of the past week it is that there is the opportunity for our leaders to usher in meaningful reform. Retired Chief Justice David Simmons promised reform, for example witnesses would be required to give recorded statement.  Several years hence the police force continues to operate as if we were a banana republic. If Barbadians accept that the police force represents a key cog in the wheel to sustaining a civil society then the perennial neglect meted out to this body by successive government must be dealt with forthwith.

0 thoughts on “A System Of Policing Which Breeds Brutality, The Time Has Come For Reform


  1. David, you confuse the Police Complaints Authority and the complaints department of the RBPF. The former does not comprise policemen.


  2. Abuse of authority…plain and simple.

    Then we wonder why children are displaying deviant sexual behaviour even at the primary school level. But I suppose these two police officers expected to get away with what they did(I’m assuming they are guilty). As they say, a thief is only known to be a thief after heshe gets caught.


  3. There was time when parents /elders used to frightened their charges with , ” if you don’t do so so and so , I gun bring de policemun fer you.” Looks like what goes around comes around.
    ——–Serviced While Protecting—-


    • @Jack Spratt

      The reference to the PSA being still born was made to illustrate its importance given that the police force cannot be expected to police itself.


  4. The comparison between the murders of MLK and Malcom X is very misleading and maybe a purposeful attempt to stir-up people or be purposely revisionist. MLK was murdered by despicable, racist white people and X was murdered by equally despicable Afrocentric people mesmerised by their leader Elijah who singlehandedly broke a serious number of religous laws. I would agree that many of the principles of The Nation were very worthwhile.
    In every Police Force there are members who are prone to illegal behaviour. When they act (or appear to) illegally they must be given due legal process and if guilty sentenced accordingly. Certainly law and order are key to the reputation of BIM as a tourist/ business location.


    • @moneybrain

      The discussion many feel is not about a few rogue cops moreso the system of reform which in Barbados we need to confront head on if we want to improve police effectiveness.


  5. In many countries Police Departments at one time or another have been forced to reform because of scandals and complaints many of them exposed by the media. Reform should be a continuing process and not just a one off affair. Like most providers of goods and services, customer feedback is necessary to measure how good a service is.

    How people are treated when arrested is vitally important. Many may say that the people who are arrested are lying. How can anyone or any department determine what is truth and what is fiction. Whenever crimes against the Police are brought, as citizens we must pay great attention. These are the people we have entrusted to protect and save us from criminals. When that trust is broken it is almost impossible to regain. Many crimes will go unreported, many will refuse to assist the police in their investigation thus hindering any good results. We must hold this department to the highest of standards. We must be the guards guarding the guards.


  6. I feel as though I’m living in France, for everyone’s information, a person in Barbados is innocent until proven guilty. It seems like all of you have tried the case already without evidence and condem the persons to lifetime in jail with the keys thrown away. Why are we so quick to do this to our own citizens? Of course, if they are proven guilty, the FULL weight of the law should be used against them but until then CHILL. The same thing goes for the Myrie case


  7. We are about to bring together two different situations, and see them as one and the same and thus cast judgement in equal measure to both.

    This is flawed thinking, as on the facts available to us this should not be the case.

    The situation with the young lady and subsequent allegation, occurred as I understand it at Grantley Adams Airport. The police officers have been charged with offences that are alleged to have taken place at the Police Station in Bridgetown.

    The common features of the incidents are that both young ladies are Jamaican and there are allegations of inappropriate sexual conduct….there it ends.

    If it is that there is a climate in Barbados which allows certain types of behaviours to be seen as the norm. This is most unfortunate and should be addressed with due haste. However, we do a great dis-service to public officers – Immigration Officials – if they accused and then sentenced on the basis that X or Y has misbehaved and because of “chronology” of time they are by public perception convicted. . . that is not justice and there is no logic to it.


  8. Yardbroom

    I thank you sir for your insightful remarks.I couldn’t have said them any better.

    Some persons are too happy to point to this charge,which at this stage has not resulted in any conviction – to say – ‘see I told you so,you should not be defending those immigration officers in the myrie case so strongly, – police,custom and immigration are all wicked and corrupt here in Barbados and they always treat these caricom non nationals badly.’

    All I will say is innocent until proven guilty,whether immigration,myrie,police or custom and most particularly Barbados.

    Anyway like I said before,the enemy is right in our midst.


  9. @ David
    LOL! Getting yourself all worked up again….?

    “…a System Of Policing Which Breeds Brutality…” are you serious?! You mean that you are surprised that there may be some within the ranks of the police who would do such things…?
    So is there a need for reform in blogging because of the likes of BFP?
    Must Test Cricket be reformed because of Gayle….?

    Man David, there are bad apples everywhere, the REAL problem is that we need someone dedicated to the task of finding those bad apples at an early stage, removing them from the good ones, and dealing appropriately with them.

