The Jeff Cumberbatch Column – A Borderless Region

“You are not to wrong or oppress an alien, because you were aliens in the land of Egypt. –Exodus 22:21 (ISV)

There appears to be an irrefutable presumption in the collective mind of governing administrations in Barbados that a substantial majority of our citizens are firmly in favour of the ongoing regional project in all its iterations. Hence, there is no need to consult the populace on any measure proposed by that project to which the State might be inclined to accede.

However, if I am to judge from certain views expressed in various quarters over the years, I am not so sure that this presumption might not be seriously flawed. Of course, our Constitution does not mandate the holding of a referendum in order to ascertain the public sentiment with regard to these or, indeed, any treaty matters. These are solely within the executive prerogative so officialdom is nonetheless entitled to base its international relations on this presumption without fear of legal recrimination.

We saw the application of this presumption with regard to our accession to the appellate jurisdiction of the Caribbean Court of Justice and we are now witnessing it anew with the recent enactment of legislation, the Caribbean Community (Amendment) Act 2019, intended to give municipal effect to our regional obligations under the Protocol on Contingent Rights to which the Honourable Prime Minister affixed her signature on Barbados’s behalf on July 6 2018 in Montego Bay, Jamaica.

To my mind, the presumption is founded on the popular anecdotal expression that for the people of the region, true integration is a daily-lived experience ever frustrated by the actions of the political leaders who care not one whit for any cession of their sovereignty in their several bailiwicks. The first part of this opinion was echoed by the Right Excellent Errol Barrow, sometime Prime Minister of Barbados in his speech at the 1986 CARICOM Heads of Government Conference where he declaimed, “If we have sometimes failed to comprehend the essence of the regional integration movement, the truth is that thousands of ordinary Caribbean people do, in fact, live that reality every day. In Barbados, our families are no longer exclusively Barbadian by island origin. We have Barbadian children of Jamaican mothers, Barbadian children of Antiguan and St. Lucian fathers. We are a family of islands.”

As Mr Barrow appeared to be, I, too, am a committed regionalist. Yet, it may be argued and is submitted that the reality of which he spoke is experienced by only a few in the region, and that there are numerous CARICOM nationals that have had or will have no contact with the other states in the region or their inhabitants. For these people locally, Barbados is their oyster, the self proclaimed “gem of the Caribbean” whose imagined pristine environment of low crime, harmonious race relations, and general law and order would only be sullied by an invasion of foreigners from other regional jurisdictions.

His Right Excellency would have been referring to those of us who, whether by marriage, romantic relationship, occupation, trade or otherwise are compelled to be Caribbean men and women. But there are also significant numbers who, as a caller to David Ellis last week, have never even visited a neighbouring island and whose experience of other CARICOM nationals is either based on generalized hearsay (“the violent Jamaican”, “the smart-man Guyanese”, “the poor small- islander”, or “the party-minded Trinidadian”) or on some random adverse encounter with one such person. And then there are the unrepentant xenophobes or latter-day “nationalists” who will brook no strangers at all within their gates.

As for the legislation itself, I have perused a copy of this from the Barbados Parliament website –Bills before the Senate- <https://www.barbadosparliament.com/site> (last accessed March 9 2019). My first comment is the rather esoteric one of dissatisfaction with its form. The language of treaties is ordinarily less rigorously crafted than that of public statutes, thereby permitting the ratifying jurisdiction to fashion its complying law in accordance with its perceived national interest while still respecting the intendment of the international obligation. However, on this occasion, the state has taken the “easy “ way out by simply appending the Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas [RTC] and the relevant Protocols thereto as Schedules to the body of the Act that does not itself make any substantive provision. It has been done elsewhere before, it must be conceded, and I am unaware at the time of writing of any revision to the electronic document.

The Protocol on Contingent Rights, the Third Schedule to the Act, is the only one reproduced on the electronic copy referred to above and it repays reading. What is immediately striking is that certain jurisdictions are not signatories to the original document so that if the rights and obligations under the Protocol are intended to be reciprocal, these jurisdictions are not privy to them. Indeed, I have learnt subsequently that some of these jurisdictions have asked for a deferral of their accession to the Protocol for varying reasons.

