Most Expensive Fast Food in the Caribbean

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Back in 2019, I wrote a series of articles on KFC in the Caribbean. Today, I am following it up with a look at Little Caesars in the Caribbean, and in particular, a price comparison of one of their menu staples (and a personal favourite of mine), the Little Caesars Hot-N-Ready Large Pepperoni pizza.

Before I do that, a few words on my research methodology. Firstly, I defined the Caribbean as member and associate member states of CARICOM. Secondly, using Google, I searched for CARICOM countries with Little Caesars locations (and websites). Thirdly, the prices are the final price paid by customers (including tax). Finally, I included the price of a large pepperoni pizza in the USA for comparison. The USA price was obtained from the Real Menu Prices website. All local prices were checked and converted to USD, on November 21. Currency conversion was done via the Xe Currency Converter website.

17 comments

  • Bajans paying more

    Biggest hikes on food and non-alcoholic drinks

    by SHAWN CUMBERBATCH shawncumberbatch@nationnews.com

    THE COST OF LIVING in Barbados has gone up by at least six per cent since April.
    It could rise even more as trade experts are warning importers and consumers to brace for higher prices linked to increased freight rates for shipped goods.
    Based on the Barbados Statistical Service’s (BSS) September 2021 Monthly Index of Retail Prices – the most recently available – households have had to dig deeper into their pockets to survive over the past several months.
    Between August and September alone, Barbadians paid more for food and nonalcoholic beverages (4.8 per cent), the biggest category of increase. Prices were also higher for alcoholic beverages, tobacco and narcotics (0.2 per cent), and housing, water, electricity, gas and other fuels (0.5 per cent).
    On the other hand, the cost of clothing and footwear decreased by 3.2 per cent, as did some other areas including furnishings, household equipment and routine household maintenance (0.6 per cent).
    Price indicator
    The BSS explained that the Retail Price Index “is an indicator that records the change in prices of a fixed basket of goods and services on a monthly basis, which depicts the fluctuation of the cost of living (inflation/deflation) on the island”.
    It noted that the fixed basket of goods and services “consists of the items the average household would purchase”.
    After having 201.5 index points in January, the index fell to 197.6 points in March and 196.5 points in April, but has been climbing ever since, reaching 208.4 points in September.
    BSS data going back to January 2018 showed this was the highest the cost of living has been for nearly four years.
    “The Retail Price Index for September 2021 increased by 1.9 per cent in comparison to August 2021, moving from 204.5 to 208.4 index points,” the BSS said.
    “Amongst the major groups, food and non-alcoholic beverages increased by 13.3 points or 4.8 per cent; alcoholic beverages, tobacco and narcotics increased by 0.4 of a point or 0.2 per cent; clothing and footwear decreased by 2.1 points or 3.2 per cent; housing, water, electricity,gas and other fuels increased by 0.8 of a point or 0.5 per cent; [and] furnishings, household equipment and routine household maintenance decreased by 0.9 of a point or 0.6 per cent.”
    The state entity added that “health increased by 0.1 of a point or 0.04 per cent; transport decreased by 0.2 of a point or 0.1 per cent; communications remained unchanged; recreation and culture decreased by two points or 1.9 per cent; education remained constant; restaurants and hotels decreased by 1.5 points or 0.5 per cent; [and] miscellaneous goods and services decreased by 0.1 of a point or 0.1 per cent.”
    News that the cost of living has increased by six per cent since April came as the United Nations Conference On Trade And Development (UNCTAD) warned that Barbados and other small island developing states could face a 24 per cent hike in import prices and a 7.5 per cent increase in consumer prices – “with a time lag of about a year”.
    UNCTAD made the prediction in its Review Of Maritime Transport 2021 report in the context of high global freight rates, which it said “will remain high until shipping supplychain disruptions are unblocked and back to normal, and port constraints and terminal efficiencies are tackled”.
    It also cautioned that “even when they have new capacity, container lines faced with prolonged port congestion and closures may take capacity out of the system – keeping freight rates high”.
    Demand for containers
    “Since the second half of 2020 there has been an increase in freight rates. While demand for containerised goods has been higher than expected, shipping capacity has been constrained by logistical hurdles and bottlenecks, and shortages in container shipping equipment,” the report found.
    “Unreliable schedules and port congestion have also led to a surge in surcharges and fees, including demurrage and detention fees. Freight rates are expected to remain high.”
    The supply chain challenges highlighted by UNCTAD
    were also flagged in an analysis by Dr Kai-Ann Skeete, trade research fellow of the Shridath Ramphal Centre For International Trade Law, Policy & Services (SRC), The University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus.
    Her assessment was that these issues would “exacerbate the challenges confronting our local retail industries and inevitably, local consumers”.
    She said there were no immediate solutions, but advised Barbados and its neighbours to “think about expanding our seaports to achieve greater efficiency and increased movement to ensure there is space for the storage of containers, consulting with the trade unions to ensure that port operations eventually become 24/7 similar to the Asian ports of origins.
    “In addition, we must start to think and act as a collective where we source products from our regional and even indigenous markets. Furthermore, as a region, we should explore chartered – joint cargo shipments – directly from Asian to Kingston Wharves and then disseminated across the region,” Skeete recommended.