    Such persons are called LEADERS. …..and it is for lack of these that we are doomed.

    Honestly!! did you listen to the ‘ police leader’ tonight on CBC? Inspiring nuh??!!
    …and have you EVER heard anything even remotely intelligent from his boss? …the only person in Barbados who is unaware of any rift among the senior ranks….?

    ….is it any wonder that they keep pushing this idea of having to recruit policemen from overseas -while thousands of expensively educated bajans hang out on the blocks….

    When are you going to explain to them that our problem is that no one wants to follow an uninspiring leader? Why would an educated bajan youth choose to join an organisation led by a ‘leader’ with no vision?
    ….One where, those already in the force only speak about wanting to get out?
    …..Where, instead of setting high standards and ferreting out the bad apples early, the ‘leader’ seems to be going after the natural leaders in the force who appear to be a challenge to his leadership?

    The only reform needed for the police force is inspired LEADERSHIP. Believe me, there are no better police officers anywhere else…
    …but then again the same can be said for our Courts, Civil Service, Waterworks, Parliament etc… as long as we continue to accept the situation where ‘leaders’ are appointed based on family, Lodge, political or other considerations -RATHER than on ability to perform, we will be doomed….
    …..Granny on her last legs…..


  10. Mash up & buy back

    You wrote
    “police, custom and immigration are all wicked and corrupt here in Barbados and they always treat these caricom non nationals badly”.

    That is a very general statement and I wish that you would really reconsider. I am not saying that all immigration, customs and police officers are nice decent people, but in each of those categories, I can personally point out some very decent hard-working people. Unfortunately, they get tarnish by the misdeeds of the few corrupt officers among them. I was an immigration officer many years ago and could have identified and did identify some of the corrupt ones. Unfortunately, they had political protection.

    Let’s face it, our police, customs and immigration officers are not recruited from Mars: they are recruited from among us and their indivdual conduct will reflect our the same falling standards in our society.

    Bad behaviour is not restricted to public officers. Three years ago, I reported, to the Minister, Police and Director of Public Prosecutions, embezzlement among some credit union officials. I even provided credit union documents to prove the case. You would not believe what happened: a very senior police officer called me and asked me not to pursue the matter. I insisted but the police paid me no attention. Next thing the credit union is doing Government a favour by channeling National Insurance funds to buy CLICO Mortgage Finance Company.

    Another instance outside of the public service: I recall that a former work colleague was arrested and charged with having carnal knowledge of his minor step daughter. The Child Care (Less) Board was involved; the matter went to court at Boarded Hall Magistrates’ Court; a politician called in a favour and that was the end of the matter. So much so, the wife even took him back.

    I gave all that information to show that the bad behaviour is not restricted to public officers; it is a societal problem . Therefore, do us all a favour and allow the law to take its course and do not judge less ye be judged.


  11. Caswell

    what is wrong with you tonight bro?

    Did you read the enire paragraph – then you would see that I am saying that those sentiments above is what ‘some’ would be quick to say because of the myrie and this matter.

    My sentiment – innocent until proven guilty for everyone.

    It is interesting to read in the jamaican newspaper of jamaicans comenting on their police officer who killed 4 of his in-laws – and I can’t believe the same jamaicans who accepted myrie and this other jamaican drug mule stories as true are now saying with one of their own – well there are always 3 sides to a story.

    What hipocrisy!


  12. That kind of thing has to stop in Barbados.
    With the presence of persons of varying nationalities in this country, people who are not even sure about their status and who cant even access certain social benefits etc, violence will increase. If these people can not get justice because they aint grow up or went to school with Jaon Howard -Arthur, if they cant call somebody and get things patched up , they will take matters in their hands.

    Every body in Barbados should be subjected to the law. This is why something such thing as Breathalyzer testing has not yet appeared in Barbados. Too many ‘proud ‘ people who feel that the law should not touch them, who feel that they are too proud to pay a fine in court or to pay for anything at all, who feel that sponging off of Government is being ‘smart’ and that Barbados owe them something because they ‘bright’ and can ‘talk’ sweet and went to this school or the next or that they got a degree in this that or the other or is friend of somebody who could do them a favour-in other words some sort of status even if it is only a-state of pride-

    This a foolish part of Bajan culture that must be changed. Too many people feel that to pay a sum of money for some things is somehow beneath them. Do you know who I AM ? they usually ask –I am so and so, why should I pay to go in the Stadium–Look send my ticket yeah !

    -Yes-I mean Them kinda people. Some of them turn so bewitch when they dont get what they feel they should get because them went to x or y school.

    There is one for example who turned against society because he went to Harrison College and feel that somebody owe he something. He did not get that something so he walks about and call he delf SIGN MAN or something like that –head –tear—
    They got quite a few like he.