According to the Recitals to the Protocol, the States Parties to the RTC that establishes the Caribbean Community, including the CSME, declare themselves “convinced that the primary rights accorded by Member States to nationals of the Caribbean Community in respect of the CSME must be supported by other enforceable rights operating to render them exercisable and effective. Interestingly, while they acknowledge the differential institutional and resource capabilities of Member States of the Caribbean Community in ensuring the enjoyment by their nationals of internationally recognised (sic) rights” and, at the same time, “the importance of equality in the grant of Contingent Rights among the Member States”; they nevertheless are “committed to conferring the contingent rights as set out in this Protocol…” [Emphasis added]

I suspect that it is these italicized passages more than anything else that is the source of phthisic for most Barbadians opposed to the measure. After all, they reason, parties enter into agreements in order to secure mutual benefits and if the parties are not equally resourced, then the benefits (and the burdens) are likely to be disproportionate. So that while Barbados is able to provide social benefits such as taxpayer-funded bus transportation for schoolchildren, I am not aware of any regional jurisdiction that does this. It is similar with regard to undergraduate tertiary education.

By the same token though, Barbados, with its comparatively high cost of living and levels of taxation might not be that alluring to many individual wage earners, as assumed.

Essentially, the contingent rights to be afforded to the principal beneficiary – a national of a Member State exercising one or more primary rights under the RTC-; his or her spouse and their dependants as both these terms are defined in the Protocol, are detailed under Article II (a) to (f). These rights are minima only and Article IV permits a Member State to confer even more extensive rights than those in the Protocol, subject to Articles VII and VIII. In addition, there is, in Article III (a) to (g), a built-in agenda of potential rights that “shall only be recognised and applied as contingent rights at such time and upon such terms and conditions as the Conference may determine”.

To be continued…

282 comments

  • Agriculture workers will come if there is opportunity to earn a living. If there is opportunity then it benefits the country because Barbadians do not want that work.

    Like

  • Sunshine Sunny Shine

    We can arrest the assimilation. Caribbean people can enhance the bajan ‘identity’ with diversity. Bajans are unique creatures even though often blame for being passivist and conformist. However, without the necessary stabilities in place, expect clashes instead of embraces, variance instead of viability.

    Like

  • Enuff no i dont undetstand nuttin just asking questions
    Questions that maybe Charles Jkng and the million dollar consultants never even thought about
    How about increased transportation well that alone will become a major problem
    Cause as of present barbados roads can not handle overload of motor vehicles
    So yuh telling me that with the little land space we have we will be able to supply sufficient housing for the increased in population by cuttng down trees/ open forest which that it inself can create a problem for natural life and problematic for the enviroment
    Any how so we ago ahead and clear forest or wherever wild bush is growing for housing .how would govt makeup for the landspace necessary for agriculture
    It is either sufficient land for agriculture use or insufficient for housing

    Like

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @Tron March 11, 2019 3:45 PM “It would be best if we invested the entire capital of the NIS in Guyana…”

    Is a good thing to put all of your eggs in one basket?

    Is this how you have invested your own money?

    Like

  • PIECE OF THE ROCK SIR

    RE The last word is Latin too, check um out and wunna will see dat de word fvcker comes from the verb Foopo which means I foop you with its parts “Foopo, foopere, Foopsi, and foopsum (as in we are going to foop sum of wunna, possibly all of wunna soon enough)

    MAN THAT IS ADVANCED LATIN MAN
    I NEVER LEARN THAT VERB IN O LEVEL LATIN MAN
    HOW YOU COULD PUT THAT VERB PUN BU WHEN THE PEOPLE HEY DONT EVEN KNOW BASIC O LEVEL LATIN?

    I CAN JUST HEAR YOU CONJUGATING
    FOOPSI FOOPSISTI FOOPSSIT
    OR FOOPIBAM FOOPIBAS FOOPIBAT

    QUAE CUM MIA FOOPSISET BITEIT! MURDER

    BITEIT IS FROM THE VERB BITEO BITERE BITME BITEUM

    MURDAH I GWINE DEAD !

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  • @SSS

    Should you ignore some comment?

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  • Sunshine Sunny Shine

    David

    You can as well. I like tic for tac.

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  • I repeat, because you don’t understand densification. How did we find land for the 272 rooms at Sandals Royal?

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  • @ SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife March 11, 2019 6:22 PM

    In any case, this proposal would make more sense than throwing the money from the NIS after the slave driver from the Apes Hill plantation.

    You simply have to become a little more progressive and not constantly think in the old structures of Barbadian conservatism that led the country into the abyss.

    In Barbados, it’s all whining. Innovations are critically questioned and sabotaged. It is a miracle that the island has introduced electricity and running water at all. With the current structures, the island will perish figuratively speaking: Too many civil servants, too many boarders, too many naysayers and too many recipients of social benefits.

    Barbados reminds me of Poland or Romania in the summer of 1989.

    It is time for the Prime Minister to break the shackles of international financial capitalism and globalism so that these beneficial institutions can do their work on the island.

    But what am I saying? An audience of doubters and enthusiastic followers of Karl Marx.

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  • @ David who wrote ” Barbadians do not want that work.”

