Another Window to the Sea at Accra Approved to Disappear

A losing battle is being waged by a few Barbadian citizens who want to see a characteristic that defines Barbados protected. To the blogmaster it does not matter if the government is BLP or DLP – in cahoots with the economic class – limited windows to the sea are rapidly being slammed shut!

One of the few windows to the sea on a congested South Coast about to be closed is the open area opposite Blue Horizon at Accra. You will recall the property was sold by the last government for a dime to Mark Maloney, Phillip Tempro et al. The late Reverend Andrew Hatch must be writhing and sweating in his grave God rest his soul.

A town hall is scheduled to be held at the Accra Hotel conference room @6:30PM tomorrow 18 July 2019, a mandatory requirement of the planning process. It is unlikely the meeting will change the plan but there is the Cahill experience to inspire dissenting voices.

Sign the Petition!


Keep The Sea Window At Accra/Rockley Open

Whereas, the residents of Blue Waters, Cot Road in Rockley and the wider Rockley district and adjoining Worthing and Hastings areas along the South Coast, have no issue with the concept of redevelopment and have no desire to stop this project as a whole, we however have some legitimate issues that concern its impact on our nearby homes, the surrounding infrastructure and the use of the existing beach access, car park, window-to-the-sea and the general environment.  Therefore we want these concerns considered with regard to T&CP Application Ref: 0267/02/2019 B;

So please sign and share the below petition if you share these concerns and believe that …

1.       The traditional Window-To-The-Sea opposite Blue Horizon at Accra should be left open as a legacy.  It is one of the last remaining vistas to the sea on that coast and the south coast of Barbados.

2.       Locals and visitors alike have been using that parcel of land for parking and access unobstructed and continuously for decades, and now have a legal prescriptive right to do so.

3.       The proposed 10 storey height of the hotel is out of character with the surrounding area, and will create shading and ventilation issues for the surrounding residential area.  There is also the major concern on setting such a precedent for the South Coast, especially established residential areas nearby.

4.       Given the above points and potential threat to existing road and sewerage infrastructure a full Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) must be done for the Blue Horizon/Blue Tourism Inc project, as presently proposed.

Dated:  July 15, 2019

https://www.change.org/p/prime-minister-s-office-planning-unit-barbados-keep-the-sea-window-at-accra-rockley-beach-open?recruiter=21389388&utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=facebook&utm_campaign=psf_combo_share_abi&utm_term=psf_combo_share_initial&recruited_by_id=6f0b81c0-0bdf-0130-6c25-00221968d0e0&share_bandit_exp=abi-16710281-en-GB&share_bandit_var=v0&utm_content=fht-16710281-en-gb%3Av6

 

Graeme Hall Nature Sanctuary, Designated Sewage Dump

One of the first task Prime Minister Mia Mottley opted for was to tour the sewage affected South Coast area with an army of stakeholders in tow. The event no doubt was to demonstrate publicly the priority government has given to fixing a national embarrassment.

Of interest to the blogmaster after viewing recent pictures and video of the Graeme Hall Nature Sanctuary locale – supported by a statement from the Prime Minister while on the tour of the area – the RAMSAR site has been relegated to a sewage dump.

It is unfathomable why successive governments have supported polices which have led to a compromise of the wetland. The sheer negligence by those in charge have led some to  theorize that the Graeme Hall area may have been ‘sabotaged’.

Attached is a view shared n social media.

 

 

This is possibly the link to the story the citizen referred in the comment above – How The Barbados Government Is Stealing Graeme Hall National Park From Our Children – With The Help Of The News Media – Part 1.

Related linkSouth Coast Sewage Issue Deemed A National Crisis

Sewage Alert!

Sewage leaking into the sea on the South coast  Image credit: Barbados Today

Sewage leaking into the sea on the South coast of Barbados

The revelation in recent weeks that sewage (raw) is spewing into the sea on the South coast should be of concern to all Barbadians. Along with the health concern there is the potential to dent the good reputation of Barbados as an idyllic tourist destination.  The members of the BU household are fiercely patriotic and it pains us no end to observe how our infrastructure -built on the backs of our forefathers- is crumbling with a disastrous result.