    This society needs to change this foolish approach and level the playing feel. The old school tie and the ‘ring’ should not exempt anyone from facing the consequences of their actions. People are watching and they will react violently at times because of it.


  13. caswell do you know how much bpwcu was loaned for clico mortage and finances. I don’t think the figure was ever released.


    • @Bush Tea

      There is merit in what you stated. The thrust of this blog is to highlight that there are systemic things the police force can do to improve. The improvement of procedure and process, for example recording of statements.

      For the love of Mike can’t understand why the AG is so gunhoe about presenting to the public the information that there is no rift between Hinds and Dottin. It definitely increases the perception he is a horses ass.


  14. I understand that if drug testing were to be introduced in both the police and defense forces, there would be s very high rate of failure. I am also wondering why don’t they have random drug testing. And that includes alcohol as well.

    @Caswell …..many don’t like to hear anyone criticize the system or anyone within. They call you an enemy in the midst.

    It seem that the authorities seem to think that John public is as stupid as they are, and will believe anything that is said in a public forum.

    For too long many have been denied justice because of who they are and the position in society they hold. Never in the history of Barbados since Independence, has any Politician been charged or sentenced. Have they all been spotless? Yet we moan and groan and whisper of wrong doings that amount to criminal acts.

    If it were a poor nobody with no connection we would be hauled through the court system for the same acts. It is time that the state ensures that no one is above the law and prosecute the people who have broken the law.


  15. Islandgal246

    I tend to agree with you. Look around the world and see: the former President of Isreal is heading off to jail; the former President of France is before the court; the Governor of Illinois is fighting to stay on the outside; Panday in Trinidad is doing all that he can to stay out of prison; several MPs in the UK were placed before the courts and there have been convictions. The list goes on. However, in Barbados our politicians and some senior public officials become millionaires on their salaries. What a laugh!


  16. It would be nice to read the report which concluded Anderson Bowen’s investigations. BU has asked before what is the police using the surveillance technology procured to be used for CWC2007?


  17. Caswell

    First you accused Jeff cumberbatch when all he was doing was complimenting you;

    then you accused me of the complete opposite of what I was saying.I would think the proper thing to do was to say you were wrong in your accusation to me.

    Is this a pattern somehow?hmm.Please keep your feet firmly planted on the ground.

    Enough said.


  18. Look at the strategy of Russian Spy
    Anna Chapman sent to the USA!

    Jamaica has long been envious of
    Barbados education, wealth & civil society!!!
    It’s an old trick, if the Males of Jamaica
    can’t gain easy access, they will try to send the women of Jamaica to do the job! The Jamaican females are on a mission
    to help & aid their Male Jamaican drug gang counterparts to flood into Barbados with Jamaican destruction.
    Jamaicans want easy access into
    the Country of Barbados and they want it
    NOW!!!The Women will always cry rape when their plans go belly up!

    The Barbadian Male Officers nationwide who
    are open to ANY bartering or solicitation from
    these incarcerated Jamaican females are TRAITORS to Barbados!! They are engaging in dangerous sex play with Jamaican Prostitutes & Drug mules to help Jamaica’s main agenda to bring down & tarnish Barbados stellar reputation using the press.

    The Barbadian Men guarding our
    Nation’s security who abuse their power of authority & their position of trust to procure sex from drug mules or illegal immigrants from Jamaican should be dealt with
    harshly for betraying the integrity of their country!!
    Even if the Jamaica female prisoners instigate relationships or solicit the Officers for free sex in exchange for favors or leniency while they
    are in custody, the Barbadian Officers are selfish fools for allowing their own lust to corrupt their position of authority to protect our borders & serve the country of Barbados are being used as a “sex tools” to destroy & bring down Barbados. They are Selling Outs, for all their Parents have fought & worked
    hard for! They should be shame! because They are are selling out their children’s birthright to a progressive, low crime, Barbados for stupid easy prison sex from desperate Jamaican females!
    The Barbadian Female Officers who help these corrupted Male Officers carry out their
    abuse, even if they are threatened with loss of their job are pawns and traitors to their own gender, worldwide.


  19. To further respond to Bush Tea’s comment, what has become increasingly evident to BU in recent times is that we have some rotten apples in the police force which maybe causing some headaches to the government at this time.

    Leadership is a hell of a thing.


  20. @ David
    “If we continue with the police using the insensitive and ‘brawn’ approach to delivering enforcement, rebellion by the ‘new citizen’ will be the unavoidable outcome.”

    Each time there is a discussion about the Police Service on this blog, I would make suggestions that could be used as a basis to bring the RBPF into the modern era of policing. But, as usual we seem to dismiss them as being trivial, yet we want a modern police system using old methods.