    Give Bajans ownership of the land or substantial profit sharing and you will see how hard they will work.

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  • The Barbadian model of redistribution, of excessive taxes, of social consensus, of powerful trade unions, of the demotivation of the top performers in society has failed grandiosely.

    Twenty years ago all people marveled at Barbados, today they no longer even laugh, but are only shocked.

    We should stick to the truth instead of drowning it in rum and hanging on to nostalgic memories. The Cindarella land we experienced from 1995 to 2007 has passed forever. It should rest in peace.

    The people have it in their hands whether our Prime Minister is ever called a executioner of Barbadian structural conservatism or a leader of progressive subjects.

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  • Sunshine Sunny Shine

    Hants

    David pretends that he does not know this. David knows that the moment that there are incentives for agriculture you will see worms coming out of the woodwork to be part of the new agriculture paradigm. But, but, but, Agriculture is deliberately set to be looked upon as having no basis so that certain people can remain in the money and the politicians are not too far behind it.

    Like

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @Tron March 11, 2019 4:16 PM “The rain of money will plaster all the differences.”

    When has money ever plastered all of the racial, political, religious, or nationalistic differences between people?

    And will the money from plenty of oil be equitably divided? Are there poor people in every oil rich country in the world.

    You Tron are nothing but a snake oil salesman.

    A Snake oil salesman=is someone who knowingly sells fraudulent goods or who is himself or herself a fraud, quack, charlatan, and the like.

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  • And once again structural conservatism shows its head. The present Barbadian state with high taxes and maximum redistribution is an outdated model condemned to death.

    Where you only see risks, I see opportunities. And I’m not Chinese, even though I honestly admire them.

    You hang on to the Barbadian redistributive and welfare state as a member of a sect reads from the master’s lips.

    Guyana is the future. At least that’s what the Prime Minister of Barbados understands. She is way ahead of everyone else here.

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  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @Enuff March 11, 2019 5:25 PM “And this is how densification would be justified, which would engender a more profitable public transport system. Keep up!”

    We may not even need to do densification. I believe that some time ago the Chief Town Planner noted that we have too many lots already designated for housing and not built on. And many. many vacant houses. In my short gap alone 2 three bedroom, 2 bathroom homes in excellent condition for been vacant for years; and 2 apartments, both with 2 bedrooms and one bathroom each also vacant. More people may increase demand for these already existing homes, all move-in ready.

    One gap. Ten vacant bedrooms, 6 vacant bathrooms.

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  • “Anyone stop and give pause that along with these immigrants there will be population growth which means land space for increased housing would be necessary.”

    Enuff

    I have to agree with your comments as it relates to the above comment.

    It is LUDICROUS to suggest Barbados would have such an influx of CARICOM nationals that would lead to an exponential growth of the population, an increased demand for “house spots” …….. and “an overload of motor vehicles Barbados roads cannot handle.”

    [Unless we’re expecting 290,000 skilled CARICOM nationals to enter the island looking for work].

    And what makes the comment even more ludicrous, is that it came from an individual who previously WROTE in FAVOUR of projects such as Country Towers, Valerie and The Grotto, when the previous administration introduced the concept of high-rise housing as a solution to the dilemma of a high demand for housing.

    Recall in February 2011, then housing minister Michael Lashley said government was planning to “embark on a major high-rise urban housing project,” which was scheduled to commence in March 2011, and would have seen the construction of apartments at Mason Hall Street, the City, and Exmouth, near Land’s End.

    So, wuh part all of a sudden, dis great concern ‘bout the scarcity uh land come from?

    Perhaps what we should be more concerned with, are those “unskilled” non-nationals in Barbados, who took advantage of the mandatory 6 months stay to remain here, without regularizing their status.

    Several of them are now SQUATTING on designated water zones, the old dump at Gemswick and Rock Hall, St. Philip and areas in St. Peter. Some have illegally constructed stalls on the environs of the old Fairchild Street market, where they sell food and beverages without the required health certificates and liquor licences.

    Additionally, I believe it’s “stretching it a bit too far” to also suggest because of an aging population, skilled CARICOM non-nationals coming here to work, would somehow be the saviours of the NI fund.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Artax

    i must agree with you here

    Liked by 1 person

  • Well, I don’t think anything of a densification of the buildings. How is the wind supposed to cool the rooms? You can also do without the neighbours looking into your living room.

    It is best if you live on a hill with a maximum distance to your honourable neighbours. It is best to use barbed wire, cameras, dogs, guards and explosives in the ground around the entire property to keep the police and the rabble at a distance.

    Like

  • Even if that is successful, it is not enough and our next step has to be a sensible and cogent immigration policy to grow our population at a sustainable rate while preserving our culture and values in the process.