    Source: Nation

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  • PriceSmart faces price challenges

    PRICESMART INC., the American warehouse shopping club that has operated in Barbados since 2001, says it is trying to shield members from higher prices while grappling with higher costs associated with supply challenges and container shortages.
    However, chief executive officer (CEO) Sherry Bahrambeygui said while the company was “in a position to be able to mitigate much of this”, the increased cost caused by transportation, freight and other supply chain issues ultimately has to be reflected in the pricing. She communicated this during a recent earnings call with financial analysts, during which she said PriceSmart’s 13 Caribbean stores suffered a 1.8 per cent decline in net merchandise sales during the quarter ended August 31.
    In addition to its lone store at Green Hill, St Michael, PriceSmart operates 47 warehouse clubs in 12 countries, including four in Trinidad and Tobago and one each in Aruba, Jamaica and the United States Virgin Islands.
    Bahrambeygui reported that just like many other businesses across the globe, they suffered numerous challenges during the quarter, including container shortages, port delays, and truck and driver shortages.
    “These disruptions and shortages are impacting the timing of deliveries and leading to higher freight, transportation and labour costs. Despite all of these issues, we worked hard to hold down or mitigate the price increases passed on to the members while maintaining sufficient inventory,” she said.
    “Our expanded network of distribution centres and additional real-time data on a number of fronts has facilitated alternative routes of shipments, increased throughput and provided flexibility, all of which helped us keep good in-stocks and generate the sales for this quarter.”
    The CEO added that supply chain disruptions and overall inflationary impact of sourcing and shipping merchandise “are causing pressure on our ability to consistently source merchandise, and will likely further impact our costs and the price
    of merchandise.
    “We are closely monitoring our inventory and supply levels to continue to provide the best possible value in this inflationary environment, while mitigating against the risk of decline in demand,” she added.
    Bahrambeygui said PriceSmart “made strategic investments in inventory and worked with our local vendors to source alternative products to reduce potential future out-ofstocks on high demand items that have been impacted by these disruptions or that have been affected by electronic part shortages.
    “In the last several months, we’ve also experienced inflation because of significant increases in the prices of commodities that are input to our vendors’ products. Despite these issues, our team has done a great job of holding, delaying or mitigating cost increases in their continued efforts to provide the best value to our members,” she said. (SC)

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  • This inflation is pretty scary stuff everything going up but a bit of a silver lining some of my buddies and I were out on the town last night and hookers are going down.

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  • I WONDER WHAT TRON HAS TO SAY ABOUT HOW WELL HIS SUPREME LEADER IS HANDLING THE ESCALATION OF FOOD PRICES AND THE ECOLOGY IN BIM AS THE COUNTRY PUNCHES ABOVE ITS WEIGHT INTO REPUBLICHOOD
    I HAVE A BLUE BED SHEET TO PUT OVER MY SHOULDER WHEN I GO OUT TO SPEAK THIS WEEK

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  • Aren’t you afraid you might stand out in a crowd of white sheets.