    For example, there are programs that serve to increase the contact between local communities and the police, thereby improving the service given to the public. It also gives volunteers the opportunity to support the police in making communities safe. (Community policing)

    I also mentioned the P.A.C.E (Police And Criminal Evidence act) interrogation techniques, which could be modified and introduced to Barbados. This method was developed when it was recognised that deceptive police practices yield false confessions, which ultimately led to wrongful convictions.

    As it relates to interrogations and methods of obtaining evidence, all police stations should be equipped with the necessary facilities to electronically record all interviews with suspects in custody for the purpose of the investigation. The caution administered prior to arrest should be recorded at the beginning of the interview. Before asking any questions relating to and for the purpose of the investigation, the interviewing officers should ask the suspect a series of standard questions, which would establish if the suspect understands his/her rights.

    We were quick to amend the law to bring in a new Chief Justice, but there has been no attempt to by the authorities to reform police procedures and practices and upgrade the criminal justice system. In other regions, a significant emphasis has been placed on re-balancing the criminal justice system in favour of the law-abiding majority. The new priorities are to reduce crimes, reduce criminal activities of repeat-offenders and protecting the public. The abiding majority in that context include victims, witnesses and avoiding privileging offenders over victims.


  21. These are troubling times for us in Bim, if reform doesn’t come quickly we are doomed. Citizens, Tourist and the incarcerated must be protected. We cannot allow a mob like mentality to take over.

    I repeat …When criminal elements creep into our judicial and political system we will have a problem like Jamaica. Let us stamp it out and clean house before it takes root.


  22. You can say what you like about Darwin, it appears that more officers have been brought before the courts under his command, than under any of his predecessors.


  23. @ islandgal246

    This is exactly what I mean. we are in urgent need of reform. My views on these matters are based on my experience as a policeman.

    With some unknown degree of regularity, innocent suspects were sometimes induced to confess to crimes that they did not commit. Thus, the methods used by police to gain confessions from suspects became a matter of concern for the government, and the justice system was reviewed.
    for example, what I have encountered is that those persons who are psychologically vulnerable are the one who are most likely to confess. Included in the reform of the justice system, are new police interview procedures and guidelines, which were implemented to protect such persons, as well as juveniles and individuals with mental disorders. These persons are deemed as “risks”, and may give statements, without knowing or wishing to do so, that may be particularly prone in certain circumstances to provide information which is unreliable, misleading or self-incriminating.


  24. In the police force you can find some of the best and some of the worst people you could ever wish to meet.
    Why should this be the case when they all go to the same training school and presumably, receive the same training?
    If prospective recruits undergo psychological evaluations before being accepted, does it mean that the Psych professionals are getting it wrong?
    After leaving the training school, how often are officers re-evaluated?


  25. @ Josey Wales

    Despite what you what you stated may be correct, theoretically, I do not think that you are being fair to COP Dottin. The Commissioner of Police is not responsible for recruiting potential officers. There is a personnel department for that activity. As with any organisation, there will be those individuals who will not learn from its culture. These situations are not common to Barbados. Again, from my experience, I have realised that the officers who get involved in criminal activity, are those who, although they have the required prerequisites and meet the general criteria, perform just about average while at the training facility, and in performing their duties. I have worked with officers in the CID who have total disregard for authority. Some officers have an extremely hard time separating themselves from the society that nurtured them


  26. My above was meant to be complimentary to the COP. We have always had allegations of misconduct made against officers in the past. However officers appearing before the courts as a result of such reports is a new phenomenon. I have attributed this to the present COP and do not, in anyway view it as a negative on his record.

    I apologise if the above was interpreted in any other way.


  27. you all already have a problem for a while now that island has animosity and hatred towards ”some” people.the police are only doing what most of you cant do because they’re in the position to.

    what reputation are they protecting,i know of none good or bad.


  28. Some officers have an extremely hard time separating themselves from the society that nurtured them
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    I would want to believe that there is a mechanism in place that would then separate such officers from the force.


  29. Boss man,
    Ef yuh guh down town now, yuh gine find people from all over the world rite now walking bout and nuhbody ain’t doing dem nutton.
    If duh ten vendors selling down town, 8 ain’t Bajan, but guess who dem selling to, and who buying from dem.


  30. Boss man,
    Hush up, ef you ain’t noa wuh fuh seh. Animosity and hatred my foot! You jus airing yuh mout?
    Bajans does support evahbody. In fact we does love anybody and anything dat come from over in a way.


  31. @ Josey Wales

    @ Josey Wales

    It is me who has to extend apologies, I understood what you meant after I read your contribution again.