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2018/07/11/how-do-we-cope/

    Like

  • Living in Jamaica I have been surprised by the vast numbers of people with little interest or knowledge of the other islands- including Trinidad and Tobago and Barbado… let alone Guyana,Belize, the Spanish Caribbean, Haiti, and the smaller islands.

    I would advise optimistic caution in regional integration until major international partners put greater emphasis in preparing their citizens for that integration.

    Like

  • Tron
    Spot on bout Guyana. We too nuff as the Jamaicans would say.

    Like

  • Just likeveverything else it is after the horse has bolted that all and sundry twist and turn like bobble heads trying to find answers
    The fact being that if extending families are granted immigration status to live in barbados one cannot take a stance that the family would not expand
    Fact being the probability is real that these extended families would have families of their own

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  • Never said land was scarce
    My point is based on prioritizing i.e how much land would be given to agriculture and if barbados have enough land space to accommodate an influx of immigrants

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  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @Tron March 11, 2019 7:43 PM “How is the wind supposed to cool the rooms?”

    A Simple Response: Do like i did and get yourself some solar powered air conditioning units

    @Tron March 11, 2019 7:43 PM “It is best to use barbed wire, cameras, dogs, guards and explosives in the ground around the entire property to keep the police and the rabble at a distance.”

    A Simple Response: Since you feel the need for so much security, I think that I had better ask the police to pass around to see if you are up to some kind of hanky panky…or worse.

    Like

  • Ануфф,

    не пытайся издеваться надо мной.

    Like

  • “Fact being the probability is real that these extended families would have families of their own….”

    “My point is based on prioritizing i.e how much land would be given to agriculture and if barbados have enough land space to accommodate an influx of immigrants…”

    Come on!!!

    You’re making ludicrous, politically motivated assumptions.

    By mentioning “extended families,” you are essentially suggesting skilled CARICOM nationals coming here to work, in addition to having their wives or girlfriends and children accompanying them, their uncles, aunts, cousins and grandparents will “tag along” with them as well.

    So, if we were to go by your argument, a man would be allowed to travel to Barbados with his wife and children, parents, brothers, sisters, in-laws, grand-parents, uncles, aunts and cousins. They will eventually marry and expand, ……….. and government having prioritize how much land to allocate to for agriculture and land for housing.

    And you have not yet realized the folly in your comments?

    Like

  • Q: What happens when a collection of failing states are randomly cobbled together?
    A: You get a larger failing state.

    Why you you think that after roughly 7 decades Caricom/ CSME/ [insert random acronym here] has always been less than the sum of its parts?? Because of bad luck? Stupse..

    Man GP like he right yuh. Wunna people like wunna aint got much sense at all.

    Or as BT would say BBBB’s…

    Like

  • @ Dullard,

    CARICOM is the most flawed regional or international body in the world. Here are some reasons: it is undemocratic. Prime ministers, ministers, and civil servants meet regularly in their smoke-filled rooms, but they do not allow ordinary people to have a say.
    This flawed and fractured body even charges for its electronic publications, the only international or regional body that does. Most bodes charge for hard copies and electronic versions (at virtually nil cost) are free.
    The net result is that even if citizens want to know about the body that controls them they have to pay a hefty fee. The history of Caricom, for example, is about US$89.
    Another reason is this: CARICOM is a collection of minor politicians who rule micro-states; to give CARICOM greater power will mean the inverse, removing power from these little autocrats. They do not want that. The net result is that CARICOM is powerless because the politicians want it to remain so. On top of this nonsense body we have free movement of people. Why do we have free movement of media workers?
    How about an elected chamber? How about regional regulatory bodies? How about a regional central bank? How about a tariff-free zone? How about an interchange of police, judges, magistrates,, civil servants, students?

    Liked by 1 person

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    “I would advise optimistic caution in regional integration until major international partners put greater emphasis in preparing their citizens for that integration.”

    Caribbean nationals thinking about coming into Barbados to work, live etc… have to be very cautious, concerned and aware that black Barbados governments have a decades old history of colluding with and enabling RACISTS to STEAL FROM and commit crimes against Black people…that is what they should be wary of…that is the real threat..they do not want generations of their offsprings to be marginalized, disenfranchised and have their futures STOLEN…as has happened to Black bajans for the last 53 years…because backward, miseducated black nuisances in the government sees that as the only way to manage a majority black country..

    Mia has PROVEN…that she and her gang of black sellouts CANNOT BE TRUSTED……to do better or to do otherwise..