    Promised myself I would be more serious this week but …

    Liked by 1 person

  • THEO
    THE MORON THAT WROTE THIS POST SEEMS NOT TO UNDERSTAND THAT THE BRILLIANT EFFECTIVNESS BY WHICH THE USA IS NOW RUN WILL, AND IS ALREADY AFFECTING THINGS IN OUR WONDERFUL LAND OF UNBELIEVE WHERE WE THINK THAT PUNCHING THE AIR AND TALKING RUBBISH EQUATES WITH SOME NEBULOUS CONCEPT THAT WE ARE PUNCHING ABOVE OUR WEIGHT.

    THEN WE TALK RUBBISH ABOUT DOWN WITH NEGATIVITY. WHILE WE SUPRESS REPORTING, AND DEALING WITH THE FACTS.

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  • Vincent Codrington

    @ GP at 9 : 38. AM
    When you go out with your blue bed sheet just be careful and take the road to your speaking engagement and not the turn that takes you to the street where the hookers “are going down.” Lol!!!. Wuh Loss!!!

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  • THEO
    RE Aren’t you afraid you might stand out in a crowd of white sheets.
    NO SIR I LIVE IN FL, NOT WASHINGTON, DC OR ONE OF THE DEMOCRATIC RUN STATES WHERE THE IDIOTS STAND OUT AND ENGAGE IN FAECAL BEHAVIOUR

    VINCENT
    THANKS FOR YOUR GOOD ADVICE SIR. I WILL TAKE SPECIAL CARE TO HEED

    Liked by 1 person

  • Of all the Caribbean islands I’ve visited, KFC in Barbados is the most expensive.

    Went into the KFC outlet in Speightstown a few weeks ago to purchase three (3) pieces of chicken, 1 large fries and two small drinks. Was shocked when the cashier told me the bill was $36.

    Told her to cancel the order.

    Liked by 1 person

  • always liked kfc but went to popeyes the other day much better

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  • Steupse! You don’t have a clue what is causing the inflation. Parroting right-wing talking points without understanding.

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  • maybe not but I do know whats causing your inflation…..DUBs weed making it through your internet and giving you a craving for HALO donuts.

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  • Haven’t had a donut in years!

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  • @ GP November 22, 2021 9:55 AM
    (Quote):
    THEO
    RE Aren’t you afraid you might stand out in a crowd of white sheets.
    NO SIR I LIVE IN FL, NOT WASHINGTON, DC OR ONE OF THE DEMOCRATIC RUN STATES WHERE THE IDIOTS STAND OUT AND ENGAGE IN FAECAL BEHAVIOUR…. (Unquote).
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Seems as if “THEO’s” barb of innuendo ‘missed’ you completely,

    But you might just be at home among your cross and sheet white ‘KKK’ brethren with whom you share the same religious principles, right coon!

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  • Barbados is very expensive. When you add the cost of the inputs, that $26 may be a fair price. Tomatoes were $40 a kilo recently, so I don’t see anyone making their own sauce for a pizza even if they wanted to. So, flour, yeast, tomato sauce, pepperoni, mozza cheese, etc. and you will see it is not a fair comparison based on price alone. I used to make my own pizzas from scratch, not anymore, too lazy.

    Liked by 1 person

  • I really hope that fast food will soon become unaffordable. A pizza and a burger should cost at least 100 BBD. Sugar, rice, soft drinks and snacks should also radically increase in price.

    Our population is far too fat and therefore an easy target for Corona. We should urgently return to the slim, smart African type of people, away from the white fat type.

    Therefore, I explicitly welcome the high food inflation. Once again, our government is doing everything right. I hope that food will increase in price by at least 20 per cent this year.

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  • Tron, you got some right, others not so. Rice is a Bajan staple. You should advise your supreme leader to encourage merchants to import only brown rice and whole wheat bulgar, which is cheaper than rice. Better yet, get her to ban the importation of white rice, white flour, pasta, etc. and stick to whole grains.

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