    The system of policing I worked is very different from the Barbados model, despite the fact that I worked in a Commonwealth country, with similar in nature to those of Barbados. However, having been born in Barbados, I was able to adapt.
    The system is always under review, and initiatives to improve the system, which serves both the public and the criminal justice system, are usually presented for implementation. Our system caters for such eventualities. Unfortunately, the Barbados system does not. However, I am not implying that our system is perfect, that is why it is always under review. Criminals and criminal activities change with society. Barbados needs to be proactive, rather than being reactive.
    This present Attorney General seems lost as it relates to what actually needs to be done.
    Addressing police functions to say that the police need better buildings is true, but it only has been stated to appease the rank and file present, and score political points. I have not heard Brathwaite address the fundamental issues that have been plaguing the RBPF for years, mainly a new direction and a revamping of the system.


  32. Given the bureaucracy that would be involved, there might not be enough time to formulate and execute reforms for the RBPF, if you have one eye on the clock and the other on fickle constituents.
    One can therefore understand, and probably forgive, the need to focus on more attainable goals.

    Country before self is not a mandatory maxim for political aspirants.


  33. @Josey Wales: “Country before self is not a mandatory maxim for political aspirants.

    What are you suggesting?

    That the politicians et al should be allowed and forgiven for putting self before Country?


  34. first it was finga-foopin, now sexual assault. I waitin wid baited breff to hear dis week’s accusation. Which offica/ immigration offica bull who now or sumting mo dramatic.
    dem mekkin my arse sickkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk.
    stupseeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee, all de time so?


  35. @The Scout | April 10, 2011 at 4:26 PM | I feel as though I’m living in France, for everyone’s information, a person in Barbados is innocent until proven guilty. It seems like all of you have tried the case already without evidence and condem the persons to lifetime in jail with the keys thrown away. Why are we so quick to do this to our own citizens? Of course, if they are proven guilty, the FULL weight of the law should be used against them but until then CHILL. The same thing goes for the Myrie case.
    =========
    Nothing is wrong with people have their personal opinions as to whether the cops are guilty or innocent. What is wrong is when people don’t open their minds to the possibility that it could be either or. What we also need to understand is that every court case doesn’t always return the correct verdict. Many innocent people have been found guilty, and vice versa.


  36. @islandgal246 | April 11, 2011 at 6:54 AM | I understand that if drug testing were to be introduced in both the police and defense forces, there would be s very high rate of failure. I am also wondering why don’t they have random drug testing. And that includes alcohol as well.
    =================
    Many police drink on the job all the time…I know that for a fact.


  37. Where the junior officer is concerned I believe its damn if you do and damn if you don’t. If she had reported the action of her partner who would have wanted to work with her after that. Remember the case a couple of weeks ago when the officer called as a witness
    conveniently “could not recall”


  38. The ‘facts’ surrounding this matter are out there.

    It should be noted the lady in question only told the truth when she was convicted.

    Read between the lines.

    What do they say about a rotten apple again?


  39. @ Chris Halsall

    The reality is that most political representatives are judged on their achievements in the constituency. The average constituent have little regard for politicians who recite national achievements while neglecting their constituent’s needs. Politicians are acutely aware of this and operate accordingly.

    They will continue to do so until it is made clear that different is expected and required in order to serve, but then all of us would have to adopt the maxim.


  40. The mere fact that it is possible for such to occur in a holding cell at a police station, should necessitate steps being taken immediately to eliminate such possibilities.


  41. And the came “delight”, to say unto the entire world: “Where the junior officer is concerned I believe its damn if you do and damn if you don’t”.

    Quite right.

    You’re damned if you do allow the rape of people in captivity in Barbados, and you’re damned if you don’t.

    So why not just go along with the rape?

    As the various dunces on BU say: “could not have said it better myself.”

    Dave: you’re really keeping it classy. Huge round of applause.


  42. mash up
    smoochhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh.
    you notice how dese peeple wid funny names dat blogging bout hay only preaching gloom n doom fa we 166 sq.mls? wah dem want from we doe? we pay we dues evva since n dem still humbuggin de blasted place. dem mekkin my stummuck churn. stupseeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee.

    Tony Almeida
    who you referring to as a BU dunce? ya cunny.

    Zack
    you mite be talkin from experience bout de ‘drunk’ police. doan tell out ya secrets jus so. could be detrimental ta ya well -being or dat of a close relative. shhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh. ya talk too much.


  43. @Bonny Peppa | April 11, 2011 at 8:48 PM |

    You’re obviously one of the dunces. One of those people without the ability to be fair, honest and objective, when it comes to discussing the problems that exist in Barbados. By the way, I’m the proprietor of a bar and restaurant (aka rumshop).


  44. Zack
    You’re the proprietor of a bar n reataurant and I run a ‘whore-house”. what does it have to do with the discussion?
    I have no problem discussing problems which exists in B/dos but when you (plural) want to black list my lil 166sq.mls and bias as arse, I gun keep real fcuking noise. If dat meks me a dunce, well, ‘Hail Mary’.
    ( I passin fa a drink lata ‘ron) Scotch pun de rox.