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    BTW..Enuff in LaLa Land..since ya are Mia’s spokesperson…tell Mia to tell those Ross University students who love to hire taxis and then do not want to pay their cabfare when they reach their destination…that taximen have to buy gas and feed their families..it is not a free for all and Ross university students are not special and are not on the island to freeload off black people…like everything thinks is the case…

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    ….like EVERYONE thinks is the case…

    And taximen need to stop taking these Ross students anywhere when they refuse to pay their fare…let them walk..

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    One way or the next that SLAVE SOCIETY that is Barbados will be broken up, torn down and permanently dismantled and demolished…it is no way that the Mia clown show is going to be allowed to spread that poison to the Caribbean and reel in vulnerable Caribbean people into Barbados’ nastiness to appease, please and enrich her racist masters and inflate all their offshore accounts…not going to happen…

    ..the institutions and structures of racism and disenfranchisement of black people will be torn the hell down on the island…one way or the other….or none of the cursed and blighted of parliament and the bar association will EVER experience another moment of peace in their lives ever again…..and they can guarantee it will come with photos…

    that is a solemn PROMISE..

    Like

  • Piece Uh De Rock Yeah Right

    @ the Honourable Blogmaster

    I recommend AND SECOND THE BANNING OF ONE DULLARD

    Imagine that he said, and I quote

    “…Q: What happens when a collection of failing states are randomly cobbled together?
    A: You get a larger failing state.

    Why you you think that after roughly 7 decades Caricom/ CSME/ [insert random acronym here] has always been less than the sum of its parts?? Because of bad luck? Stupse..”

    Such foul language has NDVER BEFORE BEEN SEEN ON THIS BLOG.

    Imagine that he has the gumption to suggest that ” if jn 72 years, these Foopibastum States called CARICOM have done nothing, what would be encouraging wunna to think that by importing a few of these fellow regional denizens Barbados’ plight going change overnight?

    Ban him forthwith!!!

    The gumption of these people!! To come on Barbados Underground and talk sense!!

    Foopabasti, Honourable Blogmaster, foopabasti alluh dem um (Latin)

    Like

  • Some will focus on the negative others will build on what is possible.

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  • @Waru
    Sad story.
    That is where our docility does not pay-off
    One or two cut-asses and people would pay their fares or find other means of transportation.
    Don’t just hold hard on locals, hold hard on some of the protected classes.

    (The test I use is “Would I get away with that nonsense. I have a feeling the taxi-man and I would still be fighting somewhere)
    We always get to where issues breaks down to money/class/color.

    Like

  • Talking Loud Saying Nothing

    How is it possible for the Caribbean to push for regional integration when we fail to discuss the racial divide throughout the region?

    Barbados is to all intent and purpose a country that mirrors an apartheid state. Whilst in Trinidad and Guyana it has been proven that blacks and Indians are incompatable.

    We also have a terrible problem with colourism throughout the region.

    How does David Comissiong and those in favour of a border less region expect to proceed with their lavish plans if they refuse to address this historical and deeply embedded problem?

    As a dark-skinned man of african descent, I am deeply concerned.

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    Theo…exactly..some of these taximen are very nice people, but expect the imported lowlifes to take full advantage and try to rob them…..it is either Ross students start walking if they do not want to pay taxi fare, catch bus like the locals are forced to or buy or rent vehicles…but don’t rob vulnerable people who are trying to make a living because you believe you are better than them..

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    That is the major problem with Mia and Comissiong…they do not address the real issues and are hoping and pretending that no one else is capable of noticing their shortcomings and failures…which are all too glaring…they are just focused only on the… by any means necessary outcomes…for the self praising and back patting value…but this time…it will not fly..

    they are not getting away with this..Comissiong wrote a whole article to BFP about it…now they are pretending it does not exist or better yet…they will eventually tell ya…we cahn do nutten….but had a lot of mouth before Mia was elected…

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  • Did the Minister of Transportation in an article posted in local media today said that barbados does not have enough land mass

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  • @Waru,
    Your statement reminded me of a comment I saw elsewhere.

    In the midst of this upsurge of crime someone was “glad” that no visitors were affected.

    I understand what they were saying but we should place the same value on all human life.
    The life of a foreign individual with an airplane ticket and money for a hotel room should be no more valuable than that of an ordinary Bajan.

    Sadly, you and I know that if a tourist was harmed, police activity on the island would increase.

    The values of our society are questionable. We are content to be second class citizens in our own country.

    Like

  • @ Talking Loud,

    Talking about free movement. A few years ago I spent Xmas in Barbados and stayed at a small bed and breakfast at the Rockley end of Dayrell’s Road, owned by a retired Guyanese optician who lived for a long time in London.
    In the afternoon he invited us to Xmas lunch, along with a number of other Guyanese people. The entire conversation was rubbishing Bajans, and it was assumed that because I lived in London I was no longer a Bajan. It would have been worthwhile recording the conversation and playing it to Bajans so they could hear what their ‘guests’ really thought of them. Bajans live in a fool’s paradise.