Of even greater concern is the lack of transparency shown by the government so far. Barbados is a signatory to Rio Principle 10 adopted in 1992 as a part of the Rio Declaration. A relevant  extract from the agreement states:

Environmental issues are best handled with participation of all concerned citizens, at the relevant level. At the national level, each individual shall have appropriate access to information concerning the environment that is held by public authorities, including information on hazardous materials and activities in their communities [BU’s emphasis], and the opportunity to participate in decision-making processes. States shall facilitate and encourage public awareness and participation by making information widely available. Effective access to judicial and administrative proceedings, including redress and remedy, shall be provided.

Clearly the Barbados government is in breach!

Moral Rehabilitation a Prerequisite to Achieve Environmentally Sustainable Lifestyle

Extracted from Andrew Simpson’s Facebook timeline.

keep_island_cleanSo many issues need to be addressed, and in so little time – worsening political, economic, environmental and societal conditions are all connected. Everything we do, affects the whole. Numerous valuable offerings grace the pages of our media. Solutions are attainable. Trusted and committed leadership, to corroborate a common vision, is needed.

Wastage and pollution are my pet peeves so promoting environmentally sustainable lifestyles is what I am most passionate about. I believe that we must do what we can, with what we have, now. Barbadians should fully embrace the idea of resource preservation and practice permaculture; converting green waste for soil remediation to improve food security, while reducing impacts of chemical fertilizers / pesticides on ground water and nearshore reefs. Such measures would save much foreign exchange; as would more renewable energy generation, recycling, etc.

A national beautification program, utilizing available ‘manpower’, crowned with a centrally located nature zone (surrounded by with affordable lodgings) and linked through gully eco-system trails to a coastline rim for hiking and biking, would greatly enhance our tourism product.

Adoption of the above values, within a super efficient cooperative framework, would positively affect employment /standard of living within a new ‘green’ entrepreneurial class; increasing GDP as we facilitate more local production and climate friendly options. Unused properties must be developed with private funds, with opportunities to invest shared as widely as is practical. Policy makers must limit public borrowing to support unnecessary spending, on luxuries we can ill afford at this time, with any deficit financing strictly reserved to facilitate project investments that have undoubted potential to repay our national debt. Less reliance on government, through adoption of basic policies that encourage cultivation of greater individual responsibility (including design of a more effective governance platform) is the key to national prosperity being obtained in a truly independent Nation.

The greatest challenge which must be overcome; in order for our island to flourish, is the moral rehabilitation of this present generation. I urge each fellow citizen to recognize the power of free will; and choose for yourselves this day, whom you will serve. We must acknowledge the poor choices we have made, often under influence; accept healing and forgiveness, and promise to live in love.

SHELL Oil Spill and Southern Farmers

There is the saying hope springs eternal.

Local media has not reported recently on the plight of the Southern Farmers group who have suffered as a result of leaking pipes by SHELL Oil Company. BU assumes if the group of long sufferers at Gibbons had been satisfactorily reimbursed Minister of the Environment Denis Lowe would have had reason to update the public. On the flip side, we have not heard about any protest march planned by the Southern Farmers Group to indicate the matter remains a concern for them.

The long sufferers should not despair at the length of time it has taken SHELL to make good. There is a report posted to Amnesty International website of an out of court settlement in the amount of 55 million pounds to compensate a community in the Niger Delta that was affected by an oil spill as well.

Relevant link: Nigeria: Long-awaited victory as Shell finally pays out £55 million over Niger Delta oil spills

The Cotton Silk Tree At Warrens Must Go

Local environmental activist Agyeman Kofi wants a sculpture using the trunk of the Cotton Silk tree to be integrated in the Warren design and the area named Centennial Pass (see illustration)

Earlier this year BU posted the blog Protecting Our History, Save The Silk Cotton And Boabab Trees. The days of the Silk Cotton Tree are numbered because of the Warrens development in progress. Abdul Pandor, the engineer responsible for the project was adamant the tree has to be cut down at the onsite meeting staged in March of this year. The few Barbadians who attended to protest the decision to cut down the tree received assurances from government officials that an alternative would be found.

An update on this matter is that a final decision has been taken to cut the tree down. It appears the cost to acquire the land necessary to circumvent the area of the Silk Cotton Tree is estimated at 1.4 million dollars. The fact that a tree which has achieved 25 feet girth of Bajan history does not provoke enough consideration to salvage it.

How it is we have ended up in such a bad place where we would design a road works program which dismisses any recognition of our heritage? How can we cut down a tree which has been part of our landscape and history for decades? What message does it send to our young people who are struggling with the need to be aware and friendly of the environment?

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