  45. @Bonny…….first it was finga-foopin, now sexual assault. I waitin wid baited breff to hear dis week’s accusation. Which offica/ immigration offica bull who now or sumting mo dramatic.
    dem mekkin my arse sickkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk.
    stupseeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee, all de time so?”

    Bonny please doan wish dis las one pon we …….. ROFLMAO yuh know we got some bad mangoes and if dem mekking us look bad we gine gotta do someting bout dem. I will wait for the outcome . But to hear anuuder allegation bout who bull who gine brek muh heart. I hope de menz in blue keep dem back strait.

    Leff Zack alone fuh me pleeze, he is bout de only one mekking nuff sense here. He aint fighting wid dem Jamaicans. We cud meet at his shop for a drink and have a frank discussion.


  46. islandgal
    to say that we have a few bad mangoes is correct, like any other place in the world but in this allegation, to apply such, is to ‘side’ with Myrie. I would prefer to wait-out this one. There’s no way that I am stringing along with these J’cans who seem hell bent on condemning us without trial. to hell wid dem.

    I gun leff Zack fa you bozie. He call me a dunce but um in gun stop me from gine by he bar fa ‘one pun de rox’. LOLL


  47. Halsall
    I mek up part a de 2% dat illiterate. Ya duncy retard. stupseeeeee. ya does mek ma tu sickkkkkk.


  48. Christopher Halsall says, incorrectly: “And we in Barbados claim 98% literacy.”

    No.

    “Barbados” does not and cannot claim 98 percent literacy. On standard measures (PISA and so on), Barbados ranks at about 90 percent literacy. Of those 90 percent, about 50 percent can be judged to be what is termed “functionally literate”. That’s to say, they can understand road signs and supermarket labels, and they can sign their own names. At the age of fifty, we Bajans average out (on global comparisons) at a standard reading-age of eleven.

    Wunnah I wid you on dat souse wid flying fish pudding ya stupseeeee!!! wid dat wunnah stupseeee!!!


  49. @ Chris Halsall
    You might be a Barbadian but you clearly ent nuh Bajan.
    Wuh suh rong wid Bonny Peppa sentance?


  50. The European Commission has just announced an agreement whereby English will be the official language of the European Union rather than German, which was the other possibility.

    As part of the negotiations, the British Government conceded that English spelling had some room for improvement and has accepted a 5- year phase-in plan that would become known as “Euro-English”.

    In the first year, “s” will replace the soft “c”.. Sertainly, this will make the sivil servants jump with joy. The hard “c” will be dropped in favour of “k”. This should klear up konfusion, and keyboards kan have one less letter.

    There will be growing publik enthusiasm in the sekond year when the troublesome “ph” will be replaced with “f”.. This will make words like fotograf 20% shorter.

    In the 3rd year, publik akseptanse of the new spelling kan be expekted to reach the stage where more komplikated changes are possible.

    Governments will enkourage the removal of double letters which have always ben a deterent to akurate speling.

    Also, al wil agre that the horibl mes of the silent “e” in the languag is disgrasful and it should go away.

    By the 4th yer people wil be reseptiv to steps such as replasing “th” with “z” and “w” with “v”.

    During ze fifz yer, ze unesesary “o” kan be dropd from vords kontaining “ou” and after ziz fifz yer, ve vil hav a reil sensi bl riten styl.

    Zer vil be no mor trubl or difikultis and evrivun vil find it ezi TU understand ech oza. Ze drem of a united urop vil finali kum tru.

    Und efter ze fifz yer, ve vil al be speking German like zey vunted in ze forst plas.

    If zis mad you smil, pleas pas on to oza pepl.


  51. Franklyn on 10 April I note that you mention of a case of child molestion and sexual abuse. It amazes me that none of the bloggers picked on it. As a matter of fact it frightens me that it has been so noisily quiet. Normally I believe you writings but this one? It runs me very cold. How could this be so if as you write it went as far as the courts? And what about the mother? How the hell could she sleep with that man. No wonder our people are so cruel. Again if what you report is true, just imagine, without therapy, how cruel this citizen could become as an adult. Our country is sick


  52. BAFFFFFFFFFFFF
    you crazeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee.

    Black Milk
    Chris is as Bajan as de maple leaf pun de Canadian flag. He is a klown too. LOLL


  53. Delight

    You wrote, “Normally I believe you(r) writings but this one?”

    I try my best to always tell the truth. I have no reason to lie, if you want proof just go to NUPW and ask any member of staff who is the sick bastard that raped his minor step daughter? He still works there. I could name names but I don’t want to victimize the young lady again.

    There are too many instances in this country where law breakers escape punishment because they have connections, usually political connections.


  54. @Black Milk: “Wuh suh rong wid Bonny Peppa sentance?