    Like

  • The Canadians buying up Barbados.. First Emera and now Parkland Fuel Corporation.

    ” Parkland completed its US$1.2 billion acquisition of SOL on January 8,”

    http://www.nationnews.com/nationnews/news/238842/changes-coming-parkland-takes-sol

    Like

  • If I were a taxi driver I would drive them to the nearest police station and also take a picture of them and post it on social media advising other taxi drivers not to pick them up.

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    Word has spread among taximen Donna…but bajans are still to grasp the concept of FULL SOCIAL MEDIA EXPOSURE…to the lowlifes who are trying to violate their right to exist as first class citizens in their own country…..they will get to that stage though, they will be forced to…it’s not like the Mia government cares enough to address these types of violations of their own people’s rights….so the PEOPLE will be forced to take a stand..

    Like

  • RE tell Mia to tell those Ross University students who love to hire taxis and then do not want to pay their cabfare when they reach their destination…that taximen have to buy gas and feed their families..it is not a free for all and Ross university students are not special and are not on the island to freeload off black people…like everything thinks is the case…

    WHY IS THIS NOT REPORTED IN THE NEWSPAPERS AND ON TV
    SOME ONE NEEDS TO PUT THIS OUT
    THESE AMERICAN TWITS WONT ATTEMPT NOT PAYING TAXI FARES IN THEIR OWN COUNTRY

    TAXIMEN WHO DRIVE AROUND ROSS STUDENTS SHOULD CARRY BULL PISTLES IN THIER CARS

    Like

  • Today, the ugly man from England is in full agreement with ‘Talking Loud’.

    Yesterday, he was also in full agreement with Sir William Skinner, who was positing the integrationist narrative.

    How quixotic can an idiot be, or should be? Is there to be any commitment to morality, at all?

    And for a teacher to be in bed with an idiot – what could be made of such?

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    “TAXIMEN WHO DRIVE AROUND ROSS STUDENTS SHOULD CARRY BULL PISTLES IN THIER CARS.”

    they could not do that in Trinidad or Jamaica…they would know what for…some of them probably got away with it in Dominica and think they can also get away with it in Barbados…..not paying their way…but that is what hungry, dependent governments with no viable plans, with no self respect or respect for their own people … attract..

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  • Y’all need help. Haha talking about undemocratic. One of the oft repeated criticisms by opponents of the EU is that it is undemocratic, notwithstanding an elected European Parliament. In fact Farage is an MEP. 🤣🤣 My point is that we will always look for reasons, no matter how weak or hypocritical, to justify our position. Again, the UK had a referendum to allow the public to determine if they should remain or leave. The public voted yes, and some of the same proponents of the ‘undemocratic’ whistle characterises that decision as madness. I ask again, what should the government had done before agreeing to contingent rights, a referendum? Stupse! Just talking because we got a mout. Maybe the OECS should have waited to build up their own PHD-like factories and consultancy class before signing on to previous agreements. I guess Haha woulda buy all the exports the OECS currently buys. Economic integration is a process that brings together the weak, strong and not so strong because they recognise they are better off together in the longterm. Singapore is ranked #9 on the UN HDI, Brunei at #39 is the closest of all Singapore’s fellow ASEAN members. Do they allow movement of skilled labour? Wunna stand dey!

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  • William Skinner

    Just read in this thread:

    “My point is that we will always look for reasons, no matter how weak or hypocritical, to justify our position.”

    Oh My!

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  • @Pacha

    If the integration movement is a work in progress are you not prejudge what is possible?

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  • Fuh true? Fuh real? Soun sweet nuh.

    ““The first claim on the country’s biomass cannot be foreign investors of whom we know little, but has to be the sugar industry of Barbados, so that a sugar factory can be powered 12 months a year to become a viable financial proposition, being able to stabilize the sugar industry.

    More than anything else Barbados has to stem the decline of the sugar industry by making sensible financial decisions that can make the industry profitable again at all levels,”

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  • But David

    This has been ‘in progress’ for 70 years. The road it has gone down, is going down, will lead to the further disempowerment of African peoples living in these here islands, global formations are changing.

    There is a time and place for everything under the Sun. We judge that that the CARICOM bus has long passed.

    Fundamentally, and this is something Sir William Skinner, does not confront and will never engage, is that African peoples in these islands are ourselves trying to make Barrow perverse vision come true. Barrow said we will wake up one morning and own nothing in these islands (sic)

    Community, whether regional or national must be first undergird by the ownership of the resources by the population. In Barbados, we have never achieved that. Far from achieving economic democracy we are now pretending to invite other people to take more advantage of us under the rubric of investment.