    Hey, nothing’s wrong with it.

    So long as you want to be a small insular island unto itself.

    If, on the other hand, you want to compete globally, there’s a lot “rong wid” it…


  55. Bonnie Peppa wrote “Which offica/ immigration offica bull”

    No Jamaican man is going to report being homosexually assaulted by a Barbadian (even if in fact that happens)

    You remember John Lee Malvo who was convicted of multiple murders and John Allen Muhammad was was sentenced to death for the same murders?

    The autorities still list the motive as unknown. But in life the primary motives for evil doing are money or sex. And if ya can’t follow the money, then follow the sex.

    But looka what was the hard backed Muhammad doing with the homeless teenager Malvo? And why did Muhammad plan to “set up a homeless camproung for black children in Canada?

    It is my belief that Muhammad was likely a homosexual pedeophile who had been sexually assaulting Malvo for years and in his deluded mind hoped to continue so to multiple “effective orphans” children far away in the Canadian wilderness. And that Malvo even in the face of a lifetime in prison did not reveal that there was something perverse about his relationsip with Muhammed.


  56. Dear Christopher Hallsall:

    In linguistics what Bonny Peppa is doing is called “code switching.” Most people can do it. You may not be able to do it because by your own admsiion you are dyslexic. But believe me Bonny Peppa can write in standard English, AND in very creative, colourful and understandable Bajan.

    Bonny like Hants (in Canada) and man wiv no name *in England) can read, write and speak standard English and Bajan. And I am sure that Hants has no difficulty understanding and being understand in Canadian English, not man wiv…in the Queen’s English.

    Its a linguistic skill possessed by most non-dyslexics.


  57. @Christopher Halsall,

    Bonny Peppa has always written Bajan and we real real Bajans understand everything she writes.

    Barbadians are taught “English” in all schools and learn Bajan by de stan pipe.

    Since you Mistah Hallsall posture as being an intelligent person you would understand why we real real Bajans sometimes write like Bonny Peppa.

    In a play on the words of our great Bajan songwriters MADD, doan touch bon bon, lef she lone.

    Wait! it near 12.30. I gine an guh sleep boh.


  58. @Bonny Peppa | April 12, 2011 at 4:09 PM |
    Zack
    You’re the proprietor of a bar n reataurant and I run a ‘whore-house”. what does it have to do with the discussion?
    I have no problem discussing problems which exists in B/dos but when you (plural) want to black list my lil 166sq.mls and bias as arse, I gun keep real fcuking noise. If dat meks me a dunce, well, ‘Hail Mary’.
    ( I passin fa a drink lata ‘ron) Scotch pun de rox.
    ========
    Blacklist my foot. People like you just doan like to hear the truth about certain things come to light. Wrong is wrong regardless of who doing it, so it needs to be dealt with. I am glad to hear people speaking out about these things because it needs to stop.

    You are of the opinion that I talk too much because I said I know that many police drink while on duty. This just goes to show the type of mindset you have.


  59. @Random Thoughts and @Hants…

    I am well aware of what Bonny is doing. And, yes, I can understand what she’s saying.

    Much 11k3 1 c4n und3r$74nd 07h34 c0d1ng$. (7h47’$ 1337 g33k, BTW…)

    My point is if one want’s to be understood, one should communicate in a manner which facilities understanding. “Be responsible for the listening into which you are speaking”, as a very good friend once told me.

    If, on the other hand, one wants to confuse, 7h3n 741k 1n c0d3…

    Even our own Minister Responsible for Education was in the newspaper only a few days ago encouraging the use of Standard English over Bajan.

    Some Bajans seem to take delight from communicating in a manner which is unassailable to most “outsiders”.

    H37, 7h47’$ c001. 1f y0u w$n7 70 b3 1n$u1$r.


  60. CH
    If I tune to a Trini station I gine hear Trini, ef i tune to a Vincy station, I duz hear Vincy and doh talk bout St. Lucia, but in Barbados yuh can’t talk nuh Bajan pon de radia.

    It’s not the proper thing to do and would incur the wrath of the guardians of the Queen’s English. After all, we are an educated people and the only way to demonstrate such, is to always speak “properly” and preferably with an accent.

    You eva try watching one o dem old movies pon BBC?
    Sometimes I duz caan even understand wuh dem duz be saain and dem duz be speaking de Queen’s English.
    I wonder if it is because my brain has been corrupted by speaking too much Bajan?


  61. @Black Milk: “You eva try watching one o dem old movies pon BBC? Sometimes I duz caan even understand wuh dem duz be saain and dem duz be speaking de Queen’s English.

    Translation: “Have you ever tried watching one of those old movies upon BBC? Sometimes I can not even understand what they are saying and they are speaking the Queen’s English.

    @Black Milk: “I wonder if it is because my brain has been corrupted by speaking too much Bajan?

    Possibly.

    Please understand that it is harder for the receiver of a message over a noisy channel to reconstitute the message than it is for a broadcaster to send it. (Basic information theory.)


  62. @Chris Halsall
    I now see dat u is a trickster, u playin u smart but u caan trick me nuh more. I now kno dat u cud understand bajan real gud.

    Should we not determine if the broadcaster is only fooling around with the transmitter or trying to send a message, before we press the preset button?


  63. @Black Milk: “I now see dat u is a trickster, u playin u smart but u caan trick me nuh more. I now kno dat u cud understand bajan real gud.

    Thanks for that. Now, shall we get down to the business at hand?


  64. Zack
    drink a cold bare/bear/beer (cannnnn rememba which is de rite spellin) from ya bar n cool down man. I know some church peeple dat does drink a grog too so doan kill a police fa a lil ‘drink’. Chill.
    I refuse to cry down my lil 166, I doan k wah you sa.

    Halsall
    you is a rale puss-c fa tru.
    I more qualified in Ingalish dhan you would evva tink. I in got ta prutty-up na Ingalish fa you nor na non-bajans. ya idjit. If yu cannnnnnnn undastan de lingo, jess keep ya han pun ‘scroll-dung’. ya puppet.why you sa ig’runt doe? stupseeeeeeeeeeeee.
    you got dis ting bout tawkin down ta peeple dat i doan like a’tall. U cum across as a rale snob. I is a bajan but you like you want me ta speak patois, or wah de ass um name. who de fcuk you tink you is?Looka, go n bade do.


  65. Ok CH.

    People have died before in police custody. For ages, accused persons have gone to court and sworn that they were tortured by officers and forced to confess to crimes that they did not commit.
    The methods use by officers to extract information and confessions have even become comedic material.

    The authorities know these things but precious little have been done to eliminate the possibility of such claims ever having merit,
    and so we are where we are today.

    Whether by accident or design, certain topics on this blog tend to generate “discussion”.

    Unfortunately, this does not appear be one of them.


  66. @My dear Aunt Pepper: “I more qualified in Ingalish dhan you would evva tink. I in got ta prutty-up na Ingalish fa you nor na non-bajans. ya idjit. If yu cannnnnnnn undastan de lingo, jess keep ya han pun ‘scroll-dung’. ya puppet.why you sa ig’runt doe? stupseeeeeeeeeeeee.

    I understand everything you say. Even the “F” word encoded in fcuk.

    My first question is, what are you trying to communicate?

    My second question is, are you trying to bring good to the conversion, or are you simply seeking auto-gratification, but without the euphoria?


  67. @Black Milk: “People have died before in police custody. For ages, accused persons have gone to court and sworn that they were tortured by officers and forced to confess to crimes that they did not commit.

    Before we start this conversation (which should perhaps be a new Blog), could you please tell us all what jurisdiction this particular debate is going to be based upon?


  68. @ Chris Halsall
    I was under the impression that this thread was about the RBPF and the need for reforms in the way it executes the “protect, serve and reassure” mandate.


  69. @Black Milk: “I was under the impression that this thread was about the RBPF and the need for reforms in the way it executes the “protect, serve and reassure” mandate.

    So answer my question. Or is this statement an answer?

    Either way, please provide evidence to your claims.


  70. I just got back my land line after it went dead shortly after posting the above.
    I have watched too many X-Files and First Wave episodes for my own good.

    This is Barbados, there is never any evidence.


  71. @Bonny Peppa | April 13, 2011 at 3:23 PM |
    Zack
    drink a cold bare/bear/beer (cannnnn rememba which is de rite spellin) from ya bar n cool down man. I know some church peeple dat does drink a grog too so doan kill a police fa a lil ‘drink’. Chill.
    I refuse to cry down my lil 166, I doan k wah you sa.
    ============
    See why I would have to refer to you as a dunce? Because you know church people who does drink, you telling me it is ok for a police ON DUTY to drink. Too simple minded.


  72. Zack
    ok Zacky ol boy, you win. i is a dunce. i surrenda.you win dis roun. de drinks pun me.

    but i cannnn rememba you tawkin bout police ‘ON DUTY’. my bad, sorryyyyyyyyyyy.
    de drinks still pun me.


  73. @Bonny
    See my original post below in which I specifically said “ON THE JOB”.

    Zack | April 11, 2011 at 5:11 PM |
    @islandgal246 | April 11, 2011 at 6:54 AM | I understand that if drug testing were to be introduced in both the police and defense forces, there would be s very high rate of failure. I am also wondering why don’t they have random drug testing. And that includes alcohol as well.
    =================
    Many police drink on the job all the time…I know that for a fact.


    • @Zack

      The head of the Barbados Defence Force confirmed in the press last week that there is random drug testing.

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