    Nobody who comes to these islands has to deal with Black people as the dominant players in economy. Why, because we have no developed communities that we control.

    In other words, we are all sophisticated beggars talking shiiiite about integrationist notions in the interests of our enemies, both domestic and foreign. Interdependence, or a deepen integration, can only mek sense if we are an economically independent people, as a precondition.

    And if we continue to believe that development will come by somebody else’s hand or by moving penniless hordes from island to island we will only receive more of the abuse, in private and public, that the ugly man said he witnessed.

    Like

  • Pacha the alternative is a Bajan Zimbabwe?

    Our educated middle class has reneged on the leadership mantle. If Barrow were alive this would probably be his greatest disappointment.

    Like

  • David

    Respectfully no, again!

    The education was a miseducation, in the first place. And we have a semi-literate COW who is then asked to employ the so-called educated middle classes.

    So yours could not be the problem. The problem has always been land or resources, not education.

    We will proffer that those same miseducated middle classes you described would have done far better for the country had they not been ‘educated’ but had large tracks of lands and banking support.

    Like

  • We may very well reach Zimbabwe status, circuitously

    Our man PIECE UNDER may rejoin by citing the presence of Mugabe here already. LOL

    But yes, even worse than Zimbabwe

    Like

  • @David

    Pacha at March 12, 2019, 10:08 AM sums up the whole fiasco beautifully.

    We talk and talk and talk. But the fundamental problem is that Bdos is an ex-slave society which functions in much the same way as during the times of chattel slavery.

    The neo-plantocrats own while the neo-slaves work.

    In fact, the ownership and wealth disparities are getting worse and will accelerate under the Mugabe/ IMF tag team.

    Like

  • Piece Uh De Rock Yeah Right

    @ Pachamama

    I now in the presence of Sages and Magis and Medicis like yourself, the Annunaki and my myope colleague.

    When I grow up, it is my hope to be as profound, as verbally adept and as spiritually sound as you three and hopefully congeal each of those qualities into my simple self.

    I will not say anything about Mugabe in this submission

    I will not mention her constitution changes, nor her rehiring of the wiretapper, nor her $21 million heist fro friends and family

    You said and I quote

    “…And if we continue to believe that development will come by somebody else’s hand or by moving penniless hordes from island to island we will only receive more of the abuse, in private and public…”

    See how adeptly you have explained this “Billy goat logic” of importing entrepreneurship under this Protocol signage?

    You sight dis idiocy?

    “…moving penniless hoares sorry you said hordes from other besieged CARICOM territories…” as a cure for our economic woes

    STEUPSEEE

    Like

  • PIECE
    PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE
    DO NOT MENTION ME IN THE SAME BREATH OR THE SAME SENTENCE OR ON THE SAME DAY AS THESE DIABOLICAL SCUMS!
    THANK YOU SINCERELY

    Like

  • Georgie Porgie

    Go fuck off with your stinking White god. Rassooooooooul idiot

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    It sure will…since Mia “cares” sent home postal workers last year and there is still a backlog of packages and mail from January that people have not received….both at the airport and the processing centre in town…but they will not tell you about that backlog which impacts people waiting for their packages and mail from US and other places…..a useless government.

    How long have the blogs been telling both useless governments to dismantle the slave society..they are the ones keeping it alive and using pensioners and taxpayers money to maintain it for their tiefing local masters…dismantle that evil…..but no…Mia wants to involve other Caribbean nationals in that blight to destroy their lives and futures and that of their offspring and descendants….instead of addressing it….

    that is what should be happening, the conversation should be about doing the right thing by the taxpayers, pensioners, voters, ..but no….continue using and wasting tax dollars to throw bashment parties at Llaro Court…instead of living in the residence as the brass tax contributors are saying and are damn annoyed about…they are angry she is using the residence they are paying her to live in …for her public functions and wukups…that is what is most important to her….

    she still thinks she got every bajan brainwashed and believing in her shite..

    Like

  • @Dullard

    Execution continues to be an issue for us.

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    When you see what i have seen…Bajans will understand that it is because of both black governments that their lives have been harder than it needed to be….there was no need for so many young men and women to fall through the cracks because of lack of opportunities…it happened because the black population was robbed by both black governments…doubt me…check out who benefitted from your money over the last 40 years….if you can access those areas…..then check out the depressed areas and see the blatant neglect and devastation…which was unnecessary….and would never have happened if the population had not been robbed blind….by their own governments..

    just the fact that they all…in parliament…in bar association…who have been in positions of power…ALL HAVE OFFSHORE ACCOUNTS…both them and their racist masters…but the island is broke…and the most vulnerable in the population are suffering…….that alone tells u everything u need to know…

    and none of them can hide their offshore accounts…that they should all have to explain…how they got them and whom they stole from..

    Like

  • RE since Mia “cares” sent home postal workers last year and there is still a backlog of packages and mail from January that people have not received….both at the airport and the processing centre in town…but they will not tell you about that backlog which impacts people waiting for their packages and mail from US and other places…..a useless government.

    IF THIS IS TRUE THIS IS AMAZING
    WE HAD THE SECOND POSTAL SERVICE AFTER THE UK
    AND ONE OF THE MOST PROFICIENT POSTAL SERVICES ANYWHERE IN THIS WORLD

    Like

  • @ Pacha

    I have long accepted your view about the shortcomings of our current existence because of historical injustices. What I would not accept is that we are incapable of overcoming them. I remain steadfast that they can be better addressed and defeated via a unified Caribbean state.

    Like

  • @ Pacha

    I have long accepted your view of our current circumstance because of historical injustices. What I would not accept is that we are incapable of overcoming them. I remain steadfast that a unified Caribbean state , is the most effective tool to address and defeat them.

    Like

  • apologies for the double post.

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    GP…unfortunately for them…it is first hand info from those who cannot get their packages, because of staff shortages and backlogs.

    Like

  • William Skinner

    Maybe that’s why you lost your deposit and still bitter up in Trumpland. #dontblameme

    Like

  • Skinner

    We remember well your heroic activism around the vendors issue back in the 80’s, we seem to recall. So you come to this debate not without substantial credentials. As few of us do.

    Our disagreement is not unreasonable. Indeed, your argument will win the day as it represents the dominant narrative. And we will bow to that when the time comes. Although we know it will be a wrong determination.

    Maybe history will prove you right. And if that happens, we all will be winners. But we very much doubt.

    Like

  • I WORKED IN THE LOCAL GPO
    IT WAS VERY EFFICIENT
    ONE COULD POST A LETTER IN HOLETOWN ONE DAY AND A PERSON IN LONDON COULD GET IT NEXT MORNING

    IT SEEMS THAT BARBADOS IS INDEED A FAILED STATE

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    They dragged the island down GP…and none of that destruction, thefts from the people etc could have happened, without the collusion of both governments….none of it….not with what people are seeing..

    Like

  • @Enuff March 12, 2019 9:20 AM

    Y’all need help. Haha talking about undemocratic.

    What will it take for you to ignore the self hating bullshitter from the Ivy, Hal Austin. Everything from the Caribbean region is bad, but not a word on the incompetence of the UK parliament which is the laughing stock of the world.

    Like

  • @ Bajan n New York,

    I do have views on Trump and the cess pit that is New York.

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    Caribbean nationals need to research black ministers, lawyers, politicians in Barbados THOROUGHLY…before uprooting their lives to get stuck in her and her racist master’s swamp.

    And this is when u have absolutely NO SHAME….how can the roads be any better when u have the same tiefing crooks with their substandard road works…over and over using the same substandard methods so that they can do a halfassed job every 3 years when the roads fall in to disrepair ….like clockwork….and everybody get their bribes and kickbacks while the taxpayers are left with deploreable roads…Mia immediately started following the same damn script.

    ….no government wants concrete roads to last 40 years…that will not generate theft of tax dollars and bribes.

    http://www.nationnews.com/nationnews/news/238841/roads-mess

    “IT’S NOT AN EASY ROAD in Barbados.

    are in a deplorable state, with not a single one reaching an international four- or five-star standard.

    Minister of Transport, Works and Maintenance Dr William Duguid yesterday cited what he said was an independent road safety study which determined the island had only 30 per cent three-star roads, 44 per cent two-star roads, and 24 per cent one-star roads.(BA)”

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    Ah wonder which one will have the balls to tell us on BU that the deploreable roads are not both governments and Cow’s fault….i will wait to see if they got balls or as balless as we all know they are…

    Like

  • Theresa May’s day of decision. We are betting she will fail, then fall.

    Like

  • @Pacha

    How can a lame duck prime minister be allowed to lead a government on Brexit?

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog
  • 391 – NO
    242 – Yes

    Brexit fails

    Like

  • David

    The traditions are not being upheld. Just like Trump in the USA.

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    Caribbean nationals need to stay out of Barbados for their own safety until the grip the corrupt and the racists have on the island is gone permanently..

    Like

  • Any comments on the Brexit mess from the Ivy born bullshitter who lives in England?

    Like

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